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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, September 02, 1910, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-09-02/ed-1/seq-2/

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Los Angeles agency for "Trefousse" Kid Gloves—
; the finest France produces.
Store open Saturday till 5:30. Closed Monday-
Labor Day.
Girls' Wash Dresses
Many Under Hall
ON SALE SATURDAY
Just in time to outfit your girls for
school comes a chance to buy styl
ishly cut dresses of white or natural
linens, colored chambrays, ginghams,
etc., in 4 to 14-year sizes—s3.so to
$4.50 values—at $1.95.
Similar styles and materials—only more elaborately
,' trimmed— from $5, $6 and $7.50 to $2.95.
r ' $7.50 to $12.50 dresses at $3.95 —elaborately embroidered
dresses of colored repps, linens and piques, and a lot of
misses' dresses of striped percales trimmed with white
''" pique. Black-and-white, navy and white and light blue and
white.
$*f tL(\ For Misses
£JV 12.50 to $30
Wash Suits and Dresses
ON SALE SATURDAY
.? * Coat suits and one-piece dresses of white and colored lin
', ens and crashes to be sold tomorrow at $7.50 each. Were
1 $12.50 to $30. Stylishly cut and tastefully trimmed gar
f ments in 14, 16 and 18-year sizes— of them just right
7 ' for adult women who are not above the average stature.
(Main Floor, Rear)
r- Sales for Today—^
Details of Which Appeared in Yesterday's Papers
Men's $1 white shirts with pleated bosoms at 75c' $1.25 black
silk gloves, 16-button length, at seventy-five cents.
v s
J. W. ROBINSON CO.
238-239 So. Broadway 234-244 So. Hill Street
The Home of [
Hart Schaffner & Marx
Clothes
| —r-n " --l'tii""^\
■ii If^ ft W&L
Great Columns at Kinwo
Around The World
By the "OFFICE BOY"
Hello, everybody!
' Well, here I am baok o<» the job
after • six months' trip around the
world. Gee, but Los Angeles does
look good to me. Why, honest, I
hardly knew our Sixth and Broad
way Store when I stepped Into it)
but I'm not going to talk store.
From day to day I'm going to tell
you some of the funny things I saw
in Egypt, India, Ceylon, China,
Japan, eto.
The Old Man and I certainly
laughed our heads off. I wished
lots and lota of times that some of
you folks were with us. Don't you
know I've almost decided that
Americans are the only people who
have a sense of humor. I used to
spring lots of good ones, but couldn't
even get a raise, so I'd make lem
onade out of the lemons handed to
me. Half the people in the world
don't know what the other half eats.
In Asia one has to close his eyes
and make a wish and whan he gets
up from the floor or the table he
places his hand on his watoh
charm and says, "Stay there, you
currie and rice." One of the nicest
things about a trip around the world
is that you don't have to vote for
something every week or two.
Come In when you have time.
EITHER STORE
F. B. SILVERWOOD
221 South spring L os Angeles
Sixth and Broadway
Bakersfleld Long Beacb
San Bernardino Marlcopa
HE THOUGHT SO
Uppardson — Do you think It pay! you to
be considered penurious?
Atom—Sometimes It doe». The barber
•haves me and cuts my hair in half the
lime he does his fenerous euatomers, —CM
;a*o Tribune.
DETECTIVES ON GUARD
TD PROTECT CANDIDATE
Friends of Theodore Bell Alarmed
by Strange Actions of
Oakland Man
(Continued from Pace One)
other brief one was received. In It
Carroll wrote:
Dear Sir: Your lifelong friend,
as well as a friend of mine, Mr.
Frank L. Moore, died yesterday at
. Providence hospital, city of Oak
land. Cause of death a secret
poison administered by a secret or
der.
SAYS FRIEND POIBOXED
Carroll's last letter was dated Au
gust 20. In it he wrote:
I am marked for slaughter by a
strong secret order. Any way to
get me Is their orders. Your lifelong
friend, Mr. Frank L. Moore, was
poisoned by this order. Then his
death certificate was signed as
"typhoid fever." Police refused to
open his stomach and analyze it
when I demanded it. I have no
money, but I will bring you fame
and fortune if you will hurry north
at once, before they patch up some'
fake charge to cause my arrest, to
defame my character, to cover their
dirty work and save their necks.
Let me hear from you. Address in
a plain, sealed envelope—not your
regular business one. It is dan
gerous for you to be known in this
case at this time.
Carroll gained notoriety during the
campaign preceding the primary elec
tion by suing Bell for $20,000 dam
ages, basing his action on the asser
tion that Bell had not acted honorably
in conducting the damage suit. When
Bell and Rogers met In St. Louis at
the national meeting of the Eagles, Bell
told Rogers of his relations with Car
roll and the latt.cr's actions. Rogers
recalled having received letters from
Carroll and an investigation brought
to light the correspondence. It will
be used, Attorney Rogers intimated last
night, In instituting proceedings
against Carroll.
EUROPE MAY ADOPT THE
PAY-AS-YOU-ENTER CARS
NEW YORK, Sept. I.—The atten
tion of Europe has been called to the
latest idea of American street railway
men, "the pay ; i you enter jar," and
the type will bo given a thorough trial
on Europan tramways,
At the invitation of the European
Tramway congress, Duncan M;tL>on
ald, a traction man, is on his way to
H jssels with a model of the "pay
as you enter" car which ho will ex
hibit before the congress.
"I look to Paris to adopt tho 'pay
as you enter cars' at once," saiJ Mac-
Donald, "and we may see ESurope more
generally adopt them In time."
ASKS CHICAGO TO FAVOR
SAN FRANCISCO FOR FAIR
BAN JOSE, Sept. The San Jose
chamber of commerce today <ent the
following dispatch to the Chicago as
sociation of commerce;
"We urge you to endorse San Fran
cisco for Panama Pacific exposition,
1915. If not free to do so, then we
request you to remain neutral. It Is
the logical place, ha* lie money and
all favorable conditions, and we seek
favorable reply."
LOS ANGELES HERALD: FKTDAY MOKNIXG, SITTKMBEI? 2, 1010.
'BETTER TO CALL
ME PROGRESSIVE'
SAYS ROOSEVELT
Colonel Cheered When at Kansas
City He Defined His Pol
itical Status
MAKES FOUR LONG SPEECHES
Declares Laws Should Be Made
to Drive Corrupting Corpora
tions Out of Business
{Associated Pres»)
KANSAS CITY, Sept. I.—The people
of Missouri today kept up With a vim
the roar of enthusiastic welcome that is
following Theodore Roosevelt every
where In his wanderings through the
west.
Crowds that blocked the streets of
Kansas City cheered him whenever he
made an appearance, and the three
speeches which he made here were re
ceived with shouts of applause.
The colonel was told that lie was an
insurgent through and through In a
song which was sung in his honor at
luncheon today, but he said it would be
better to call htm a progressive.
The member? of the Commercial club,
who were entertaining him, cheered his
definition of his political status.
.Although it was raining hard when
Col. HOoseVelt, after stopping at Kan
sas City, Kas., to make a speech,
reached this city, thousands of people
were at the station to cheer him.
After a parade through the business
section of the city and the luncheon
the colonel went to the West port school
in the southern end of the city and
talked to the pupils. He wound up the
day by making a speech to the throng
that filled convention hall. His speech
was about honesty in public and pri
vate life.
crowds jam SIDEWALKS
The crowds that came out to see the
colonel Jammed the sidewalks and at
points blocked traffic. The colonel was.
cheered and was kept on his feet, bow-
Ins: and waving his hand.
The auditorium of the high school
was crowded with students when the
colonel arrived, and they stood on their
feet and gave him the Chautauqua sa
lute, while at the same time they shout-,
ed at the tops of their voices. As
soon as they would let him speak the
colonel said he had a confession to
make; that he was a little afraid of th&
audience, because half of it was com
posed of girls, whom he never knew
how to handle.
"I have four boys of my own," said
he, "and only two girls. The girls were
both in charge of their mother until
they grew up, and then they took
charge of mo. They have treated me
kindly, but firmly."
Col. Roosevelt said he was going to
tell them some stories of Africa.
"The natives are perfectly wild sav
ages," he said, "and their enemies ac
cuse them of occasionally and play
fully lapsing into cannibalism. That
Is a delicate subject, and I never in-
Quired into it.
AMUSES SCHOOL CHILDREN
"One day. while I was riding up the
railroad to Nairobi telegraph com
munication was Interrupted," he went
on. "That was because a herd of
giraffes had cantered across the tracks
and pulled down the wires with their
necks."
The school children liked the colonel's
stories so well that they did not want
him to stop, but he was late and had
to leave. Before he departed, how
ever, he gave them some advice.
To the girls he said: "I don't like to
have a girl dance all night, so that she
will be tired next day when her mother
wants something from the second
story." . , '■'-.
His advice to the boys was given in
terms of football. It was: "Don't
shirk, don't foul, • and hit the line
Col. Roosevelt's speech In the Audi
torium was his principal address of
the day. He said honesty should be
made a party matter, and that the
first men to attack scoundrels should
be the men in the scoundrels' own
party. He spoke of corruption in New
York, Missouri, Illinois and California,
and said the duty of the people was to
war with equal sternness against the
corrupt man of great wealth and the
small man who makes a trade of cor
ruption.
"We need laws which shall put the
corporations out of business, so far as
concerns corrupting the servants of the
public and betraying the rights of the
people," he said.
At another point in his speech he
asserted: "The people of this country
will get Justice from the corporations
only if they do Justice to them and
rigidly exact It from them."
HONESTY NBOI9MASX TO •CCCESS
"There are certain matters WhlOh
should never bo treated as party mat
ters; and foremost among these is
the great and Vital virtue of honesty.
Honesty should bo treated as a prime
necessity to our success as a nation.
"The minute that a question of hon
esty an against dishonesty is involved,
then we must all act together as
Americans, without the slightest re
gard to party affiliations. Honesty is
not a party matter; and the first man
to attack a scoundrel of any party
should.be the honest men of that
party. When in office, I always pro
ceeded upon the theory that there
would be no need of my opponents
raising the cry of 'Turn the rascals
out,' because I would turn them out
myself just as soon aw, by vigilant
and intelligent industry, I could dis
cover them.
"As we dealt with the crooked public
official, whether in Kansas or Okla
homa, so we dealt with the crooked
private citizen; with the rich swindler
in New York nr Chicago ns with the
horse thief or homicide in Indian Ter
ritory. We never attacked a man be
cause h<- was a man of one political
faith or another, because he did or did
not' possess wealth; and wo never
shielded him because ho was poor or
rich, because he belonged to any par
ticular church or to any particular
party. Hut I also wish you < specially
to remember that we never hesitated
to clileld Mm and stand up for him
once we were convinced that he was
improperly attacked.
"There is no greater foo of honesty
than the man who, lor any reason, In
any capacity, attacks, or seeka to at
tack, an honest man for a crime which
is not committod. Falsely ac
cusing an honest man of dishonesty
is an net which stands on the same
level of infamy with that of the dis
honest man himself; and it is no high
er duty to attack the dishonest man
than It Is to exonerate the honeHt man
accused! and I should be
(Continued on I'aga Three}
TEN-THOUSAND-BARREL
WELL BROUGHT IN BY
HAWAIIAN OIL COMPANY
nAKKRSriKLD. Sept. I.—The No. 1
well of the Ilauallaa Oil company, lec
tion 31, 91-3.1. which came In about a
year ago, ami was drilled deeper to the
bigger ■and, no* brought in Saturday,
and according to the Matrim-nt of tien
eurnl Manager Pollard U good (or 10,000
barrel*. It la 2200 feet deep and 1« pro
ducing M gravity oil.
1000 GERMANS SING IN
CHORUS AT SAENGERFEST
Teutons from All Parts of Coun
try Are Assembled in
San Francisco
SAN FRANCISCO. Sept. I.—Before
an audience of people gathered 'from
all parts of the United States and Eu
rope, the great chorus of 600 voices
opened the Pacific saonprerfest In the
Jiuditorlum tonight. The big pavilion
was crowded and enthusiastic appre
ciation of the efforts of the German
songsters was given throughout the
program.
In the rendition of Clanspn's •'Magda
len," 1000 singers participated.
The soloists of the evening were
Mme. Marie Rappold and Miss Mir
garet Kpyes. Arthur Claasen, Paul
Stelndorff and J. R. Reigger alternated
in the leadership of the orchestra of
75 pieces.
Prepnrations for the festival of music
have been under way for a year, and
assistance has been given by the Ger
man pinging societies in nearly every
city of the country. Some of the best
known soloists have journeyed across
the country to aid in the program. The
noted singers of New York and the
Brooklyn Arions, along with delega
tions from Boston. New Orleans, St.
Louis and Philadelphia have como to
this city for the event.
The Paengerfest will last three days.
On Sunday twenty singing societies
from different cities will compete In
the Eucalyptus open air theater at
Piedmont Springs, in the foothills of
Oakland, for the cup offered by Em
peror William of Germany, and Tyro
lean singers will contest fo,r a cup
given by Emperor Francis Joseph of
Austria.
LABOR RIOT QUELLED
BY FORCE OF POLICE
(Continued from Pace One)
of Louis Jeffries, a riveter working for
the Kaker Iron works and nephew of
James J. Jeffries, was being curried
to a wagon standing In the street.
Jeffries was Instantly killed while at
work on the Hotel Alexandria annex.
As several employes carrying the
body crossed the sldpwnlk a union
striker on picket duty la said to have
remarked that It wus a "good thing
that a 'scab' was dead."
Deputy Constable Charles Benjamin,
who has been stationed nt the build
ing for several months to maintain or
der and prevent disturbances of any
kind, endeavored to disperse the crowd
which had gathered. As the body of
Jeffries was placed in the wagon sev
ornl men began fighting. For a few
minutes It looked as though the riot
would result fatally.
A riot call was sent to headquarters
and soon Captain Lehnhmisen, three
police sergeants and a squad of patrol
men were on the scene and restored
order. Beforo the arrival of the po
lice all the strikers escaped with the
exception of Felder and Sweet.
Jeffries, who was 20 years old, was
at work on the crossbeam on the
third story of the structural iron frame
when he met his tragic death. He w;iw
In a crouching position when the arm
of the derrick, which was being hoist
ed into place, fell on him, pinioning
him to the beam and causing Imme
diate death. The cable supporting the
arm of the derrick gave way. The
body was sent to the morgue of Pierce
Brothers, where an inquest probably
will bo held today. Jeffries lived p.t
1922 Lovelace avenue with his ageci
mother. She collapsed when told of
the death of her son, and it was some
time before she could be revived. She
is being attended by a physician.
TWENTY-TWO AVIATORS
TO CONTEST AT HARVARD
Thirteen Different Makes of Air
Craft Are Entered
BOSTON, Sept. I.—Enthusiastic in
their praise of the Harvard aviation
Held, at Atlantic, and each anxious to
try for the big prizes offered in the
Harvard-Boston aero meet, Sept. 3-13,
Claude Graham "White and A. H. Koe
of England and Wilbur Wright, Wal
tor lirookins and Ralph Johnstone of
America are tonight in the hands of
entertainment committees.
When the contest committee closed
the entries at noon twenty-two avia
tors and thirteen different makes of
.loroplanes had been registered. Among
the latest to file their applications
were Stanley Beach, who will bo seen
in a Bleriot, equipped with a gyro
scope for securing stability (the first
of its kind); H. Rietmann,. with a
Helicopter, also the only one of its
kind; H. A. Conner*, with a Conners
biplane; Augustus Post, with a Cur
tiss biplane, and John W. Wilson, who
Will be Keen in a unique man-pro
pelled monoplane.
MOISSANT WILL ENTER
AMERICAN AIR CONTESTS
NEW YORK, Sept. I.—John Mois
sant, the American aviator who car
ried a passenger from Paris to a point
within a few miles of London, is plan
ning to come to America for the fall
.ivlation meet, He lias announced Ills
intention In a letter to a friend hero,
and It Is expected his formal entry will
shortly bo received.
Austrian nobility will also be rep
resented at the meet, chairman J. C
McCoy of the commission on iporta
Im.s received the entry application.-; ol
Count Alexander Kiilowrat and Baron
Ecor.omd, vice president of the Vienna
Aero club. They will use a Voisin bl
plane and an Etrich-Wel monoplane.
They will be accompanied by Prince
Don Jaime de Bourbon, the pretender
iv the throne of Spain; Duke Pram ! :
I, de Hraganza, Count Ora.sko
vltch and Count Tellka <>r Budapest.
111.- party will leave thfl first
In October, ltoth Count Kalowrat and
.mo arc well known in Km
aviation circles and have made a num
ber of successful flights.
NATION IN GOOD
FINANCIAL SHAPE
Treasury Statement for Second
Month of Fiscal Year
Is Encouraging
BANKS CAN HANDLE CROPS
Public Debt Shows an Increase
Due to Special Causes.
Receipts Large
(Associated Precis)
WASHINGTON, Sept. I.—With an
Increase of $3,273,325 in the public debt
and a total deficit of $17,371,468.08, the
United States treasury closed the sec
ond month of the fiscal year, keeping
on an even keel, all circumstances con
sidered, with a working balance of $30,
--826,057.^3 on hand, and the general fund
down to $89,523,207.59.
The increase in public debt, which
Is a complete turn over of $4,000,000
in round numbers from the month of
July, is due largely to an excess of
naUonal bank deposits over redemp
tions.
The general rule of excess of expen
ditures over receipts during July and
August Is also a contributor.
Total receipts during August were
$54,969,253.64, roughly $5,000,000 more
than for the same month last year.
Thlß brings the receipts of this year
over the $113,000,000 mark and $5,000,
--000 better than those of the preceding
year.
Disbursements on the whole and in
the face of a natural condition which
bears upon a good showing, still give
evidence of the retrenchment that has
become one of the first Considerations
of the administration. With a drain of
about $2,500,000 a month for the Pan
ama canal, the ordinary disbursement
for Augtist totaled $58,538,787.74, run
ning a shade ahead of the same month
last year, $10,000,000 under last month,
and making $126,050,496.90 for the pres
ent year, some $4,000,000 better than
the record for the same time a year
ago.
BANKS IX GOOD SHAFK
The Panama canal expenditures for
this year are brought up to $6,987,
--365.80.
For the month alone the government
was around $4,000,000 behind on ordi
nary receipts. Customs receipts
jumped up a million and about $83,000
came In from the corporation tax. In
ternal revenue netted a million less
than last month.
The government goes into the third
month of the year with a grand total
of $1,746,676,814.83 cash in the treasury.
The national bank notes outstanding
amount to $717,321,051, an increase dur
ing the month of about $5,000,000, and
an increase of about $19,000,000 over a
year ago. The deposits of bonds and
money to aecure the increases are
about even. Twelve new banks with a
capital of $3,105,000 were authorized to
begin business during the month, and
there are now in existence 7184 national
banks, with combined capital of more
than $1,000,000,000.
Reports of the week from national
bank examiners in the middle west,
where some apprehension had been felt,
indicate a satisfactory condition and
treasury officials believe the bankers
have the situation well in hand for the
crop moving.
No extraordinary demands upon tno
eastern financial market are likely.
Loans are being made carefully, rates
of interest have been raised to check
the borrowing for luxuries and high
living and the financial centers of the
middle west and the far west appear
well equipped to meet the demands of
the next few weeks.
DEMOCRATS OF SAN DIEGO
SELECT STATE DELEGATE
Will Support Louis J. Wilde if He
Runs for Congress
SAN DIEGO, Sept. I.—The Demo
cratic county convention was held in
this city today. Fred Jewell presided.
These delegates to the state conven
tion were chosen:
Frank A. Salmons', B. P. Guinan,
Jerry E Connell, H. E. Andrews, G. L.
Maxfleld, Harry Snell, H. L. Love, I.
D Sllvaa, I. I. Irwln, Albert Bchoon
over H. T. Christian, William Kettner,
James E. Wadham, B. B. Higgins, K.
M Parker, B. F. Hubbard.
Among the resolutions adopted is ono
reciting that as the Democrats of the
Eighth congressional district failed to
mnke any nomination for congress,
they are urged to support Louis J.
AViido as an independent candidate in
case he can be induced to run.
Another resolution reads: "We fa
vor the issuance of state bonds for tho
lfprovement of San Francisco and Sun
Diego harbors, and the purchase of
I si;, is creek, and call the attention of
the people to the fact that the amount
of such bonded indebtedness will be
repaid to the state from revenues to be
derived from such harbors."
STANFORD STUDENTS ON
DIET OF DRIED FRUITS
SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 1.— Twenty
students of Stanford university have
agreed to submit themselves to a diet
of dried fruit i'or an indefinite time, to
assist a government experiment.
They will eat dried fruit at all their
meals, and the effects of the various
preparations on their health will be
noted by Dr. Swain of the department
of chemistry at the university.
The experiment is the outcome of the
widespread discussion of the use of
sulphur in the preparation of Califor
nia fruits.
NATHAN STRAUSS CLOSING
INFANT MILK DEPOTS
NEW YORK, Sent. I.—Nine of the
seventeen Nathan Strauss Infant milk
depots in this city have been closed as
the first step In the ending of this
philanthropy which Mr. Strauss started
in 1892, and which he says he has "felt
compelled to abandon because of per
sonal attacks" thut he reared hindered
the c;mse df pasteurisation.
At the eight other depot! the sale of,
pasteurized milk by the plasß has been
discontinued, but the supply of milk In
nursing bottles will be < ontinued for a
time.
Mr Strauss will arrive on the steam
ship Celtic next Saturday and will then
(Ix the date for the (liming of the sta
tions that are DOW Open.
4MUSEIIENTB_^
M"oroscos BURBANK^THEATER i""i^Bii|BP Bg> :
MAIN STRtE't, NEAR SIXTH. <||^g«^^'
Another Week of the Burbank's Greatest IS^sl^R^
Achievement '^w^fwi^^^*'^
BEGINNING MATINEB SUNDAY, HKI'T. «— ' >'Inw' l
I SPECIAL MATINEE SPECIAL MATINEE |\
MONDAY, SEPT. 5 FRIDAY, SEPT A 9
■ LABOR DAY | ADMISSION DAY
Salvation Nell
Record toys—Sermon »nd work of art combined, delivered with Intelligence and artisuo
... . skill.
Olymplns In Herald s«r«—Mado so real by Burbank players that it will be remembered /
when the players are forgotten. \ ■. . (- ' .. . , .
SteTpns In Examiner says—Scenlcally wonderful. Production remarkable.
Johnson In Times Realism can go no further. Surpassed anything ever seen at ths
Burbank.
PRICES »So, lOC, TBo. MATINEES SATURDAY. SUNDAY, MONDAY, FRIDAY, lOC : 2«0.
BOc. NEXT ATTRACTION, "8TRONOIIBABT."
I #fy, jsvmV%*ffi^iVv sftfOv T# O*' Matinee Every Day.
|p.y,ng particular at-1 Vaudeville ||g|EF
iri^ir'Sr'l V Q-^^V^ V **>*'+' I Amene-nTtSaefon-
Positively Last Week-ADnOttO Kcllermann-"Tho , Perfect Woman."
FOUr Fords I ; — ~1 Clifford & Burke -
Greatest American Dancers. Burnt Cork Comedians. , t<l
' Ryan-Richfield Co. Matinee ' Four Chftons ;
4ag Haggertvs Visit." ITXAIIiJ^O Extrnorc ,inar.v Athl.tei.
Granville &. Rogers TnHaV* Harry Atkinson
"Two Odd Fellows." ■»■ OU»y . Australian Orpheus.
Josie Heather I I New Motion Pictures
Winsome Comedienne. . Latest Novelties. _
Every Night—loc, JBo, BOc, 76c. Matinee Dally— lo6, MS, 800.
HAMBURGER'S MAJESTIC THEATER Broadway, war ninth.
LOS ANGKLES' i^AliiS-«TsiwiTmfvsir~ »s!** MOROSCO, Manager
OI'HN'9 MONDAY MATINKE, SF.iT. 6.
SEATS NOW ON SALE 4WM , V "
FOR THE GREATEST COMEDY HIT NEW YORK EVER KNEW. . r . .
By RIDA JOHNSON YOUNG. Management of SAM B. and LEE SHlinßnT (Inc.) ;■
Hofrday Matinee Monday (Labor bay). Regular Matinee Saturday. _LaBtperformanc.
Sunday night. Sept. 11. PRICES 800 to >1.80. Bargain matinee Wednesday. 85C to 11.
MASON OPERA HOUSE w T<»£!££:
"TONIGHT AND TOMORROW—MATINEE SATURDAY ONLY—
Maurice Campbell Presents •
Henrietta Crosman
P^eV? 680o pa tro Ku.'Bo. C6medir' anti-matrimony by ,s;'.'C".*x.«
WEEK SEPTEMBER B—MATINEES WBDNESDAT AND BATURDAT. |
DAVID BEIABOO PRESENTS
FRANCES STARR
IN EUGENE WALTER'S GREATEST PLAY,
The Easiest Way
PRICES Bftc TO )1 BEATS NOW ON BALE. COMrNO—"WKVI^ DATB."
B nl An/~>/-> T> XIV A TIT 13 Belasco-Blackwodd. Props. * Mgrs. „,
ELAbLO 1 tI&A 1 MATINKKS TOMORROW, Sunday, Thuriiday
LAST FTVB TlSrlCS—The Belasco company presents for the first time by any
stock company, Charles Rann Kennedy's gre at play.
t^fe Servant in the House
"IT IS THE GREATEST TRIUMPH THE BEI..ABCO COMPANY HAS - EVER
' Regular Belaseo prices, notwithstanding the enormous expenses: Nights, 18, to and
7Bc; Matinees, 25 and BOC. • , • '
XEXT WEEK, COMMENCING SPECIAL LABOR DAY MATrNKß—William Col- '
lier's famously funny farcical success, THE MAN FROM MEXICO. Seats :on sale.
mOS ANGELES THEATRE
&uwMML>>VA & SEVILLE
»"£-=. I Murray K. Mill|gsS^
—. RAND OPERA HOUSE ?tiX a T o£?^L AIZ," mJI*K
„»r"™" The Girl and the Gambler
Lnttvin r'ATTT? ANT ANT ■ 'THIRD AND main st«. I
EVY S LAr Hi CriAfM i. **r* X a. S:3O an 10:30 DAILY. ,
—COUNTESS OLGA ROSSI, Russian Grand Opera Prlma Donna; 808 , AL- .
BRIOHT The Man Melba; GRACE BELMONT, Favorite American Balladist;
MADGE MAItLaND, . Fascinating Comedienne; and KAMMISRMEYER'S ORCHES- l
TKA. ' • - -''."' :':■ :.: '■ -. .
OLYMPIC THEATER f^t a^.l & •
ALPHIN & FAROO offer "THE BULL FIGHTERS," a breezy burletta by Charles j
Alnhln with JULES MENDEL. Ten big singing and dancing novelties, '„ >;O ;
INITIAL APPEARANCE OF FRANCES PRESTON. * , -, ■> - •
BASEBALL— Pacific^oast League -
SAN FRANCISCO VS. VKBNON—Wed.. Aug. 81st; Thu., Sept. Ist: Sat., Sept.
3d- Sun Sep. 4th; Won., Sep. Bth. at Chutes Park at 2:30 p. m. Frl., Ben. l!d,
at Vernon at 2:30 p. m.; Sun., Sep. 4th. AC Vernon at 10:30 a. m.: Mon.. Sep.'Bth. at
Vernon at 10:30 a. m. Ladles' Day every day except Sat., Sun. and holidays. Kids' ;.
Day Sat. ■ .' ' ■
P-OTMr'TT'OO »TT-TT?AT'C 1P FIRST ST., Near Spring;. "Home of Clean
KIJML.JJ.aO IHIJ.AIC.K .. Musical Come<ly." PRINCESS MUSICAL
COMEDY CO presents the big military burlesque. "BATTLE OF MHO') v RUN,"
featuring FRED ARDATH, "the unexcelled Irish comedian," with AL FRANKS.
AMfITF NORTH EARL HALL, BESSIE HILL and the favorite chorus of • the city
EVENING*! ••■h and »:15. MATINEES DAILY EXCEPT WEDNESDAY and FRIDAY.
i PRICKS lOC, 20c and 260. ■„'.■- .<■ ■■■■-' ■■ ■■-■■■ ■■ - ■•;' ■'■ ;■; , ";'
FIND MORE WATER VAPOR
IN MARS' ATMOSPHERE
Striking Disclosures Made at the
Lowell Observatory
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz., Sept. I.—An
other spectrogram by Slipher of the
Lowell observatory haß Just been
measured by Very with his new com
parator and yields more striking proof
of the presence of both water vapor
and of oxygen in the atmosphere of
Mars than the previous plates. The
spectrograms of the moon and Mars
were taken at equal altitudes and co
incident times, the Lunar spectrum
being got at the middle of the Mars
exposure.
The humidity at the timo of the
observation was only 51M00 of a grain
of water vapor in a cubic foot of air
at the earth's surface, which means a
very exceptional dryness.
The tneaaurei make the intensity of
the little A band of water vapor in
the spectrum of Mars two and one
lialf times aa great as in the lunar
spectrum taken under identical condi
tions, and great B one and one-half
times as strong in the spectrum of
Mars us in that of the moon. The
lunar .spectrum represents the ab
sorption mf the terrestrial atmosphere
above Flagstaff. „„,,.
The probable errors are only 1-60 of
the quantity measured. The little A
band is known to bo due to water
vapor absorption, and that of big B
to oxygen.
TO DOUBLE-TRACK FROM
DENVER TO SALT LAKE
D. & R. G. Improvements to Cost
About $10,000,000
DENVER, Sept. I.—An afternoon pa,
per says today the Denver & Rio
Grande railroad is to double track its
line from Denver to Salt Lake City
:ind that the company will spend be
tween $10,000,000 and $12,000,000 for im
provements. President Jeffery in hl«
annual statement announces that tli'i
directors have authorized the issue
and sale of $10,000,000 of Hrst and re
funding mortgage bonds. (Jfmeral Man-
HRor Horace W. Clark said today:
■■! understand we are to double
track the line from Denver to Salt
Lake City. We now have 100 miles of
double track. There will be approxi
mately 640 additional miles of that
kind of work to be done. The work
will probably cost $10,000 a mile."
VICTIM OF MONTANA FIRES
IS DEAD IN BAKERSFIELD
BAKERSFIELD, Cal., Sept. I.—lt
WU learned today that Joe Cyr who
died here yesterday after a severe at
tack of hemorrhage or the lungs, was
a victim of the forest fires in Mon
tana.
in fighting the flames he breathed
so miirii hot air that hemorrhag
■lilted. Ho was sent here by the Mls-
Mont., Eagles, In the ho]
recovery, lie was seized with hemorr
i :iliort time after arriving here*

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