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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, September 06, 1910, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-09-06/ed-1/seq-2/

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~\!£if Bosjon Dry Goods Store
S A fifty Cent Jar of Mme. Isebell's Turkish Bath Oil
given free with every SOc box of Mme. Isebell's Face
Powder said this week. . ; , •
Sales for Today
Details ol which appeared in Sunday's papers.
$2.75 to $7.50 Embroidery Flouncing* at
$2.00 a Yard.
Women's $12.50 to $25 Linen Suits at $4.75.
Women's $25 to $45 Tailored Suits it $14.50.
$12.50 to $25 Linen Robe Patterns at Ten
. Dollars.
Startling Reductions on Boys' School
Clothing.
Many Toys and Dolls at About Half.
$5 to $6.50 Lace Curtains at $3.50.
65c and 75c Fancy Ribbons at 35c
Room-size Rugs of Domestic Make at
About a Fourth Under Regular.
These Sales for Wednesday
Clean-up of $1.25 and $1.50 Allover *9 ft
Embroideries , .-.. • Jv
- ■ . . .
Sample line of $1.50 and $1.75 Hair Brushes—solid ebony
and rosewood back; 9 and 10 rows of bristles— m "C/%
On Wednesday * JC
- Women's! sheer handkerchiefs with hand-embroidered ini
tials—were $1.25 a box of six. *9 fLg^
Wednesday's price will be 7 •JC
Jumbo Bridge Whist Cards, regularly 50c a pack. «JP
Wednesday's price «^ J*w
J. W. ROBINSON CO.
235-239 So. Broadway 234-244 So. Hill Street
The Home of
Hart Schaffner Marx
Clothes
Am Btnuttaa Sand Curt
Around The World
By the "OFFICE BOY"
All the world is not a stage, but
It win soon be a moving-picture
show. And, don't you know, the
fcw-clotlies residents of the Par
East seem to enjoy them just as
much as; we do in our Hart Schaff
ner & Marx. There were three
American college girls on the Med
iterranean steamer going down to
Egypt. Their parents were plain old
New England folks, but the girls
were full of life and they certainly
had a flood time. Most of the pas
•engars iwere Europeans, so the
ways of 'the girls were apparently
pew to tibtsm. This seemed to please
the girls, so they didn't do a thing
but bend, the hearts of some of those
foreign cßiaps. One army officer,
who nad evidently taken a violent
ancy to one of the young ladies,
and had, rip doubt, forced her to tell
him that <pld story about being a
sister to ham, etc., come to me and
said that has believed the girl was
trying to rr*ak» a monkey of him. I
told him that even at that she may
have meant well.
I lost my Bilv«rwood three-dollar
hat while crossing the Atlantic so
whan I arrtv«d In London I had to
buy a now eoft hat. Don't you
know, I had a hard time to get one
that suited me, as the English soft
hat maker maikes his hats too
heavy, or wood/, as we would say,
and they don't appeal to us. We
"Wo a soft, mellow hat, so that we
oan pull it down in the front if we
want to and make It look natty or
chic. Their huts won't work that
way. I finally bought a John B.
Stetson hat for a sovereign, which
is $4.85 In our money. Now, we sell
that exact hat for $4, and England
Is a free trade country, and it costs
us just as muoii freight to Los An
geles as it does to London.
Our fall Stetson's are now on sale.
We carry them at $4, $5 and up.
We also continue to sell the best
(3 hat obtainable.
We deserve your hat patronage.
Can't wo have it?
EITHER BTORS
F.B.SILVERWOOD
I? 1 south spring LOS Angeles
Sixth and Broadway
Bflkepsflell Long Bead)
San Bernardino MarlcoDfl
RAILWAY TO RESUME
IN BURNED DISTRICT
SEATTLE, Sept. s.—riffle on the
Chicago, Milwaukee & Puget Sound
railroad will be resumed tomorrow
over the part of the linn in the Bitter
Root valley which was recently de
stroyed by forest fires.
For a .stretch of about thirty miles
in the valley all the bridges were
burned and the rails warped and
twisted.
SOLONS APPROVE
FAIR BOND PLAN
Senators and Assemblymen Are
Assembled for Extra Ses
sion in Sacramento
. [Associated Press]
SACRAMENTO, Sept. s.—Nearly
every member of the Thirty-eighth ses
sion of the California legislature is on
hand for the opening of the extra ses
sion tomorrow morning at 10 o'clock.
Among the number present only a
few are in any way opposed to the
resolutions that have been prepared for
presentation to the legislature further
ing the Panama-Pacific exposition at
San Francisco in 1915.
Those who oppose it are open to con
viction, and it is expected that beyond
a discussion along minor lines there
will bo no trouble in bringing about
the desires of the exposition com
mittee.
There was a meeting In Governor
Gillett's office this afternoon when the j
two resolutions to amend the state j
constitution were taken up, one to
bond the state for $5,000,000 and the
other to change the Ban Francisco
charter and made to carry out the
■wishes of the majority of the commit
tee Among the changes made was
one which arranged for the commis
sion to handle the funds. This commis
sion Is now to be composed of the
governor and four other members, each
of the latter to be selected from dif
ferent sections of the state.
While it does not say in so many
words that no member shall be from
San Francisco, this is the implied
meaning. This was one of the pro
visions asked for by the commission.
Governor Qillett was asked to be
come one of the commission, but de
clined, He feels that as the commis
sion will act under the administration
of his successor the governor
named next November should be the
one to net on the commission, and he
should have the naming of the other
members. For this reason it is pro
vided now In the resolution that the
four members shall he named Febru
ary, 1911. thus giving the new governor
the appointing power.
At a meeting held tonight In the
Capital hotel, at which nine senators
and twenty assemblymen -were present,
there was a general discussion regard
ing the measures to be brought before
the legislature. All of those present,
with the exception of Assemblyman
Gibbons of San Luis Oblspo were In
hearty necorii with the provisions of
the resolution as hastily read. There
was no general discussion, because, as
was expressed by Senator Leavltt, the
bill was not before the members in
printed form, and It would be better to
wait until it was no placed before them
bo that careful reading would give a
full and Intelligent knowledge of the
contents.
James McNab presided and explained
the benefits to come to California as
a state by bringing the fair to San
Francisco, and in this he was seconded
by Leon Sloss, who gave some interest-
Ing figures along lines of subscriptions
to the fund in San Francisco.
Tho meeting was an enthusiastic one.
KILLS MAN WHOS r: WORDS
SENT HIM TO SING SING
NEW YORK, Sept. 6.- Dom
Bcarpla, a Bay KMyfi cobbler, Junt out
of Sine Kirnr prison, where he had
served live year." for .stabbing a woman,
walked into a group of Hay Uiil>;
today, shoved them gently aside
;ni(i then shot the man ho wanted,
Pellpo Crenetto, through the heart,
Crenetto'i testimony had convicted
him, mid during the trial Bcarpla
warned him he would return from
prison to kill him. The police have no
i lev to his whereabouts.
LOS ANGELES HERALD: TUESDAY SfORNIN^, SEPTEMBER 6, 1010. '
WORKERS MEET
ATBEACH RESORT
Los Angeles Union Men and Fam
ilies Observe Labor Day
at Venice
ATTENDANCE EXCEEDS 20,000
Celebration Holds Record for the
Greatest Number of La
borers Present
(Continued from P»»« One)
years or under —Ralph Martinez, first:
Roy Prumlck, second; Ernest Munard,
third.
Girls' running- race, fifty yards, 16
years or under—Cora Fowler, first;
Murla, BcfVard, second; Grace Bovard,
third.
Men's running: race, 100 yards—R. D.
Nash, first; W. Bailard. second; E. W.
Fedlor, third.
Ladles' running race, fifty yards-
Mrs. E. G. Bond, first; Mrs. Mary
Flood, second; Mrs. Laura Galnea,
third.
Egg and spoon race, twenty-five
yards and return —Mrs. R. D. Nash,
first; Mrs. Laura Galnes, second; Mrs.
w. Rice, third.
Totato and sack race, twenty-five
yards and return—Joe Franklin, first;
Ralph Martinez, second; R. D. Nash,
third.
Three-iegged race, fifty yards and
return—Nashm and Burnester, first;
Shields and Hunsberger, second; Wil
liams and Bennett, third.
Business agents and organizers' race,
100 yards— B. J. Leary, first; F. B.
ISrln, second; F. R. Burden third.
Tilting tournament—Shultz and Ely,
winners.
The prizes In each event were: First,
flvo shares of Labor temple stock; pec
ond, three shares, and third, two
shares.
Howard Marshall served as starter
in these «evpnts, with V. Klngshury as
Judge. Harry Bayless gave personal
direction to the races.
Tn the evening an elaborate fireworks
display was given on the ocean front.
The dance hall was cror.ded through
out the afternoon and evening.
MANY PICNICS HELD
IN SYCAMORE GROVE
Sycamore grrove was a popular resort
for the smaller picnic parties yester
day. Among 1 the organizations that
celebrated Labor day by gathering In
the grove were:
The Livingstone County, Missouri,
society; the Whiteside County, Illinoin,
society; the Walther League of the
Kvangelical Lutheran church; the La
dles' Auxiliary of the Caledonian
club, and several Sunday schools.
There were about 150 former Mls
sourians at the Livingstone county
picnic, most of them from ChlUicotbe
and vicinity. C. W. Owens, president
of the society; William J. Matron, sec
retary; Samuel Millay and G. W.
Beauchant were speakers.
Two hundred former residents of
Illinois heard addresses by Mrs. Mary
Tucker, vice president of the White
side county society; TV. W. Haskell,
secretary, and W. H. Griffin. F. W.
Mountz sang.
Members of the Caledonian club were
guests of the women of tho auxiliary
organization. About 100 enjoyed the
luncheon provided.
THOUSANDS IN PARADE
AT SAN BERNARDINO
Mayor S. W. McNabb and Offi
cials Ride at Head of Unions
RAX BERNARDINO, Sept. s.—San
Bernardino today was thronged with
union labor men and their families
from all over San Bernardino valley
and Riverside county. In the street
parade at 10 o'clock several thousand
men marched In uniform, representing
the various trades unions in the two
counties.
Mayor S. W. McNabb ami other city
officials, with the union officers of the
day, rode in carriages at the head of
the parade. The fire department, which
previously had given an exhibition run
and water display, was represented by
two wagons and firemen in uniform.
Thn prize for the best appearing local
in the parade was awarded to the
Riverside carpenters and joiners, sev
eral members of which were in uni
form.
At Lugo park, where the parade fwl
ed, Mayor McNabb welcomed the vis
itors. In the afternoon there was a
program of sports and an address by
Cyrus Grow. The celebration termi
nated tonight with a grand ball.
TWO THOUSAND LABORITES
IN PARADE IN SAN DIEGO
SAN DIEGO, Cal., Sept. s.—Mnro
than 2000 members of organized labor
in San Diego we.re in the big parade
which took place at 9 o'clock this
morning, and a seaside, resort at Cor
onado was crowded with labor men
and their families this afternoon to
witness the athletic contests.
Tho parade and athletics are tlin
first to be held by organized labor in
San Diego for about three years, and
the showing of the strength of the dif
ferent unions in thi3 city was sur
prising. There was no disorder, al
though it was feared previous to the
parade because of the presence of a
big number of the members of tho
Industrial Workers of the World In
this city.
TOILERS AT FRESNO MAKE
SHOWING OF STRENGTH
FRESNO, Sept. B.—Fresno's T^bor
day parade was one of the largest of
its kind ever held in this city, over
1000 men participating:. The procession
was led by Chief of Police Shaw and
Mayor Chester Kowell was among
those in line. Sports and other cvi nts
were held at a loi-al park and a dance
concluded the festivities in the evening.
The business establishments were all
dosed in observance of the day.
SEIDEL LEADS PARADE
MILWAUKEE, Vis., Sept. The
feature of Milwaukee's Labor day pa
rade was the marching at the heart of
the column of Milwaukee's Socialist-
Democratic mayor, Emll Beidel, the
mayor's supporters In the common
council and the Socialist-Democratic
members "i' the county board. Five
thousand marchers wero in line.
SAN FRANCISCO UNIONS
MARCH 40,000 STRONG
Parade Contains 107 Unions and
Over Twenty Bands
SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. s.—Forty
thousand men marched hero today In
the first Labor day parade held slnca
the recent .•ifllllation of the Labor
council and the Building Trades coun
cil. Grand Marshal John A. Kelly,
president of the Labor council and a
member of the board of supervisors,
led the host of union men. Besides the
squads of marchers, a number of floats
lent color to the parade. A novel fea
ture of the procession were the attrac-
tive divisions composed of women.
There were 107 unions in line, with
20 bands and as many drum corps. Tho
line of march was well guarded by the
police and the parade was not broken
from the time it started at 9:30 until
it disbanded shortly after noon at the
ferry. After disbanding the paraders
embarked for shellmound park, where
tho remainder of the day was spent in
various picnic recreations. The only
serious note to the afternoon celebra
tion was provided by a number of can
didates for state offices at the com
ing election who were present to ad
dress the unionists.
71,000 UNIONITES
PARADE AT N.Y.
Labor Day Demonstration in the
Metropolis Breaks Record.
Women Among Marchers
[Associated Press]
NEW YORK, Sept. 6.—Th» Labor
day parade here brought out more
union marchers this year than have
ever been seen In Fifth avenue. Con
spicuous among them were 3100 women,
most of them garment workers, wear-
Ing blue and yellow liberty caps and
sashes. The leaders estimated that
there were 71,000 in line.
For the first time in fifteen years
Labor day dawned in Greater New
York without a single strike to mar the
celebration of the clay.
With the cloak makers' long strike
settled in the nick of time there is no
labor trouble of any kind in the city,
! a most magnificent showing: for organ
ized labor, said Edward J. Hannah,
grand marshal of the biggest Labor
day parade ever planned in the me
tropolis.
The only indication of any Impend
ing labor disturbance was of extremely
minor Importance. It was announced
today that the stage hands' unions,
representing employes of fifty-one the
aters, have presented demands for
wage increases averaging about 18 per
cent, and declare they will strike on
Sunday next if their demands are not
granted. The stage hands at present
receive from $18 to $28 a week and the
stage carpenters from $30 to $45.
It is said that a compromise settle
ment by the theaters is likely.
GOMTKItS ABSENT
The program of Labor day sports in
New York included baseball games
by both the National and American
league teams, three big athletic meets,
an automobile tournament at Brighton
Beach, with Barney Oldfield and
George Robertson as the star perform
ers; an aviation meeting at Garden
City and golf tournaments at seven
of the big clubs. On the water there
were programmed motor boat races at
New Roehelle and regattas at five
yacht clubs. Many New York oars
men attended the annual regatta of the
Middle States Rowing association on
the Schuylkill at Philadelphia.
Fully 71.000 paraders, representing
virtually every labor organization in
Greater Now York, participated In the
Labor day parade. The members of
the Cloak Makers' union, the settle
ment of whose strike last week is
looked upon by organized labor as a
great moral victory, were given a
noisy welcome all along the line of
march. ..
Samuel Gompers, president of the
American Federation of Labor, had
been expected to review the parade,
but telegraphed his inability to tbe
present owing to engagements in the
west.
SPEAKS FOR BETTER LAWS
TO PROTECT WORKINGMEN
TBBRH HAI TTE, Ind.. Sept. 5.—
John Mitchell, former j>resident of the
United Mine Workers, in a Labor day
98 hero today spoke for better
lawi for the, protection of laboring
men. „ ,
"A well known writer," he said, as
serts that 600,000 workmen are killed
or maimed annuallly in the United I
States.
"That means that more lives are ;
sacrificed and moro workingmen aro i
injured each year in the peaceful con
duct of our industries than wem sac
rificed in any one year during the civil
war."
LABOR DAY PARADE AT
STOCKTON BREAKS RECORD
STOCKTOX, Sept. s.—T^abor day
was celebrated in Stockton by the larg
est procession of organized labor which
ever marched through Stockton streets.
There were numerous fine floats, and
fully 2000 members of tho local unions
marched. Forty-four unions were rep
resented. Following tho parade there
wore games and contests at Oak park,
the literary exercl«e« taking place
also. Hon. Frank T. McCiowan of San
Francisco delivered tho oration. To
night there will be a dance in the Oak
park pavilion.
SAN JOSE UNION MEN
PARADE AND PICNIC
PAN JOSE, Sept. 5.—A1l the local
unions and many from towns through-
I out the valley paraded this forenoon
through tho main streets of San Josa
and with bands and banners fittingly
i elebrated Labor day. Thousands of
people came in from the country to see
the parade and to attend the exeri lues
and games rit Luna park this after
noon. It was tho largest labor celebra
tion ever held in this city.
DAY QUIET AT SAN PEDRO
PAN PEDRO, Sept. s.—Labor day
pasted very quietly here today. With
. xoeptlon of a Catholic picnic
given (it Point Firmin tin re WU DO
celebration of any kind. No work was
done !n the lumber yards and mills,
but an unusually large number of ves
sels worked cargo for a holiday. There
Hirer regular passenger steamers
in pori and these always work cargoes
holiday! to keep up their schedules.
Besides a number of lumber carriers
had crews working.
'SAVING OF SOIL
IMPORTANT'- HILL
Magnate Says Conservation of
Food Is Greatest Item
of Program
PORTLAND FAIR IS OPENED
Speech of Railroad Man Read,by
President of the Live
stock Association
(Associated Press)
PORTLAND, Sept. s.—The third an
nual exhibition and spaed meeting of
the Portland Fait nnd Livestock as
sociation oponed hero today. The ex
hibition of cattle,' horses, sheer, swine
nnd goats ia the finest ever shown on
the Pacific coast and is typical of the
wonderful growth of the livestock in
dustry in the Pacific northwest dur
ing the past few years.
The opening exercises were brief and
included a paper prepared by James J.
Hill. It was expected that Mr. Hill
would be in attendance at the opening,
but owing to business engagements he
was unable to be on hand nnd the
paper was read by President Paul
Maria of the Portland Fair and Live
stock association.
A paper by James J. Hill was read.
The paper follows in part:
"A nation that means to preserve its
prosperity and control its own destiny
must make sure that its food supply
is adequate and will continue to bo so.
To reverse our movement toward in
dustrial dependence, food scarcity and
permanent high prices, which has al
ready gone far, is the item of the con
servation program more important to
us than all the others combined. This
means conservation of the soil. It re
quires no expensive machinery, no
subordination of local to federal inter
ests, nothing but Industry, Intelligence
and willingness to follow the teachings
of experience. To Insist upon it is es
pecially the duty of all who, like those
gathered here, have interests insepara
bly connected with the preservation
and Increase of soil productivity.
"The raising of livestock has a two
fold relation to the food supply of any
country. Directly, it furnishes the
meat diet, and indirectly, as the most
valuable of all aids to the cultivation
of the soil and the growing of crops,
it helps to furnish the bread diet. The
interests which you represent may,
therefore, be said to act doubly upon
t.he agriculture of the country and con
tribute twice to its welfare.
>~EED TEACHES I>ESSOX9
"Since people learn mostly by the
pressure of some neoed, the sharp rise
in price of all kinds of meats has
turned attention to the state of the
livestock interest. Retail prices, in
some cases double what they were a
few years ago, stimulate inquiry. In
vestigation shows that livestock pro
duction has not kept pace with the
demand upon it.
"The receipts of all kinds of livestock
at the Chicago stockyards for the year
1909 were 1,544,997 less than In 1908, al
though the total valuation increased
over $8 000,000. The receipts of hogs at
thirteen principal markets In the
United States were 5,586,312 less in 1909
than in 1908. The total number of cat
tlo in the country has declined 3,000.000
»n the last three years and of hogs
7,000.000.
"Necessarily prices have gone up.
The breakfast table of the rich and
the dinner pail of the poor are botn
affected. As one would expect from
these figures, native beef cattle and
western range cattle sold for the high
est prices on record in the Chicago
market in 1909. Hogs brought the high
est figure received for twenty-seven
years Increase of population, changes
in agriculture, drift of population city
ward, all have helped to restrict pro
duction and to add to price.
"These are a few facts bearing on
the direct relation of the livestock
interest to population, prices and the.
general welfare. As our population
increases by anywhere from 1,500,000
to 2,500,000 per annum, and practi
cally every person is a meat eater, it
follows that when tho number of the.
principal food animals cither remains
stationary or begins to decline, the
cost of living rises and the pinch be
gins Not even the extraordinary
prices paid for live stock have thus far
been able to raise production to the
level of demand.
"It is desirable that we should not
only feed our own people but maintain
those declining exports of food ani
mals and other food products by which
we have to so considerable an extent
paid our debts in the past.
"In the last fivo years utir exports
nf meat and dairy products fell from
$211,001,1100 to about $130,000,000; and
of cattle sheep and hogs from $43,500,
--000 to about $13,000,000. This illus
trates the swift decline in all our ex
ports of food products, a trade change
BO BUdden and so tremendous that the
country may well take alarm.
"Unless we change our Industry, we
must soon cease to bo self-supportisg
as far as food is concerned. This
sounds absurd In view of our immense
expanse of fertile land, our relatively
scanty population and the part we
have played in feeding the world in
the past. Rut the figures prove it. Our
foreign trade in cereals tells the same
story as that In meat products. Be
tween the five years ending with 1904
and tho five ending with 1909. the de
crease of our wheat exports was over
40 per cent. In round numbers our
exports of foodstuffs in crude condi
tion nnd tnriil animals were $106,
--000.000 for the eleven months ending
May 31 of this year, $132,000,000 for
the same period in 1909 and $181.
--000,000 In 1908. Our exports of food
stuffs partly or wholly manufactured
for the same three eleven-month pe
riorls were $240,000,000, $281,000,000
nnd $310 000,000. The wheat exports
were 46,000,000 bushels, 66,000,000
bushels and 95,500,000 bushels; the
flour exports 8,500,000 barrels, 10,
--000,000 barrels and 13.000,000 barrels.
The force of these figures cannot be
evaded or misunderstood.
"Food consumption In the United
States Is Increasing more raplrlly than
food production. That Is the explana
tion of the falling off In exports of all
forms of food products."
TO PRESENT BAY CITY'S
CLAIMS TO 1915 FAIR
PAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 5—M. F.
Tarpey of Fresno, Col. (J. H. Pippy of
this city and Manuel nominguez of Los
Angeles, mirnbors of the commission
recently appointed by Governor Olllett
to visit President Dins! of Mexico and
promt the Halms of San Francisco of
th(> right to hold the Panama exposi
tion, will leave for Mexico tomorrow.
They will alfco confer with the special
ambassadors for the various nations
who represent their erevcrnments at the
Mexican centennial.
AMUSEMENTS
I esss «r=a, n d Vaudeville iSSSIr
U.iie. and children. V CT. t4.VtV> V AAAV^ | Amerioan attraottons.
• "The Police Inspector" I 1 4—Four Fords—4
By Armstrong * Greene. Greatest American D*ncer».
isf»ma Ptimes" Matinee ssrssss'A-
Sa!a!SP & Kin« Todar Gr^Al°S
Lou Anger ' I Josie Heather
"The German Soldier." 01"* Comedienne.
' ' - . ORPIIEUM MOTION nCTl'lftS _ <
' EVERY NIOHT loe. 25c. 80c. 75c. V MATINEES DAILY lOC, 250, 800.
MOROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER "near^iltS:
' BPBTIAL MATINEE FRIDAY—ADMISSION DAT—
ii years ci rrrcc
572 WEEKS \| I I |\^
5200 Performances JIVvLV/J
*s, ■ ■■ ' ■
This week the Burbank celebrates the close of eleven years of "access that have been
the envy of the entire theatrical world, culminating this week In the marvelous per
formance of the "red blood" drama. ,
SALVATION NELL
PRICES 250. BOe. TSC. MATINEES FRIDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY. 10c. 26c. 50c,
NEXT WEEK—"STRONGHEAKT."
HAMBURGER'S MAJESTIC THEATER SmNiH.
""WEEK ENDING SUNDAY' NIGHT DOLLAR MATI[NEB TOMOR
ROW SAM* AND I.KE SHCIIKnT PRESENT THE LAUOHING SUCCESS
OF THE CENTURY. BY RIDA JOHNSON YOUNG.
THE LOTTERY MAN
PRICES 800 to 11.50. ■■££; WEDNESDAY MATINEE 25c to »1.
._-.„_, -nrPBHC - NEXT WEEK.
BEorNN^NEXT MONDAY Jofs\ MU^a^x >." 1"
NIGHT, • ■ ■ KSflfmta THURSDAT.
WILTON | "J THE
LACKAYE mm BATTLE
And his splendid metrapolltan \i'.*vitif A, , ■ , r «•„»»•« .„». n!a»
TTo niZn:zr y- I'lebber hevTLr::a '^l**'
B ITT AOPrt TUITATITP Belanco-niarkwood Co., Proprs. »nd Mgrs.
LLAa^U lnl!ifllJi.K MATINEES Thursday, hutunluy, Sunday.
TONIGHT AND THIS WEEK ONLY—The Belasco theater company presents
William Collier's famously funny farcical success,
1 The Man from Mexico
REGULAR BELASCO PRlCES—Nights. 25c, 800 and 76c Matinees J6c and 60c
NEXT WEEK—COMMENCING MONDAY —NEXT WEEK J
The Belasco theater ■will celebrate Its SIXTH ANNIVERSARY. on which occasion
LEWIS S. STONE and the Belasco company will present for the first time on any lob
Angeles stage CHANNINO POLLOCK'S play, „_^ ■:-..,
1 Such a Little Queen
First appearance with the Belaaco company of MISS EVE KELLY. Every member of
the Belasco theater company In the big cast. Seats now on sale. Regular Belasco
prices.
MASON OPERA HOUSE ■ * **]!££?•
TONIGHT AND AIjL. MATIVFES TOMORROW AND SATURDAY.
DAVID BELASCO PRESENTS
FRANCES STARR
IN EUGENE WALTER'S GREATEST PLAY.
THE EASIEST WAY
PRICES 50c to $2. SEATS NOW ON SALH.
WEEK SEPTKMnKR 11— USUAL .MATINKKF.S—
WAI.KMIAI.S & KEMPEB L^ jff Ullilffl ifflll^MW
COMPANY PRESENT W JcRKATEST COMEDY ■
irT^^—, "■■"'■
PRICES ROc to $" no. SEATS ON WALK TinjltSDAY. 9 A. M.
moS ANGELES THEATRE
imSaBBBfrYAUDEYILLE'
VloU Crane & Co. TDTTT T MAN PDRTFR An"* Di" Monkeys
George B. Alexander. ULI i,* mo Harry "n<l ltJ"e MUlhe"-
The JLaugh-O-Scope. MAIDS Harry Tsuda.
RAND OPERA HOUSE v K*anSS I&v&ai? o**0 **
J y A i^ug-B^|gr aThe Burglar and the Lady
OT Vft/TPTP THPATVR ' i MAIN ST., Bet. Fifth and Sixth.
J-» XMr I XhItLAA^K cool. COMMODIOUSi COMFORTABLE.
"HADES t'P TO DATE," a musical hot time with Impish Interpolations, anil
dazzling deviltries, featuring JULES MENDEL. Ten big musical specialties.
10c. 50c. 25c. .
*-~
LTTVV' 1? CAW OHANTANT third and main sts.
h,y V i^Avti, 3 8: . 1O an( , 10 . 30 DAlljY
COUNTBSS OLGA ROSSI. Russian grand opera prlma donna; 808 ALBRIGHT,
the Man Melba; GRACE BELMONT. favorite American balladlst; MADGE MAIT
LAND, fasrlnatinf? comedienne; and KAMMEiiMEYER'B ORCHESTRA.
GAYNOR IS 'RECEPTIVE'
CANDIDATE FOR GOVERNOR
NEW YORK, Sept. s.—Mayor Gaynor
will not be an active candidate far
the Democratic nomination for gov
ernor of this state, but the New York
Times will say tomorrow, on the al
leged authority of several of his close
political friends, that he Is a receptive
candidate.
The mayor is said to have reached a
decision that if there is a strong pop
ular call for him he will accept tho
nomination. He will not reverse this
attitude unless his health Is so en
feebled that it would be dangerous for
him to undertake tho campaign.
FIVE WOMEN FAINT IN
LABOR DAY TUG OF WAR
SAN BERNARDINO; Sept. 6.—As
the result of tin: strain of the women's
tug of war at the Labor day celebra
tion here today five women are in a
■erioua condition tonight. When the
San Bernardino team had about an
inch farther to pull Mrs. Howard
Mitchell fainted.
The Riverside women were quick to
take advantage of the loss, but in the
struggle that enaued two women of
tho visiting team fainted and were
carried away. Hardly had they left
their positions before two more San
Bernardino women dropped to the
ground, and Riverside won.
BRITISH ARREST GERMAN
PORTSMOUTH, Kng., Sept. s—An
offlcor of the German pioneer regiment
wag arrested here today in tho act of
sketching the fortifications.
CAPTURE YOUTH IN STOLEN
AUTO AFTER LONG CHASE
After an exciting auto chase through
many streets of this city Earl Bennot,
19, of 911 Cottage place was cap
tured by Deputy Constable H. R. Zim
mer shortly before 1 o'clock this morn-
Ing and is now being detained at the
city prison, charged with the theft of
an automobile belonging to Dr. A. F.
SrhifCman.
Dr. Sehiffman left his auto on Flow
er street between Ninth and Tenth
streets at 10 o'clock last night. At
10:30 o'clock he ascertained that his
machine had been stolen. H. R. Zim
mer, a deputy constable, waa informed
of the theft, and as he had seen the
stolen machine many times he started
out in a sixty horse power auto in
search of the missing car. Zimmer
had turned the corner at Main and
Ninth when he espied the missing ma
ohlna being driven down Ninth street
by a young boy. Another lad accom
panied him. Zimmer increased hla
speed and went in pursuit. The boy at
the wheel of the auto, seeing that ho
was pursued, also increased his speed,
and the chase was on. After driving
tba stolen auto over many blocks In an
endeavor to'escape tho youthful driver
brought the machine to a stop In front
of a pool room on Main street near
Sixth, three blocks from where tho
chase started. Both lads jumped from
tho machine and ran. Zimmer ran
after the driver and captured him after
a ihort Cham. The boy gave hla name
i t and at central police
station informed Lieutenant Sebastian
that a man had given him the auto
no that ho could take a "joy ride,' 1

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