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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, September 15, 1910, Image 14

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-09-15/ed-1/seq-14/

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14
Late News from the Neighboring Towns and Cities
PASADENA
Correapmdrat'—
Be*, phone
Sunset 48«7.
OFFKTR, M TTFST COI.ORA DO STREET. Phonw *827.
MOTORIST SENTENCED
TO BUY SPEEDOMETER
T. Anderson Finds He Can Not
Accurately Estimate
Speed
PASADENA, Sept. IB.—A school for
motorcycle speeders Is the latest in
novation In local police circles. T.
Anderson of Villa street and Chester
avenue, who told Justice McDonald
yesterday that to the best of his
knowledge and belief he was travel
ing only twelve miles an hour when
arrested, was given a test on the Or
ange Grove "speedway" by motorcycle
officers, and he failed to estimate
within ten miles of his speed. When
he returned to court he changed his
plea to guilty, and the judge sen
tenced him to buy a speedometer.
F. G. Pardee, a delivery wagon driv
er, the first victim of the "tell-your
troubles-to-a-policeman" ordinance,
was given a suspended sentence yes
terday by Justice McDonald. He was
charged with failing to report to the
police when his wagon collided with
a bicycle ridden by Harry Tobln at
Mountain street and Fair Oaks ave
nue recently. The ordinance requires
all parties to an accident of any kind
to report their names to the police.
Pedro Garcia and Severo l>andin,
two Mexicans who were arraigned be
fore Justice McDonald yesterday on
the charge of stealing several articles
of clothing from the Men's Wardrobe
in East Colorado street, and who were
held for trial September 23, were
taken to Los Angeles, where 137
charges are lodged against men of tho
same names. It is said the names are
common among Mexicans, but it Is
thought the parties now in custody
may be connected with some of the
Angel City Jobs.
Nicholas Seidlinger of Sunland was
found guilty by Justice Klamroth yes
terday of selling liquor contrary to
the county ordinance, and will be a
guest of Sheriff Hammel for fifty days
because he declared he had no money
with which to pay a $50 fine.
Harry Thatcher, charged with ap
propriating a Los Angeles automobile,
was cited yesterday to appear for trial
in Justice Klamroth's court September
20 at 10 o'clock.
The case of H. R. Graham, charged
with forging a check o£ $10 on A. L.
Eyder, was continued yesterday by
Justice McDonald until this afternoon
at 2 o'clock.
PASADENA BREVITIES
PASADENA, Sept. IB.—Six wagons
with full crews are setting thirty me
ters daily for the municipal light plant
to supply the customers obtained In
the campaign of June and July. It is
said that when the work is caught
up another campaign will be inaugu
rated.
Superintendent Hamilton of the Pas
adena schools has issued notice that
all children whose names do not ap
pear on the rolls as having been vac
cinated must show a vaccination cer
tificate before they will be allowed to
attend school. The fall term opens
September 26.
President Geohegan and Secretary
Bertonneau of the board of trade, ac
companied by Architect Williams and
Engineer Nlshklan, who designed the
proposed Intermediate bridge across
the arroyo from the foot of Colorado
street, laid their plans before County
Surveyor Noble yesterday to enable
that official to figure the cost of the
structure for the guidance of the coun
ty supervisors, who will be asked to
contribute half the cost of building
the bridge.
Albert G. Thurston states that ac
cording to the new city directory,
which is now on the press, the popula
tion of Pasadena will be shown as
31,000. His figures show that there
are 10,000 houses in the city.
Joseph Bell, furnace man at the Troy
laundry, who was severely burned
about the face and body by gas from
the oil burner Tuesday, is reported as
improving, with prospects of being
able to return to work soon.
The Christian and Missionary alli
ance will hold an all-day session to
day In the gospel tabernacle above
Holly street on Electric drive.
The Rev. Canon Good, assistant pas
tor of All Saints' Kpiscopal church,
returned yesterday from an extended
visit to his former home in British
Columbia.
Dr. Matt S. Hughes, pastor of the
First Methodist church, and Mrs.
Hughes are due to return home this
afternoon from a three months' Eu
ropean tour.
The initial meeting of the Ohio so
ciety of this city for the coming sea
son, which was scheduled for this
evening, has been postponed to next
Thursday evening.
Funeral services for Hal Clarke, a.
negro jockey who died Tuesday, sup
posedly from wounds received March
8 when he was shot twice by Walter
Hamilton, will be held this morning
at 10 o'clock from Grace Nazarene
church in South Vernon avenue.
PASADENA SPORTS
PASADENA, Sept. Work of oil
ing the Pasadena polo field will begin
today, and it is thought the field will
be ready for fall practice in two
weeks. The stables at Tournament
park are filled with polo ponies, and
Superintendent Schwarz declares that
additional stalls will have to be pro
vided in the near future. When prac
11ce is resumed all play will be under
the rules of the American Polo asso
ciation, which, it is said, affords a
game more easily understood by lay
men than the English rules under
which the team formerly played.
The indoor baseball team of the lo
cal Maccabee lodge has Joined the re
cently organized interurban league,
and the initial game of the season is
scheduled for Friday night in the
\Maccabee auditorium between the
Mtoccabees and the Los Angeles Y. M.
C X 7 •The locals are matched for
• seven' games during the season, all of
which will be played at home.
PASADENA CLASSIFIED
PASADENA BUSINESS COLLEGE
OLDEST AND BEST SCHOOL IN THE CITY;
owns its own college building; pli.eei most
graduates in position.. ENIIOLL ; TODAY.
' WN. FAIR OAKS AYE. 8-26-lmo
PASADENA SHOE HOSPITAL
MBN'B "bBWED^SOLEIJ AND HKEI.K. II;
*?£l?«- **a 111 N. FAIR OAKS AVIt
Circulation Drpt.
Hams 1043
Siin.et *74«
MANY VOTERS PETITION
FOR SUNDAY THEATERS
Pasadena Citizens Sign Request
That Council Enact Ordinance
Nullifying New Law
PASADENA, Sept 14—Two hundred
and eighty signatures In five hours Is
the record claimed yesterday by those
who are circulating petitions to Invoke
the initiative and passing an ordinance
making It "legal ofr theaters to be
open and theatrical entertainments to
be held In such theaters on each and
every day In the week, Sundays In
cluded."
Petitions bearing copies of the pro
posed ordinance in fuH JMTve bee"h
placed in several cigar stores, barbor
shops and other business places, and
it is said others will be circulated as
soon as printed copies can be procured.
To Invoke the initiative the city charter
requires the signatures of 30 per cent
of the voters who cast their ballots at
the last general election.
Supporters of the proposed Sunday
show legislation claim that they will be
able to secure the 1100 names neces
sary to bring the matter to a vote of
the people if the council docs not paS3
the desired ordinance within thirty
days after the petition Is presented.
Since the council at Its last rr.eMlng
passed an ordinance on first reading
putting the ban on Sunday shows and
other amusements, the question has
been the principal topic of conversation
hero. Churchgoers and others who sup
port the council declare that "the peo
ple" are not to be trusted to vote In
telligently on the matter. Those who
want Sunday shows are twitting the
church people with being inconsistent,
claiming that pews are rented on Sun
day, that the janitors at most churches
are required to work on Sunday, and
that tho business meetings nt which the
anti-Sunday show resolutions were
passed were held on Sunday.
City officials are receiving communi
cations pro and con upon the question,
but they are noncommittal. It is re
ported that the constitutionality of a
"negative" Initiative petition will be
tested In case the required number of
signatures are obtained.
Every business man should own a
copy of the Pasadena City Directory.
It enables you to locate your slow
paying customers. Get a copy. A. O.
Thurston, publisher, Stanton buildtngi
Pasadena.
RIVERSIDE
CARS CARRYING CEMENT
LEAVE RIVERSIDE RAILS
Trolley Blocked by Accident Near
Portland Plant
RIVERSIDE, Sept. 14.—A freight
train hauling cement from the plant
of the Riverside Portland Cement com
pany's plant at Crestmore went off
the rails near the Southern Pacific
crossing north of First street this fore
noon and interfered with traffic over
both lines for a few hours. Two of
the cars, heavily loaded with cement,
were being pushea ahead of the en
gine and went off the track with the
spreading of a rail. The cement had to
be unloaded before the Southern Pa
cific rails could be cleared. The elec
tric cars to Crestmore were unable to
get a clear track until late this after
noon.
RIVERSIDE WILL HAVE
NEW AWNING FACTORY
RIVERSIDE, Sept. 14.—A tent and
awning factory is the next industrial
enterprise In prospect for Riverside.
C. W. Kinnear of Seattle has decided
to locate here. For several months he
has been contemplating the establish
ment of a plant similar to the one he
has operated in the northern city. The
primary motive for his coming south
is the health of a daughter.
VALUATION IN RIVERSIDE
CLOSE TO ONE MILLION
RIVERSIDE, Sept. 14.—County Au
ditor Brown has compiled figures on
which the tax rate for county and
state will be based for the current
fiscal year. The total real estate and
railroad valuation for the city of Riv
erside is $9,434,350, and the total inside
cities is $12,374. l^n. For outside cities
the total is $14,551,606, and the grand
total $26,925,831.
SHERIFF COBURN SELLS HOME
RIVERSIDE, Sept. 14.—Ex-Sheriff
P. M. f'oburn sold his home at the cor
ner of Tenth and Chestnut streets to
day to George F. Seger for $6500. Mr.
Coburn will make his home in Los An
geles. He was sheriff of Riverside
county from 1898 to 190G and was a
candidate-on the Republican ticket at
the recent primary election.
RIVERSIDE NOTES
B.IVERSIDK, Sept. 14.—Miss Amy
Hoffman, daughter of Mr, and Mrs. P.
A. Hoffman of 609 Pine street, was mar
ried at noon today to Henry Rehart,
Rev. A. W. Adklnson of the First
Methodist church performing the cere
mony. The bride is well known in this
city, where she has a wide circle of
friends, and has been tho guest of
honor at many social affairs since the
announcement of her engagement In
September. Mr. Rehart is a ticket clerk
in the Salt Lake railroad office.
Announcement was made today of
the annual banquet of the Woman's
club. This will take place September
30. Following the banquet, which will
be held at 8:30 in the evening, Key.
Robert Burdette will give his lecture,
"A Woman's Way."
Rodney Allen of this city, a freshman
at the University of California, lias
been promoted to tha varsity Rugby
team.
LOS ANGELES HERALD: THURSDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 15, 1910,
LONG BEACH
CIRCCI-ATIOT* imrARTMBNT
4 line It. ll»me 1001 SaMet Mil.
CorrMpandent: Horn* 4S3| Ba»rt 1181.
SAYS MAN WHO STOLE
SHOES THREATENED HIM
Long Beach Man Says That Rob-
ber Was a 'Terror'
LONG BEACH. Sept. 14.—Henry Sil
vas claims to have come across a man
at Watts who has a very bad disposi
tion. Sllvas says the stranger robbed
him at that place last night of a pair
•f new shoes and other articles of
smaller value. Today while at his work
on American avenue Silvas observed
the alleged robber walking along the
street. He stopped him and wanted
his shoes back, but the man drew a
knife and told Silvas If he. did not move
on he would find himself cut Into fine
shoestrings. Silvas went to the police
station and had a John Doe warrant
Issued for the men, who has not since
been seen.
LONG BEACH CITIZENS
WANT COMMISSION PLAN
Colonel Collier of San Diego to Be
Invited to Speak
LONG BEACH, Sept. 14.—This city
expects to be operated at some date
either near or distant under a com
mission form of government, and at
present several of the leading civic
improvement bodies are seeking in
formation and knowledge of the popu
lar plan. The Civic Improvement
league, which covers the entire city,
has invited Col. D. C. Collier of San
Diego to visit Long Beach and address
Its citizens on the subject at a ban
quet to be given for that purpose soon.
If he cannot come some member of
the San Diego council will be Induced
to take his place.
DOGS TO GUARD FLOWER
GARDENS OF JAPANESE
LONG BEACH. Sept. 14.—The Jap- I
finese flower gardeners on the north
side of the city find that their carna
tions are in demand both night and
day, and as a result they have en
gaged six large watch dogs to guard |
the beds during the hours of darkness. |
F. Yumakachl, one of the extensive
growers, went to Los Angeles today
and brought back the dogs, which have
been doing duty at Japanese gardens
near Huntlngton Park.
The Japanese say that they have
had to cancel several large orders for
carnations on account of the series of
depredations within the last few
nights
LONG BEACH NOW HAS
AUTO FIRE APPARATUS
LONG BEACH. Sept. 14.—The auto
mobile conblnation fire apparatus re
cently purchased by the city from a
Los Angeles firm, arrived lat night, and
today hae been seen by a large num
ber of citizens. The machine is built
from a six-cylinder Mitchell chassis,
and is arranged from plans drawn by
Fire Chief Shrewsberry. It cost $3000,
and will be sationed at the downtown
fire house. It takes the place of the
fire chief's rig, the chemical wagon
and the auxiliary outfit. It can main
tain a speed of sixty miles an hour
over the ordinary streets. The auto
will be ready for use In about three
week.
RELEASED ON CHARGE
OF STEALING LUMBER
LONG BEACH, Sept. 14.—Richard
Longeval, a Belgian who has been em
ployed by the Alamitos sugar factory,
was released by Justice Underwood
this afternoon on the charge of having
stolen two wagon loads of lumber from
one of the bridges being built in the
Alamitos township by the county.
Longeval had several of his country
men, who could barely talk English, to
testify in his behalf to the effect that
one of the bridge foremen, or a man
who resembled him, had given I/onge
val permission to take away all the
lumber he wanted.
ROUGH SEAS HALT TRIPS
OF BEACH PLEASURE BOATS
LONG BEACH, Sept. 14.—0n account
of the high waves that threatened to
reach a point almost as disastrous as
on July 3 and 4, when the pier was
damaged, no pleasure craft plied be
tween this city and San Pedro from
Sunday until lust night. The sea today,
however, resumed its usual pacific con
dition, and the four boats are again
carrying passengers. No damage what
ever has been done by the unusual
swells.
WOMAN'S FALL FROM CAR
ADDS TO FAMILY MISHAPS
LONG BEACH, Sept. 14.—Mrs. Reg
inald Donovan of Los Angeles, who is
visiting nt 1331 Pine avenue, stepped
from a Willows car at Anaheim and
American streets lute last night and
was seriously injured. With Mrs. Don
ovan was her daughter, age 17, who
carried her arm in a sling as a result
of a fall at the sk-itlng rink last week,
and her son Reginald, age 11, who
broke his left arm by a fall from his
wheel Monday evening.
THIEF IN SCHOOLHOUSE
TAKES PENCILS AND PENS
LONG BEACH, Sept. 14.—Principal
Neal of the Daisy Avenue school has
discovered that the building has been
robbed lately of nearly all writing
articles. So far he has missed 600 lead
pencils, 200 penholders and about 600
pen points. The building was entered
last night by some person who used a
passkey.
WILL BHOW ARTISTS' WORK
LONG BEACH, Sept. 14.—The library
commission is planning- to have on dis
play in the gallery of tlie library build
ing for two weeks the work of Long
Beach artists, and today issued invita
tions to the dozen or more painters to
send In specimens of their best work.
SAN BERNARDINO
- ( Office 488 Court »tr««t.
Fbone*— 443 1 Burnt Mala 441.
YOUNG FRENCH CANADIAN
FATALLY HURT BY TRAIN
Left Beside Track for Dead, Is
Found Alive, but Suc
cumbs Later
SAN BERNARDINO, Sept. 14.— J. K.
Mcrlzettl, a young Frenchman who is
said to be the scion of a wealthy
French-Canadian family, was fatally
injured this morning near Keenbrook,
north of San Bernardino, In front of
the Santa Fe tourist express west
bound. He had be"en riding on the
pilot of the engine and fell.
When the trainmen reached his side
he was taken for dead, and leaving
the body the train pulled into San Ber
nardino.
Merizetti, however, recovered con
sciousness for a brief time after the
train left and a following passenger
train picked him up and brought him
to this city, whore he died on the way
to the county hospital.
From Denver it ia learned by the au
thorities that he had been a represen
tative of a large book concern, and has
a presumably well lo do family.
A fractured skull caused death.
MUST ANSWER CHARGE
OF ROBBING DEAD MAN
! Albert H. Phifer Taken to Needles |
for Trial
SAN BERNARDINO, Sept. 14.—
Charged with robbing the dead body j
of S. C. Winchester while he was em- |
banning it, Albert H. Phifer, formerly |
i a Needles undertaker, has been taken i
I to Needles to answer for his alleged j
' crime. It is charged that he took »300 j
I from the person Of Winchester, a |
: wealthy Philadelphia man. who died'
| on a Santa Fe train'near Needles.
The arrest was made at Ocean. Park ,
Iby Deputy Sheriff J. C. West of
| Needles and Detective P. 11. Murray of
I Los Angeles.
' Phifer was given employment In the
| undertaking establishment of D. B.
Metcalf at Needles und claimed to be
I without funds. At- the time Winches-
I ter died the proprietor of the estab
lishment wad ill and Phifer was in i
charge. He suddenly dropped out of
sight and a warrant was then sworn
out for his arrest.
It Is said by the officers here that
Phifer confessed to Deputy Sheriff
West and returned $200 of the money.
SON SAYS FATHER'S WILL
WAS MADE UNDER DURESS
Legal Contest Begins Over $33,-
500 Clements Estate
SAN BERNARDINO, Sept. 14.—A le
gal contest over the $33,500 estate of
John Clements, deceased, has been
started in the superior court. W. J.
Clements, through Attorneyd Stuts
man and Wade, and Dutcher & Davis
of Los Angeles, has asked the court
to declare the will invalid and set
aside on the ground that his father
was not acting as a free agent when
he executed the will, but that he made
it under duress and undue influence of
others.
W. J. Clements, who is a son by the
first wife, was bequeathed $100 and
"certain sisters and brothers'' a like
amount. These are the children by
Clements' first wife, long since de
ceased. The bulk of the estate Is di
vided between the widow and two
daughters, Violet and Rebecca Clem
ent.
WARRANTS OUT FOR OWNERS
OF DOGS WITHOUT LICENSES
SAN BERNARDINO, Sept. 14.—Be
cause they have refused or neglected
to take out licenses for their dogs,
twenty-one residents of this city were
today named In warrants sworn to by
J. C. Edwards, dog catcher. They will
all be arrested and brought Into the
police court. Several prominent busi
ness men are included in the order for
the wholesale arrest. The dog license
ordinance makes it a mlsdeameanor for
the owner of a dog to neglect to take
out a tag. -
WORK DELAYED ON NEW
CITY HALL AT POMONA
POMONA, Sept. 14.—Work has been
temporarily stopped on the new $30,
--000 city hall here because the contrac
tor, J. W. Burge, is unable to meet
bills claimed to be due his subcon
tractors, workmen and others, i-'ev
eral liens have been filed, but it is
said an effort is being put forth to
make an arrangement amonsr the par
ties concerned for a settlement of the
difficulty. Burge claims tho city owes
him money on his contract which has
not been paid. The city, however,
does not pay out on warrants to
Burge until ordered by the architect
of the building, H. A. Reeves of Los
Angeles, and there has been trouble
for some time between the architect
and contractor. Meanwhile the work
is delayed and two watchmen are in
charge of the building, acting under
Mayor Firey.
PRESIDENT OF BOARD
OF EDUCATION RESIGNS
SANTA ANA, Sept, 14.— J. H. Han
key, president of the city board of
education, last night presented his res
ignation from the board, as he is soon
to leave for Bakersfleld, where he will
engage In business. Mr. Hunkey has
for twenty years past been a prom
inent man in Santa Ana and has been
identified with most of its progressive
enterprises.
SON OF MILLIONAIRE
SETTLES CHECK AT SEA
H. B. Cook Allays Fear of Rail
way After Financial Trans
action in Redlands
REDLANDS, Sept. 15.—nvestlgatlon
by the Santa Fe ruiiway officials here
has convinced them that H. B. Cook,
who was accused of having passed a,
check for $35 at the station in payment
for a ticket to Vancouver, was inno
cent of any intent to defraud the com
pany, although the check was marked
"No Funds" at the First National
bank.
Cook recently left San Francisco on a
steamer for Vancouver. As soon as he
learned that the company had inquired
about his financial standing he deposit
ed the amount of the check with the
captain of the vessel while still at sea.
The company has promptly dismissed
the mattor. Several local merchants
have received checks from Cook in
payment of accounts on which they
had given time for settlement. The
father of the young man is said to be a
New York millionaire.
WELL DIGGER STRIKES LOG
SANTA ANA, Sept. 14.—While dig
ging a well north of Garden Grove, E.
B. Elliott, a well driller, struck a
large log of wood at a depth of 100
feet. Several inches of the log was
brought to the surface and a remark
able state of preservation was found
to exist. The log must have lain
under the ground for uncounted years.
Herald
Classified Liners
Under more than one hundred' special
headings. 'The Herald offers Its classi
fied advertisers real value In the way of
publicity. The needs of every business
house, office, factory and home have en
tered Into consideration when the list
was compiled. • . .. ■
Tou w,ant something that classified
liners will get tar you. others want some
thing that you have for Bale. Exchange
what you don't want for something you
do want -, ,
If you are seeking a position In any
hon«st field of endeavor The Herald will
publish your request free of charge. j
In placing your classified advertising
you should consider quality of circula- |
tion us well as quantity.
The Herald does not claim the '"»•"
clrr-ulitlon In the city, hut It doe* claim,
and can prove to you. that as an »°>_"; !
tlslng medium It Is second to none. Try
It far results.
ADVERTISERS
The Herald reserves th* right to re
vise advertisements an* to reject or omit
and refund the amount paid. ,
The Herat* will not he responsible for
more than one Incorrect Insertion of any
advertisement ordered for more than
one time.
Advertisers should read receipts given
by The Herald In payment for "liners,
as no mistakes can tie rectified without
them.
Rates for Classified Ada.
IF PREPAID
1 cent n«r word each Insertion.
. > Insertions for price of two.
7 Insertions for price of five.
No advertisement taken for less than 100
For contract, solicitor* and advertising
advice call \ •
SUNSET MAIN 8000
, HOME 10211
And ask for classified advertising man
ager.
branch~offices
long~¥each
Ocean and Pin* streets.
oceaTTpark
144 Pier avenue.
PASADENA
10 W. Colorado st. ,
SAN BERNARDINO
438 Court street. .
SANTA* ANA
Kir, V gymnAr» nt.
THE WEATHER
LOS ANGELES, Sept. 14, 1810.
Tim?.lßarom iTher.;Hum| Wlnd| Vie. I Weather.
6 a.m. 29.51 | 77 | 45 I NE I 5 | Cloudy.
5 p.m. 29."8 I 79 I 65 ISW| 14 I **t- cldy.
Maximum temperature 90.
Minimum temperature this date last year,
96.
Maximum temperature this month in S3
jiurs, 108.
Minimum temperature 72.
Minimum temperature this date last year,
66.
Minimum temperature this month in 83
years, 44.
Possible sunshine for the day 12:27 hours.
Total sunshine for the day 9:16 hours.
Rainfall for season .04.
Rainfall last season to date trace.
FORECAST
Southern California —Showers Thursday;
not so warm; light south wind.
San Francisco and vicinity—Light show
ers Thursday; not so warm; light south
wind.
Santa Clara valley—Showers Thursday;
light south wind
Sacramento valley—Showers Thursday;
light south wind, raisin growers continue
stacking.
Kan Joaquln valley—Showers Thursday;
light south wind; ralßln growers continue
stacked.
MARRIAGE LICENSES
FORBEB-SHERADAN—W. D. Forbes, ago
27, and Agatha L. Sheradan. age 91; na
tives of Utah and California and residents
of Los Angeles.
MARTINEZ-MONTEZ—Ladlslao-* Martinez,
age 29. and liernardlna Montez, ag« 28;
natives of Mexico and residents of Los
Angeles.
NORRIS-BPROUL —L. A. Norrls, age 23, and
De Attress C. Sproul, asro 21; natives of
lowa and California and residents of
!,<m Aneeies and NnrwaJk.
GUSTAFSON-NICKLASON—d. Gustafson,
age 33, and Hilda Nlcklason, age 32; na
tives of Sweden and residents of Hynes.
THORNE-RICE —W. B. Thome, age 41, and
Mary V. Rice, age 30; natives of Minne
sota and residents or Covlna and Los An
geles.
IHH'.SER-KROWN —H. M. Houser, age 40,
and Julia Brown, age 31; natives of Mis
souri and Idaho and residents of Los An
geles.
LIMBECK-ZINT—J. Limbeck, age 32, and
Agnes A. Zlnt. age 23; natives of New
Jersey and New York and residents of
Los Angeles.
HERREI/L-BAI.'M —J. N. Herrell; age 30.
and Illanch llauni. age 22; natives of Mis
souri and residents of Los Angeles.
NH'HOI.S-VININIi- CbarlM L. Nichols, age
:.".'. an.l Vivian R. Vlnlng, age 19; natives
of Kansas anil California and residents of
I,os Angeles.
UELL-CUEAOI3R —A. D. Bull, age 23. and
Louise M. Creage% age 21; "*"*'*. if
. California and Texas and residents of Los
ANDERSON-THOMAS—H. W. And.r.on.
age 34. and Ethel M. Thomas, age 25; na
tives of Canada and Michigan and resi
dents of Los Angeles and Oak Park.
RICE-MAC DONALD-J. J. me*, age 30
and Mary B. Mac Donald, age 88. natives
of Now York and Vermont and residents
ot Los Angeles. W. Wilder, age 14.
WILUER-GRBEN—L. W. Wilder, age J4,
and Elizabeth A. Green, age 24; natives
of Ohio and Alabama and residents of
Los Angeles. I .
DAIN6-RAIL— A. Rains, age 14, and
Myrtle E. Rail. age^9; natives of Michi
gan and lowa and residents of Ventura
. and Los Angeles. C.ark. age 50.
CUBK-IHM-E. A. Clark, sg* 60. and
Gladys Ihm, age 20; natives of Wisconsin
and California and residents of Tucson.
Ariz., and Los Angeles. , ,
iNORRIS-BAKER—J. T. Norris, age 39,
and Elizabeth D. Baker, age 23; natives
of Louisiana and Oklahoma and residents
of Los Angeles.
WILSON-LONGWELL—J. R. Wilson, age
31, and May L. Longwell, age 81; natives
of Canada and Ohio and residents of Los
SCHNEIDER-FORMER— Schneider, age
22, and Martha 'Former, age 30; natives
of Russia and Missouri and residents of
Los Angeles.
EVERSOLE-CLARK—H. O. Eversole, age
33, and Mary S. Clark, age 26; natives
' of Ohio and Arizona and residents of
Los Angeles.
MORRIS-WILLARD — Morris, age 24,
and Eden L. Wlllard. age 20; natives of
Illinois and Kansas and residents. of Los
Angeles.
McDONALD-FROST—A. A. McDonald, age
36. and Lillian G. Frost, age 26; natives
of Canada and residents of Glendalo and
Los Angeles.
ELLIS-RHBA—W. A. Ellis, age 39, and
Myrtle C. Rhea. age 38: natives of Mis
souri and Arkansas and residents Of Ho
bartsvllle and San Bernardino.
ROGERS-HITCHCOCK G. H. Rogers, age
71, and Ellen M. Hitchcock, age 86; na
tives of Massachusetts and residents of
Riverside and San Diego.
REIDENBACH-SCHEPPEIL—A. .* Relden
bach, age 26, and Mario Scheppell. age 21;
natives of Hungary and .Germany and
residents of Los Angeles.
HAWLEY-FOLEY— A. Hawley, age 82,
and Margaret J. Foloy, age 25; natives
of California and New Jersey and resi
dents, of Los Angeles.
BUTTS-ANUNDSON —C. T. Butts, age 25,
and Minnie F. Anundson, age 28; natives
of Colorado and South Dakota and resi
dents of IvOs Angeles.
NICHOLSON-KLAUS — N. A. Nicholson, age
31, and Rosa J. Klaus, age 19; natives of
. California and Kansas and residents of
San Francisco and Winfleld. Kas.
SISSON-PARKER—G. Hi Slsson, age 27,
and Virginia Parker, age Hi natives of
Illinois and Kentucky and residents of
Los Angeles. ' \
CLARK-YALE — E. L. Clark, age 22. and
Ethel Mac Yale, age 22; natives of lowa
and Pennsylvania and residents of Los
Angeles.
McKEE-LIST —S. C. McKee. age 25. and
Catherine Augusta List, age 26; natives
of China and Pennsylvania and residents
of Los Anceles and South Pasadena.
THOMAS-DAFFORD^-Fred Thomas, age 25,
and Silvia DafCord, age 31; natives of Mis
souri and lowa and residents of Los An-
Z \MMITT-LAURENCE— Henry W. Zam
mltt. age 24. and Bertha Laurence, age
20: natives of California and residents of
San Francisco and Los Angeles.
BIRTHS
BOYS '
GREGORY—To William and Elizabeth
Gregory, 2006 North Broadway.
PIERCE — Charles and Anna Pierce, X l4l
North Ivor avenue.
PIZZORNO —To no and Zendado Plzzorno,
513 North Flgueroa.
DEATHS
MONTlGO—Guadelupa, 8175 Upper boule
vard, native of Mexico, age 65: pneu
monia.
MULLEN —John H., County hospital, native
of Ireland, age 34; tuberculosis.
BOYNTON— R.. California hospital,
native of Illinois, age 66; heart disease.
THOrtSEN — Anton, County hospital, native
of Norway, age 62; gastric carcinoma.
TOMME —Davis, County hospital, native of
Texas, age 27; tuberculosis.
MAIER — County hospital, native of
Germany, age 44; tuberculosis.
BOURNB-^-Alice, California hospital, native
of Ohio, age 50; heart disease.
ROGERS —Nellie, Sisters' hospital, native
of Montana, age 36; carcinoma.
HIPWELLWiIIiam, 620 E. Compect ave
nue, native of Ireland, age 75; myocardi
tis. . • - ■ ■ ■
BALDWIN — 1217 Temple street, na
tive of Michigan, age 32; senility.
PERKINS —Jane, 1379 E. Washington; na
tive of Canada, age 59: heart disease.
MERAMONTE—DeIoris, Mitchell alley, na
tive of Mexico, age 21; tuberculosis.
SCllOTT Henrietta, 210 East Avenue 66,
native of Prussia, age 75; tuberculosis.
BARNES — Mary E.. Bellevue terrace, na
tlve of Pennsylvania, age 84; pneumonia.
FUNERAL NOTICES
BOYNTON—At his residence, 1925 South Flg
ueroa street, Horace R. Boynton, aged 66
years. Funetal services will be held In the
First Unitarian church, 926 South Flower
street, Thursday, September 16, 1910, at 11
o'clock a. m. Interment private. 1-14-2
CEMETERIES _.iw
ROSEDALE CEMETERY
An endowed memorial park, noted for. Its
natural beauty; endowment fund for per
petual care, over /260.000; modern receiving
vault, chapel, j/'=matory and columbarium;
accessible. •'fty office, suite 802-806 EX
CHANGE BLDG.. northeast corner Third
and Hill sts. Phones Main 909: AS62O.
Cemetery office. 1831 W. Washington st
Phones 78868; West 80. f-S-llmo
HOLLYWOOD CEMETERY
Rolling lawns, trees, shrubbery and beautl
* MODERN IN EVERY RESPECT
Situated In the most beautiful section of
Southern California, the Ideal location, just
Inside Los Angeles city limits.
Melrose and Colegrove car lines to grounds.
A CEMETERY THAT IS SELECT
AH SI. *08 Laoghlln Bldg. • Main 301.
Cemetery phones 59058; Hollywood 548.
EVERGREEN CEMETERY
The Los Angeles Cemetery association, Boyle
Heights, near city limits. Operated under
perpetual charter from Los Angeles city.
Modern chapel and crematory.
Office, 339 nradbury Building.
Phones—Main 652; A 5466.
Cemetery—Home D 1083; Boyle V.
l-S-llm
BUSINESS PERSONALS
~™~~~ MORPHINE
OPIUM, COCAINE
and' all drug habits cured at home by the
mjst remarkable remedy ever discovered.
No hypodermic Injections; no pain. A cure
or no pay. Call or write SO. CAL. CHEM
ICAL CO., 202 Vi % Broadway, rooms 205-200,
Los Angeles. 9-10-tf
MRS. MASSON, - THE NOTED LONDON
palmist. 322 S. SPRING. over Owl drug
store. 11-28-tt
STORAGE
LAUGH PRIVATE, LOCKED. IRON
rooms for furniture, etc.; $1.60 and $2 per
month. Trunks, boxes, etc.. 26c to 60c.:
open vans. 16 per day, or 76c per hour.
We pack and' ship household goods every
where at reduced rates. COLYEAR'H
VAN AND STORAGE CO.. offices 509-11
8. Main St. Warehouse 416-17 San Pedro
St. Phones F3171: Main 1117. • 3-35-tf
CHURCH NOTICES
I -NIEL HALL, 227 S. MAIN-NOON PRAY
er meeting dally; gospel meeting • every
night. 9-1-tf
CESSPOOLS
IMPERIAIT^CEisPOOII PUMPINOi CO^
We take out largest load. West 5396;
22040. ' . 2-10-tf
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
SPECIAL INVESTIGATIONS—PERSONAL
. Injury claims specialty: estates settled. J.
W. MACY,-;5«33-. Douglas .bldg. ; Phones:
A»SS3, Main 8533. j' tf
irTi i i ■ An. i ■•■ niiWirl* rti-fW^rl? / •./--■'
WANTED >
HXLP— MAIM i ,_
WANTED—MEN QUICK TO LEARN A
trade In months'insteii of years; no expense,
for Instruction; automobiles, electricity,
plumbing, bricklayings actual contract work;
200 students lant year. Catalogue fro*. -
UNITED TRADH SCHOOL CONTRACTING
CO.. 668 Paclflo Electrli bldg. . ' 9-1-tt
A GOOD POSITION IS OPEN AT THE HER
. aid for an ambitious boy about 16 years of
age. Apply this morning to ADVERTISING
CLERK of Hera: .. 9-14-tf
WANTED— FIRST-CLASS PAPER-HANGER:
also first-class upholsterer; none others need
apply. American preferred. PASADENA
UPHOLSTERING COMPANY, 94 West Col
orado St.. Pasadena. \ 9-15-3
HELP—FSMALB ■ '
WANTED-A YOUNG WOMAN. UNBLEM- '
ished character, Interested In occult sciences,
who wants her clairvoyant powers developed;
prefer one with some money to Invest In '
good proposition. PROF. E. V. YOUMANS,
2786 Malabar St. »-»■»
WANTED—LADIES, BEAUTY CULTURE,
pays big; learn right, salary guaranteed.
"FLORENTINE." the world largest. 117
M rrantll* place, corner Broadway. 8-1-tt
WANTED — SEVERAL EXPERIENCED
pressers on ladles' garments; steady work
to the right party. Apply AMERICAN DYE
WORKS, Bth and Maple aye. »■"•»
IIELF—MALE Oil FKMAUB
WANTED-. AND WOMEN WHO WANT
to be cured of piles In 3 to 6 days, to get
my treatment. No free samples. PROF. E.
V. YOUMANS. 2731 Malabar st. 8-13-1
WANTED-MEN AND WOMEN TO LEAR>»
tho barber trade; guaranteed In eight weeks.
Catalogue tree. Mohler Barber College, 122
E. Second St. 9-14-tf
SITUATIONS—MALB
YOUNG MAN, TWENTY-THREB YEARS
old, desires to. come west; Is now assistant
cashier of a national bank In Mississippi;
has held present position nearly four years;
has good health and Is willing to work hard;
can furnish best of references; Is not broke
or out of a Job; country locality with chances
of advancement preferred. Address BOX 377,
Herald. *'"-
WANTED-DAY work by LADY; wash-
Ing. Ironing or cleaning. Address B. H..
6503 Ruth aye., or phone Ruth apartment
• house. Ask for Mrs. Hamilton. t-4-13
BETHLEHEM FREB EMPLOYMENT
agency, 610 Vlgnes street. Main »736;
Home A 4884. Men for houseoleantng. yard
work and general labor. »-34-«
HONEST YOUNG MAN WANTS POSITION
as cook In private family. Address C.
RIFFERQ. box 2. Herald. »-i-l»
. (UXUATIOMd—
WANTED—POSITION AS NURSB FOR IN
valid or companion for elderly lady or house
keeper for widower In city, or some light
work by the day. Address or call on me at
1415 CATALINA AVB-, upstairs. 9-18-3
YOUNG LADY WITH A-l OIL LINB BX
perlence wants position as stenographer, blu
er or price work. Can give reference. Pnoae
EAST 614. __^ *-1-"
YOUNG LADY EXPERIENCED IN ALL
lines stenography, wants temporary port-.
tlon; also rapid btller. Phone EAST "£ u
?■■?*% MONET
FOR SALE—
Gilt edge first real estate mortgage*.
$600—-8 per cent net; lot worth $1500.
1500 —8 per cent net; house worth $1400.
• (POO— per oent net; house worth $1800. ■
$700—8 per cent net; two lots worth $1300.
11000 7 per cent net; lot on Central ave
nue, worth $6000. . ' ■ '-:
$1200 —7 per cent net; close In cottage worth
$1500.
$1600 — 7 per cent net; oottage closs In,
worth $3000.
These mortgages are all made by good
parties, and I will collect interest free of
charge. MARSHALL BTIMSON, rooms 301
-2 405 B. Hill st. Phones Main 44U; Home
F7337. »-"'1
MONEY WANTED—SIOOO ON
160 acres of land in Kansas. R.
E. JAUMAN, 304 Grant Bldg.
Al9s3— Main 1589.
, »-14-4t
TO PURCHASE —REAL BSTATB
1 WANT BEACH HOME
Have client wanting beach residence,
value up to $25,000; Ocean Park or Santa
Monica preferred. Must be striotly first
class. Owners please answer, giving full
description, price and terms.
J. O. BRAIMAKD,
, P. O. bo* U6, ra»aden», C.X. v

WANTED AT ONCE—7B.OOO TO 100.000
acres of cheap agricultural and (rasing,
where water can be obtained. Call or
write and give full description. JAMES
BURKE It CO.. 318 Llssner Bldg. 9-15-1-
WANTED— PURCHASE STOCK
WANTED— . .
Stock in the Los Angel** Investment Mm*
nany: any amount up to 140.0001 will »a»
within I per cent at the company's selling
price, a T.. car* Glob* Savings -Boa*.
. ' ■- C-11-tl
——— ——————— ■ , . ,
TO MISCELLANEOUS ;:
WANTED—CASH PAID FOR FEATHER
beds. 758 SAN PEDRO ST. Phones Main
1106! FBO4l. H-17-tf
MONEY TO LOAN
weTß^n^money^
To wage-earners and housekeepers, on
personal note; $10 and \fpward. Do you
one the landlord or the grocert Do you
want' money for any purpose? You re
pay weekly or monthly. No publicity;
lOW* PARK ""LOAN * CREDIT CO.. f ■ .
424 80. Broadway. B°°?-83-tf
MONEY TO LOAM
I j 000 to loan en real estate, city or eoun- .
lr» I to 7 per cent, amounts to sulk
MOYKR * GILBERT. 303 H. W. H.llma.
Bldg. Home pbo»e A8837J Mala J M tf
MONEY LOANED ON DIAMONDS. FURNI- .
ture. pianos and any kind of security; low
rates. JOHNSON. 339 H. W. HellmanJWg.
II »EY TO LOAN-SALARIED MEN AND
• women accommodated without delay or pub
licity. SOUTHERN CREDIT CO., 411 O. T.
John.nn Bldg. '" l-14-tf
R W. POINDEXTBR, 409 WIIAXJX ULDO..
' 'i' loan yo- what yon need "on real es
tate, stocks and bonds. BulldlnsH loans a , |
• »clalty. *< 5-9-tt
PACIFIC SAVINGS BANK. 643 S. SPRING,
a friend In need. Loons on real estate
" and commercial paper without - delay.
■-. , ... ■ 9-4-tf '
TO LOAN—SALARIED PEOPLE; NO RED
tap*; without security confidential. WBIT I
COAST EXCHANGE. 419 Helm* Bid*.
■ .--:■' ' - ■■ 10-4-
DON'T BORROW MONEY ON SALARY UN
tll you see me. V. A. NEWTON, 708 O. T.
Johnson bldg. 9-1-lmo
TO LOAN— ON REAL BBTATE.
i Sea HURD BROS.. 407 Central bldg.
■..-.;•■■ v 8-23-lmo i
$M 0 TO $10,000 TO LOAN AT 7 PER CENT? '
T. L. O'BRIEN * CO.. Jefferson and Mala.
>-s-tf '•
SOCIETY MEETINGS
MHS. CLARA SHORTRIDGE FOLTSS, .
president Votes for Women club, lectures
Friday evening. Sept. 16, at 7:30 o'clock,
Society hall. 337 Mi South Hill street, aus- .
pices Get Acquainted society. — Games,
music, program, refreshments. Admission
free. . 9-15-1
SANITARIUMS
T£IE~wiSSAN'B HOSPITAL " '
Exclusively for.women and children. Bes
■ •quipped and homelike hospital In the clt:
for confinement cases. Terms to suit. 134/, J
South Flower. 74134. 3-12 >

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