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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, September 15, 1910, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-09-15/ed-1/seq-2/

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II tgm \yy Bosjon Dry Goods Sjom
Butterick Patterns and publications for October are
ready. Two years' subscription to the Delineator for
SI.SO—a saving of fifty cents. (Main floor, rear.)
———————

Summer Underwear
Specially Priced for Friday
; Commercially speaking, this is sum
mer underwear. But it's the weight
worn the year around by thousands of
you—so you'll welcome this chance
to save half the cost of a year's supply.
WOMEN'S $1 UNION SUITS AT 50c—Some high neck
and long sleeves, and ankle length; others short sleeves and
knee length; others low neck and sleeveless knee-length lace
trimmed, or with cuff knees.
> WOMEN'S 50c PANTS—AnkIe length, 25c. Women's 65c
vests and pants at 35c each.
: CHILDREN'S 25c GARMENTS 2 FOR Included are
children's vests with high neck and long sleeves, and knee
\ length pants.
p BOYS' SHIRTS with high neck and long sleeves, and knee
f* length pants.
BOYS' SHIRTS with high neck and long sleeves, and knee
,'•'•,.- length drawers.
CHILDREN'S VESTS in low neck, sleeveless or low neck
short sleeve styles.
BOYS' $1 UNION SUITS 50c—Some with high neck and
long sleeves, or short sleeves.
i BOYS' 50c LISLE SHIRTS AND DRAWERS 25c.
BOYS' 50c UNION SUITS 25c.
J. W. ROBINSON CO.
235239 So. Broadway 234-244 So. Hill Street
FORMER OFFICIALS MUST
ANSWER ROBBERY CHARGE
WICHITA, Kas. ( Sept. 14.—L. S.
Naftzger, former president of the
Fourth National bank of this city,
Frank S. Burt, foimer chief of police
of Wichita, and R. John ("allahan,
alleged leader of a gang of bank and
postofflce robbers, were Indicted by a
federal grand Jury here today on
charges of conspiring against the gov
ernment and receiving and disposing
of stamp which it is charged they
knew were stolen from the govern
ment. The value of the stamps men
tioned in the Indictments is $1500.
I The Home ot
Hart Schaf fner & Marx
Clothes
The Pyramid Road
Around The World
By the "OFFICE BOY"
There Isn't a more beautiful road
in the world than the large and
lovely avenue which leads from
Cairo to the Pyramid of Qhlzeh,
that is constructed at the entrance
of the desert. Along its entire length
| of seven miles are superb and lofty
trees on either Slide, and at all hours
of the day It is full of life. In the
morning, ladies and gentlemen out
for a canter; mules, donkeys and
strings of camels going and coming
from the market; in the afternoon,
fashioable Cairo is walking, driving
or motoring, and on the left the
electric street railway, with its note
of modernity. This magnificent
road was made within a few weeks,
at the time of the opening of the
Suez Canal by the Khedive Ismail
so that the Empress Eugenic might
drive comfortably to the Pyamlds.
It ecu-red to me that if those people
could build that seven-mile boule
vard across the sand in a few weeks'
time they must rush road-making
faster than we do in Southern Cali
fornia —and, you know, Egypt is a
tourist country Just the same as
ours Is. I honestly think that next
to climate, good roads make the hit
with the tourist. Some day we are
going to have a lot of good roads,
and no matter which way they lead,
whether to the oil fields around
Bakersfield or Marlcopa, the orange
belt at San Bernardino or to the
sea at Long Baach, you'll find a
,Silverwood Store and kind, obliging
salesmen to serve you.
EITHER STORE
F. B. SILVERWOOD
221 south spring Los Anrjeles
Sixth and Broadway w
Bakersfleld Long Beach
San Bernardino Marlcopa
FAULTY DESIGN CAUSED
BATTLESHIP EXPLOSION
Navy Board Makes Report About
Oil Apparatus on the
North Dakota
WASHINGTON. Sept. 14.—Faulty
installation and design of the oil-burn
ing apparatus on the dreadnaught
North Dakota were responsible for the
accident on that battleship on the Bth
instant, whereby three men were killed
and eleven injurej, according to the
report of the investigating board.
The explosion occurred near Hamp
ton Roads. The board took much tes
timony, the most Important coming
from Lieut. Commander Orln G. Mur
fln, in charge of the ship's machinery.
He told in a graphic way how he had
personally started two of the oil burn
ers and was at work turning on the
third when there was a flash which
seemed to run along the pipes and
around the separating tank.
He ordered "abandon fire room" in
stantly, but so fierce was the fire that
although everyone rushed for the door
in the bulkhead three men perished,
probably being cut off in the bunker
by the flames and noxious gases.
Touching the faulty design of the
system the- board found there was a
leak in the oil pipes which permitted
the escaping oil to drop upon the su
perheater, causing it to flash and fire
the oil In the settling tank.
The board finds that no blame for
the fire or the damage therefrom at
taches to anyone serving on the North
Dakota.
Every possible precaution was taken
and everything was done after the ex
plosion to limit the damage. So far as
the board could ascertain all officers
and men acted with the utmost
promptness and efficiency. The dam
age to the structural fittings was not
extensive and couli be repaired in ten
days by the .ship's own force. No fur
ther proceedings are recommended.
The plant is of German oripln and
was installed by contractors who built
the North Dakota at Fore River. As
they guaranteed the performance of
the machinery for six months it is
believed they must make good the
damage.
Engineer-in-Chief Cone, commenting
upon the report, ways it contains noth
ing that will prevent the continued use
of oil as a naval fuel.
PLEADS NOT GUILTY TO
CHARGE MADE BY GIRL
MILWAUKEE, Wis., Sept. 14.—Dr.
William Colby Huckcr, who up to hist
niKlit was health commissioner of Mil
waukee, was brought before Judge
John J. Gregory in civil court today
on a warrant sworn out by Miss Cath
erine Handorf, charging a statutory
offcase. He pleaded not guilty anil
the ease was continued to December
14, the doctor belnp admitted to bail.
KING OF GREECE OPENS
CHAMBER OF DEPUTIES
ATHENS, Greece, Sept. 14.—King
George opened today the session of the
especially elected chamber, which is
charged with a revision of the constitu
tion of Greece. His majesty reminded
the deputies that their mandates were
limited to a revision of the non-funda
mental clauses of the constitution.
There Is much popular enthusiasm over
the government's new program.
ORGANIST AND COMPOSER DEAD
KANSAS CITY, Mo., Sept. 14.—Wil
liam A. Pitcher, an organist and com
poHer of New York ami a grandson of
the famous organ builder, Henry
I'itehc r, died in ROieda.l*, Kas., near
here, today. It is believed he died of
apoplexy.. ■
LOS ANGELES HERALD: THURSDAY MOHNING, SEPTEMBER 15, 1910;
TROOPS ASSEMBLE
FOR MIMIC BATTLE
Regiments Gather at Camp Atas
cadero to Engage in An
nual Maneuvers
TENTS PITCHED IN STORM
Regulars Await Arrival of Nation
al Guardsmen from Arizona
and New Mexico
CAMP ATASCADERO, Sept. 14.—
With the arrival late this afternoon of
Brig. Gen. Tasker H. Bliss, oommand-
Ing the department of California, and
who will command both the regular
mid state troops participating in tln>
war game that wlil extend throughout
next week, the infantry and cavalry
of the regular army In California, Ari
zona and N«w Mexico are now undor
canvas at Camp Atuscadoro, with the
exception of several companies at the
Presidio.
The troops pitoiiPd their tents In a
drizzling rain which continued all day.
The Eighth infantry from Monterey,
the Thirtieth from San Francisco, two
troops of the First cavalry and sev
eral companies of the Eighteenth in
fantry all reached camp about the
same time this morning.
Under the direction of Lieut. Baker
the headquarters tent has beep erected
and made ready for the commander*
in-chief, while Col. F. yon Schrader,
chief quartermaster, and Lieut. S. B.
Wlddifield, his assistant, directed the
transportation of equipment and sup
plies from the stalicn to the camp l>y
wagon trains in fast time. Hy noon
scores of tents had sprung "P and to
night 2500 troops are comfortably
housed under canvas.
CA.UT JN CKKjjCKNT FORM
The encampment is laid out in the
form of a crescent, facing U>« west. I
The artillery camp and two troops of j
cavalry form the north horn; next is I
the Eighth infantry, and on the south
are the Thirtieth infantry and First !
cavalry, with th-j tield hospital and
signal corps, with the headquarters in
the center.
Gen. Bliss was iiccompanied by his
aid, Lieut. Arthur Poillon of t'.ie Four
teenth cavalry, several others of his
staff and a dozen officers from various
posts who have been detailed to Atas
cadero to umpire the game of war.
Major S. W. Dunning, adjutant gen
eral; Major W. W. Wright, chief of
staff, and several of the umpires are
busily engaged in planning the prob
lems and field movements in. Which
the regulars and national guard will
be engaged. During the maneuver* tin
troops will move over about SO,OOO
acres of little valleys, hills and moun
tains, comprising the land leaaed by
the war department for the pun o»e,
and the purchase of Which was recent-.
ly recommended by Major Genera]
Barry in his annual report. General
Barry recommended that Atascadero
be made the principal training camp
in the west lor the training and drill
ing of both regulars and guardsmen,
and because of its topography, having
hills, mountains, plains^dales and val
leys, it was well adapted for tactical
problems and field movements for
troops in all branches of the service.
AWAIT SOI XmVHSTKRN TROOI'S
The regulars are now .awaiting the
coming of the national guard of Ari
zona and New Mexico, the latter be
ing due on thu ISth. As the war de
partment has allowed but fourteen
days' pay tor the New Mexico foi
including the time in transit, the mil
itia of that territory will bo in camp
with the regulars but six days. Some
of the army officers freely express
doubt whether the territorial forces
can get enough practical knowledge of
tactics and operations in field move
ments in only six clays to justify the
expense of the long trip.
With the coming on October 1 of
the California guard, probably accom
panied by Governor Gillett and his
staff, the camp will becoma more lively.
The California guardsmen will have
two full weeks of field maneuvers.
With their coming there also will be |
social functions to relieve the monot
ony of camp life.
A military ball has been planned at
Paso Robles Hot Springs, competitive
band concerts will be held by the sev
eral regimental bands for a silver cup,
and arrangements are making for a ten
nis tournament In which the Misses
Sutton are expected to participate.
POSTMASTER GENERAL
LEAVES FOR WASHINGTON
SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 14.—Post
master General Frank H. Hitchcock
left for Washington, D. C, tonight,
after a day spent In conference with
the local postofflce officials. Mr.
Hitchcock had nothing to nay regard
ing the political outlook during his
brief stay in this city and could not
be Induced to comment on the election
and primary returns from various
states. He has been on his vacation
and is returning to take up his duties
at the capital.
WOMEN ARE BARRED FROM
BIG GRAND ARMY PARADE
ATLANTIC CITY, N. J., Sept. 14.—
Women from the organisation! affili
ated with the g. A. n. will bo barred
from thn bit; encampment parade next
week. The announcement is made by
Executive Director F. M. Stern-U that
the line will be composed entirely of
Civil War veterans, with the exception
of a gun detail from the Sons of Vet
ernns for escort dutj and to fire sa
lntes.
BALL PLAYERS WILL HEAR
PASTOR OF ROCKEFELLER
CLEVELAND, 0., Sept. 14.—The Rev.
W. W, ISust;iill. |' i. l'ir ol tile Euclid
Avenue Baptist OtlUrch, known as John
D. Rockefeller's church, i« to preach
to the members of the Cleveland Amer
ican league baseball team next Sun
day on the subject: "The Ba
Field; a Picture of Life." Dr. Bus
tard was captain and pitohi r for the
Brown university team for three years
and pitched tor the Boston National*
fine season twelve years ago,
SOLDIER IS CLEARED
SALINAS. Oil., slept. 14.—Not guilty
was the verdict returned today iii tin;
case if Corporal Qrady J. Willock,
company H lOlghtli United States in
fantry, charged with Hi'- murder "<
Jose Para at Monterey. Tim jury was
out twenty-four hours. Wlllock'j plea
was self-defense.
RUNAWAY AUTOMOBILE
BREAKS INTO BANK
SANTA ANA. Isml. II. —An automobll*
driven by 8. J. .liwkmnn. nn amateur In
the driving of m machine, cm-thed
through IBM door* of the tint National
hank thli afternoon and utruck theconn
ter Insi.lr. The accident occurred after
the hunk had cloned. Or. J. 11. Medlock
w»m Btnick by the runaway machine und
nnrrowl.T escaped Rerloim Injury.
BOBBERS HOLD UP
PHARMACY IN GUY
Drug Store on South Grand Ave
nue Entered, and Shot
Fired at Proprietor
(Continued from Pa** On*)
I tion and captured G-rahain, who was
j hiding in a barn near the drug store.
Graham is a one-legged youth, IS
years old. He was covered with Just
and his clothing was disarranged. He
appeared greatly frightened and re
fused to make a statement when taken
into custody. Later, it is alleged, he
said he was escorting Mrs. Adeline
Kelly of 1258 Temple street to the
home of a friend a short distance from
tho drug store.
According to the story Graham is
said to have told the police, he was
walking near the drug store when the
woman asked him to enter the place
and purchase a small bottle of perox
ide of hydrogen. Just as he Uttered,
he is alleged to have stated, the rob
bi is rushed out of the store. This
frightened him and he turned and ran.
Tie said he was running when a man
with a revolver pursued him and or
dered him to halt. Instead of stop
ping- Graham ran into the barn, close
to the entrance of the alley In the
rear of the drug store, and hid behind
a door, expecting his pursuer to give
up the cIMUM.
Kruell gave the officers a partial de
scription of the robbers. He said that
one of the men is five feet, four inches
in height and appeared to be about 21
years old. The other man appeared to
be older and about five feet eight
Inches in height. Both robbers wore
dark clothes and slouch hats. The re
volver, which was held by the larger
man, was small and of blued steel. The
bullet, which crashed through a num
ber of bottles and lodged in a box,
was found. It was fired from a .32
caliber weapon.
ROBBERS raatAND MONKY
"I was in the prescription room when
I heard a noise in front of the store,"
said Kruell in telling his story to the
detectives. I was alone at the time, |
having sent my clerk on an errand. I I
entered the front room and found two
men standing near the cash register.
The short man walked close to the
counter and commanded me to open
the money drawer. I was so surprised
that I made no move until the second
man drew a revolver, held it over the
shoulder of the short man and ordered
me to hand over -the money. He
threatened to shoot If I did not act
quickly.
"I still believed that the threat was
a bluff and that the man had no in
tention of shooting. An angry gleam
in his eyes caused me to change my
mind, and I dropped down behind the
counter and hegan to yell for help.
I crawled as fast as possible around
to the end counter, my intention being
to get behind the counter on the op
posite side, of the room and make a
dash for the door.
"Just as I was in front of the cur
tains that hido the entrance to the rear
room the man fired. The bullet passed
over my head and I heard a crash of
glass in the back room.
"The bell on the register rang and I
heard the pound of money rolling on
the floor. As I raised up from my hid
ing place I saw the men run out the
front door.
"I am not positive, but I believe
there was a third man who was stand
ing guard on the outside in readiness
to Rive the others warning in the event
anyone attempted to enter the place."
Kruell found all the money which
had been spilled on the floor, and after
counting it and comparing the amount
with the figures on the cash register
he discovered that only $1 was taken.
A short time before the robbery there
was more than $?0 in the money
drawer. Kruell took a $20' gold piece
from the drawer just before he went
Into the rear room, leaving about $35
in the register.
Detectives from the central station
and from the T'nlversity district are
goarchlng the city for a young man
who is supposed to be one of the rob
bers. The suspect is said to be a vic
tim of the drug habit and to have re
cently been discharged from the peni
tentiary.
Late last night no trace of the man
ha,d been found.
PINCHDT, FORMER CHIEF
OF FORESTRY, ARRIVES
Friend of Roosevelt Declares the
Insurgents Are Making
History in Country
(Continucpd from I'a.sce One)
genuine significance. It tells a whole
volume to the man who Is conversant
with the history of conservation: yet
Glfford Pinchhot intends merely to be
pleasant; to conduct himself as a gen
tleman, and it is far from his inten
tion even by a smile to make known
the determination within him.
Determlnatloln—ttiat tf the one word
that gives the keynote to his charac
ter. Kvcry action, every word, every
smile, however restrained or guarded,
Is a man of determination. He
conveys the Impression of a man who
'hitched liis wagon to a star,"
whose Ideal ia above and beyond the
selfish ambltilon or purview of a life
time; who has a humanitarian pur
poae, and who plans that every mo
ment, every word, every step shall car
ry him nearer to the consummation of
his work. Back of this determination
there is evidently a resolve that n<>
man shall ever say of him that if has
achieved his purpo.se by political trick
,r misrepresentation. He is care
ful, conservative in his work, but no
lis.-i vigorous and determined.
BALLINGER MAKING TRIP
SKATTLE, Sept. 13,—Secretary of
the Interior Ballinger will leave, for the
fast tomorrow night, going drat to
Kpokane and south) Idaho on official
business. He will be present at the
cabinet meeting on September 26.
COUNT CONFIRMS
INSURGENT SWEEP
Ballots Tell Story of Progressive
Domination of State of
Washington
BASEBALL MAGNATE BEATEN
William LaFollette, Cousin of the
Wisconsin Senator, Nominat
ed in Spokane District
[Astoctatfd Press]
SEATTLE, Sept. 14.—The count of
the ballots of King county was com
pleted tonight, from which it appears
almost certain that' Representative
William K. Humphrey, regular Re
publican, has been beaten in the First
district by Thomas P. Revelle, insur
gent. In King county Revelle received
MM vote*, Humphrey 7131, a plurality
for Revelle of nearly 1500. Revelle's
plurality in King county i« much more
than offset by Humphrey's pluralities
in Whatcom, Skagit, Snohomish, Kit
sap, Island and San Juan counties,
yet Humphrey, on the returns now in,
has less than the necessary 40 per cent
of all the votes cast, and the second
Choice provision of the state primary
law comes into operation. This would
give Revello a plurality in King coun
ty of 3643, and in tho other counties
Humphrey's plurality would be wiped
out.
Late returns leave Miles roindextcr.
insurgent Republican candidate for
United States senator, with a plurality
of more than 30.000.
In the Second) or T»conw district,
Congressman w. W. McCrcdie, owner
of the Portland baseball club and a
standpatter, was beaten by Stanton
Warhurton. insurgent, a. Tacomn law
yer of high rank.
In the Third, or Spokane district.
William LaFollette, Insurgent, a cousin
of the Wisconsin senator, was nomi
nated.
rOINDEXTKK TMI MI'HS
Miles Poindexter, of Spokane, insur
gent leader in the present house, to de
feat whom the president of the United
States and his close advisers lent their
advice to the regular Republicans, was
nominated for United States senator by
from 30,000 to 40,000 plurality, carrying
every county in the state, defeating
his leading opponent, Judge Thomas
Hurke of Seattle, in Burkes own pre
cinct, and carrying Pi rce county, tho
home of the other regular candidate,
James M. Ashton.
The Democratic vote was so small
that the returns sent in thus far take
r.o account of it. It is believed that
Ktute Senator George F. Cotteral of
Seattle, national head of the Good
Templars, lias received the Demo
cratic nomination for senator.
In the First district the only Demo
cratic candidate for representative was
W, W. Black of Everett, who was
unanimously chosen. In the Second
district M. Langhorni of Tacoma was
similarly nominated.
In the Third district there were two
candidates. I
As the Democratic vote was only 3
per cent of the total it is evident that
many Democrats voted Republican
ballots.
Poindexter having received a ma
jority of all the , ote; cast, any attempt
to. defeat him in the legislature would
be hopeless, even if there were a dis
position on the part of any members
to ignore the primary result.
CONGRESSMAN POINDEXTER
TAKES VICTORY MODESTLY
Future U. S. Senator's Wife Does
Usual Family Washing
SPOKANE, Wash., Sept. 14.—Having
carried Spokane county by 6noo plural
ity and every county tn eastern Wash
ington by a clear majority over all op
ponents in his race for United States
ienate Congressman Miles Polndextor
takes 'his sweeping victory in Tues
day's primaries modestly.
"I am as much gratified by the vic
tory of the progressive candidates for
congress a.s by my own," he said today.
Hlm wife devoted her attention today
to the family washing as usual.
"I knew all the time the judge would
be elected," she declared. "I felt it in
my bones."
CONNECTICUT REPUBLICANS
INDORSE PRESIDENT TAFT
Charles A. Goodwin Is Nominated
for Governor
HARTFORD, Conn., Sept 14.—
chillies A. Goodwin was nominated by
the state Republican convention for
governor on the second ballot. Hla
vote won 318 to 259 for Kverett J. Lake.
Senator Dennis A. Blakeslee of New
Haven was nominated for lieutenant
governor by acclamation. For con
gressman-at -largo John C. Tilson of
New Haven was renomlnated by ac
clamation.
At the opening of the convention the
committee on resolutloinn prcsentetd
its report, in which President Taft is
called a good and great president. The
report In part followa:
"Thanks chiefly to his tactful but
resolute Insistence, the vital part of the
reform! for which his predecessor
pleaded in speeches and messages is
now statute law, and the Republican
congresi lift! made a record for ron
■tructlve work of abiding: value That
will be a landmark in our legislative
history. At once conservative and pro
gressive, patient under misrepresenta
tion and detraction, William Howard
Taft has set an example of official
fidelity and pure patriotism to all his
successors in the presidency."
LOCAL OPTIONIST WINS
NOMINATION FOR GOVERNOR
COLUMBIA, S. C Sept. 14.—Cole
man I-iivlnßdton Bleaae of Newbury,
local optlonlst, has received tho Dam
..l riitic nomination, equivalent to elec
tion, tor governor of South Carolina.
Col. W. W. Moore of Barnwell has
<>'. majority for adjutant general
over Capt. J. M. Richardson of, Aiken.
For railroad commissioner Georjre
McDuflU Hampton of Rlchland is
nominated over Jam™ cansler of New
York.
Congressman J. E. Kllerbee of the
MOROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER "nJlr'™"™
.-- ~~ Sill I. rACKING Till M IN
i SALVATION NELL
PRICES 25c. 50c. 750. MATINEES Saturday. Sunday. 100. 26c, 50c.
NEXT WEEK— ONGIIEART."
HAMBURGER'S MAJESTIC THEATER * <*&***
!.(>> ANOKI.KS' I.K.\rtl\(i THK.\TKU—OUvrr Moroaco, Manager. jM 9k
- -' WKEK ENDING SUNDAY NIGHT, SEPT. 18— ... ;; ■, «M|^fls!m •:
WILTON LACKAYE v f<T*v> :t
. r; (l.lrblrr * Co.. Manager*.) fiT-'JIT^ I
In Cleveland Moffelt'* great drama of love and millions, , , • tfjK'^'*")
THE BATTLE W^S
PRICES 800 to 11.50. BA.RQAIN MATINEE WEDNESDAY, 260 to W^ J 1
|1, REGULAR MATINBE SATURDAY. ,
\^S*\a\\^Vft\V\\^VoC^X\>lk<« Phones 1447.
*?**gy^L^ VM»^»W» V*W« Both Phones 1447.
. ■.. .-~" "\' —"~""*~"~~" ~" ■' ■- ■'- -■-'■".-•
I p..,.,_ nartlcular at-1 XT J *11 Presentln« always the
TeVtioS t ?".s.A p.i.j«« Vaudeville I^J^S^r
ludle* and children. V CL UAJLw V XX*\* \ Amertean attraetlon*.
The Operatic Festival ( ' - , "The Police Inspector"
"Qyp»y Life" and "Carnival f By Oreene & Armstrong.
,°f, Venice," o r> »» J "Toyshop Pastimes"
J. C. Nugent & CO. • Matinee Sohfke'a Kama Kama Girl*.
Fi»na|anTKdward» Todar Btgjj. Monger * King
Harvey de Vora Trio I Lou Anger
fik-rentrie Dnnclnir "Tho iman Soldier."
Lc.entrlc MOTION" IIC Tl XX «_• AIM X IN H -O.NUKBLAND."
KVEHV NIGHT 100 sic •■'l<- T»0. MATINBE UAII.Y 19c. 25c oOc.
~*OS ANGELES THEATRE
§ms^^ms^VA!IDEYILLE
ZlneU. and Bout.Ha • TT T A"°# Mortlook *Co
Symonds, Ryan A Worth HPTIfV jPP Scott Brother,
The Laugh-O-Scope XiClliy J—4\~>\S Will 0.,..
GRAND OPERA HOUSE Matineei Saturday and Sunday
special Hargain i Trnrlrr»H hv WirHf««s«» I The Se"* th">
Matinee Today 1 *■ raCKeQ Dy W IfCICSS | of th. Tear
B • r. r\r\ TUUATIPV HelHiico-Blackwood Co., Propra. and Men.
ELAbtU 1 tttJ4i\ 1 &!*■ Mt'l'iM.Ks TODAY, Saturday, Sunday.
TONIGHT AND A 1,1- THIS* WEEK —LEWIS R STONE and the Belasco theater
'company present for the llrst time In Lea Anjtelcs Channlng Pollock's play.
Such a Little Queen
,—. .
EVERY POPULAR BELASCO PLAYER IN THE Bid CAST. THE MOST DELIGHTFUL,
COMEDY OF THE ENTIRE YEAR.
REGULAR BELASCO PRICES—NIGHTS, «lc. 60c and 76c. MATINEES 26c and 60c
EXT Clyde Fitch's suc.-i-.H»fiil comedy, "OIHIX." SEATS ON SALE. -^
ASON OPERA HOUSE w>
MASON OPERA HOUSE w.
"TONIGHT AMI All. WEEK— MATINEE SATURDAY.
f***j**M****y**. J --j*j*^»3y**j* M * J j.J Has the
WAOKMIAUS * KKMPER lm A 91.L. a m~\\ TOC
COMPANY present V gmmmmmmmmm i
i w¥ J£ hit ij i to v pr» | -L-augning
trices boc to j:.oo. I***l'l**'lll''*''''"'*! Don't Miss It
LEVY'S CAFE CHANTANT l uiHf^SloH^SailS:
OTTO DOBES-BOREL JULIETTE, In popular song and harmony; COUNTES3
OLQA ROSSI. Russian grand opera prlma donna; 808 ALBRIGHT, the Man
Melba: GRACE BELMONT, favorite Amerlc an balladlst. and KAMMRRMBYER'S OK
CHESTRA. •
OI YMPIC" THEATER MAIN ST., Between Fifth and Sixth.
lwXJVl**!^ inH.rt.lE.Vi. Coo , Comm ,, dl(>u(l Comfortable.
ALPHIN and FARQO offer "TIIK DEVIL'S GROTTO," a stalling mixture of
mirth and melody, compounded by Cha*. Alphln, featuring JUI.ES I MENDEL.
TEN BIG MUSICAL SPECIALTIES. 10c, 200. 260.
BASEBALL— Pacific Coast League Oakland vs. Los Angeles
Schedule —Tuesday, September IS, Wednesday, September 14, Thursday, Sep
tember 18, Saturday, September 17, Sunday, September It. at Chutes park. 3:30
p. m; Friday, September 16, at Vernon. 3:30 p. m.: Bunday. September 18, at Vernon.
10.30 a. m. Ladies free every day except Saturday, Sunday and holiday*. Kids' day,
Saturday.
Sixth district is nominated for re
election by about 1200 majority over
P. A. Hodges.
Congressman J. O. Patterson of the
Second district and his opponent, J.
F. Byrnes, are close' together, with
Byrnes claiming a bare majority.
WASHINGTON SOCIALISTS
NOMINATE CONGRESSMEN
SEATTLE, Sept. 14.—The Socialist-
Labor party yesterday nominated a
county and congressional ticket headed
by Edward Gilhaus. Gilhaus was the
Socialist-Labor candidate for president
two years ago. Since then he has been
a resident of New York. The newly
organized party held a convention last
night and named candidates for the
legislature from this county. The plat
form declares for tho referondum, In
itiative, recall, woman suffrage and
proportional representation.
INDEPENDENT DEMOCRATS
INDORSE G. 0. P. NOMINEE
Break in Tennessee Extends Only
to Governorship
NASHVILLE, Term., Sept. 14.—The
Independont Democrats of Tennessee
today indorsed the candidacy of Capt.
Ben W. Hooper, Republican nomim o
for governor, and further cut loose
from the regular Democratic wins.
The solid south break outlined in to
day's program extends only to the
j governorship. Then; is a "gentle
man's agreement" between the inde
pendents and Republicans that neither
party will invade the other's "safe"
legislative territory, and this the In
dependents say assures a Democratic
I legislature. The last Republican gov
! ernor in Tennessee was Alvln Haw
kins, in 1881-2.
The pardon of Senator Carmaek'fi
slayer was denounced repeatedly by
the ipaalnro amid shouts of applause.
The platform adopted by the Inde
pendent Democratic convention «ays
in part: '
"We denounce the usurpation of
party authority In the name of .De
mocracy by the Patterson machine,
and we condemn its efforts to dis-
I franchise Democratic voters of thia
state.
"The independence and the integrity
of the three co-ordinate departments
of our state government should be
preserved in all their constitutional
limitations, and we denounce the ac
tion Of the governor in attempting, by
th,o use of his political machine, to
control the actions of the legislature
and to coerce the Bupreme court In
the matter of a case ponding before it.
"We indorse the four-mile law the
prohibition law) and its various amend
ments, prohibiting the manufacture and I
s.ih- of intoxicating liquors In this state
and we condemn the efforts of Gov
ernor Patterson to discredit those laws
without giving them the test of en
forcement.
"When the governor of the state, in
violation of his oath of office, refuses
to uphold and enforce the law ho bo
comes a teacher of anarchy and an
enemy of republican institutions and a
menace to the ucurity of human life
and property rights.
"We unqualifiedly condemn the abuse
of the pardoning power by Governor
Patterson and hie efforts to convert
the penitentiary and workhouse into
political recruiting office* and to make
tlm pardon and the. punishment of
crime an asset in his political ma
chin*."
Among the other planks was one
favoring nomination "by direct and ex-
press authority of th« people, through
primary election* or delegated conven
tions."
The regular Democratic committee
tonight called a convention to meet in
Nashville October 6 to nominate a gu
bernatorial candidate and adopt a plat
form.
PLATFORM OF MISSOURI
DEMOCRATS IS COMPLETED
Indorse Former Governor Jos. W.
Folk for President
JEFFKRSON CITY, Mo., Sept. 14.—
Platforms of the Democratic and Re
publican parties In Missouri were com
pleted today. In the Democratic plat
form Joseph W. Folk, former governor,
is indorsed for president in 1012. The
platform denounces the Payne-A-ldrich
tariff law and declares for tariff for
revenue only . Criminal prosecution of
trusts is urged. One plank declares for
a merchant marine anil a strong navy.
Another favors an employer's liability
law. The solution of the liquor ques
tion is local option, according to the
platform.
The administration of President Taft
is indorsed in the Republican platform,
which favors the principles of a pro
tective tariff on necessities adn in
creasing: it on luxuries. A tariff com
mission is urged. The conservation of
the public domain is favored and tho
administrations of former Presdient
Roosevelt and President Taft are in
dorsed for their activity in this respect.
Home rule for cities, a utilities com
mission and an employer's liability are
advocated.
James T. Lloyd, chairman of the
! Democratic congressional committee, is
! chairman of the committee which had
i the Democratic platform In charge.
Tho Socialist party could not agreo
on certain planks of the platform and
i one faction bolted the convention. Kaoh
faction will ask the attorney general
I for an opinion as to which is entitled
' to the Socialist party name.
WABASH FREIGHT MANAGER
TESTIFIES IN RATE CASE
Maxwell Says That Fast Service
Makes Light Load Necessary
NEW YORK, Sept. 14.— W. C. Max
well, general traffic manager of the
Wabash, told the Interstate commerce
commissioners, who are Investigating
the proposed freight rate increase of
eastern railroads, that he considered
the rates—suspended pending the in
vestigation—reasonable, and added:
"Wo operate an expeditious mer
chandise service. In response to the
shippers' demands we have to carry
goods in lightly loaded cars.
"Thla is expensive traffic, and we get
$37.50 as our share of the $76 for that
class rate to Chicago, and with higher
wages and increused terminal charges
we don't believe we can make a cent
out of it. We must have more money
to live."
Mr. Maxwell was asked how advanced
rates would affect the cost of llvins.
and he replied it would add perhaps
3 mills to the cost of a pair of Bhoox
cent to Chicago <ir St. Louis from Mas
wuhusetts. He thought a dozen «gg» ,
sent from East St. Louis would have (
to pay lft mills more freight charges, j

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