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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, September 16, 1910, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-09-16/ed-1/seq-2/

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«*vf»> Boston Dry Goods Siore
Several dozen 51.25 fancy hat pins at 25c each.
(Just Inside Main Entrance).
Butterick Patterns and publications for October are
ready. Two years' subscription to the Delineator
for $1.50—a saving of fifty cents.
(Main Floor, r*nr).
Straw T° ma quick riddance of all
hats children's straw hats the prices,
reduced for Saturday, will be:
$2.00 HATS AT $1.00 j $3.00 HATS AT $1.50
$2.50 HATS AT $1.25 ( $4.00 HATS AT $2.00
$4.50 HATS AT..;... 52.25
Some with gorgeous Persian Sashes, some with ribbon
rosettes.
(Main Floor, rear).
Sales ! Women's 35c and 50c tan and
for black lisle and cotton stockings
today at 25c.
Men's 75c French Balbriggan shirts and drawers C(\rt
• (Bon Bon brand) on sale at, each OUC
Men's 50c Balbriggan mesh underwear on sale j j
■' at, garment OOC
Men's $1 Balbriggan union suits *7Cr»
on sale at / DC
Odds and ends of Summer Athletic undergar- 'J »■
• mentssoc to $1.00 goodson sale at OOv
Men's pleated white shirts with attached or H £•
; detached cuffs—regularly $I—on sale at luL
Men's $1.50 and $2 soft turnback cuff shirts £* Irv
of soisette and madras, on sale at $ 1 • 1U
Men's $1.50 Pajamas of madras and percales *< ■* «.
w9 . on sale at Jl.lU
Women's $1 union suits— \ Children's 25c summer un
various styles 75c |! dergarments!, 2 for 25c
Women's 65c summer Boys' d un, ion suits- •■ -sOc
wiK . t _ „ Boys' 50c lisle shirts and
veBts ....35c |. drawers, each 25c
Women's 60c pants 25c \ Boys' 50c union suits... 2sc
J. W. ROBINSON CO.
235-239 So. Broadway 234-244 So. Hill Street
BUILDING NEW LINK IN
PHONE LINE TO ATLANTIC
TUCSON, Ariz., Sept. 15.—The consol
idated Telephone, Telegraph nnd Elec
tric company forces today commenced
the construction of a telephone line to
Yuma, working east to connect with
Tucson, in order to complete another
link in the coust-to-coast phone line.
The trl-state company Is extending Its
line to Douglas, to make connection
I etween El Paso and Tucson, while the
Pacific States company will build a
connecting line into Yuma from the
west.
j The Home of I
4art Schaf f ncr & Marx
Clothes
Tim Temple of Phlle.
Around The World
By the "OFFICE BOY"
I heard a man say, "I never worry
or hurry," so I asked him what de
partment of the Government service
he was In.
About the most attractive things
one sees in the foreign countries are
their postoards. It seems impossible
to make folks believe that an old
man with a young wife has not been
swindled, and everybody who makes
a purchase In Egypt thinks they are
going to be swindled, and I guess
\th«y usually are.
I used to ask those merchants
over there why they didn't do a one
price business. They said that it
would be impossible, as the impres
sion has gone broadcast that a pur
chaser should never offer more than
half the price asked in the shops
and bazars, so the merchants gov
ern themselves accordingly.
I wanted to buy a few things so
I found a good-looking place In
which tho kind of goods were car
ried that I wanted and I went to
the proprietor and told him who I
was and how we did business at
home. He said, "Pick out the things
you want and I'll make a price on
them." His son helped me and
when I got about $65 worth of stuff
he made me a price of something
like $19 on the lot. I Just put it up
to him instead of trying to quarrel
with him. I found that a good sys
tem In other countries.
There is one line of goods that
Americans beat the world on—that
is shirts. Nowhere can you buy
shirts like ours. Although the fab
rics are just as quod as ours, often
better, the fit and finish are awful.
Sllverwood shirts reflect all the skill
the best of shirtmakers can put into
■ shirt. Plain and pleated, cuffs on
or off, $1, $1-60 and up to $5.
EITHER STORE
F. B. SILVERWOOD
221 Sooth Bpri«fl LOS AllfJßleS
Sixth and Broadway
Bakersflell Lono Beach
San Bernardino Maricopa
STATE RULES DIVIDE
INSURANCE FACTIONS
National Fraternal Congress in
Line with Comissioners'
on Public Safeguard
(Special to The Herald) •
CHICAGO. Sept. 15.—The final
breach, amounting to an open war by
the National Fraternal congress upon
the opposition to state regulation of
"fraternal Insurance, the position of the
Associated Fraternities of America,
was reached when the executive com
mittee of the congress, at a meeting
here, formally lined up with the In
surance commissioners. The societies
which comprise tho membership of the
oongreis have about 3,000,000 members,
those of the Associated Fraternities
about the same. Only recently there
was prospect of a merger of the two
great bodies, this split having been
caused by the fact that many so
cieties now Insolvent refuse to read-
Just thf.-lr rates to adequately meet
their promises of Insurance or agree
to any safeguards of law decisively to
protect the public
The formal action of the congress
was embodied In resolutions of the ex
ecutive committee as follows:
Resolved, that It is the sense, of this'
tlve committee that no further
rence be heldl with representa
tives of the Associated Fraternities of
America, looking toward nn agreement
upon a tentative bill to be proposed in
the several legislatures during the
coming legislative session, for the
reason that there is no apparent dis
position on their part to agree upon,
or support any legislation, looking to
ward the proper conduct and ultimate
solvency of the business of fraternal
Insurance.
Reßnlved further, that It Is the sense
of this executive committee that tlie
representative! or thß National Fra
ternal congress should confer with and
co-operate With the Insurance commis
sioners of the several states to the
end that such legislation may be had
ns will secure a proper conduct and
ultimate solvency of fraternal insur
ance associations.
President J. J. Hyn»« grave, out as
the explanation of this action the fol
lowing statement:
"Tho \ iniittoo hoard tho
report of Mr. Piper, who represented
tli" ci inn of fhf A«
eld at Atlantic
City tontntivo hill
appro -ingress. Tho
nltlof go pma culated the hill—
us tlioy atti mpted to approve
an i sections ih they entirely elim
inated that "i- bill Is nothing at nil
like the '■ * ommlsKlonprs 1 hill
we a] pn . hearing that ro
unantmously re
solved to have nothing further to do
with the Asso 'raternlties nnd
we will take up the matter of the
t!ve bin with the Insurance com
missioners and [i" what we can to K<"t
the necessary legislation
"I think Hint it la about time that
a line of demarcation between the fra
ternal conftr"ss, composed of orders
that have adopted adequate rates and
orders that fire ihout revising their
rates so as to comply with tho Na
tional Fraternal congress mortality
table, and tho Associated Fraternities,
composed of orders that aro not In
sympathy with the fraternal coneross
upon adequacy of rates; who seem to
be opposed to placing fraternal or
ders upon a plan leading to solvency,
and I cannot see what benefit It Is
to us to hold any conference with
such a body.
"In the first T'l'"'fl we dlflVr ra llcally
upon what is adequate ratea; that li
the vital jirindpip nf the confreas,
and f i^on't believe that It would ba
common mie tn trust the protection
■ i Hi it pi vi jilo with those who
opposed or the enemies/
LOS ANGELES HERALD: FRIDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER IC>, 1010.
BIRD IN FLIES
MILE IN MINUTE
Glenn H. Curtiss Is Defeated by
Claude Grahame-Whit:,
English Aviator
BEATS WORLD SPEED RECORD
Wins $3000 Harvard Cup and
Second Prize in Bomb-
Throwing Contest
{AfswlfttiM PrWl]
Boston, Bept. 18.—Driving his
Rleriot monoplane approximately nt a
mile a minute, Claude Grahame-Whlte,
tha Kngiish srtator, brought to n suc
cessful close hli first Americas on
gagement by defeating dlemi 11. Cur
tiss, the American nvlntor and world's
speed champion of tln> air. In a special
match speed teat at the Harvard avia
tion field at Atlantic.
He defeated I'urtlas by sixteen ami
three-fifths seconds, In a five nnd n
quarter mile rare. He thereby won the.
$3000 Harvard cup and made :1 new
speed mark for the field by ;;oing the
coune in five minutes, forty-seven and
four-fifths seconds.
White, also added to his winning; the
John Hays Hammond cup, the second
prize for a special bomb throw inn con
test.
Ralph Johnstnne, the "Wright avia
tor, took the first prize, the Huston
cup.
This was the concluding day of tho
Harvard aviation meet, and it was
marred by the first noteworthy acci
dent of nearly a fortnights flying. A.
V. Roe, an English flyer, who has had
bad luck with his triplanes, wrecked
his second machine today and was
painfully hurt.
NINE BALLOONISTS ENTER
IN CHAMPIONSHIP RACE
INDIANAPOLIS, Ind., Sept. 15.—
Pilots and balloons for the American
championship and free-for-all rates,
which start at the Indianapolis motor
speedway Saturday afternoon, are ar
riving at the speedway and inflation
will begin tomorrow. Nine contest
ants have entered in the championship
race, which will be conducted under
the rules of the Aero Club of America.
Six are entered in the free-for-all
race for ga.= balloons of any capacity,
which will be Started just after the en
tries in the championship contest have
been sent into the air. This race Is
for distance, the winner to receive a
diamond studded cup. In the cham
pionship race both endurance and dis
tance will be taken into account.
ON FIRST FLIGHT IN U. S.,
AVIATOR FALLS 25 FEET
NEW YORK, Sept. 15.—Harry B.
Harknesp, the aviator of Cleveland,
had a narrow escape today when the
monoplane In which he was flying at
the aerodrome In Garden City, L. 1.,
dived suddenly to the ground from a
height of twenty-five feet. Harkness'
machine was demolished, but he es
caped Injury. \
Thli was Harkness 1 first flight In
America. He haa been known abroad
for his foats In aviation nnd came to
America to enter the elimination trials
for the International aviation meet
next month.
DUKE ASKS AMERICANS
TO AN AEROPLANE TEA
NEW YORK, Sept. 15.—Several
New York society people have been
favored with complimentary Invita
tion.s to a novel society function
to be given In Paris by the Due do
Rohan, a leader of the French aris
tocracy. •
The duke is to give an "aeroplane
tea." the first of Its kind In the world.
M Busson, who flios a Bleriot machine,
will be the sruest of honor and "ill
make flights with each of the other
guests In turn.
READY TO START WORK ON
CHICAGO RIVER TUNNEL
Tubes Will Be Floated and Then
Sunk Into Place
CHICAGO, Sept. 15. —The talk of floating
In order to place th« twin steel ' tulie* that
will mall,- up the La Kalle tunnel under tile
Chicago river will be undertaken the first
of next week. The tubes, weighing many
tons, will be made buoyant as pneumatic
tires, floated Into their place and connected
by a system that will reduce the use of
heavy and expensive machinery to a mln
mum. *
The tubes, each of which i» IS feet In
diameter, are ready for u»a and will be
pumped full of air. scheme, an It has
been worked out by the engineers. Is to
fastf-n the sections < igether, pump them full
of air and sloe both ends with heavy bulk
heads. Meanwhile the tunnel will have
been [lied with water and the heavy "Inner
coating" of tho tunnol will be floated out
upon It. Then will com the ta-lc of pump-
Ing th« air out and letting water run Into
it« placj In i"" tubes. Tim result will bo
that the tubes will link and ba drawn Into
place by ropes and heavy cables.
COL J. B. NEVILLE'S MOTHER
DIES AT ADVANCED AGE
tin. Caroline Dennlson Neville, widow of
Morgan Neville, a Columbus, Ohio, banker,
ami «lst«r of former Governor Dennlson, Ohio*
war governor, died at Santa Ross, Cal., je«-
rday, aged S8 years.
Mrs. Neville woa the mother of Col. .1 B.
Neville, one of th« prominent member! of the
Los Angela* stock exchange Colonel Neville
went to Bants Bos", yesterday to take charge
of.tha funeral.
ELECTION DECLARED NULL;
GOVERNOR APPOINTS MAYOR
PHOENIX, Aril., Sept. 16.—Governor Sloan,
today appointed a mayor and Coyr aMermen
for th« municipality of Wlnki-nburg. Tho elec
tion held some time M resulted In a contest.
Taken into court, election was declared null
and offices vacant. The governor appointed.
Itlchaj-d W. Baxter, mayor; C. W. flatt, J,
C,'OregO*! Oscar Jennings, William Ileatsch,
alderr.ien.
THE EASY WAY
"HOW do you propose to bridge the
social chaHm?"
"That's easy. By bridge parties."—
Baltimore American.
DR. WOODROW WILSON
TO LEAD NEW JERSEY
DEMOCRATIC TICKET
<fflK7 ~~n«fc
OR
SCORES CONGRESS
ON CONSERVATION
Edward Hines Declares That
Politicians Were Actively at
. Work During Session
[Associated Press]
CHICAGO, Sept. 15.—An echo of the
politics nt the recent conservation con
gress at St. Paul was hoard here today
in an' Interview with Edward W. Hlnes,
and In a statement from B. N. Baker,
who was president of the St. Paul con
gress.
Mr. Hines, assording to his own
statement, was in a large measure
made the medium of an attack which i
had, he said, for Its purpose the defeat
of J. B. White of Kansas City for
presdlent of the congress.
Mr. Hines and Mr. White both are
lumbermen. The delegates In general,
when they learned that Gilford Pinchot,
who Is president of the National Con
servation association, refused to. allow
the use of Ms name in connection with
the presidency of the congress, took it
for granted that .Mr. White, the chair
man of the executive commitee, would
bo elected to the place about to be va
cated by President Baker of Baltimore.
>1 i;il(l«K AT DECLINATION
Great surprise was felt when Mr.
White declined the office, moved there
to, according to Mr. Hines, by demands
that certain delegates should bo named
on the executive committee. Mr. White
refused to bo bound In advance of his
election, and a surprise was handed to
Henry Wallace of Dcs Molnes, la.,
when the presidency was unanimously
awarded to him.
' "The Illinois delegation drew up a
protest against my membership on the
credentials commltee because I, like ten
other delegates there, was a lumber
man, although they gave a different
reason for their action," said Mr. Hines.
"They did not want Mr. White or any
other lumberman for president. In the
absence of any legitimate reason for
requesting my withdrawal, the Illinois
delegation dragged in silly Rostip con
necting my name unpleasantly with the
election of William Lorimer to the
United States senate. That is a matter
that will be discussed when I am a
witness before the Lnrimer Investigat
ing committee, which will meet here
■inber 20.
"Previous to the congress I requested
Mr. White not to name me on any
committee, nor asulgn mo to any duties
In connection with the congress."
PRESIDENT BAKKR'B UCTTEK
Mr. Hlnes exhibited a letter from
President Baker, in which tho latter
states that Mr. Hlnes' appointment on
the credentials committee was unso
licited. Mr. Baker's letter states tliat
he did not for a moment consider a
request that Mr. Hines withdraw. An
other letter signed by the other mem
bers of the committee states that the
committee meetings were at all times
harmonious, and that Mr. Hines acted
with the committee until it was dis
chraged.
"My friends on the committee, as
well as numerous other delegates, ln
d at the protest from the delegates
from Illinois, wished to voice their re
sentment and disapprobation on the
convention floor," continued Mr. Hlnes,
"and it was with considerable effort
that I dissuaded them.';
MISSING MAN SAID TO HAVE
BEEN SEEN BY SHERIFF
PAX DIEGO, Kept. i:>- The probable
whereabouts of the missing Peter J.
McMahon was learned today. Sheriff
Jennings, returning from a trip to
Campo miintry to Induce his fathi-r to
rancher named Gilson riding in ;i wag
mi near that place. Tho rancher's wife
said tho two men were on a prospecting
trip to the Carrlso Creed district
A sf>n of McMahon has gone to the
Campo, reports lie saw McMahon and a
return. Tho check! hearing the signa
ture of McMahon, and which were not
honored, aro still a mystery. The man
supposed to have attempted to pass
them Is thought to have left the city.
CALIFORNIANS HEAD OFF
MEETING FOR NEW ORLEANS
Rochester. N..Y.1 Sept IB.—Dele
to the twenty-eighth annual con
vention of the National Association of
Stationary Engineers held but one
business session today.
New Orleans, put In a claim for the
convention In 1915 and tried to get
the convention to Indorse a resolu
tion naming that city as the place for
holding a Panama exposition in 1915,
The California delegation fought the
resolution and succeeded in haying It
tabled.
QHICAGO POST CUTS PRICE
riIICA.O, Sept. 15.— The Chicago Evenlnß
Frwt, which for »everal years has been the
only 2-cent afternoon newspaper in Chicago,
announced today that hereafter th« price of
the paper will b» 1 cent.
HAB EDISON BEAT
Bx-Prqildent Roosevelt seems to be
,\,-. ted type of storage battery
s (I. siKiierl for long runs.—Phila
delphia Inquirer.
NOMINATE WILSON
GOVERNOR OF N. J.
Head of Princeton University Se
lected State Standard
Bearer by Democrats
CHOSEN ON THE FIRST BALLOT
Candidate Declares Three Great
Questions for Solution
Are Before People
[AmoclWoil Fr«si]
TRENTON, N. J.. Sept. 15.—The
Democratic state | convention today
nominated Dr. Woodrow Wilson, presi
dent of Princeton university, for gov
ernor of New Jersey. •
Dr. Wilson was nominated on the
first ballot and received forty mo^e
votes than was necessary.
The platform adopted was In line
with the Democratic platform of three
yean ago, except thai it was more
■pacific in advocacy of reform measures,
Including the conferring Of rate-mtik-
Ign power upon the present public utili
ties commission.
Dr. Wilson accepted the. nomination
and made an address which was highly
pleasing to the delegates. ■
After discussing the platform, Mr.
Wilson said: 'There are three great
questions before the people, reorganiza
tion and economy in administration,
equalization of taxation, and the con
trol of corporations.
"Other important questions are the
proper liability of employers, the ques
tion of corrupt practices in elections
and the. question of conservation.
"Our system of government should
not be unnecessarily complicated and
elaborate, and there should not be too
many separate commissions and
boards."
Discussing the question. of corpora
tions, he said: "Corporations should
not be favored in the matter of taxa
tion. The power to regulate taxation
and fix rates should be vested in a pub
lic utilities commission. The regula
tion of corporations is much more the
duty of the state than of the federal
government."
In coneludiner Dr. Wilson paid: "The
playing of politic! is to be deprecated.
Measures having for their object the
bettering °f our condition should be
conceived in the largest spirit and
urged by leaders who are. statesmen
and not "demaßOßuea."
BACKER OF POLAR DASH
SEEKS COOK'S RECORDS
Bradley on Way to Etah-Report
Says Missing Explorer
Acompanies Him
COPENHAGEN, Sept. 15.—The Dan
ish steamer Hans Kgede arrived here
today with the news that John H. Brad
ley, the financial backer of Dr. Fred
erick A. Cook's North Pole expedition,
was on his way to Etah to procure
the much talked of records and In
struments which Cook said he left at
that Eskimo settlement northeast of
Greenland. The captain of the Hans
Egede believes Cook Is with Bradley.
The Hans Egede, which is the ves
sel on which the explorer traveled to
civilization, fell in with a yacht at
Godhaven, a Danish settlement on the
south coast of Disco island, Greenland,
and in the course of exchanges between
the masters learned that Bradley was
aboard the other craft. .
The Polar hunt promoter admitted
his identity and explained that he was
bound for Etah to recover whatever
had been left thero by Dr. Cook. He
refused, however, either to deny or to
confirm the report that ho was ac
companied by the explorer. The gov
ernment vessel also brings the infor
mation that two missionaries who are
working among the Eskimos who ac
companied Cook on this expedition say
that these Eskimos Insist that the
doctor renehed the North Pole, as ha
claims, prior to its discovery by Com
mander Peary.
CENSUS PUTS CLEVELAND
AMONG FIRST TEN CITIES
WASHINGTON. Sept. 15.—The popu
lation of Cleveland, 0., Is 060,663, an
increase of 178,895, or 46.9 per cent, as
compared with 381.768 in 1900.
The returns for Cleveland established
thai city as one of the large centers
fit' imputation of the country, lifting it
to B point above PittHbur« and com
paratively below St. Louis and Bos-
Clnclnnatl, which in isno contained
about 85,000 more persons than Cleve
land. Is now distanced by almost 200,
--000. Cleveland now ranks among the
first ton cities of the country.
The population of Joliet, ill., is 84,670,
an Increase of 031", or 18. l per cent, as
compared with 29,353 In 1900.
U. S. FINDS NO FAULT IN
PANAMA ELECTION RESULT
WASHINGTON, Sept. IB.—Richard
O. Marsh, the United States charge at
Panama, has reported to the state de
partment by cable the result of yes
terday's elections In the national us-
Wy.
The selection of Pablo Aro.wmnna,
Boyd and Rodolfo t'hairias
as vice presidents had been expected
b y the department which finds no
ground for objection.. It is not ex
pected that there will be any Inter
vention in the affairs of the republic
ho long as the terms of the constitu
tion are observed.
MISSING CASHIER'S WIFE
TELLS HOW HE RAN AWAY
ABILENR, Kas., Sept. 15.—Mrs.
John A. Flack, wife of the missing
Abilene hank cashier, said today shn
lpft her husband In New York last
Monday. Flack told her ho m go
ing to Oalveston. Ho had only $260
with him. Her husband did not al
low her to read the newspapers* and
shn did not know of recant develop
ments until she arrived In Topeka
last night.
Tho bank reopened today for con
tinued liquidation. The sheriff and
Plnkerton detetctlveg aro on the trail
of Flack.
AMUSEMENTS
Bn T AGr>n »rXJItXt*HMD*""' llcln«oo-lll«<-kwooil Co., Proprs. and M»rs.
ELAoCU i. Jiili Al MATINEES TOMORROW, Sunday, Thursday
Second Week of Thig Success Starts Monday
Even the weather has no effect on the crowds that want to see LEWIS S. STONE and
the famous Belasco theater company In th* season's supreme comedy success,
Such a Little Queen
ITS THE MOST DELIGHTFUL COMEDY OFFERING OF TUB YEAR. AND BVRRr
PERFORMANCE HAS SEEN THE BELABCO CROWDED TO TUB DOORS WITH HUN
DREDS UNABLE TO GET SEATS FOR THIS REMARKABLY FINE PRESENTATION
OF ONE OF THE BIGGEST COMEDY BUCCESBES OF RECENT NEW YORK SBA
IOKS,
Seats for Next Week Go on Sale This Morning
This means that if you don't want to be among those who are cer
tain to be disappointed you'd better^get your seats the very first
thing, today. It's about your only chance to get just what you want.
This is the first time "Such a Little Queen" has ever been played
in Los Angeles, but there's no advance upon the regular
Belasco scale of prices*. It's a big Broadway suc
i' cess and production at Belasco prices.
EVERY NlGHT—ir.c. 50c and 75c. MATINEES EVERY THURSDAY, SATURDAY AND
SUNDAY, 25c and 50c. '. i*t
• TO FOLLOW First stock production of Clyde Fitch's enormously successful comedy.
"GIRLS." SEAT BALE MONDAY. ■ |
|ssß!.«r.»s| Vaudeville ISrL a
l»rtle. and children. | V CL ULVjLV*r V XXAW \ Amarloan attracttona.
Th« Operatic Festival m : ; "The Police Inspector"
"Gypsy Llfe"-and "Carnival ■ By Greene 4 Armstrong-. , ;
,»' Venice.- . »-.... "Toyshop Pastimes" ■
J. C. Nugent & CO. Matinee Sohlkes nama Bam. Girls. ,
S^i^ Todar
Harvey de Vora Trio I Lou Anger #> '
Eccentr'o Dnnrlng MOTION r.CTCRES-AMCK "The Oorman Soldier."
ORriIECM MOTION riOTITIES—"AI4CK ™v'°*l!***'** liii . Oa .
EVERY NIGHT 10c. ISO, 50c, 75c. MATINEB DAILY 10c. 160, too.
MOROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER *^JFnm
STILL PACKING THEM IN
SALVATION NELL
TRICES 25c, 800, 750. MATINEES Saturday, Sunday, 10c, JBc, tOo.
NEXT WEEK— ONGHJSART."
HAMBURGER'S MAJESTIC THEATER
Ii» \N(,I.IK> 'LEADING THEATER—OIiver >loro.< o, Manager. Js****^k
tVEEK KNDING SUNDAY NIGHT, SEPT. In— BrS^SSKIk
WILTON LACKAYE T^sWV
(Lleblei a Co., Managers.) n «HBg\
In Cleveland Moffett's itrnit dramn of lore and millions, '^L. 3
THE BATTLE tB|j/
PRICES Bno to $1.60. BARGAIN MATINEH WEDNESDAY, 280 to %iLSV^
II REGULAR MATINEE SATURDAY.
GIGS ANGELES THEATRE
SSSr- Henry Lee ||p|
GRAND OPERA HOUSE Matinees Tomorrow and Sunday
T«.m.S.s Tracked by Wireless.^ ic^R^
MASON OPERA HOUSE «'• WlF'
"tonight and tomorrow night—MATnnnß Saturday, T-ABT TIMES.
I^, M ,—,^_—.— m—l Has the
WAGENH.4M * KEOTER L MJZ&JsMJSLZA Town
comi-any present ifSSEATCsT comeby| Whole
nggrMflHshsß H Town
W« iffliiiiiT Innlmiiiis?mii?iiil|| Lauehine ft
PRICES 50c to $2.»0. a. sasfasss»ssssssssssssMssssMgssssssl Don t MISS It
PRICES 50c to i:."g. *„ '" ■
_,_..„-,£,£, TUI7ATITP FIRST ST., Near Sprint;. "Ham* of Clean
RINCESS THEATER Musical comedy." PRINCESS MUSICAL
"COMEDY CO. presents the' rib-tickling farco comedy, "ZIG ZAG ALLEY," fea
turing FRED ARDATH, "the unexcelled Irish comedian." with AL FRANKS.
iwsilß NORTH EARL HALL. BONNIE BROWNING, and the favorite chorus of the
*l?y EVENINGS. land 9:16. MATINEES DAILY EXCEPT WEDNESDAY AND
FRIDAY. PRICES 10c. 20c and 28c.
1 L T -. Trv>o r>AT?T? PHAMT4MT THIRD AND MAIN STS.
EVY CArh. CfIAIMIAINX , g. 3 (, and io:«o daily.
OTTO DOBES-BOREL JULIETTE. In popular son* and harmony: COUNTESS
OLOA ROSSI. Russian grand opera prlma donna; 808 ALBRIGHT, the Man
Melba: GRACE HEi-.MONT, favorite Amerlc an balladlst, and KAMMERMEYEIVS OR
('•HKSTRA. -
Ot v ,,tirn TUJTATITK MAIN ST., Between Fifth and Sixth.
LYMJrIC I titi.i\LniiX. Coolt commodious, Comfortable.
ALPHIN and FARGO offer "THE DEVIL'S GROTTO," a slszllng mixture of
mirth and melody, compounded by Chas. Alphln, featuring JULES MENDEL.
TEN 810. MUSICAL SPECIALTIES. lOC. iOc. lie. ■
BASEBALL — Pacific Coast League Oakland vs. Los Angeles
"" Schedule Tuesday, September 137 Wednesday, September 14, Thursday, Sep
tember 15, Saturday. September 17. Sunday, September 18. at Chutes park,' 2:10
n m- Friday September 1«, at Vernon, 3:30 p. m.; Sunday. September 18, at Vernon.
10:80' a. m Ladles free every day except Saturday, Sunday and holidays. Kids' day.
Saturday. t
SLASHES TWO MEN IN
QUARREL OVER 20 CENTS
Man Who Slew Brother Held for
Another Killing
PHOENIX, Ariz., Pr>r>t. 15.—Angered
by language used toward him by
Jesus Flores and Martin Lucero, and
fearful that he would not collect 20
cents due him for sandwiches, Tom
Ktolos, a GreeK who keeps a lunch
stand, murderously assaulted the two
Mexicans, cutting them frightfully
about their faces and necks. Although
the two men were seriously Injured,
it is believed they will recover, stoios
was arrested and Is in jail.
Scott New shot Jennie Silver and
then blew out his brains at their room
in the Kirkland House at Winkelman,
Gila county, early this morning. The
woman lived one hour. Jealousy is
suM to have bean the cause of the
Clime. New w;us formerly a police
man in Douglas, where lie fell in love
with th« woman In spite of her no
toriouH habits. He went to Winkel
man recently and sent for her. He
told friends she was afraid of him.
Tim couple were heard quarreling be
fore the shooting. New was 25 years
of age and the woman 21.
Bheiiff White of Cochise county,
Who is now in Phoenix, has Identified
C. D. Thomaß, who was jailed here
\l lay for killing Mauro Murrietta
in the White Tank mountains near
Buckeye, as the man who killed his
(Thomas') 17-year-old brother in Bis
-1 two years uso through mistaken
identity. Thomas, jealous of his wife,
returned home, saw a man in the
house and fired through a window.
Discovering that the had killed his
own brother, he was nearly crazed,
and though legally exonerated, has
never been fully normal since.
A3 TO JUMPING
It Is woll to cultivate decisiveness.
Nobody *v*r m able to Jump more
than one way at a time.
MAN CHARGED WITH SUB
TREASURY THEFT BAILED
Asserts Innocence; Has Suspicion
of Guilty Party
CHICAGO, Sept. 15.—Efforts to ob
tain a reduction in the bail of George
W. Fitzgerald, who was arrested here
yesterday charged with having stolen
$173,000 from the subtreasury three
years ago, were made in the United
States district court today before Juclgo
Landls. Judge Landls fixed the ball
at $50,000. This Fitzgerald was un
able to give, and In consequence he
spent the night in a cell.
The prisoner, vho stoutly denies the
charge against him, was brought from
the county jail Into court to listen to
arguments. Judge Landls declined to
reduce the bail.
Bonds of $50,000 were provided by
William Joyce and James Ralph. Fitz
ffurald told reporters that while he did
not take the money, he had a sus
picion as to the guilty party.
"I am willing to give the name to
Judge Landis," said he. As to his In
vestments, he said< "I borrowed money
to start with and I've made all I have
hy legitimate business methods. I
cleared $800 on a real estate deal In
two weeks, for Instance. In 1908 I
bought eggs at 16 3-8 cents and sold
them for 19 and 19% cents a dozen.
That netted me $3200."
He denied that he owned stock In tho
Illinois Bolt and Forging company un
der an assumed name. He satd he
possessed $1700 worth of stock In his
own name. He said he resigned some
time ago as secretary of the Illinois
Car Manufacturing company.
AN EXCEPTIONAL CABE
"What nre you doing hero these
days?"
"Playing the hories."
"N To money in that."
"Yen, there is. I get two dollars a
night tor imitating hoofbeats in a mel
odrama."—Washington Star.

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