OCR Interpretation


Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, September 29, 1910, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-09-29/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 2

2
Oriental Dept. now on Third Floor—consolidated
with the Art Dept.
( \ The women's gloves offered Fri
_ f day at $1.10 equal the best reg-
Gloves u iarly sold elsewhere at a dollar
s ) fifty.
One clasp pique gloves in white, tans,
modes and grays, on sale Friday only
. at $1.10.
:
Women's 35c f Something over a
and 50c ' thousand pairs
of women's 35c and
Hosiery *°< st°f n«*
-* sample lines from the
Three Pairs J great mills in
for \ Chemnitz—go on sale
Friday morning
5#% at three pairs for 50c.
-xP^jp^S Plain and fancy.
All sizes.
(On " Sale _ Main Floor>
' Friday) I Rear.
J. W. ROBINSON CO. J
235-239 So. Broadway 234-244 So. Hill Street
CORONER'S JURY SAYS
DOCTOR KILLED GIRL
Robert Thompson Charged with
Murder of Eva Swan in
San Francisco
RAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 28.—Dr.
Robert Thompson, alias Grant, was
formally charged by the coroner's Jury
today with the murder of Eva C.
Swan, the young stenographer whose
mutilated body was found buried be
neath the cement flooring of a vacant
house last Friday night.
The verdict charged that Thompson
performed an operation upon the
young woman, which resulted in her
death. In conclusion the Jury re
quested that the authorities take steps
to stop malpractice in medicine "so
common at present" and prevent the
display of signs advertising "this crim
inal practice."
Immediately after the rendering of
the verdict Paul Parker, tha former
Stanford athlete, who had been held
since last Sunday in connection with
the case, was released. No evidence
tending to connect him with the case
was adduced before the jury.
Dr Thompson already rests under a
murder charge preferred by the district
attorney.
The police were informed today that
a man answering the description ot
William Saack, former assistant to Dr.
Thompson, had escaped from the gov
ernment hospital at Angel Island last
Monday night. It is believed that he
left the hospital after learning of the
ilisi overy of Eva Swan's body.
ALASKA RAILWAY RACES
WITH WINTER IN WORK
Two Months Left to Lay Forty-
Seven Miles of Track
SEATTLE, Sept. 28.—The Copper
Riter & Northwestern railroad's race
with winter from Cordova to Kennl
cott, Alaska, has just passed an im
liortant lap.
A cable message received here from
Chief Engineer K. C. Hawkins today
says the upper crossing- of the Copper
river at Mil' 132 was made success
fully yesterday. The]-,, remains only
one more difficult feat, the crossing of
the Kuskalana canyon at Mile 149.
This point, Kays the dispatch, will b«i
reached with track October 16.
Across the canyon a steel bri Ige X'O
feet high and ':£, feet long mvi i i><
built before further advanCi
made. It is hoped to race construc
tion of the bridge through In a fort
night, which will leave but two
lean winter months In which to build
i miles of road to the ter
minus ;ii K( r.nicott, which must bo
reached by the end of the year.
ARRAIGN CANDY MAKER
ON CHARGE OF MURDER
CHICAGO, Sept. 28.—Karl A. Badd
sing, a young ler of tiiis city,
n a charge of
murdering his ivife, Mabel Reid B
sing. The A to await
ioroner'6 rei I to enable the
police to continue their investigation
of the deatli of the prisoner's first
Wife, Mary McConnell Baddsing.
Prof. Walter S. llaines has reported
to the police that he found arsenic
In the body of tin second wife. The
body of the first .Mrs. Baddsing was
exhumed late yestoulay and !s being
examined for possible traces of poison.
FLOAT STEAMSHIP TENYO MARU
HAN FRANCISCO, Bept. 18 The
Japan aer Tenyo Maru, which
ran i hangha! on Monday
niKht has been floated B ''riding to
v dlspatcli received by the Merohants'
exchange, The vessel suffered no serl
damage.
RESTRICT PROSECUTION
IN TRIAL OF HASKELL
Court Rules Evidence Be Confined
to Proof of 'Conscious
Participation'
McALESTER, Okla., Sept. 28.—The
hearing In the trial of Governor C. N.
Haskeil and others in the Muskogee
town lot cases was postponed today
until tomorrow. Federal Judge John
A. Marshal] granted a request hy the
government's attorneys that they be
allowed time to examine their witnesses
before putting them on the stand.
Judfi-"' Marshall ruled that the evi
dence against Haskett would have to
be confined to proof of "conscious par
ticipation" in the alleged conspiracy in
the three years prior to the returti of
the indictment against him, which w.is
on May .'7. 1909.
S. R. Rush, special assistant to the
attorney general, said the government
did not wish to take up the time of the
court if the witnesses for the proseeu
tlon would bo unable to present evi
dence under the n strlctlons laid down
by the court. Mr. Rush said he did
not wish his statement to be taken as
Indicating the government was nnt
sure of its case. Heretofore he said
the government expected to use evi
dence coverning the entire period of
the alleged conspiracy, which began In
1901. The ruling of the court restrict
ing the prosecution made it necessary
to reconsider the government's cast-.
Judge Marshall's ruling was based
on a decision handed down by the cir
cpit court of Minneapolis at St. Louis,
Mo., last June in what was known as
the Lonobaugh case.
TELEGRAPHERS PLAN TO
DEMAND HIGHER WAGES
Operators Move to Ask Higher
Pay Next April
SPOKANE, Wash., Sept. 28.—The
Chronicle says, today:
A movement whereby all commercial
telegraphers in the I'nited States shall
make > coir erted demand for incri
wages i"i April 1, lull, has been start
ed, 'l'lii' plan is to enlist as many
telegraphers in the union as possible,
elect a representative from every re
i lay office and let these in turn elect
i a rep ■ entatlv from ••very superin
' tendi ;ii.-' district, the latter committee
■■: in Chicago in February next
! with the general officers of the union
to prepare a schedule to be presented
plovers.
The commercial telegraphers claim
there avoragn pay Is less than $80 n
month, ami this for a day of ten to
fourteen hours.
BLACKHANDERS ATTEMPT TO
KILL PETROSINO'S FRIEND
NEW Y<>l:K. Sept, 28.- His friend-
Bhlp for members of the Italian squad
of the dot ictli •■ bun a i « hleh the lite
Lieut, Petro Ino comm ■ Is he
iic\. .1 to ha - • in. Ited bla khanders to
make a n ci md attempt ti «iay to as
sassinate Agnati Kirn. a watchman
on First street, bj bomb ai
him from a housetop. The missile
Struck near him, ;i
unconscious, bul ci ai ed fatal in
juries.
ENDS LIFE BECAUSE WIFE
CONTINUED DIVORCE SUIT
CLEVELAND, Sepi ! ident
becauM his wife refused to give up her
suit for divorce and let in, t him,
James Payne, former trainer of the
Cleveland baseball club and a well
known wrestler, pugilist and athlete,
went to her home today, and In the
ol v■ Payne and her motni r
committed suicide by shooting hli
In tiie right temple. Payne was known
in sporting circles ail over the world
as "i>oi\"
LOS ANGELES HERALD: THURSDAY MORNING,, SEPTEMBER 29. 1910.
TELLS INSIDE OF
I. C. CAR FRAUDS
Former President of Ostermann
* Company Relates Sensa
tional Story
PAID OFFICIALS FOR BUSINESS
Testifies Vice President Rawn
Received Percentage on
Repair Charges
[Associated Press}
CHICAGO, Sept. 28.—Henry C. Ostcr
inann, former president of the Oster
mann Manufacturing company, who Is
said to have been a big factor in the
Illinois Central car repair frauds, re
lated a sensational story of the inside
workings of his concern before Munici
pal Judge Burggemeyer today.
• The lato Ira G. Rrawn, former presi
dent of the Monon route, who was mys
teriously shot to death at his summer
home last July, was named by Oster
mnnn as One of the chief figures In the
alleged srraft ring. .. ■ .
Ostermann declared that Itawn, when
vice president of tho Illinois Central,
was given 1600 shares of stock in the
Ostermann Manufacturing company,
and that this was increased to 2700
shares.
He said Rawn sold his stock to the
Ostermann plant at par, or $5 a share.
After he had sold back the stock for
$13,600, the witness testified, Rawn de
manded and got first $5, then $10, and
finally $15 for each car repaired, or al
leged to have been repaired, at the
Ostermann plant.
FAYS RAWN *10,500
Ostermann testified that he person
ally made one payment of $10,500 to
Rawn, which, he said, was for 700 cars
upon which the concern collected re
pair bills.
In addition to the payment per car
'as to Rawn, said Ostermann, a fixed
monthly sum.was paid certain officials
and a 2 per cent per month dividend
was paid on large blocks of Ostermann
Manufacturing- company stock held by
Illinois Central officers.
"What Illinois Central officials held
stock In your company?" Ostermann
was asked by Attorney Walter L*.
Fisher, counsel for the railroad.
'"Ira G. Rawn had 2700 shares, Frank
B. Harriman had 2200, John M. Taylor
had first 1000 and then 6000, Joseph B.
Buker had 2200, William Renshaw had
1500 and W. .T. Taylor had 600 shares.
S. P. and Mildred Harriman had 100
shares each, but I do not know who
they are, or whether they were con
nected with the Illinois Central com
pany, , their stock being *bought and
paid for by Frank B. Harriman."
TCKNS DOWN FRIENDS '
Ostermann then told of the organiza
tion of his company and how the men
who helped him get started were later
"turned down" to favor certain Il
linois Central officials.
Ostermann first jeeured a patent on
a special door for box cars. To get
money to market the enterprise he j
went to his old friends, to brakemen,
conductors, yardmen and other em
ployes. Many of them purchased stock
in the concern with their savings. They
paid par value for the stock, but were
never given anything but a nominal
dividend upon their investments.
"The idea of going into the car re
pair business was first suggested to me
by a Mr. Considlno, whom I met while
selling stock in the grain door enter
prise," said Ostermann. Later I took
it up with John M. Taylor of the Illi
nois Central. Ho discouraged me at
first and later assisted me, Joseph Bu
ker and Ira G. Rawn to arrange for
a contract to do the repair work for
the Illinois Central.
"Mr. Rawn asked me how many cars
I thought I could turn out and I replied
about twenty-five a day. You are the
man we are looking for,' he said, and
the deal was arranged."
ASKS AID TO RECOVER
JEWELS LOST IN HOTEL
Wife of Proprietor of Caravan
sary Complains to Police
SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 28— Mrs.
Albert G. Day, wife of a hotel pro
prietor of Portland, Ore., has asked
the police here to aid In recovering
Iry valued at $6000, which she says
was deposited by her for safe keeping
with a clerk of a local hotel last
Saturday night.
A.Ci ording to detectives, the clerk
denied having received the jewelry
from Mrs. Day.
She lists the articles as follows: One
ring with tiyo solitaire diamonds,
worth $130; one diamond necklace,
$1500; one pair of diamond earrings,
une bar pin with eight diamonds,
|2000.
A notorious pickpocket seen near
the hotel last night was closely ques
tioned by the officers, but they got no
satisfaction.
COMPLAIN THAT MINING
PROPERTY WAS LOOTED
SAN BERNARDINO, Sept. 28.—
Charging persons called "John Doe"
with looting desert mining property,
I?. F. Rowan, E. R. Courtright and
j. w. Keeden, through Attorney C. L,
Allison, have tiled suits in the superior
court.
Tin- plaintiffs own the Lead Queen,
Danby Boy, Daggett Queen, Elsinoro
and Jumbo Girl mines, and it Is
charged that the thieves took about
$1000 worth of property. Tlio identity
of the. men engaged in the looting Is
unknown.
An Injunction is askod to prevent
the defendants from taking other
property.
MONKEY ESCAPES FROM
ZOO BUT IS RECAPTURED
POMONA, Sept. 28.—Barney, the big
monkey at the park zoo, became too sly
for his keeper yesterday, and In an
unguarded moment shot through an
opening In his capo and ran away.
The park attendants had a merry
chase, the monkey grimacing and de
fying them when surrounded and scar
ing the life out of a sedate burro.
He was finally cornered, and after
showing signs of fight was led back to
the cage by nieuuß of a feed box.
COUNT WACHTMEISTER ILL;
FUNERAL PLANS HALTED
Count Axel Haoul Wacbtmelster, don
»f the Countess Constance Waehtmelster,
B-ho died In tbis city lMt Friday night,
I* seriously 111 to New York city, accord-
In to reports received yesterday, and
cannot come to Los Angeles to attend
the funeral of his mother.
Because of his Illness there will be no
funeral service. The body of the count
<•«• will be cremated and the . ashes
placed In an urn for the son. lie was
harrying to I<os Angeles from Europe,
hoping to reach his mother's bedside be
fore nil* died, when lllnem» ncin-il him.
SUPPRESS RIOTERS IN
BERLIN WITHOUT MERCY
Police Ride Down and Saber Mer
cilessly Wherever Small
Groups Gather
BERLIN, Sept. 28—"Suppress dis
turbances without mercy," were Po
lice Commissioner yon Jagow's orders
today. Tho police followed their In
structions to the letter. They rode
clown and sabered mercilessly where
ever a small group of people had gath
ered in the Moabit district.
For two days this district has been
the scene of grave riots. Hundreds of
persons have been injured and pitched
biittles between strikers and their
sympathizers and the police have oc
curred.
Afl a result of the severe repressive
measures, scores of persons, some of
them were passersby, were bruised or
wounded during the evening.
The correspondents of Reuters Tel
egram company, the New York Times,
the New York "World and the New
Yojk Sun were among the victims
while watching the progress of the
events from motor cars. The police
swooped down upon them with drawn
sabers, apparently without provoca
tion. The Reuter representative was
wounded severely in both hands,
while the other correspondents were
badly bruised. They were saved from
further injury by dashing at full
speed to the nearest "first aid" sta
tion, where their wounds were ban
daged.
BROOKINS SOURS HIGH
OVER LAKE MICHIGAN
Biplane Man Trains at Chicago
for $10,000 Prize Flight
to Springfield
CHICAGO, Sept. 28.—Carrying a
newspaper man, the first aeroplane
passenger ever carried in Chicago,
i Aviator Walter Brookins soared about
over the city's lake front late today,
and sailed away over the lake, swung
about the edge of the tall building
district, and easily brought his Wright
biplane to earth again.
Brookins' flights were preliminary to
his attempt tomorrow morning to
break the American sustained flight
■record, and thereby capture the Chi
cago Record-Herald's prize of $10,000
for a flight from Chicago to Spring
field, a distance of 187 miles.
His sailing today was closely watched
by his tutor, Wilbur Wright.
A special train over the Illinois Cen
tral road will endeavor to beat Brook
ins to Springfield tomorrow.
SICILIANS FIGHT WORK
OF SANITARY OFFICIALS
ROME, Sept. 28.—Notwithstanding
that the widespread nature of the
cholera infection at Naples is known to
the public, tho official report yesterday
announced only five cases and three
deaths In the entire province of Naples
in the last twenty-four hours, three
cases and one death in the district of
Apulia and one deatM from the disease
in the province of Foggla.
No new cases are reported In the
city of Rome.
Dispatches from Sicily report violent
scenes there, the peasants everywhere
opposing- the work of the sanitary of
ficials.
DUCHESS VISITS SICK
NAPLES, Sept. 28.—The Duchess of
Aosta paid a visit to the cholera
patients in the hospital yesterday and
spoke words of encouragement to each
sufferer.
BODY OF STUBBS SENT TO
FAMILY HOME FOR BURIAL
CLEVELAND, Ohio, Sept. 28.—The
body of Donald P. Stubbs, general
agent of the Union Pacific Railroad
company here, who died last night of
a bullet wound Inflicted Saturday night
with suicidal intent, the police say, was
sent today to the old family home at
Ashland, Ohio, for burial. Tho dead
man's father, J. C. Stubbs of Chicago;
his mother, Bister and wife accom
panied the body.
Members of the family insist that
Stubbs was accidentally shot while ex
amining a newly purchased revolver.
JUSTICE SAYS PRISONER
KILLED IN SELF-DEFENSE
BAKERSFIELD, Sept. 28.— J. C.
Loftus, charged with the murder of
Joseph Lnfferty September 4 wai ac
quitted in a justice rourt here today
on. the grounds of self-defense. Testi
mony of witnesses showed that Laf
ferty had been the aggressor and had
choked I-ioftis twice the night before.
The next morning he attempted to
repeat his treatment when he was
.shot by Loftus. A quarrel over tho
treatment of a horse was tho cause
of the trouble.
ARCHITECT KILLED
SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 28.— City
Architect James L. Fisher was Instant
ly killed tonight, L.. F. Stradling was
fatally injured and three other men
sustained minor Injuries when the au
tomobile in which they were riding on
the Ocean Beach boulevard skidded Into
a sand bank and overturned. Fisher
was crushed beneath the machine and
was dead when it was taken oft his
body.
FAVORED LORIMER
BUT TOOK $2500
State Senator D. T. Holtslaw
Tells Committee of Re
ceiving Money
GETS HIS SHARE OF 'JACKPOT'
Legislator Claims He Did Not
Know Why $700 Was
Presented Him
(Associate Press*
CHICAGO, Sopt. 28.—State Senator p.
T. Holstlaw of luka, one of the fifty
three Democrats who voted for the
election of Senator William Lorlmer,
on the witness stand, today before the
senatorial Investigating committee, tes
tified that after he had voted for Sen
ator Lorimer he received $2500 and that
he supposed the money was paid be
cause of his vote.
The state senator, who until recently
was a banker in luka and- had some
prominency in the Baptist church, was
the second legislator to tell the com
mittee that money was paid because
of a vote for Lorimer.
Senator Holtslaw, In response to the
question by Attorney Austrian, "Was
anything said about payment for your
vote for Senator Lorimer?" said:
"The night before the election of
Senator Lorimer I met State Senator
John Broderick outside the St. Nicholas
hotel in Springfield, and he said to me:
'They are going to elect Lorimer to
morrow.'
"I replied: 'Yes, I think bo, and I am
going to vote for him."
REFERS TO MOXEY
"He said: 'Well, there is $2500 in It
for you.'
"That was all that was said. I In
tended to vote for Lorimer anyway,
and had made up my mind three or
four days before that and did not know
there was a thing In it for me."
"Were you offered anything?" was
asked, and the witness replied:
"He did not offer me anything, and
simply said there was $2500 in it for
me."
"Did you get the $2500?"
"Yes," was the answer. "I went to
Chicago about June 16, 1909, to Senator
Broderick's office and he gave me
$2500, which he counted out of an en
velope. He merely said 'Here's that
money,' and I said nothing to him be
yond greeting him when I met him."
On further examination, Holstlaw
said he supposed the money was paid
for his vote for Lorimer.
In response to the question by Sena
tor Prazier, Holstlaw said Broderlek
was the first man to speak to him re
garding voting for Senator Lorlmer.
"Did you ask what the $2500 was for,
or who was paying It?" queried Senator
Frazier. /•
--' ASKS NO QUESTIONS
"No," was the reply, "I asked noth
ing."
The witness declared he had had no
other conservation with Broderlck rela
tive to the vote, and that he went to
Chicago to see Broderlck in response to
a letter, the substance of which was a
request from Broderlck that he (Holst
law) meet him In his office.
"Did Broderlck owe you anything?",
asked Senator Frazter.
"No." was the reply, and the same
monosyllabic negative was the wit
ness' reply to the questions "Did you
have any claim upon him?" and "Was
there any reason other than your con
versation before the election for the
payment?"
Further on Holstlaw said that later
Broderick paid him $700.
"When I got the $700 Senator Broder
ick simply said that much was coming
to me, and I simply took It. I don't
know what It was for."
The $700 has been referred to as part
of the alleged jackpot fund.
CONFESSION RECALLED
Senator Paynter asked the witness if
Senator Lorlmer or the senatorial elec
tion was mentioned when he received
the $2500 from Senator. Broderick.
"Neither Senator Lorlmer nor the
senatorial election was mentioned
then," said Senator Holtslaw.
A confession signed by Holtslaw May
28, 1910, when he was before the Sanga
mon county grand jury, was presented,
and Attorney Austrian called the atten
tion of the witness to his statement
there that "Broderick told me there was
$2500 In it for me if I would vote for
Lorimer."
On cross-examination Attorney Han
ecy brought out that Holtslaw had told
many persons prior to the Lorimer elec
tion that he had made up his mind to
vote for Lorlmer.
Asked by Senator Johnston what In
duced him to vote for Lorimer, the
witness replied:
"We had tried so long to elect a Dem
ocrat and could not, I thought electing
Lorlmer would make the breach wider
In the Republican ranks. I naturally
liked Lorimer, and just made up my
mind to vote for him."
RECEIVES NO ADVICE
"Who advised you the time had come
to vote for Lorlmer?" was asked.
"No one."
"Did you know that anyone was paid
to vote for him?"
"I did not." ,
At the afternoon session Chairman
Burrows announced that Representa
tive White would be permitted to tell
what he did with the money he said he
received for his vote for the election of
Lorimer and his share of the alleged
jackpot, without making the ruling of
precedent In other testimony.
White then began a recital of his ex
penditures, beginning with his pay
ment of debts in O'Fallon, 111., his home
town.
White testified that he did not de
posit any of the $1000 he says he re
ceived for voting for Senator Lorlmer
in any bank, but left about $700 of it
over night In the custody of the cash
ier of a department store In East St.
Louis.
He also said that he did not deposit
In any bank any part of the $900 he
alleged he received as his share of the
alleged jackpot. .
MOTION TO QUASH JOHNSON
INDICTMENTS OVERRULED
SPRINGFIELD, 111., Sept. 28—Judge
Thompson in the Sangamon circuit
court this morning overruled .the mo
tion to quash the Indictment In the
two cases of Archibald B. Johnson of
this city, charging bribery and perjury.
Johnson was indicted on the charge
of bribing Senator D, W. Holt.slaw of
luka to award the contract for fur
niture to the Ford & Johnson com
pany of Chicago, who were the high
est bidders, and on the charge of,per
jury in denying that he had dono so.
AMUSEMENTS
Tl/TOROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER Mnear STb?x?h:
A Splendid Revival -4P fffe I | M 4 g
Thi» Week Only | m#
Obey That Impulse ■% I Bm
Phone Your Order Now
PRICES—»So, 60C, 75c. MATINEES SAT- 11 D ■ I Isj WmO ■ Q
URDAY AND SUNDAY. 10c 25c. 60c. ' ".' ■ »■ ■». « .- .-:-'. SB f':;
NEXT WEEK— "WHEN KNIGHTHOOD WAS IN FLOWER."
I Paying particular It") \/ 011 f\ P»\7111 A Presenting always th. I
tentlon to entertaining V dUviv Vlllw b0" European and I
ladles and children 7 American attractions. 1
| ladies and children. | BKOINNINO MONDAY MATINEE I —. „ I
"Top o' th* World" - „ ' Minnie Dupree & Co.
Dancers coiiie mm j "Th* m'"'*l" 1' wife." .
S»JWa4iL- Matinee SJt^m^ «».U
Mr. and Mrs. Erwin -, V _ 6 Original Kaufmanns -
Connelly "Sweethearts." TOOa/* World Famed Cyclists.
The Krags Trio I - Mile: Rence
Trapese Athletes. Orpheum Motion Pictures. Goddess of.MusW.
EVERY NIGHT—IOc, 25c, BOc, 76c. MATINEE DAILY—IOc, JBo. 500.
. . ;
HAMBURGER'S MAJESTIC THEATER n ™™n™th:
LOS ANGELES' tKAUINO I'LAYHOUSE—OLIVER MOROSCO, MGR.
Seats Now on Sale
Monday, October 3—One Week Only
Margaret ILLINGTON
In Her Great Success, UNTIL ETERNITY
Mall orders accompanied by checks now received. Prices— BOo to $2. Best seats at
matinees Wednesday and Saturday. $1.
MOS ANGELES THEATRE
SLzZZgxbSSSbiSrVA UDEVILLE
It's Just As We Predicted
Sullivan & Considine have sent another "bully" bill, chocked full of
novelties, good music, bright, snappy fun and entertaining exhibi
tions of skill. It's a splendidly diversified variety and the Los An
geles theater is again packed to the doors at every performance.
THE REASON:
"It's So Much for So Little"
Prices always 10, 20 and 30 cents. Matinees every day at 2:30; two
shows every night at 7:30 and 9; three shows Saturday and Sunday,
commencing at 6:30 sharp. Doors open at 6 o'clock.
P RAND OPERA HOUSE **™I^h^ K? m ?Zjn KZ.
VJ ort^'ear o*""" I The Old Clothes Man | tSSST to' ""*
A TTTITTOTPTTTIVr i "Theater L. a BEHYMER.
A UDITOKIUM . Beautiful." 1* SL Manager.
UDITUKIUM Beautiful." Manager.
X* TONIGHT—^REMAINDER Of WEEK—MATINEE SATURDAY.
THIS IS THE SEASON'S BEST HIT— IT.
THE BANKERS' SHOW
$10,000— GORGEOUS PRODUCTION—SIO,OOO
AN HAWAIIAN MUSICAL COMEDY.
The Maid of Manalay
BY HARRY QIRARD AND JOSEPH BtETHEN, AUTHORS AND PRODUCERS OF
•THE ALASKAN." ' • $ \'*
17—Catchy Musical Numbers, All New —l 7
—Pretty Girls, All Singers—loo
BEATS NOW ON SALE—NIGHT PRICES: 50c. 75c, ll.'OO, 11.50. SPECIAL ' BAR
GAIN MATINEE PRICES: 260 to 11.00 BOTH PHONES. "
PANTAGES THEATER
Now Opened, South Broadway
UNRIVALED VAUDEVILLE
STARS OF ALL NATIONS
ntnvitiivq r»OO AND MONKEY ACTORS Ma*LTJAN ft BRYANT
fn^he^one"™ comids-pantomime. "A In William Weston's Great Gambling Story,
Hot Time In DOKvllle." Including the orl*-- "11-10 ON THE BLACK." .
inal Intoxicated canine. "DAN." MXLIOT BROS.
Greatest Comedy Animal Act on ' Karth Comedy Musical Sketch.
Th. I cc C^ al"n" Kovetty^hlrfwl^ancera \
The "Oth Century Singer New York's Lat- MAURICE Bt'RKHART
The «th e^t ent^ 1 >, e s', n 5 Vaudeville. Character Singing Comedian.
MATINEE DAILY— SHOWS AT NIGHT. 7:30 AND 8:10. POPULAR PRICES—
lOC. 30c. 30c.
Bt-.t ao/-</-» TurtTCU Bcla»co-Bl»«kwood Co., Props. ft Mgrs.
ELASCO THEATER Matinees TODAY, SAT. AND SUNDAY.
~~THIS WEEK ONLY—LEWIS S. STONE and the Belasco Theater company pre
sent Clyde Fitch's most successful comedy, ,
■ GIRLS =====
A rattling good comedy with a laugh every minute. See It!
COMMENCING NEXT MONDAY NIGHT
The Belasco company will give the first stock production anywhere of George M.
Cohan's great musical play.
FIFTY MILES FROM BOSTON
Regular Belasco prices—Nights, 25c. 60c and 75 Matinee. Thursday. Saturday and
Sunday, 25c and 60c.
_-■.■■■! ATTT-.T-rj-njTTTTIT ~ "THEATER - KB. BEHYMER.
rf^HE AUDITORIUM— BEAUTIFUL." Manager.
1 "ENTIRE WliKlfOF MONDAY, OCTOBER 3—Matinee. Wednesday and Saturday.
•*■ Engagement of Famous
NATIONAL POLLARD OPERA COMPANY
In a grand revival of Gilbert & Sullivan', world-famed comic opera, j
THE MIKADO
Seats now on sale. Prices Sse. 50c Tsc, 11.00. Ww Mln ,. ter , • .
Seats now on NE XT ATTRACTION—"Our New Minister." '■■
PnTvtr>-coo THTTATTTP ' Tint Street. Near Spring.
RINCXLOO Ltl&AlE'K Home of Clean Musical Comedy
Princess Musical Comedy Co. presents the stupendous Oriental travesty, "A
TRIP TO TURKEY," featuring the best musical stock company In the elty
and a chorus of ten prettiest, daintiest dancing girls on the Paclflo ooast. Even-
Ings, 7:45 and 9:15. Matinees Monday. Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday.
PRICES — 10c, 200. 26c. |
Lpuv'C r*A"irra rHANTANT third and main bts.
EVY S CAE ti istlAN 1 AIM I , 8;J0 and 10:30 daily.
TRY THE LEVY PROGRAMMES—THEY LENGTHEN YOUR LIFE—THH
ROYAL HUNGARIAN GROZIEN TROUPE ! OF DANCERS; OTTO DOBEB
BOREL JULIETTE In Popular Song and Harmony; FERN MELROSE—The Girl with
tho marvelous double voice; .lEANETTE DUPREE—The Girl with the many smiles,
and KAMMERMEYER'S ORCHESTRA.
OTVA/TTJTr'TWTrATTrT? Main St., between Fifth and Sixth.
LYMPH IJTlJirAi.llfK |s 0,,,,^ commodious.
Alphln & Fargo offer "THEY'RE OFF IN A BUNCH." the big fun handicap
by Bookmaker Chas. Alphln. playing Jules Mendel >as the one best bet. An
attractive card of comedy.. See ■ the pony chorus In racy song and dancing. Price. —
10c, 20c, 25c- ■■■■■-■■■.•..
ASEB ALL—Pacific Coast League
BASEBALL —Pacific Coast League II; Thursday; Sept. 2»; Satur
~LO¥~AN«E"LEi~Vir~VERNON— Wednesday, Sept. 2«; Thursday; Bept. 39; Satur
day, Oct. 1: Sunday, Oct. 2; Moaday. Oct. 1. at Chutes park, 2:30 p. m.
Friday, Sept. 30. at Vernon. 2:30 p. m. Sunday, Oct. 2. at V.rnon. 10:30 a. m. La
dles' day every day except Saturday, Sunday and holiday..
WHITE GIRL IS MARRIED
TO JAPANESE SWEETHEART
TACOMA, Wash., Sept. 28.—Miss
Rayda-need of Salt Lake and K. Toda,
a Japanese merchant of Los Angeles,
procured a marriage license here to
day and were married at the Japanese
Baptist mission" by Rev. T. Takaka
shl. The girl was arrested in Oakland
last week on complaint of her father,
and after it was found that she was
of age she was discharged.
The pair were refused a license In
Seattle and then came to Tacoma.'.
Here the deputy clerk of the court
Bald ' there, was no law against issuing
the license. '
Toda and his wife expect; to make
their homo In Los Angeles.
PRESIDENT AND ADVISERS
WORK ON ARMY ESTIMATES
WASHINGTON. Sept. 28.—President
Taft and hi« advisers worked today
on estimates to be submitted to con
gress at the approaching session.
Acting Secretary of War Oliver and
Major General "Vood, chief of staff
of Hje army, went over the war de
partment ostlmates with the cabinet.
A tentative draft of the postal bank
regulations was submitted to the presi
dent and briolly considered.
It had been th» intention to close
up tin "house party at the White
House today, but so much work re
mains that another session will be held
tomorrow and probably still anothor
nri Friday. President Taft expects to
return to Beverly on Saturday

xml | txt