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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, September 30, 1910, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-09-30/ed-1/seq-2/

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Judging by the comments heard during tha Fashion Show
this Is about the only Millinery Department in town show
ing more genteel than "freakish" hats.
;
Misses' [Thirty-one coat suits of broad
s3o to $40 cloths and storm serges —the
Suits ideal g arments f° r misses' school
wear —to be sold tomorrow at
ill 0.75" $19.75 each; heretofore priced
*r* -/—s3o to $40.
* On Sale And 26 splendidly tailored suits of lighter mate
c . A „ rials reduced from $25 to $13.75.
Saturday [ (Main Floor, Rear.)
t
« , I That word "Bargain" is not mis-
Clothing applied—they ARE Bargains.
Bargains $4.65 for double-seated Knickerbocker Suits of all
—— ' wool Tweeds, Worsteds and Cheviots, worth up
to $8.50. And the $10 to $15 values at $6.25. Eight to six
teen-year sizes.
Boys' double-breasted Corduroy Pants—built to stand
many months of hard —specially priced at $1.65. Eight
to sixteen-year sizes.
(Main Floor, Rear.)
' • ./.
— ZTT As advertised yesterday over a
*™ er thousand pairs of women's 35 c
Sales and 50c stockings go on sale' this
For Today | morning at three pairs for fifty
' ". CENTS.
Women's one-clasp pique gloves of the class generally sold
elsewhere at $1.50 for $1.10. '
J. W. ROBINSON CO.
235-239 So. Broadway 234-244 So. Hill Street
The.Home ot I
i -Jart Schaffner & Marx
Clothes
Statue •* JUncnt 11.
Around The World
I By the "OFFICE BOY"
"One reason for the discontent
that fills the land just now is that
pork chops cost us just as much as
we once paid for cow."
I heard a man say that Ms wife
made him let bis hair grow long in
view of the high price of living,
that It would pay to save his comb
ings.
Our now fall goods are nearly all
in and we have gone over them
carefully, and we can truthfully say
to you that we are offering better
values for fall in every department
than we ever offered since we first
embarked in business. True, our
margin of profit hi very small, but
our immense output makes up for
that. We'd rather sell 100 Silver
wood bats for $3 each on a 10c net
profit than tea for $3.50 each on a
60c net profit. The same is true of
our $15, $18, $20 and $25 cuits, our
50c and 750 neckwear and in every
other department In our six big
stores.
The Old Han's slogan to every
buyer is, "give more and buy only
the best goods made." Why, If the
pubiio could know, as every sales
man in a Silver-wood store knows,
the excellence and value of our new
fall goods, w* wouldn't be able to
wait on half the people who would
hurry here to get a share of them.
Every article we sell is true in
character and price and may be
depended upon to give months of
good service, for no article i* taken
into our stocks at any price that
does not worthily represent Silver
wood quality to the customer who
buys it.
EITHER STORE
F. B. SILVERWOOD
1221 south spring Los Angeles
Sixth and Broadway
Bakersfleld. Long Beach
San Bernardino Marlcopa
Harvest Festival
and Baby Show
- Under the Auspice* of the
PAKENT-TEACJII3IW ASSOCIATION
for the benefit of the
KEDEBATJON OF^rHK^ CONGRESS OF
Saturday, October I, 1910,
Hu n t.B«t«« o H..lT«r«- i «;« h . ana Main Street.,
, rom 10 a. m. to 6p.m^ M| 3p m
Admi«lon 10c. - .Luncheon Served.
HOOKWORM MAY BE BAR
TO ORIENTAL ENTRANCE
Federal Officers Find Disease Is
Prevalent Among Immi
grants from Far East
SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 29.—A dis
covery that may prove far-reaching
In its effect on Oriental Immigration
to this country has been made, it is
announced today by Dr. M. W. Glover
of the Angel Island immigration sta
tion hero.
Ills discovery is that the Hindu Is
a victim of the hookworm disease, i >f
seventeen Hindoos now being held at
the hospital on the Island, all but five,
it Is stated, have been fuund to be
suffering from the malady.
It is further announced that two
Chinese immigrants, the only ones of
that race to be examined, have b_een
shown to be afflicted with hookworm.
A federal statute debars aliens af
flicted with dangerous contagious dis
eases from landing in this country.
That hookworm falls under this classi
fication/is the contention advanced by
those who profess to see in Dr. Glo
ver's discovery the checking of furth
er Hindu, and perhaps other Oriental
immigration into this country.
The secret of the discovery, made
after extensive laboratory tests, has
been carefully guarded by Dr. Glo
er and his assistants, -who have been
engaged In the work of. analysis for
the last four weeks.
For the last, few months Hindus
have been entering this port at the
rate of over 300 a month.
Considerable agitation against the
Hindu invasion has been in evidence
of lato throughout the Pacific const
states.
E. C. MOORE ENTERS ON
DUTIES IN YALE COLLEGE
Former Los Angeles Educator
Takes Up New Work
NEW HAVEN, Conn., Sept. 29.—
■\Vlth the opening of Yale university
tor it;- 211 th year, six new pro
lie up the work of their
classes. i)f the six, throe are connect
ed with the {graduate school.
The !]■■» professors are Ernest C.
Moon ■ ny years superintendent
! 'iueles, who becomes
: "n; Albert F. Clay,
from the Unlvereity of Pennslyvunla,
who will in- professor of Assyrlology
and Babylonian literature on the Laf-
I'nii ; ■ tabllshed by J. P.
mi. Char!. M Lean Andrews,
from Johns Hopkins university, as
I "f American history; Allen
Johnson, from BowApln college, pro
i History; William
R. Vance, from George Washington
university, professor of testamentary
law in i he i i . and Bertram
Boltwood, I'-Min Cambridge, professor
;dio activity.
( im Ing to the ttb lence of I'rof. Arthur
T. Hadley abroad, Si cretary Anson
Phelps Stokes, Jr., will make tho an
nual matriculation addi
MURDERS WIFE AND BABE
AFTER NIGHT OF QUARREL
PHILADELPHIA, Sept. 29.—Follow
ing a night of constant quarreling with
Ma wife at their home In Oakvlew,
Delaware county, John Green, a car
penter and the father of nine children,
shot and pernapi fatally wounded his
wife early today and Instantly klled
their 13-mnntli.s-old child.
In the KhootinK a 16-year-old daugh
ter narrowly escaped death.
LOS AXGELES HERALD: FRIDAY MORNING. SEPTEMBER 30, 1910.
T.R. HOME WITH
OLD GUARD SCALP
Colonel Reaches Oyster Bay and
Adds Fresh Trophy to
Big Collection
TO START SOUTH NEXT WEEK
Will Campaign for Beveridge in
Indiana and for Lodge
in Massachusetts
(Associated Press)
OYSTER BAY, N. V., Sept. 29.—The
odore Roosevelt returned early this
evening from Saratoga with the scalp
of the Republican old guard of New
York state added to his big collection
of trophies.
When he reached Troy, N. V., last
Monday, on hit way to Saratoga, he
told the crowd at the station that he
had returned from Africa with a lot of
trophies, and that when he came back
from SaratoKa he would have some
more.
Col. Roosevelt went to bed early to
night to get a good night's sleep, for
he expects to have little rest until after
election. He was tired and hoarse when
ached Sagamore Hill, but in fine
spirits. He expressed himself as well
pleased with the result of the conven
tion, but had no other comment on any
thing relating to politics.
The colonel took a train from Sara
toga at 8 o'clock this mornig. Reach
ing Poughkeepsie at noon, he attended
a luncheon, drove two miles to the
Duchess county fair grounds, made a
speech there and returned to the sta
tion in an hour and a half. His
Poughkeepsie speech contained no ref
erence to politics except a repetition of
his assertion that corruption must not
be tolerated.
PLAN'S STATE CAMPAIGN
On reaching New York late in the
afternoon, he started at once for Oyster
Bay by automobile. He had no visitors
this evening, and said that he hoped to
have a quiet time for the next few days,
as there would be no let up when once
the campaign is fairly under way. He
has placed his services at the disposal
of the Republican state committee and
hopes to make at least one speech In
every county in the state.
In addition to the campaign at home,
Col. Roosevelt has a great deal to do
elsewhere before election time. A week
from today he is to start on his "south
ern trip, which will extend over a little
more than a week. On this trip he will
speak at Knoxvllle, Term., before the
Appalachian exposition; at Atlanta at
the Uncle Remus Day celebration, and
In Hot Springs, Ark. Then, turning
north, he will speak at Peoria, 111., be
fore the Knights of Columbus, and will
make a campaign speech in Indiana for
Senator Beveridge.
In the latter part of October the
colonel is to go to Massachusetts to
In]]. Senator Lodge by a campaign
speech, and to New Hampshire to speak
for Robert Bass, the Republican candi
date for governor. This trip probably
will be made October 21 and 22. Early
in November lie is to start for lowa to
make two campaign speeches just be
fore election. He has also promised to
go to Ithaca, N. V.. for a day's tour
of abandoned farms.
With thqse journeys to make in addi
tion to the campaign speeches that will
carry him all over his own state. Col.
Roosevelt says he expects to have a
fairly busy time of it. At his offices in
New York tomorrow the colonel will
hold some conferences to lay the ilrst
plans for the campaign.
RECALL STIMSON'S RECORD
IN SUGAR TRUST CASE
G. 0. P. Nominee for Governor of
New York 43 Years Old
NEW YORK, Sept. 29.—Henry Lewis
Stimson, nominated by the Republi
cans yesterday for governor of New
Y.uk, first came prominently into the
public eye as United States district
attorney for the southern district of
New York, to which he was appointed
by Roosevelt in January, 1906.
In his three years and two months
in office Mr. Stimson prosecuted the
so-called sugar trust and the New
York Central railroad for rebating and
secured the imposition of fines aggre
gating nearly $400,000.
Tho proceeding to compel the late
H 11. Harriman to answer questions
put to him by the interstate commerce
commission also was won by Mr. Stim
son. and his next court victory was
against the American Sugar Refining
company for fraud In weighing imports
of sugar. This case resulted In the
government recovering more than I'l,
--000.000 in duties.
Mr. Stimson was born In New York
city, September 21, 1867.
SHERMAN SAYS CONVENTION
DOMINATED BY ONE MAN
UTICA, N. V., Sept. 29.—Vice Presi
dent James S. Sherman of this city,
In speaking of the state convention,
said:
"I am entirely content with the re
sult. The platform is exceptionally
clear and forceful, save only in ref
erence to direct nominations.
"In that regard it needs explana
tion of Its meaning, and explanations
will differ. I preferred the minority
plank, which was clear and unequiv
ocal.
"The ticket named Is most excellent.
Of course, the convention was abso
lutely dominated by one man and its
every action was taken at his bidding.
That, however, 1 regard as not basic.
I accept the result complacently and
shall, of course, support the ticket
nominated."
TAFT CONGRATULATES STIMSON
WASHINGTON, Sept. 29.—President
Tatt sent the following telegram of
congratulation last night to Mr. Stirn
■on: "it Rivaw me the greatest pleas
ure to hear you have been chosen as
the Republican candidate for governor
of Now York. I sincerely hope and
believe you will be el Cted. You cer
tainly will be elected If the people of
New York wish to have aa their next
governor a citizen of the utmost civic
courage an.d disinterested patriotism;
a lawyer of eminent ability and a man
of the highest character."
HUGHES INDORSES ACTION
ALBANY, N. V., Sept. SB.—Governor
Hughes heartily indorsed the action
vi' the Republican state convention
ticket and platform. He paid a trlbuto
I" Henry I.- Stimsun, the nominee for
governor, ii whom ho sent a con
■ry telegram.
WOMAN ASKS PRIVILEGE
AS INDEPENDENT TRADER
Mrs. Mury K. Stoddard yesterday filed
In the superior court a petition to b«
made a sole trader —thnt Is, that she be
given the right to transact business
quite free from her hnsbnnd. She as
serts thnt the Intter, Percy C. StoddaH,
Is unable to support her and »be wants
to engage In the real estate business In
order to care for hersedf anl her minor
son by a former husband.
URGES THAT MINISTERS
TAKE PART IN POLITICS
Rev. Dana W. Bartlett Delivers an
Address at Methodist Con
ference in Fresno
FRKSNO, Sept. 29. —"Ministers should
take an interest in the political and
social welfare of their towns and cit
ies." assorted Rev. D. ,W. Bartlott at
the Methodist conference here today.
Rev. Mr. Bartlett is at the head of
the Bethlehem movement in bos An
geles.
"There is a great political and so
i'ial awakening going on In American
cities. It is not enough for ministers
to report ko many people have Joined
their Churches, or to tell at the con
ference of the sums raised for mission
work. They must tell of brothels
closed, of improved labor conditions, of
how towns go dry, if the church plays
its proper part in the creation of the
new America."
Memorial services for those who died
during the last year were the feature
of the conference today. The princi
pal address at these services was de
livered by Bishop Edwin Hughes of
San Francisco. Following the mem
orial services a business session was
held, during which reports from all the
ministers of the district were read and
enthusiastically received.
This afternoon a meeting of the Wo
man's Home Missionary society is be
ing held with General Secretary Dana
W. Bartloft and Rev. Charles Edward
Locke, both of Los Angeles, as the
principal speakers.
This evening there was a session
of the Freedmans' Aid and Southern
of the Freedman's Aid and Southern
Rev. Mr. Mason, a negro minister, de
livered an address relating to his race.
MANCHURIAN BANDITS
CARRY OFF IS CHINESE
Marauders Hold Merchants for
Ransom—Raid Town, Steal
$30,000 from Bank .
VICTORIA, B. C, Sept. 29.—Man
churian bandits made a raid on the
town of New Chwang, at the mouth of
the Liao river, early this month and
carried away fifteen wealthy Chinese
merchants to be held for ransom, ac
cording to advices received by the
steamer Sado, which arrived from the
Orient yesterday. The bandits stole
$30,000 from a bank and secured large
stores of arms and ammunition.. The
brigands, of whom there were'3oo, re
tired to a stronghold In the mountains
near An Tan Shien.
When the steamer left Japan the
bandits were surrounded by 600 Chi
nese troops and police from Hal
Cheng and Liao Yang. Operations
against the brigands began September
5, when a number of pickets and two
entrenchments were captured. The bri
gands have a large store of food in
the temple buildings In the mountains
and have settled down to withstand a
siege.
Artillery was being sent from Muk
den. A company of Japanese frontier
guards, who joined the Chinese and
sought to assist In the attack, were
ordered to return by the Chinese.
JAPAN FLOODS DESTROY
HOUSES OF THOUSANDS
Large Cities Inundated—Loss of
Life Not Over 100
VICTORIA, B. C, Sept. 29—The
steamer Sado has brought news of fur
ther disastrous floods in Jnp;m, affect-
Ing the southern portions, during the
early part of September.
Several large cities, including Kobo,
Osaka and Hiroshima, were inun
dated, while large areas were flooded
and several thousands were made
homeless. The loss of life was small
compared with the recent floods in
central Japan.
The total death list did not exceed
one hundred.
Severe storms with loss of twenty
three lives and much damage to prop
erty were also reported from For
mosa.
Heavy losses of life and property re
sulted from floods in south China,
northwest of Canton, where tho river
overflowed, Inundating ten villages and
small towns. Several hundred per
sons perished and the crops were de
stroyed. Famine probably will result.
FIND SKELETON OF HORSE
FOOT AND HALF IN HEIGHT
NEW YORK, Sept. 29.—The skeleton
of a horse which must have been about
the size of a modern fox terrier and
hud four toes has been found in Wy
oming by an exploring party sent by
the American museum of natural his
tory. The museum officials have Just
received the news.
The skeleton represent! the oldest
ancestor of the horse of today ever
found on the American continent. It
was about a foot a.nd a half tall and
resembled a hippopotamus and a tapir
as much as it did a horse.
FREDDIE GEBHARDT WILL
SHOWS LESS THAN $10,000
NEW YORK, Sept. 29.—The will Of
the late "Freddie" Oebharrlt was died
for probate yestciciay. The petition
Biiti forth that the one-time society
Ipader died worth leu than 110,000.
The will bequeaths the entire estate
io Mrs. .Mary Isabella Neilson. tin,
<;. iiiiunit'a iltter.
RULE OF TAMMANY
AWES CONVENTION
Charles Murphy Secures Votes to
Dominate Democratic Gath
ering in New York State
METZ APPEARS IN CONTEST
Shepard and Associates Have
Trouble Adjusting Feat
ures of Program
ROCHESTER, N. V., Sept. 29.— The
final conference to decide what candi
dates' names shall be laid before the
Democratic convention tomorrow began
at midnight In the rooms of Charles 1".
Murphy, lender of Tammany hull.
The two hours before this Mr. Murphy
had spent' In Tammany headquarters,
"taking evidence." One after the Vtlier
be received the candidates still In the
field, or from their representatives heard
their claims.
When be left the headquarters and
went to his rooms at the lintel Seneca
he was accompanied by Daniel .1.
Cohalan, J. Sargent Cram and National
Committee Chairman Norman B. Muck.
The word went around that this quar
tet, with the possible later addition of
other leaders, would continue the dis
cussion of candidates and reach a de
cision If It took them all night.
[Associated Press!
ROCHESTER, N. V., Sept. 29.— The
first session ot" the Democratic state
convention today was a brief inter
mission in the business that has
brought together here the delegates
of the sixty-one counties of New York
state. This business was tho selec
tion of a candidate for the head of
the ticket, and it promised to keep
the leaders out of bed all nUht.
The convention perfected temporary
organization, listened to a brief ar
raignment by the temporary chaiiman,
Alton B. Parker, of the Republicans
in general and the political aso'iul
ancy of Theodore Roosevelt at Siua
toga in particular, and then adjourned
until tomorrow afternoon to await the
Judgment of the leaders.
All questions of availability center
arounfl the wishes of the triumvirate,
of which Leader Murphy of Tammany
is the dominating personality; Dom
inick Cohalon, the mouthpiece, and J.
Sargent Cram, the adviser in chief.
Norman Mack, chairman of the na
tional committee, admits Murphy con
trols the situation. Out of 450 dele
gates he controls, with Kings county
led by John H. McCooey of Brook
lyn, and Erie led by William Fitzpat
rick of Buffalo, more than 200. Up
state leaders recognize tonight the
hopelessness of effecting any coaliti' n
strong enough to oppose him with any
show of success.
MIRPHY FACES HARD PROBLEM
The problem that Mr. Murphy faces
is one that needs all his caution, ex
perience and judgment. He must find
a candidate, who will be strong enough
to run at least even in the race with
Henry L. Stimson, backed by Theodoro
Roosevelt; one who will command the
support of Democrats of all shades of
opinion.
The names of Supreme Court Justice
James Gerard of New York and Mar
tin H. Glynn of Albany were heird most
often in the stream of gossip that
leaked from the conference. The sup
porters of James S. Havens appeared
less confident.
The latest arrival In the lists was
Sherman A. Metz, whose name was put
forward by, the Brooklyn delegation
when it appeared that the contest was
again open to all comers. It was still
anybody's race before the convention
met this afternoon.
The task of turning out a satisfac
tory platform appears to be giving
Edward M. Shepard and his associates
trouble. The Democratic league and
the progressive Democracy have united
in demanding a direct primary plank
broad enough to attract those who are
not satisfied with the efforts of the
Republican convention in this direc
tion, and it Is probable that the plat
form committee will carry out these
recommendations.
SIAIN M-AN'K DISCUSSED
There is discussion about which plank
should be the main one. Some de
clare that the tariff should be held
up as tho principal issue with the high
cost of living oa a corollary; others
favor direct nomination, while a third
group wants the party to push for
ward its denunciation of the "new
nationalism," which will, be Inter
preted to mean mainly principles ad
vocated by Theodore Roosevelt. Along
with this would be a defense of the
supreme court from Colonel Roose
velt's recent attacks.
Important meetings that may last
until long after midnight are in pro
gress by the committee on resolutions
and the committee on permanent or
ganization.
Representative William Sulzer says
he is losing no strength. Representa
tive James S. Havens is still sure he
tannof lose.
Edward M. Shepnrd said everything
he had heard today tended to encour
age him.
Laying aside all speculation, the sit
uation is this: What will Murphy do?
It was generally believed tonight he
would endeavor to make good his
promise of conciliating upstate senti
ment, but that if he found it impos
sible he would Jam through his own
preference.
Except for the address of Alton B.
Parker today, the opening session of
the convention was purely routine. Mr.
Parker's remarks were greeted by
scattered applause.
Real enthusiasm came when ho laid
aside his set speech and launched with
energy into a bitter attack on execu
tive interference in legislative and
judicial affairs and the ascendancy of
Theodore Roosevelt In the late con
vention at Saratoga, which, he said,
had been achieved by the aid of fed
eral officeholders in the face of In
sincere denunciation of machine rule
and the bosses.
At the conclusion of the speech the
committees on contested seats, perma
nent organization and resolutions were
named and adjournment was taken
until tomorrow.
JUDGE PARKER SPEAKS
ON PERILS OF DICTATOR
ROCHESTER, N. Y./Sept. 29.— Judge
Alton B. Parker, taking the gavel as
temporary chairman of the Democratic
state convention, Bald:
"Today there, are polltloal prophets In
otl^er lands who predict for us a speedy
AMUSEMENTS . 4,-;)
Eii^S Vaudeville |S3aS,r i
\ / miHoiTi I I C3k Presenting always th«
Paying particular at- WO ] lClCvl 1C *>e.t European and
tentlon to entertaining V CL VJ.V-I^^ V ***V Amprl can attraction..
parties and children. | I|l , :(i , >N i] S « MONDAY MATINEE I 1
"Tod o th' World" -, Minnie Dupree & Co.
lop o in worm _ —» „T he Mlnlgt , r . s wits."
Dancers come nwiot. Tolson
McKay & Cant Well MatinOC Late Star Dock.tad«r'« Mln.tr.l«
"On the Great White Way." T* « , . . . _, ,
Mr and Mrs Erwin -, . 6 Original Kaufmanns
Mr. and mrs.r.rwin TodaV^ World Famed cyclists.
Connelly "Sweethearts." * UU«/ !?.„-•
T ,. v-Ji-.- J_____^_ Mile. Renee
1 ne. Krags Ino l_ „. . ' aoddess of mu.io. ,
Trapeze Athletes. . Orpheum Motion Pictures. uooaeas
EVERY NIGHT—IOc, 25c, 500. 750. MATINEE DAILY—IOO. 250. "<>•
MOROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER "near Tsix?h.
A Splendid Revival "IF W% I f% \ §
This Week Only B I U U
Obey That Impulse J% I
Phone Your Order 'Now Inlj ij IJH H
PRICES—2SO, 60c, 76c MATINEES SAT- M Q%■Si IV U
URDAY AND SUNDAY. 10c. 25c. 60c. \
NEXT WEEK—"WHEN KNIGHTHOOD WAS IN FLOWER."
HAMBURGER'S MAJESTIC THEATER neTr^intJ:
LOS ANGELES' LEADING PLAYHOUSE—OLIVER MOROSOO. MOB.
/ SEATS NOW ON SALE.
' ''' ' ' Monday, October —One Week Only
'■__ — _ —. rnTorn/MkT' In her >r«at success.
Margaret ILLINGTON UNTIL ETERNITY
Prices 500 to II." Best Heats nt mat! neon Wcdnpaday and Saturday. $1. ■
ffOS ANGELES THEATRE
fcSlSs-I&I UDEViLLE
Matinee Every Day at 2:30— Shows Every Night at 7:30-9 _
Bon & ellis I DOROTHY DESCHELLE the mavvilles
LOZELLE I in LEW HOFFMAN
; ti"ope OHO-| THIRTY DOLLARS «—■*■"■■
IT'S TUB HOME OF VARIETY—-ALWAYS 10c, 20c AND 30c.
RAND OPERA house MATIN B o^S II?JSi. AJiI?AT:
V, OT;.r dr>m 1 The Old Clothes Man l^r^r' 1""^
TTnTTnDTTTVT "Theater I* E. BEHYMER. i
UDITORIUM Beautiful." Manager.
1 . *V REMAINDER OF MATINEB SATCIiDAV.
HERALD —Melodies Will Continue In Memory of Hearts. , •
TIMES —The Premiere of a Real Comic Opera.
EXAMINER —A Tuneful Hit.
TONIGHT'S PERFORMANCE BENEFIT McKINLEY'S BOYS' HOME.
$10,000— GORGEOUS PRODUCTION—SIO,OOO
AN HAWAIIAN MUSICAL COMEDY,
The Maid of.Manalay
BY HARRY QIRARD AND JOSEPH BI.F.THEN. AUTHORS AND PRODUCERS OF
"THE ALASKAN."
17 —Catchy Musical Numbers, All New—l 7
100 Pretty Girls, All Singers—loo
SEATS NOW ON SALE—NIGHT PRICES: 60c, 75c. 11.00, $1.50. SPECIAL BAR
GAIN MATINEE PRICES: 250 to >1.00. BOTH PHONES.
PANTAGES THEATER '
Now Opened, South Broadway
UNRIVALED VAUDEVILLE
STARS OF ALL NATIONS
B ARNOLD'S DOG AND MONKEY ACTORS MacLBAV * BRYANT
In their one-act comedy pantomime. "A In William Weston's Great Gambling Btorr.
Hot Time In Dogvllle." lncludln« the orig- "17-20 ON THE BLACK."
Inal Intoxicated canine. "DAN." MXLIOT BROS.
Greatest Comedy Animal Act on Earth - Comedy Musical Sketoh,
The International Comedienne, YALTO DCO
SOPHIE TCCKEB <'■■> Novelty Whirlwind Danoem
The 20th Century Singer. New York's Lat- MATTRICK BURKHABT
Th* 2 ast Noise in Vaudeville. Character Kinging Comedian.
MATINEE DAILY— SHOWS AT NIGHT. 7:30 AND 9:10. POPULAR PRICES—
10c. 20c. 30c.
Bt-it AOr»/-» 'rT-TTTATI?!? ■ Belasco-Blackwood Co., Props, ft Mgra,
lliLAowlJ lnc,«l Matinees Tomorrow, Sunday and Thursday.
—L.AST FIVE TIMES — B. STONE and the Belasco theater company pre
sent Clyde Fitch's most successful comedy,
- , GIRLS ==
' ! A rattling good comedy with a laugh every minute. Bee ltl
COMMENCING NEXT MONDAY NIGHT .
The Belasco company will give the .first stook production anywhere of George M.^
Cohan's great musical play. •
FIFTY MILES FROM BOSTON
Regular Belasco prices— 28c. 800 and 750; Matinees Thursday. Saturday »nfl
Sunday. 25c and 50c.
„..[- ATTTVTTO'DTTTIUr "THEATER I* B. BEHYMER.
Tttti AUDirUKIUJVI—' BEAUTIFUL." I* B. Manager.
HE AUDITORIUM— BEAUTIFUL." Manager.
I "ENTIRE WEEK OF MONDAY, OCTOBER 3—Matinees Wednesday and Saturday.
~ Engagement of Famous
NATIONAL POLLARD OPERA COMPANY
In a grand revival of Gilbert * Sullivan', world-famed comic opera. • _
THE MIKADO
Seat, now on sal.. Prices 25c. EOc, 75c. $1.00. y , w Mln ,. ter . ' .
beats now on aai «»- ATTRACTIO N-"Our New Mlnl.ter."
Pr>TXir<TJiOO TT-TTT ATTTW FlrBt Street. Near Spring.
RlNliirOO ltitiii\X.EjK Home of Clean Musical Comedy
Princess Musical Comedy Co. presents the stupendous Oriental travesty. "A
TRIP TO TURKEY." featuring the best musical stock company In the city
and a chorus of ten prettiest, daintiest dancing girls on the Paclflo coast. Even
ings, 7:45 and 9:13. Matinees Monday. Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday.
PRICES —10c, 20c. 25c. <
LEVY'S CAFE CHANTANT ;™««^"fSaslt.
""try the 1 levy PROGRAMMES— lengthen YOUR life—thb
royal hungarian grozien troupe of dancers: OTTO dobeB
BOUFI JULIETTE in Popular Song and Harmony; FERN MELROSE—The Girl with
the marvelous double voice; JEANETTE DUPREE—The Girl with the many .mile.,
and KAMMERMEYER'S ORCHESTRA. I j ■
Ot •VR/TTJTr 1 TT-ITJ 1 ATTTI? ' Main St., between Fifth and Sixth.
LYMPIC TH&AI&K. Cool, Commodious.
—Alphln & Fargo offer "THEY'RE OFF IN A BUNCH," the big fun handicap
by Bookmaker Chas. Alphln. playing Jules Mendel as the one best bet. An
attractive card of comedy. See the pony chorus in racy song and dancing. Prices —
10c. 20c. 25c.
BASEBALL— Coast League
LOB ANGELES VS. VERNON— Wednesday. Sept. 28; Thursday, Sept. 29; Satur
day Oct.' 1; Sunday, Oct. 2; Monday, Oct. 3. at Chute, park. 2:30 p. m.
Friday, Sept. 30 at Yernon. 2:30 p. m. -Sunday. Oct. 2. at Vernon. 10:30 a. m. La
dles' day every day except Saturday, Sunday and holidays.
coming of the dictator. There are in
our beloved country advocates of the
policy gradually to take from the peo
ple the home rule powers of the states
and confer them upon the federal gov
ernment. Others, still more progressive,
would not await the action of the peo
ple, but would seize coveted powers
whenever the passing whim or caprice
of an executive shall suggest it. In
deed, a president of the United States
has said, in substance and effect, that
if we 'fail to increase the federal power
through executive action, through Ick
lllatlve and through judicial construc
tion and interpretation of law, wo show
our impotence.' Nor is ho alone in this
advocacy."
Mr. Parker attributed the growth of
these now doctrines to the prevalent
unrest. This he traced to the belief
that the government In voted a few at
the co.st of all. He continued:
•The great bulk of the larger fortunes
have been wrung from the people
through the aid of direct legislation,
assisted by non-enforcement of law. It
Is true the. tiij-ift aid.s combinations to
iin trade, created for the purpose
of securing from the public every dol
lar which the tariff statute made pos
sible.
"The firnt tariff act was in 1789, and
the average duties were BV4 per cent.
Now the average is 50 per cent.
'The Republican party is responsible
for this increase, and for the thousands
of millions pf dollars that through it
have been taken from the people to
.■rente the swollen fortunes that Presi
dent Roosevelt denounces ho vigorously.
Strange, ll it not, that he did not sug
gest that the way to prevent their cre
ation in the future was to reduce the
tariff which trade them posslbhi?"
The subcommittee on resolutions"^
cided at a late hour toolltht to refer
all matter! to a subiommit eu com-
posed of Chairman Van Sant Voord,
Congressman Fitzgerald and John Co
halon, which Is to report at 11 o'clock
tomorrow and at noon the platform
will be presented to the full com
mittee.
Th/e platform will contain an attack
on Theodore Roosevelt for his arraign
ment of the supreme court and will
also denounce the administration of
Governor Hughes for alleged extrava
gance.
Justice Morgan J. O'Brien came from
the conference of the eladers shortly
after 2 o'clock this morning and said:
• 'There was a general discussion of
candidates. No less than a dozen or
fourteen names were mentioned, but
the conference selected no one and de
cided to meet aKain at 11 o'clock thin
morning, when they hope to agree on
a list-of the candidates before the con
vention convenes."
Just before the conference broke up.
Secretary Thomas Smith of Tammany
Hall announced the following fifteen
names had been mentioned In connec
tion with the head of the ticket and
road»*hem off in the following order:
Alton B. Parker, Edwin M. Shepurd,
John A. Dix, James S. Havens, D. Curly
Herrlck, Martin H. Olynn, James Ger
ard, Herman Bidder, William Sulzer,
Victor J. Dowling, Herman A. Metz,
Martin J. Keog-h, John S. Benael, B.
Howard Hutchiijeon and Thomas M.
OHborne.
Mr. Hutchinson was the only new
name on the list. He comes from Buf
falo.
When all thn othor leaders had left
Mr. Murphy himself appeared at' the
door and said:
"The candidate for governor will l)«
chosen from that list.
"Was then any significance In the
i rd( : in which liiu names wee given
outr

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