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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, October 01, 1910, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-10-01/ed-1/seq-2/

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■: A\j/*f* Boston Dry Goods SmE
Exclusive Los Angeles agents for the Trefoause kid gloves
Short, $1.65 to $2.25; long, $3.75 to $5.
~■ ' I Saturday — the day to bring
Toys your youngsters to our toy de
'■};[_ 1— partment. It will be a treat to
them, and will let you learn what
they would like best for Christmas.
(Fourth Floor, rear elevators.)
New gowns call for new corsets
Corsets —else the garments never will
J fit perfectly. Nine of America's
most popular makes here, and experi
enced corsetieres to see that you get
the proper model, properly fitted.
Js S£--_ The "Gossard" Corsets—they lace in
\^s"ts^) front —$3.50 to $22.50.
I/H*yj~]f The "Delice" Corsets, $5 to $16.50.
// A\*£m "Bon Ton" Corsets, $3 to $13.50.
«^A^W| "Nemo" Corsets., $3.50 to $5.
|OTL "Le Reve" Corsets, $3.50 to $10.
ill wik "**' D*" Corsets' $3-50 to $7's °*
il/nSft " c"B '" CorsetSi $1 to $5*
W*~l\ || "Kabo" Corsets, $1 to $3.50.
' '-J, Royal Worcester Corsets, $1 to $3.
' ''■ (Main Floor, rear.)
I —■ Yesterday's papers gave details of these sales for
SALES today-
FOR Misses' $30 to $40 coat suits of broadcloth and
Tftn ay storm serges at $19.75.
IUiIAI Misses' $25 suits of lighter materials, $13.75.
Boys' double-breasted knickerbocker suits of
all-wool worsted, tweeds and cheviots, worth up to $8.50,
for $4.65. And the $10 to $15 grades at $6.25; Bto 16-year
v sizes. . - •
/ ' Women's 35c and 50c stockings, three pairs for 50c.
J. XV. ROBINSON CO.
235-239 So. Broadway 234-244 So. Hill Street
APPLE CROP IN OREGON
LEADS WHOLE COUNTRY
PORTLAND, Ore., Sept. 30.—Accord
ing to statistics compiled by the de
partment of agriculture, Oregon leads
the United -States this year In apple
production.
The report shows that In September
Oregon had !>3 per cent of a full crop,
while Washington, the nearest com
petitor, had !(0 per cent of a full crop.
The report says that In the whole
country there is less than hnlf a crop
this year, the percentage being 46.8.
1 The Home of [
Hart Schaffner Marx
Clothes
En iiout* to Amblr Palace
Around The World
By the "OFFICE 80. '
This is Indeed India—the land of
dreams end romance, of fabulous
wealth and fabulous poverty, of
splendor and rags, of palaces 'end
hovels, of famine and pestilence, of
tigers and elephants, the cobra and
the jungle, the country of a thou
sand religions and two million gods.
I told a Hindu merchant one day
that I was glad I had never come
out there before. "Arc you?" he
said, with a glad note in his voice.
"Yes, beoauss if I had I'd be some
where else now."
India i* the one land that all men
desire to see. It is all new, all en
tirely different. But, honestly, I
never want to see It again. I want
to forget abeut It. True, there are
some delightful spots and beautiful
eights, like the Taj Mahal and many
other mosques and tombs which are
marvels of cost, magnitude «nd
rlohness of material and ornamen
tation wonders which do, Indeed,
make the like things In the rest of
the world look tame and inconse
quent by comparison. But to me
they were offset by the horrors of
the "Temple of Bilenoe" at Bom
bay and the publio cremations at
Benares, not to speak of the poor
natives I saw fleeing in every direo
t!or> and carrying their belongings
with th^m from the city of Jaypore,
where several hundred were dying
daily from the dread disease, bu
bonic pU.jue. We found moat of
the shops olosod and the streets
deserted, but we were not afraid,
because the British officers and sur
geons told us it was not contagious
as far as white folks wsre con
cerned. They claimed there had
been only one exception, and that
was • result of a man's having de
liberately exposed himself to the
disease. But I'd rather be a live
Callfornlan than i dead tourist.
I'd rather saunter down Broadway
or Bprlng street in my Hart Bohaff
ner & Marx Suit than be a Rajah
worth millions and sit on a throne
In India.
F.B.SHVERWOOD
1221 South BpH«9 Los Angeles
I Sixth and Broadway
I Bakersfleli Long Bead)
I Sin Bernardino Marlcopa
ELIOT ADVISES PUBLIC
DISCUSSION OF EVILS
President Emeritus of Harvard
Suggests More Activity Among
Teachers and Parents
CHICAGO, Sept. SO.—Lessons on pur
ity and the social evil should be
taught In the public schools, accord
ing to letters from Charles W. Eliot,
president emeritus of Harvard uni
versity, and John D. Rockefeller, jr.,
which were read at a conference held
here yesterday by members of the Illi
nois Vigilance committee, the Mid
night mission, and the American Pur
ity federation.
The conference was for the purpose
of meeting the members of the Purity
ition, who have begun a thirty
days' tour of the west and south.
At each stop of the delegation, lec
tures will be given and literature dis
tributed. They go to Minneapolis,
a to Winnipeg, where they will
f.ide Into two parties for work
through Canada, Joining again at Seat
tle. From there they will visit all
the Pacilic coast cities and return by
way of Houston, Tex., and Memphis,
Term.
In his letter, Dr. Eliot said:
"In my opinion the social evils and
diseases incident thereto ought to be
publicly discussed, that feasible reme
dies may be decided on and applied. I
am entirely convinced the policy of
silence upon these subjects has fail (1
disastrously. Another subject which
ought to be publicly discussed among
rs and parents is the addition to
iup choo] programs of instructions
In normal reproduction In plants and
animals, sexual hygiene In the human
Bpecles, and the horrors of sexual
vlOB,"
DESTITUTE DEFENDANTS
TO RECEIVE ABLE COUNSEL
Jurist Will Assign Prominent Law
yers to Needy Prisoners
CHICAGO, Sept. 30.—A new era
dawned for destitute defendants In the
criminal court yesterday when Judge
Scanlan abruptly altered the t^ystem of
assigning lawyers fo- the defense.
It has been customary for young
lawyers, admitted to the bar, to hand
their cards to the Judge when a num
ber of prisoners are arraigned, and for
the Judge to distribute the cards to
the prisoner! who have no lawyers
nor any money to hire one.
But a number of prominent lawyers
will wake up today to find out that
thrre Is a new system. .1 djre BcanUtn
calls It the "legal directory system."
It consists of taking the directory
of the city's lawyers, opening it at
random and taking the first prominent
namo noticed Instead of a youngster's
card. ,
SECOND FIRE THIS MONTH
DESTROYS ESTANCIA, N. M.
SANTA FE, N. M., Sept. . 30.—An
other of tho serious fires which have
almost wiped out the town of Estan
da, the county seat of Torrance coun
ty, eighty miles , south of Santa Fe,
In the last two months, occurred last
night.
The large mercantile establishment
of L. A. Bond & Bros, was burned to
tho round attar it had been robbed.
Tho loss is total and aggregates
$50,000. Within two months fires have
occurred at Estancla that have wiped
out the entire business section, de
stroying the court house and a number
of/ residences. i
LOS AKGELES HERALD: SAiURBAY MORNING, OCTOBER 1, 1010.
N. Y. DEMOCRATS
SELECT DIX FOR
STANDARD BEARER
State Chairman Finally Agrees to
Run for Governor of the
Empire State
FULL TICKET IS NOMINATED
When Independence League Is
Mentioned It Is Greeted with
a Storm of Hisses
ROCHESTER, N. T., Oct. I.—A state
conT«ntton that will go Into political his
tory as' one of the moat remarkable In .
the history of the Democratic party
closed tills morning by nominating John
A. Dix, chairman of the party's state
< committee and a wealthy Washington
county business man, to ran on a pro
gressive platform of the widest type.
Regarding: the platform, there was
from the first little or no division of
opinion.
Hut the candidate was not chosen un
til Charles l. Murphy, leader of Tam
many hall, who by virtue of bis 213
delegates was In a position to control
the convention, had canvassed the mer
its of no less than fourteen others.
"I said I would give them an np
state candidate, and I've done It," was
Murphy's^ comment following the nom
ination. '
[Associated Preen]
ROCHESTER, N. V.. Sept. 30.—John
A. Dix of "Washington county was
chosen candidate for governor by the
Democratic convention tonight, while
400 delegates to the convention waited
two hours In their seats for the for
mation of the slate.
The chief cause of delay was in the
difficulty of filling second place. Mr.
Dix had been selected and the other
places on the ticket had been settled
to the apparent satisfaction of those
who gathered In the rooms of Charles
F. Murphy, the Tammany leader, ear
lier In the evening.
Mr. Dix yielded tonight to the solic
itation of the leaders and agreed to
run. The rest of the slate was ar
ranged as follows
Lieutenant governor — Thomas P.
Conway, Clinton county.
Secretary of —Edward Lazan
ski, Kings county.
Comptroller—Martin H. Glynn, Al
bany.
State treasurer—John J. Kennedy,
Erie.
Attorney —Thomas J. Carmo
dy, Yates.
Associate Judge court of appeals—
Frederick Colin, Chenrung.
Mr. Glynn refused ■ the nomination
for comptroller and William Sohmer
of New York was substituted In his
place.
CONIVAY RELUCTANT
Mr. Conway said he was reluctant
to accept the nomination for lieuten
ant governor. It was said he felt his
county was too near that of Mr, Dlx to
make him a logical candidate.
When the leaders left the rooms of
Mr. Murphy at 2:30 this morning, af
ter a vain effort to agree on a candi
date, the majority of them were for
the state chairman, Dix. Unanimity
of opinion, however, was prevented
mainly by Mr. Dix refusing to run.
"I do not see how I could accept the
hanor," he declared. "I am afraid It
would leave sore spots all over the
state."
i Every influence was brought to bear
upon the unwilling choice. Several of
his relatives, his wife, his brother-in
law and his nephew, all of whom were
here with him, were sought out and
urged to try persuasion. But when
the convention met this afternoon for
the first session of the day. Mr. Dix
was still undecided. Pale and hag
gard, showing the strain under which
he was laboring, he called the conven
tion to order. The address of Per
manent Chairman Herbert X. Bissel,
the reading of the platform, the reports
of the committees and the adoption of
the routine resolutions held the dele
gates until :45, when the convention
took a recess until 7:30 p. m.
CONFERENCE RESUMED
The conference in Mr. Murphy's
room was resumed almost ne..ate
ly. Four hours later a committee < on
sisting of National Democrat c Com
mittee Chairman Mack arid John X,
McCooey, the Brooklyn leader, left the
room and went to Mr. Dix s suite.
There they told the chairman that the
leaders still held to their opinion that
he should run. Thin Mr. Dix capit
ulated.
Within five minuter the committee
returned to the conference and an
nounced his decision. S'Oii Dix him
self came out of his room.
"Yes," he said, "you may shake my
hand," srnillnjr like those wlio con
gratulated him. "But," he said, "I
don't know wuether you should con
gratulate me or not."
"He has shown himself a big man,"
was the comment of Edward M. Sn< p
ard. Mr. Sbepard uas the first 10
abandon his own cand da< y in favor
of Mr. Din. Mr. ]Jix h:id made it a
condition of his acceptance that all the
other candidates should promise him
their support. From how many he re
ceived this pledge could not be as er
tuined.
The question of the lieutenant gov
ernorship continued to give trouble.
Congressman James S. Havens, an
other candidate for first place on the
ticket, wan said to be the leaders' first
choice, but his tentative^ declaied
that under no circumstances would he
accept. Then Mr. Conway agreed to
accept the nomination.
LAST SKSSION I.ATE
The third and concluding Bes«ion of
the convention began at 10 p. m, two
and a half hours alter the scheduled
time.
Nominations for governor were
called for at once. "When Albany
county was called, Its delegates an
nounced they yielded to Washington,
the home county of John A. Dix.
Seymour Van Sant Voord took the
platform to put in nomination Mr. Dlx.
The nomination was seconded by
Thomas M. Osborne of Auburn, an
other candidate lor the same place.
J. M W. Sanbury nominated Wil
liam Sulzer of New York. Col. Alex
ander Bacon seconded the nomination
of Sulzer. He mentioned the indepen
dence league in thia speech, and this
brought a storm of hisses.
"Hiss, if you will," he Ehouted,
brandtehing his flats.
"Get' the hook!" yelled a voice In
the gallery.
By. this time the hall was In an up-
roar, with the chairman rapping vain
ly for order.
"Keep quiet:" urged Col. Bacon,
"and ril toll you a good story."
The Jirowd accepted the promise ana
suddenly hushed Its noise, only to
break out afresh when It railed to ap
preciate the story. Col. Hacon re
turned to his »eat after talking nearly
half an hour to make a spe.cn that
without Interruption would na^fe last
ed but ten minutes. /
This completed the nominations for
governor, and the delegates proceeded
to vote.
Mr. Dix received 432 votes to 1« for
Sulzer, and the nomination was made
unanimous.
NEW YORK'S DEMOCRACY
LAUDS OLD NATIONALISM
Platform Opposes Usurpation of
State Rights by Government
ROCHESTER, N. V., Sc-pt. 30.—The
platform adopted by the Democratic
state convention today contains the
following declarations:
. "The Democratic party of New York,
In convention assembled, pledges It
self anew to the old nationalism em
bodied In the constitution of the Unit
ed States and to the support In every
•way of the Independent and continued
existence of each of the three and sep
arate and distinct branches of the fed
eral government; preserving all from]
attack and usurpation and each from .
any possibility of encroachment by the
others, and in particular we condemn
all attacks on the supreme court of
the United States.
"We are unalterably opposed to any
usurpation by the federal' government
of the rights of the states.
BETRAYAL BY REPUBLICANS
"We denounce the Republican party
in the nation for its gross and ...willful
betrayal of the trust reposed Ik it by
the people, and point out that the de
clared and expressed promise to re
vise the tariff downward, upon which
the Republicans, obtained office, has
been willfully disregarded and ignored.
"The Payne-Aldrich tariff law, pro
nounced by President Taft to be the
best tariff that the Republican party
ever passed, was a flagrant breach of
faith by the Republican party. The
bill even increased the exactions of
former Republican tariffs and has
placed great additional burdens on the
shoulders of the average man. ■■■ ■ ■
"We charge the Republican party,
both in nation and in state, with gross
extravagance in public expenditures,
with creatißfe many unnecessary offices
and adding to the public pay rolls
thousands of useless officials. We I
pledge ourselves to retrenchment and I
reform, and to the economical admin
istration of public affairs.
"Even this gross extravagance Is
overshadowed by •disclosures forced
from a reluctant Republican legisla
ture of official corruption, betrayal of
public trust and flagrant and open
bribery, which have astounded and
horrified the citizens of the state and ,
almost made the name of the New
York legislature a hissing and a by
word in the mouths of decent men
throughout the country.
DIRECT PRIMARIES FAVORED
"We declare in favor of state-wide,
direct primaries, to insure the people
the right to choose members of po
litical committees and nominate can
didates for Juhlic office.
"We favor the popular election or
United States senators. ■»
"We favor an amendment to the fed
eral constitution to permit the impo
sition by congress of an Income tax.
"We recommend the extension and
development of the parcels post so as
to increase the weight and size of
parcels which may be carried by
United States mail.
"The profit of public lands and water
power sites preserved to the people
at large, and as the value of these
natural resources and returns from
them increase, whether from develop
ment or otherwise, the state ■ should
benefit in the largest possible measure
consistent with the honest enterprise
of the present generation. We con
demn the malfeasance and incompe
tency of Republican administration of
the forest reserve. We demand strict
and impartial enforcement of the for
est laws, Including Immediate abol
ition of unlawful special privileges in
lands dedicated by the law to the use
and benefit of all the people."
NEW NATIONALISM SCORED ,!
The platform concludes with a de
nunciation of the "new nationalism"
as follows
"Lastly, we solemnly declare our in
flexible opposition to the so-called
•new nationalism.' Its inventor put
this forward as if it were progress,
while in reality it is sheer reaction to
tyrannical methods long ago shaken
off by the free people of the world at
cruel cost in treasure and blood. The
settlers of our country fled from Eu
rope to escape It. Whatever advance
its adoption would be is an advance
toward Socialism. They would have
us abandon freedom. They would re
duce the states to prefectures gov
erned from Washington. They would
clothe the president with power to de
clare what Is lawful—a power usurped
by one president In the case of a giant
corporation absorbing a competitor.
"Such a 'new nationalism' would lay
the meddling hand of a bureaucracy
on every Industry, increasing the bur
dens of taxation, making the struggle
for life still harder and compelling
every American workman to carry on
his back a federal inspector. Against
all the exaltation of federal central
ized power to the destruction of home
rule, against this despair of repre
sentative government, against this
contemptuous impatience of the re
straint of the confidence that the peo
ple of this state and of this nation,
will'not forget the noble heritage of
their past, but on that foundation will
build the still nobler progress of their
future." •
KIN OF NOMINEE'S FATHER
ONCE NEW YORK GOVERNOR
Dix Was One of the First Official
Gaynor Boomers
NEW YORK, Sept. 30.—John A. Dlx
Is 50 years old, having been born In
Clenns Falls. N. V., in 1860. He grd
uated from Cornell university in 18-2.
I fin business career he began with a
lumber firm.
In 1889 he married Miss G rtrutle
Thomson. In politics Mr. Dlx first i»
--i mi- prominent as chairman of the
Democratic county committee of
Washington county, a position which
indirectly led to his forming a county
chairmen's organization, in which he
strove for more power for the cnair
n'on as against state commltteemen.
Two years ago, with Ivwls Stuy
vesant Chanler, as head of ticket, -Mr.
Dlx was the Democratic nominee for
lieutenant j?ovornor.
At the liuffalo convention in 1906
Dlx received seventeen votes for X"V-
Last June Mr. Dix succeeded W. J.
Conners of Buffalo as chairman »f
the Democratic state committee. Since
that time he has been touring the state
Interviewing county leaders and as
certaining the sentiment for gov
ernor.
Returning to New York not long
ago, he spoke of decided Oaynor sen
timent, and with this utterance was
one of the first official Gaynor
boomers.
In 1872 John A. Dix, a cousin of the
nominee's father, was governor of
New York.
PARKER AND DIX SHOW
RELUCTANCE IN CONTEST
Chaotic Conditions Prevail at the
New York Convention Opening
ROCHESTER, N. V., Sept. 30.—
Everything was undecided, not to say
chaotic, when the Democratic state
convention was called to order today
for Its second session, an hour and a
half after the appointed time. Con- i
ferences that lasted through most of
the night and all the morning to set
tle on a candidate for the governor
ship had been fruitless except as they
brought Into view as possible nomi
nees John A. Dix, chairman of the
state committee, and Alton B. Parker.
Mr. Dlx was not a willing candi
date, but there were indications that,
if he be assured of the support of
those who are avowedly in the field for
the nomination, he would accept the
honor. Mr. Parkers attitude was
even less clearly defined.
Before the leaders repaired to the
convention hall it was announced that
after the permanent organization had
been effected, am", some routine busi
ness transacted, adjournment until
evening would be taken in order that
a decision might be reached as to a
nominee for governor.
Mr. Parker, as temporary chairman,
called the convention to order. Herbert
P. Blssell of Buffalo, permanent chair
man, shortly took the platform and
addressed the convention.
Mr. Bissell addressed the conven
tion, in part as follows:
HIGH AIMS OF PROGRESSIVES
"We have come together as a repre
sentative body of Democrats—of pro
gressive Democrats —who are faithful
1 to the sound principles of government
advocated by the founders of the
American republic and the framers of
the American constitution, but who
are progressives in the purpose to ap
ply those principles. to the solution of
present problems and the eradication
i of existing evils.
"At the present time we find through
out the country many Republicans
who call themselves 'progressives,' and
when we analyze their progressiveness
we are gratified to find that in most
cases it consists In the condemnation
of their I own party's 'standpaf dis
honest tariff revision, and their ad
vancement to the advocacy of tariff
reform so long and so consistently
urged by the Democratic party.
"We are pleased, too, to find that
this progressiveness has led to the
adoption of recommendations made by
the last Democratic president for the
regulation and control of Interstate
public service corporations, and of the
recommendation so eloquently urged |
by the last Democratic candidate for
president, for the prevention of cor
rupt practices and the interference of
corporations in politics, by insisting
on the publication of campaign con
tributions before and after elections.
RECKLESSNESS OF REPUBLICANS
"Today we find the profligacy and
recklessness of Republican administra
tion calling for the appropriation by
each congress of the fabulous sum of
two billions of dollars. A compari
son of the last four years of Demo
cratic administration with the last
four years of Republican administra
tion, illustrates with graphic and tell
ing force the strenuously spendthrift
phase of Rooseveltism and its feeble
proxy, Taftism. (
"It is our duty to present to the
people the plain facts, and I cannot
believe that their attention will be di
verted from the real and momentuous
questions to be determined at the No
vember election by any amount of
spectacular claptrap or copybook plat
itudes about honest and virtue tumul
! tuously reiterated by the unique and
, entertaining lion hunter, who, in the
wilds of Africa or in the midst of the
splendors of European courts, seems
to' have entirely forgotten his share
of responsibility for this carnival of
extravagance, excessive taxation and
dishonest tariff revision.
DEMAGOGIC APPEALS FAIL
"The patriotic business men ' and
workers of the country cannot long be
misled by impulsive and rackless at
tack* upon the supreme court, but ill
considered and reckless attacks upon
the business organization of the coun
try, whether good or bad, or by de
magogic appeals to passion and pre
judice.
"The Democratic party is now and
always has been loyal to the principles
advocated by the founders of the re
public. We are not in sympathy with
the doctrines of a so-called 'New na
tionalism' which disregard self-regard
and forget the limitations of the con
stitution.
"We are opposed to this dangerous
tendency to a further centralization of
power in' the national government. We
are upholders of the Democracy of old
nationalism."
FIRE IN BREWERY CURBED
AFTER EIGHT HOURS' FIGHT
CHICAGO, Sept. 30.—More than a
half million dollars' damage was done
by fire which attacked the Gottfried
Brewing company's grain elevator to
day. Members of several hose com
panies narrowly escaped death under
falling- debris, while all buildings In
the neighborhood were endangered by
firebrands which blew far on the
strong wind.
When the walls crumbled in the fly
ing embers set fire to nearly a dozen
adjacent buildings, but firemen were
stationed in the lee of the blaze and
no damage was done. Several railroad
lines found their service cut off for
half an hour by hose along the track.
The firemen fought eight hours bo
fore controlling the flames.
CHILD WRITES TO STORK
ASKING FOR BABY GIRL
NEW YORK,'Sept. 30.—The following
letter, addressed to "I>r. Stork, c«re
Superintendent of Central Park," ban
Im-.u received by the park authorities:
"Dear Dr. Mtork: I would like to
have a baby girl, but If jou have no
Bin. please send a baby boy. I have
only one bis brother and I would like
to have a babr to play with. Send It
for a Christmas or New Year's preaent,
If possible.
(Signed) "MAnTHA fiRANTZ.
"9 years old."
"P. H. —Be sure not to bring a baby
girl and boy, too, deputise It will be lira
UMU'U."
AMUSEMENTS , -:, \
Knew*
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Paying particular at \i O \"l f_l VlllC *">•* European and
en lon to entertaining V GIU.VJ.V V A**V American at traotlona.
jladlea and children. | BEG , NIaNG MONDAY MATINEE L . .. - '
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lOp O XII WOriQ __ Mlnlatar". Wlf*." ■■--'iK\
Dancers com. B»uet. Al Tolson
McKay & Cant Well , Matinee Late Star Dockstader-. Mlnstr.l.
Mr.andMrs.Erwin 1" T^ 6 Original Kau^mann,
Connelly -sweetheart*- * uu»jr " Renee
The Krags Trio OrpheuL Motion Picture. Ooddei of music '
Trapeze Athletes. Orpheum Motion Pictures. Qoddeas of Music
, EVERY NIQHT— 15c. 80c 7»O, MATINEE PAILT— lOC »•• »•«•
MOROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER Mn B ar ßlswt2:
WHEN KNIGHTHOOD
WAS IN FLO'WERj,
PRICES—JSC 50c. 750. MATINEES SATURDAY AND SUNDAY. 10c. 180. B»e. .
HAMBURGER'S MAJESTIC THEATER . n^ar Anint_:
LOB ANGELES' LEAIIINO rLATHOCSE—OLIVEU MOKOSOO, MOB.
SEATS NOW ON SALE. '
Monday, October —One Week Only
Margaret ILLINGTON UNTIL ETERNITY
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DOROTHY DESCHELLE C& CO.
AND 6 OTHER FEATURE ACTS
MATINEE EVERT DAT—PRICES ALWAYS 100, 10c. 3»0. THBJ HOME) OF VABIETI.
„„. T>. Mn AnnWi xir»TT<5T? ~ MATINEES TODAT AND TOMOBBOW..
Q D . Mn nT>vaa. rIUUOa . phone. Main and tomorrow..
KANIJ Uf&liA tUJVOiii Phone* Main 198 T. Home A19«7.
IT Last Two Times Today. Commencing Tomorrow M»tln«e;_, „ '
V-4 "THE OLD CLOTIITS9 MAN." "TUB COWBOY ANl> THK SQUAW."
CAN'T FAIL TO BEE THE THRILLING BRONCHO BUSTINQ EXHIBITION.
ATTT«TTr»T?TTT'M' "Theater I* E. BEHTMBR,
UDITOKIUM Beautiful." Manage*
MATINEE TODAT, »:15— PERFORMANOB TONIGHT.
GORGEOUS PRODUCTION—SIO,OOO
1 THE HAWAIIAN MUSICAL comedy.
The Maid of Manalay
BY HARRY OIRARD AND JOSEPH BLETHKN. AUTHORS AND PRODUCERS OF
. , "THE ALASKAN." /
17 —Catchy Musical Numbers, All New—
100— Pretty Girls, All Singers— loo
HERALD—Melodies Will Continue In Memory of Hearts.
TIMES—The Premiere of a Real Comic Opera. ,
EXAMINER—A Tuneful Hit. f ..
SEATS NOW ON SALE—NIOHT PRICES::' «()£ 7(k>. 1100. I1.B». SPECIAL BAR
PAIN MATINEE TRICKS: tie to 11.00. BOTH PHONES.
PANTAGES THEATER
Now Opened, South Broadway
UNRIVALED VAUDEVILLE
STARS OF ALL NATIONS
BARNOUVS IMV) AND MONKEY ACTORS ' MacUGAN — BRYANT ' _
In {heir one-act comedy pantomime. "A In William Wa.ton-« Great O.mbll», Stor,.
Hot Time In DogvUle." Including the »rlg- "IT-JO ON THE BLACK,
lnal Intoxicated canine. "DAN." UXLIOT BROS. v^
Ureateat Comedy Animal Act o» Earth Comedy Musical Sketch.
Th* I^llr?vc_lr_*~" i w-.t/m™ .S2^»«*
Th. JOth Century Binder! Now Tor*. _*- MACRICE BCRKnABT
Noll . in Vaudeville Character Singing Comedian.
MATINEE DAILY—TWO SHOWS AT NIOHT. 7:80 AND »:10. POPULAR PRICES—
100. 20c. 100. ____________-_——————-—————■— —-—-—————————
B nl »er»/-» TUPATP'R BelMco-Btackwood Co., Prwpa. A Mgrs. •
ELAotJvJ 1 tltUt\ i. i_.i\ Matinee. Today, Tomorrow and Thursday.
—last FOUR TIMES—LEWIS S. STONE and th* Belasoo theater company pre
sent Clyde Fitch's most successful comedy, • ;
===== GIRLS =====
_ rattling good comedy with a laugh evanr minute. Baa It I
COMMENCING NEXT MONDAY NIGHT -
The Belaaeo company will give the first stock production anywhere of Oeona M.
* Cohan'. graax musical play.
FIFTY MILES FROM BOSTON
Regular Belaseo prices-eights. 26c, 80c and 78c; Matinee. Thursday. Saturday and
Sunday, 25c and 60c.
TtE , ATTr»T-rr*T?TTTM -theatbr L. B. BEHTMER.
HE AUDITORIUM— BEAUTIFUL." Manager.
ENTIIIE WKJSK OF MONDAT. OOTOBKR B—Matinee* Wednesday and Saturday.
Engagement of Damons
NATIONAL POLLARD OPERA COMPANY ,t
In a grand revival of Gilbert * Sullivan's world-famed oomlo oser*. -
THE MIKADO
Seats now on sale. Prices 35c too. Tso, |1.00.
Beats now «ra NEXT ATTRACTION-"Otir New Minister."
LT3«^r\7»O r>AT?T? rHAMTANT THIRD AND MAIN BTS.
EVY S CAr —■ CrIAXM IAN i , „,„ and 10:30 daily.
—TRY THE LEVY PROGRAMMES LENGTHEN TOUR LIFE—THH
ROYAL HUNGARIAN OROZIEN TROUPE OP DANCERS; OTTO DOBES
BOREL JULIETTE, In Popular Song and Harmony; FERN MELROSE—The dirt with,
the marvelous double voice; JEANETTE Dtjpree— Girl with th* many smiles.
and KAMMERMEYER'S ORCHESTRA.
OT VK/rTJTr* THI7ATT7P ■ • Main St., between Fifth and Sixth.
LYMPIC ititiAlatf. Cool, Commodious.
Alphtn & Fargo offer "THEY'RE OFF IN A BUNCH." th* big fun handicap
by Bookmaker Chaa. Alphln. playing Jules Mendel a. th* one best bet. An
attractive card of comedy. See the pony chorus In raicy song and dancing. Price.—
10c, 20c, ISO- ' — i
BASEBALL— Coast League
LOS ANGELES' VS. VERNON— Sept. 18; Thursday, Sept. It; Satur- #
day, Oct. 1; Sunday, Oct. 2; Moaday, Oct. S. at Chutes park. 1:10 p. m.
Friday, Sent. 30. at Vernon. 2:30 p. m.; Sunday, Oct. 2. at Vernon. 10:10 a. m. La
dles' day every day except Saturday. Sunday and holidays.
Special Trolley Events
for Saturday and Sunday
_Kl__j_Sfl_fa _■ ' ' ' '
MT. LOWE
Special excursion rates for Saturday and Sunday $2 round trip. The world's
most beautiful mountain trolley trip. Reaches from Orange Groves to "To
Alpine Tavern," the famous mountain Inn, 5000 feet above the sea. Every foot
of the way Is vividly Interesting and entranclngly beautiful. Through cars
i, 9, 10 a. m., 1:30 and 4 p. m. -
LONG BEACH
IHE GEM OF THE PACIFIC. Special band concerts on the strand afternoon
an'" evening. Dancing at the Majestic. Finest surf and plunge bathing on the
ccast. First, class entertainment only, on the Pike, the walk of a thousand
lights. ,: : > I
HUNTINGTON BEACH, NEWPORT, BALBOA, NAPLES
AND POINT FIRMIN'
All offer a variety of amusements for beach-goers, while the ride along the
Through valleys and orange groves—take Monrovia, Covlna and Qlendora
C_L_*l
Other points of Interest: Rublo Canyon, San Gabriel Mission, Cawaton
Ostrich Farm and Sierra Madre. __..___
Fast, frequent service from Sixth and Main streets Terminal Station.
Pacific Electric Railway"
SULU'B BULTAN BOUND HOME
CHICAGO, Sept. 30.—Hadji Mo
hamad Jamalul Kiram 11, more com
monly known a« tin- sultan of Sulu,
arrived here today from Washington.
As he in bookec to sail October 3 he
will leave thin city tonight for San
Francisco.
START FOR FARM CONGRESS
DENVER, Sept. 30.—A Colorado dele
gation to the Dry Farming congress at
Spokane left Denver this afternoon in
cluirKe of George R, Martin, general
agent In Denver of the Rock Island
railroad. Mr. Martin will be one of tit*
speakers at the congress,

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