OCR Interpretation


Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, October 14, 1910, Image 3

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-10-14/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 3

MOISSANT OPINES
FLYING EASY ART
Aviator Declares Learning to
Guide Aeroplane Is Like
Walking on Stilts
PERIL NO GREATER THAN AUTO
Birdman Is Only In Air Twice Be
fore His Paris-to-Lon
don Flight
[Associated Press 1
NEW TORIC Oct. 13.—John B.
Molssant, the American aviator, who
drew the attention of the world by
his flight from Paris to London, de
clares that learning to guide an aero
plane ls about as easy as learning to
write or walk on stilts.
Mr. Aioissant is preparing his quar
ters at the Belmont aviation field ln
anticipation of making; some trial
flights before tho opening of the in
ternational tournament, >--, ■'..'■ V
"There is no great mystery or great
difficulty about operating an aero
plane," he said to a committee of the
International meet officials, when
they received him at Belmont park.
"Everybody will realize this very soon
and the next generation wll} use
aeroplanes as we are now using auto
mobiles. The perfection of the flying
machine ' from now on will be very
rapid and its perils will be found to
be no greater than the perils of burst
ing tires and skidding wheels and
faulty automobile machinists.
"Every person who makes a flight
In an aeroplane comes back to earth
with the same Impression. He tells
you that It was a delightful experi
ence, that it was something new, that
he was not a bit scared and is crazy
to do lt again. That tells the whole
story. When I made ray flight from
Paris to London I had been in an aero
plane but twice before.
"When I announced that I intended
to make the flight, Latham, Lo Blanc
and Bleriot said I was crazy and
laughed at me; when I said that I
was going to take a passenger they
thought I had gone stark mad. The
passenger— of my mechanicshad
never been In a machine before.
"I had never been north of Paris
and knew nothing at all of the route,
but I had a map and a compass in
front of.mo and had no difficulty in
getting to\ Calais.
« "I went up very high when I start
ed to cross tho channel, took a gen
eral course toward England and shot
away on the flight. It was no trick
to cross the channel, as It was only
24 or 25 miles wide, which could be
covered in a few minutes."
RADLEY, ON TRIAL FLIGHT,
■ FALLS IN GUST OF WIND
NEW YORK, Oct. IS.—James Radley.
the English aviator who arrived
three days ago to take part In the In
ternational aviation meet at Belmont
park, met with a mishap while making
a trial flight today.
His machine was caught by a gust of
wind and turned completely over,
■mashing.the propeller and the front
supports and bending the engine shaft.
.. - ...__ .-., ..............
JAPANESE AND CHINESE
CLASH IN MANCHURIA
Racial Troubles Threaten to
Cause Complications
VICTORIA B. C, Oct. 13.—News of
trouble between Japanese and Chinese
in Manchuria was brought by the
steamer Awa Maru today.
Following "the Issuance of orders re
cently by the viceroy of Manchuria
that all foreigners must reside only in
open cities, thirteen Japanese living in
Hailungcben wore thrown into prison
by the local magistrate for refusing to
obey the orders.
A strong protest has been made by
the Japanese consul general at Muk
den. At Chang Chun another dispute
took place as a result of the stoppage
of Col. Morita's carriage by Chinese
police, who inquired If the carriage had
boon registered. The Japanese colonel,
who was in full uniform, tried to force
the driver to go on, but the Chinese
interfered and took the colonel and the
carriage to the police station.
Col. Morita addressed telegrams to
Toklo, saying that the behavior of the
Chinese officials in Manchuria toward
Japanese was becoming Intolerable.
BROADWELL TO ANSWER
NEW CHARGE OF PERJURY
CHICAGO, Oct. 13.—William Broad
well, the butterine "moonshiner" who
was brought from the federal peni
tentiary at Fort Leavenworth to tes
tify before the federal grand Jury In
the oleomargerlne Investigation, ls
charged with perjuryln an indictment
returned today. . . '
. He Is alleged to have sworn falsely
in denying he ever received from Wil
liam J. Moxley, a corporation, or from
any . ■ persons, • wrappers bearing the
words "United States Inspected and
passed," and in denying he ever or
dered butterine or oleomargerlne from
the Moxley company in the name of
auy bakery.
SEEK TO HAVE WHITES
SETTLE AMONG INDIANS
WASHINGTON, Oct. 13.—1n the hope
of. insuring the settlement among In
dians of a desirable class of white men,
the Indian bureau > promulgated today
a new set of regulations for the sale of
surplus lands held by Indians. •- The
principal feature ls a provision for de
ferred payment in the purchase of In
dian lands. ,
The new rules require the immediate
payment of only ten per cent of the
purchase price and allows five years
for the completion of the transaction.
HUGE WATER POWEft AVAILABLE
SEATTLE, Oct. 18.—The states of
Oregon and Washington contain one
third 'of the available water power
energy in ' the United < States and . be
tween six and i seven r million horse
power can be generated in '-. the two
states, according to Fred F. Henshaw,
hydrographer of the .: United States
Geological survey, who' lias had charge
of measuring the flow of Pacific
northwest rivers during the last two
years. _HB___H
BANK CLOSED, GOVERNOR
HAS TO BORROW CASH
ORANGE, N. jr., Oct IS.—Although
Governor John Franklin Fort of New
Jersey recently signed a bill which made
Columbus day ' a legal holiday in ' New
Jersey, and which compelled state of
fices, schools and banks to close on that
day, he forgot all about it yesterday and
went to hi* bank In East Orange to get
some cash. lie found i the doors closed
and waa much surprised.
He asked the cashier If It would not
be possible to have the bank opened
temporarily, a* be was abort of money.
He waa told the time lock on the
vault was set for-this morning. There
was nothing for the governor to da bat
call on friends for aid.
JAPANESE CONQUERING
FORMOSA HEAD HUNTERS
String Wire Entanglements in the
Jungle and Force the
Natives Back
VICTORIA, B. C, Oct. 13.—Lieut.
Gen. Koizumi, who commanded the
Japanese forces in the Formosan cam
paign against the natives, has Just re
turned to Japan. He says that the
Japanese soldiers are now engaged In
making wire entanglements with
strings of block houses, pushing for
ward their line, and no fighting is go
ing on at present. Preterits of millet
and fruit were sent to the Japanese
troops by the enemy shortly before he
left, and he had returned presents of
bread and tinned, provisions. ;_• ;
Meanwhile the plans to pacify or ex
terminate the Formosans are going
forward. The Gaogan tribe ls giving
the most resistance, the Japanese
losses against them being 200 killed.
The Formosans, when they kill an
enemy, devote much energy to decapi
tating him and carrying away the
head„ and many strenuous fights have
taken place to rescue bodies from mu
tilation. The Formosans against whom
the campaign is progressing—
tribes—number about 120,000, and they
have about 25,000 rifles.
HARRISBURG CONTRACTOR
ADMITS FALSE PRETENSE
Conspiracy Charge Withdrawn.
To Restore $14,000
HARRISBURG, Oct. 13— attor
neys for Charles G. Wetter of Philadel
phia, a former member of the con
tracting firm which built the state cap
itol, today withdrew Welter's plea of
not guilty of false pretense in render
ing certain bills for alterations in the
new building and . entered a plea of
nolle contendre. «.
This means that Wetter places him
self ln the hands of the court. At the
same time the commonwealth agreed to
drop the charge of conspiracy brought
against the accused man.
The state claims In this particular
case lt was defrauded of $14,000 In a
bill of $97,000. After the plea was en
tered the case was stopped and the at
torneys on both sides announced they
will take up the matter of restitution.
HALT PREACHER'S TRIAL TO
LET JUROR MARRY COUPLE
Kansas Sweethearts Think Lucky
to Wed 6 P. M.
FORT SCOTT, Kas., Oct. 13.—Be
cause two sweethearts, each more than
fifty years old, believed that 6 o'clock
in the evening was the luck time to be
married, the trial of Rev. J. M. Mason,
a Methodist minister, charged with dis
honesty • and . untruthfulness, was
stopped for thirty minutes yesterday. .
The Rev. J. B. McKenzle, one of the
Jurors, had promised to marry Nathan
B. Manning, 09 years, and Mrs. Mary
Bearman, 56, promptly at 6 o'clock.
, Shortly before the^tlme for the cere
mony the minister arose and asked the
presiding officer to excuse him. This
was done after the attorneys for both
sides had agreed. '..-•
FIND 56 PER CENT OF PUPILS
ARE PHYSICALLY DEFECTIVE
KANSAS CITY, Oct. 13.—According
to the report of Dr. W. S. Wheeler,
health commissioner of this city, 9504,
or 56 per cent of the pupils in the
Kansas City publics schools have been
recommended for treatment because
of mental or physical defects found.
Of the number, 1292 were mentally
deficient and the others were suffer
ing from malnutrition, hypertrophied
tonsil, defective eyes and ■ defective
teeth. . • -
FORMER GOVERNOR OF
KANSAS PASSES AWAY
. WICHITA, . Kas,, Oct. ; 13.— W. E.
Stanley, former governor of Kansas,
died at his home here today of hard
ening of the arteries, from which he
When Sportsman ran away he had
been afflicted also with Intestinal
troubles.
Former ■ Governor Stanley was born
in Hardin county, Ohio, in 1848. He
was elected ' governor ,of Kansas in
1898 and was re-elected in 1900. He
was a Republican. • •■_.'
FRENCH VOYAGEUR DIES IN
SAN FRANCISCO, AGED 85
SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 13.—John
Baptlste Truvleo, said to be .one of the
last of the French^ hunters/and trap
pers who came across the, border from
Canada, died . yesterday at Marshall,
Marin county. .
Truvleo was a member of the relief
expedition sent from Fort Sutter. ln
Sacramento to carry supplies to the
111-fated Dormer party, which was lost
in the Sierras in pioneer days. He was
85 years old. ||»IWII<IJ|SHB_Mj|gHBM
COAL OPERATOR BANKRUPT
NEW YORK, Oct. Thomas H.
Watkins, formerly a prominent coal
operator with offices here, filed a vol
untary petition in ; bankruptcy in- 'ho
United States circuit, court today He
places his liabilities at.51,275,549.with
assets of $586,841.
LOS ANGELES HERALD: FRIDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 14, 1910.
NEW HOSPITAL IS
ODD INSTITUTION
Rockefeller's Money Backs Fine
Infirmary for Aristocracy
of Ailments
TREATS RICH AND POOR FREE
Commonest and Rarest of Dis
eases to Be Studied in
Germ-Proof Rooms
! - [Associated Press]
\ NEW TORK, Oct. 13.—A new hos
pital, the most completely equipped
building of Its kind in the world, is
to be opened ln New York Monday
next. It Is an Integral part of the
Rockefeller Institute for Medical Re
search, and Its aim will be the "In
tensive study of a few selected dis
eases."
The diseases selected for admission
at the beginning are infantile paral
ysis, pneumonia and heart disease, the
last two being so widely prevalent that
they cause • an alarming increase in
the death rate. Infantile paralysis, al
though numerically less important, has
made terrible ravages in its outbreaks.
The new institution adds only about
seventy beds to the hospital resources
of New York city, but Its work ls ex
pected to be of the very highest Im
portance to the medical and scientific
world. ,
ILIMXO GERM-PROOF
The whole building Is practically
"germ proof." Each room is Isolated
from every other room and all the air
supplied to the various wards and cor
ridors la sterilized before being ad
mitted/
The resources of the ordinary hos
pital must be used primarily to treat
all diseases with which a community
might be afflicted. This is not the
mission of the Rockefeller Institute.
It will select a small number of dis
eases and only patients suffering from
these diseases will be admitted during
the period that their ailments are un
der treatment and study. . .
No physician connected with the hos
pital will be allowed to engage in out
side practice or to consult with re
gard to outside cases.
The hospital is to be free. Not even
the wealthiest patients will be allowed
to pay any fee for either treatment,
hospital expenses or drugs. The only
requirement is that his ailment must
be rare or be one of those on which
the medical profession is divided, or
one the fraternity frankly admits that
it knows very little about. The hos
pital, therefore, ls not for the rich or
for the poor; lt 13 for the aristocracy
of ailments. - ' UM ;AV:"
PROGRESSIVES TO DRAFT
ARIZONA CONSTITUTION
Corporation Attorneys Left Off
Important Committees
of Convention
PHOENIX, Ariz., Oct. 13.—The ap
pointment of the standing committee
in the constitutional convention today
demonstrated predictions that Presi
dent Hunt would divide the principal
chairmanship assignments among the
progressives only. While , there are
several . attorneys among the delegates
who are. known to have corporation
affiliations, none ' received an Impor
tant committee assignment.
The chairman of the labor commit
tee Is a miner.! Another is a switch
man and a third a machinist. 'Chair
man Jones of the committee on elec
tions 'is a sheepman, while the head
of the committee which will handle the
prohibition question is a cattleman.
Prohibitionists made the claim today
that two members of the latter com
mittee are pledged to their cause, and
It is certain there will be a minority
report If the committee rejects , the
proposal to submit to the people a
state wide liquor prohibition amend
ment. . .." ' - ' <L v. \ /
.The woman suffragists also appeared
today in force, and began an individual
campaign among the delegates.
The committee on rules announced
that it would be ready to report to
morrow The convention will then
start the actual task of constitution,
making. ■ ■ „
ESCAPED PRISONER FEARS
DETECTION; SURRENDERS
Kansas Oonvict Returns to Serve
Out His Term
LEAVENWORTH, Kas., Oct. 13.—
Preferring to return to prison rather
than to be continually hounded by the
belief that he was being pursued by
detectives, John Sportsman, an escaped
convict, I surrendered - himself - at the
Kansas state prison in Lansing' yes
terday. • . " '
Sportsman and John Wllgus, both of
whom were trusties, escaped from the
prison several months ago. Sportsman
went to Missouri and obtained a posi
tion on a farm. But the fear that he
was being spied upon by detectives
worried him greatly, and yesterday he
walked back to prison to give himself
up. Going into a prison stable, he
called a deputy warden ' over a tele
phone and said:
"I'm here, ready to give - myself up.
I'm thoroughly tired of running away
from detectives." r
•i When Spotsman ran away he had but
eight months of a , five-year term to
serve. Now, because of his escape, he
will not be released until April, 1912.
Wllgus has never been located.
CARUSO'S INJURIES SLIGHT
NEW YORK, Oct. 13.—Dispatches
were received in New York today say
ing that Enrico Caruso, the famous
tenor, who suffered Injuries in • the
Munich opera house last Tuesday night
at a „ performance of "La Boheme," is
improving. One message from Caruso
himself reads: "My neck and legs are
stiff. It might have been worse. Pres
ent health excellent." "
■Two tough Jobs:; Raising the. Maine and
th»* Republican party. , .
' If , pro3i»erlty • crowds you. give • him a
deed to moro. territory.Atlanta (Cl*..) Con
stitution. rv..,si_MUMl>______H________f <
HOLIDAYS AND FUNERALS
CAUSE MINE SHUTDOWN
AURORA, 111., Oct. 13.—-A coal mine
"at BracevUle, 111, ha* J_rt been closed
because the worker* celebrated too many
holiday* and attended too many fun
erals. •';"•'-•' '•'"■-.'
Explnlnlng why the shaft was closed
for good, the mine owners declared j It
was short-handed so many days It could
not be run at a profit,
Itrncevllle 1* an old town where nearly
every one belong* to a lodge of some
1 Ind, and when a funeral occurs the
lodge member* must attend.
GOVERNOR ISSUES CALL
FOR COAST CONGRESS
Asks the Co-Operation of Pacific
States' Officials for a
Bigger Fleet
SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 13.—At a
meeting of the Merchant Marine league
today Governor GUlett signed the fol
lowing self-explanatory call for a Pa
cific coast congress:
"The„ honor of your presence is re
quested as a guest of a Pacific Coast I
congress, to be held in San Francisco
November 17 to November 19, inclusive,
under the auspices of the Merchant'
Marine league of California and the
commercial organizations of California,
to discuss the urgency of merchant ma
rine legislation, the maintenance of a
strong battleship ileet on the Pacific
coast, the permanent .organization of a
Pacific coast congress to meet annual
ly and the consideration of the Pacific
coast expositions. (Signed)
"JAMES N. GILLETT,"
; ■*.' • "Governor of California."
' The call will be sent immediately to
the United States senators, United
States representatives, governor and
lieutenant governor of the following
states and territories: Washington, Or
egon, Idaho, Nevada, Utah, New Mex
ico, Arizona, Hawaii and Alaska.
This formal call is to be supplement
ed by a statement setting forth in de
tail the objects of the congress, the
expenses of which have been assured
by members of the Merchant Marine
league. '--'.-;'.-.■■;',y
SIX NEW STEAMERS ARE
ORDERED BY JAPANESE
Nippon Yusen Kaisha Line Is
Weeding Out Old Ships
VICTORIA, B. C, Oct. 13.—Six new!
steamers, two of which have been or
dered in Japan, are to be built to re
place the steamers now used by the
Nippon . Yusen Kalsha in ' the trans
pacific service to Seattle. Orders were
placed with the Kawasaki dock yard
company of Kobe and the Mitsubishi
company of Nagasaki for two steam
ers of 6000 tons registered tonnage to
maintain an average speed of twelve
knots and the vessels will be followed
by four others.
The construction of new liners for
the transpacific line Is being hastened
owing to revision of the deep sea
navigation protection law. In conse
quence of revision Japanese firms are
weeding out did steamers of between
4000 and 6000 tons.
The Toyo Kisen Kalsha Is to aban
don its service between Hongkong, Ja
pan, and Mexico. The Japanese sub
sidiary law forbids the receipt of sub
sidies from other countries and the
Japanese company considers that line
unprofitable without the subsidy of
$10,000 per trip paid by Mexico.
DEVELOPMENT BOARD
REPORTS BANK CLEARINGS
SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 13.—Bank
clearings for the week ending at noon
today were as follows, according to
figures supplied by the California de
velopment board:
San Francisco, $41,137,097.12, an In
crease of 6 per cent.
Oakland, $2,950,712.30, Increase 60 per
cent,. —'.' -i '
- Sacramento, $1,581,541.36, increase 35.8
per cent. .'-: % ,s
San Diego. $1,117,8.-.77, increase 20
per cent.
Fresno, $773,724, Increase 19 per cent.
San Jose, $673,473, increase 2.3 per
cent. ".-.'■
Stockton, $613,902.41, increase 3 per
cent. •■ ■ : , >■ *■'-." r•!..*&*
Pasadena, $658,630.57 (no report in
1909).
STOCKHOLDERS AMERICAN
SHIPBUILDING CO. MEET
JERSEY CITY, N. J., Oct. 13.—The
stockholders of the American Ship
building company at their annual
meeting here today re-elected the old
board of directors and the directors
re-elected James C. Wallace president
and other officers of the company.
The report of President Wallace for
the - year ended ■ June 30, 1910. showed
gross earnings for the year of $1,980,
--654. The net earnings were $834,322.
There was a surplus of $7,903,974. To
tal assets, June 30, were $24,929,615.
The company built and completed 23
vessels and has now under contract
12 vessels. ■■'■■•.
RAILROADS WILL AWAIT
FREIGHT RATE DECISION
WASHINGTON, Oct. Official an
nouncement was made by the inter
state • commerce commission today of
the suspension until February l next of
the proposed advances in freight tariffs
in official classications, western trunk
lines, transmlssourl and Illinois freight
committee territories. The suspension
was made voluntarily by the carriers to
enable the commission to consider the
proposed advances.
PANAMA CANAL EXPENSE
TO DATE IS $248,002,668
WASHINGTON, Oct. 13.—1t is esti
mated that $47,920,848 will be required
to* continue the construction of.- the
Panama canal during the fiscal year
beginning July 1 next.
The total estimates are slightly less
than those submitted for, the current
fiscal year and are about $10,000,000 in
excess of the appropriation for that pc-
riod. .' The total appropriation on ac
count of the canal to date is $248,002,068.
TUBERCULOSIS TO
BE HARD FOUGHT
Effort Started to Get Hospital
Beds for All the White
Plague Sufferers
LARGE FUND IS NEEDED
Million Dollars to Be Raised for
Needy by Sale of Red
Cross Seals
[Special to The Herald]
NEW YORK, Oct. 13.—What "A Mil
lion for Tuberculosis from Red Cross
Seals" will do in the checking of con
sumption is explained in a bulletin Is
sued today by the National Associa
tion for the Study and Prevention of
Tuberculosis.
Counting every available bed for
consumptives in the United States,
even those ln almshouses, penal Insti
tutions and hospitals for the insane,
there are at the present time accom
modations for hardly 30,000 tuberculo
sis patients. This is just about one
bed for every ten indigent consump
tives and if ail tuberculosis persons in
the countrty are counted, both rich and
poor, hardly one for every twenty-five
or thirty. If sufficient hospital accom
modations are provided for only those
who are too poor to pay the full price
for their treatment, fully 275,000 more
beds in special institutions for tuber
culosis would be needed at once. The
immense outlay necessary to provide
and maintain so many beds in hos
pitals makes it imperative, the Na
tional Association for the Study .and
Prevention of Tuberculosis declares,
that such Institutions be erected from
public money, either municipal, county
or state. In order to get appropria
tions for public hospitals for tubercu
losis, agitation is necessary and in or
der to create a campaign of agita
tion, organization is demanded. But
In order that an organization may carry
on an effective campaign funds are
needed.
WILL SELL SEALS
These funds It is proposed to secure
In as many communities as possible
from the sale of Red Cross seals.
The national association cites one il
lustration of the way in which a small
sum spent in education has secured
large appropriations. The New York
State Charities Aid association In the
three years, 1908, 1909 and 1910, has
spent In the up-state portion of New
York about $55,000 in arousing the peo
ple to the dangers of tuberculosis. As
a direct result of the public senti
ment produced by this outlay the
state, cdunty and municipal authori
ties have* already appropriated for tu
berculosis work $1,500,000 and appro
priations for* hundreds of thousands of
dollars are pending. Hundreds of hos
pital beds have been provided and the
association already aims for "No Un
cared for Tuberculosis in 1915."
Thus, the national association says,
If $1,000,000 is realized from the sale
of Red Cross seals, millions more -will
be added to it from the public treas
uries. Last year 25,000,000 stamps were
sold. It is aimed this year to sell four
times as many _■ V
BOYS COMMIT 70 PER
CENT CHICAGO CRIME
Judge Blames Churches for Not
Reaching Young
CHICAGO, Oct. "The most stag
gering fact that confronts the student
of the criminal courts of Chicago is the
fact that from 65 to 70 per cent of the
criminals going through the courts are
boys between the ages of 16 and 25
years, the surest evidence that this
great city is not developing morally as
rapidly as'it is physically and mental
ly," said Municipal Judge John R. New
comer last night, In an address to the
Concordia league. :'.:'.
' "One great reason why this Is true Is
that the churches of Chicago are not
doing the work they ought to do for the
upbuilding of the city and in looking
out for the young boys and men. • .•---.
"We must not expect that the fresh
blood that comes pouring in from the
country will keep Chicago's moral bal
ance. The first blood to contract the
great immoral contagion in the wicked
city is in the veins of the boy who
comes from the country, and who does
not know what- confronts him in the
great city." j-'" ■•'*',.
JEALOUS HUSBAND MAKES
ATTACK ON DIVORCED WIFE
OAKLAND, Cal., Oct. This
morning Miss Etta Scott, a clerk In
the employ of the Southern Pacific in
San Francisco, was 'slashed on the
throat with a razor by her divorced
husband,' Thomas Kelley, Just as she
was leaving her . home for her dally
labor, and disfigured for life. The at
tack was caused by Jealousy.
Kelley attempted to make his escape,
hut was captured by D. Harrison
Doyle, a sweetheart of the victim,
who was close at hand when the crime
was committed. The couple were mar
ried in Shasta county, but were di
vorced a few years ago.
OFFICERS FINISH PROBING
OF ANNAPOLIS HAZING
ANNAPOLIS, Md., Oct. 13.—The
board of officers appointed by Superin
tendent Bowyer of the naval academy
to Investigate alleged hazing of fourth
class men by upper class men last
week has completed its labors and sub
mitted Its findings to Capt. Bowyer.
The accused midshipmen are J. W.
Anderson of Washington state, W. H.
Brian of Ohio, Jenlper Garnette of
Virginia and Howard Bode of Ohio,
all members of the first class.
What recommendations Superinten
dent Bowyer will make to the navy
department are not known.
MAN WITH BOMB AT HOME OF
MRS. PALMER FOUND INSANE
CHICAGO, Oct. 13.—Fred C. Wahl
enmeyer, who two weeks ago appeared
at the residence of Mrs. Potter Palmer
with a bomb In his hand and whose
mental condition has been under ex
pert observation since that time, was
declared to be insane in the county
court today.
<»In all probability Wahlenmeyer will
not be prosecuted In connection with
the bomb incident.
The Kingsbury
ffliP W '\*V \mfJr' /P^ %J
W^Wji^^^ At Its Low Price
•WiWl IV/T^IS THE BEST PLAYER PIANO ON THE
i'/ivVoi ' Fl)^ MARKET.
\\ \\<V/ ' It has an instantaneous transposing device.
li wiW It changes to any desired key. '"'}''.
/JV.fCe.c-' It will play softer than any player on the market
YV, Q *l'l and not skip any notes at any tempo.
_*X*~?*i> It picks out the solo with the "solo aid" lever.
5r v«i—" It lias small pneumatics and pumps easiest of
them all.
There is a reason for the above claims. Come in and let us prove them.
The "Inner Player" comes In four sizes and styles, from $Cao to $900.
EASY TERMS— OLD PIANO TAKEN IN EXCHANGE, . ,
IT PAYS TO TRADE WITH A BIG ORGANIZATION. if
—< s ———__—a—— mi i 'V^T~mmm m m m mmW
.t /■ <r\ _* _i Please Mall Me Catalogue of
416"10 bOUtU INNER PLAYER-PIANO.
Name :....•••-••• >|.. .:
Broadway -_™
' J CUT OUT AND mail
Who's Looney Now?
ft/Z. The men who came to me a year ago and
. ■ J_3r' wanted suits at $14, when I promised $25
J_Mpk _•$ values, were told they were crazy. Those
—JraTVrX .MmmmW same men have been coming back to me
J#, 3 _»I_ls_r right along and are better dressed today
__] J*",fefssSd!ESsF than their sneering friends in their $25
|WKjßp*flSy r ready-made hand-me-downs.
A "I^^lWf I just bought $15,000 worth of the finest wool
/«*_""_§fli IW ens or spot cash at a Sacrifice Price and can
111 do better than ever for you"
li I L i *°r ••• • •
Guaranteed $40-™ Suits for $14__
D Jt^dm***Jr^ I_sm^ —jtf£ff\ T_f W M Ysf§fi C_9 WfSf M_ J __——_—--.
__»_^ I H9H AMm ___^B Open
___f9 __flE_k_*_k_________l _■__■ ____! I Evening*
liߧ3 H 13^jiST_IImI _T_H -_» EP___^ I IT©! r^SSB
____jW__l H b ■ "*H___^** 1~1 *^_p__b « B_.t_i 5* WF-**^ ■___________-__________■
I anfflC__L-__»»»^___r-_____-________-____^__-___H^__-_-__-_rf
Third Floor Exchange Building, Corner Third and Hill Streets
SAN DIEGO SHERIFF HUNTS
JOR FLEEING MEXICANS
Santa Ana Fugitives Seen Near
Elsinore Going South
SAN DIEGO, Oct. 13.—Acting upon
Information from Elsinore, the sher
iff's office and members of the local
police force are watching all roads
into this county and leading toward
San Diego for the two Mexicans, Ro
sarlo Siaz and Jose Marcias, who es
caped from the county Jail at Santa
Ana last Sunday. It was stated to
day that the two desperadoes were
seen near Elsinore Tuesday night and
that they were keeping back in the
hills and were traveling south. ..'■;.
It is believed they will eventually
make their way across the line into
Mexican territory and will not be re
captured until the trail is taken by
Mexican rurales. They are armed
with two rifles and a revolver and
have, it is said, but one round each
for the rifles and five cartridges for
the revolver.
LAWYERS CHARGE POLICE
CHIEF WITH PREJUDICE
SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. Attor
neys for Joseph, alias Kid, ' Sullivan,
charged with vagrancy, presented affi
davits before Judge Doasy today,
charging that Chief of Police Seymour
was prejudiced against their client,
and asking that a special elisor be ap
pointed to summon Jurors for the trial.
Attorney O'Connor argued the motion
for Sullivan, and the case went over
until next Tuesday, when the police
will be asked to submit affidavits deny
ing the prejudice.
CHILD MYSTERIOUSLY AND
PERHAPS FATALLY INJURED
STOCKTON, Oct. 13.—Mystery sur
rounds the probable fatal Injuries sus
tained last night by the 3-year-old
son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hawkins of
this city. The child was found on
East Main street suffering from a frac
tured skull and four broken ribs.
A man was seen to pick the child
from the street and carry it to the
porch of the Hawkins home, but his
identity is not known. Whether the In
fant was struck by a car, automobile
or other vehicle cannot be learned.
HUNTER ACCIDENTALLY KILLED
SAN JOSE. Oct. 13.—Robert Pear
son of Hollister was accidentally
killed yesterday while on a hunting
trip near Gorda. While William Ball,
a companion of King City, was carry
ing a rifle over his shoulder It was
discharged. The ball lodged In Pear
son's breast and' he died ■ almost In
stantly.. He was 22 years of age and
leaves a widowed mother.
LOS ANGELES BAPTISTS.
END THEIR CONVENTION
South Pasadena Chosen for the
Meeting Place Next Year
BAKERSFIELD, Cal., Oct. 13.—After
hearing the reports of all of the com
mittees and choosing South Pasadena
as the meeting place next year, the Los
Angeles Baptist association closed at
noon today. The woman's missionary
society convention was held this after
noon and the young people's convention
will be held this evening.
The officers elected for the ensuing
year are as follows:
Moderator, H. M. Overton of Glen
dale; vice moderator, H. F. Bralnerd of
Los Angeles; clerk, George Taylor of
Sawtelle; treasurer, A. P. Griffith of
Azusa. The executive committee con
sists of W. B. Purceval of Los Angeles,
W. O. Custer of Covina and T. S. Tomp
kins of South Pasadena.
The session closed with an address by
President J. N Field of the University
; of Redlands.
FINANCIERS TO CONFER ON
BILL OF LADING QUESTION
NEW TORK, Oct. 13.— drafting
of a bill of lading mutually acceptable,
to American and British financial in
terests will again be taken in hand to
day at conferences between the sub
committee of the American Bankers'
association and Sir Sir Edward Hol
den, chairman of the English bankers'
committee. ,
The meeting, which was held last
Tuesday, adjourned without decision
having been reached.
BRITISH BANKERS FIRM
LONDON, Oct. 13.—The English and
continental bankers are standing pat
on their original demand that Ameri
can cotton^, bills of lading be guaran
teed by American banks. There have
been no developments in the contro
versy so far as this side is concerned.
CLAIMS HE IS LINEAL
DESCENDANT OF COLUMBUS
PITTSBURG, Oct. Caesar Co
lumbus of Eastville, Pa., appear. 'I In
the United States circuit court hero
yesterday and declared he had , been
waiting for Columbus day before ask
ing for naturalization papers.
Columbus was born at Mazittl, Italy,
July 4, 18S7, and has been In this coun
try since July 23, 1905. He said ho
could trace his lineage without a break
to the man who discovered America.
The poet and humorist, Fred Emer
son Brooks, will give his Inimitable
entertainment nt the Y. M. C. A. Fri
day evening, October --14 . Open to
everybody. General admla.'.ou U cent*.
3

xml | txt