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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, October 25, 1910, Image 13

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NEWS FROM NEIGHBORING CITIES
PASADENA
Correspondent—-
He*, phone
Sunaet 4807.
OTTTCB, »0 WKWT COIX>RA I>O STHRKT. Phone* 8827. I
WILL PLACE LIGHTS AT
CARMELITA PLAYGROUND
Commissioners Authorize Estab
lishment of Two 3000-Can
dlepower Arc Lamps
PASADENA, Oct. 25.—The bonrd of
city commissioners yesterday, with the
indorsement of Mayor Karley, author
ized tin; municipal lighting department
to install two 3UUO candlepower flaming
arc lights at Carmolltu playgrounds) to
enable citizens to play basketball,
handball, indoor baseball and tennis
;it night. Arrangement! will be made
whereby the lights can be shifted to
meet the requirements ot the ground*
for the present and It is planned to
install auditional lights at somo future
tlmo. The cost of Installing is esti
mated at $150. "Juice" will be fur
nished by the city lighting plant.
The proposition of calling for a bond
issue to purchase Carmellta play
grounds and the Monk hill site for tlia
city was discussed Informally by tho
board of trade directors lust evening
and referred to a future meeting of tho
directors. It is thought a scries of
iin. tings will be arranged with nu
merous men's clubs and other organi
zations of the city to familiarize the
members with the plan for a recren
tlon park and casino building which
will house a museum and other fea
tures besides providing a meeting
place for largo conventions. It is also
planned to make tho place a rendez-
VOUI i'or tourists and residents.
MOONDAY LUNCHEON TO
BOOST ROSE TOURNAMENT
I'AfiADENA, Oct. 25.—Tho board of
trade directors last evening at a spe
cial session voted to Indorse the sug
gestion of Mayor Earlfy's all-civic
committee for a noonday lunchcan "for
the purpose of boosting the Pasadena
Tournament of Roses." Friday noon
i Hotel Maryland was selected as tho
time and place for the affair. W. W.
Ogler, J. W, Edminston and Andrew
S. AHfMi wore appointed to work In
conjunction with Secretary Kerton
neau to arrange for the luncheon and
program.
Tin.- directors also authorized Presi
dent Qeohegan to appoint a commit
ipo of three as recommended last
wick at M man meeting of cltlsena to
Cunda for furnishing the board
of trade roomß to conform to other re
eenl Improvements at the board's
headquarter*:.
The advertlalnc committee was au
thorized t<> lltue a board of trade ad
vertising booklet sotting forth the
• harms and advantages of Pasadena
as outlined In previous plans which
call for an edition de luxe.
PASADENA SOCIAL NOTES
PASADENA, Oct. 25.— engage
ment of Miss M. Helene Fitzgerald
and Edwin K. Sorver was formally
announced yesterday by the fiancee's
mother, Mrs. H. A. Fitzgerald, 244
South El Molino avenue. Each of the
engaged couple is popular in Pasa
dena's younger social set. Mr. Sorver
Is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Sorver,
272 South Madison avenue, and Is as
sistant secretary of the board of trade,
secretary treasurer of the Amateur
Astronomical society and acts as co
operative weather observer for Pasa
dena.
Commander and Mrs. Ford Brown of
Altadena entertained the New York
Avenue Card club last evening. Twen
ty members of the club played five
hundred, while a juvenile table was
arranged for many youngsters who
were present.
Mrs. H. O. Cattell, 362 South Los
nobles avenue, will entertain this
evening at her home for Chapter F
of the P. E. O. Visiting members of
the order are invited to be present.
A halloween party for all the boys
and girls In town is being arranged by
Superintendent and Mrs. Swarthout of
Carmelita playgrounds. The affair
will be held next Monday evening from
7 to 8:30 o'clock.
SUGGESTS SELLING CYCLE
PASADENA, Oct. 25.—"You might
sell your motorcycle," declared Justice
McDonald yesterday to A. E. litian,
who stated that he was unable to pay
the $15 fine imposed for speeding. Iman
declared that he had never been
"pinched" before, and asked to be let
off easier. Justice McDonald replied
that if the motorcyclist should bo
brought to bar again he would think
515 was decidedly easy.
DEMANDS JURY TRIAL
PASADENA, Oct. 25.—Mrs. Bernice
Whipps pleaded not guilty yesterday
in Justice McDonald's court to the
charge of conducting a "blind pig"
upstairs at 14 West Union street. Sha
demanded a Jury trial and will be ac
,. Mimodated November 17. She is rep
uted by Attorney J. G. Rossiter.
♦ « ♦
TO ENTERTAIN O. E. S.
PASADENA. Oct. 25.—Fifty or more
northern delegates to the convention
of the Order of the Eastern Star re
cently closod in San Diego will be en
tertained in Pasadena at luncheon to
day after a drive around the city. Fol
lowing luncheon the party will be tak
en to Mount Lowe.
PASADENA PARAGRAPHS
PASADENA, Oct. 25.—Antonio Apa
che of the Eastlake Indian village was
in Pasadena yesterday arranging de
tails with the Pasadena Polo club for
the proposed pushball game to be held
November 6 at the Indian villago for
the benefit of the families of the Times
victims.
Misa Edith Olmsteud, 336 North Lake
PASADENA CLASSIFIED /
PASADENA BUSINESS COLLEGE
OLDEST AND BEST SCHOOL IN THE
city; new building. Individual Instruc
• tion, positions guarantor! Day anil even
ing tchool. Enroll today^.S^a N. FAIR
OAKS. ; 9-87-tt
PASADENA CLEANERS & HATTERS
WORK CALLED FOR AND DELIVERED.
All kinds of altering and repairing. 79 N.
liavni'.n.l qve. PHONE 3088, 10-10-tt
PASADENA SHOE HOSPITAL
HEN'S SEWED BOLES AND HEBLB. 11l
!,j|rt «60. 164 N. FAIR OAKS AVB.
Circulation Dept. I
Home IM3 I
Straaet *740
avenue, who was burned by fiamos
from a gas stove Sunday, is roported
as Improving at the Pasadena hospital.
She had been placing an oven on tho
stove and when «he turned around her
clothing caught tire.
Fred It. Kmery, polo enthusiast and
club man, has accepted a position with
tho recently formed Hogan company.
A house-to-house canvass for mem
bers is being conducted by the Men's"
brotherhood of the Lake avenue Con
gregational church. Rev. Dana Hnrt
lett will speak at the mooting tonight
on "Bethlehem Institutions; an Ex
ample of the Municipal Church."
An all-day meeting and basket lunch
will he held by the ladies' aid society
of th Lake avenue Congregational
church In the church parlors.
The woman's prayer and bible class
of the First Congregational church this
.iltornoon at 2 o'clock in the church
parlors will bo conducted by Rev. W.
H. Walker.
SANTA ANA
Office 815 N. Sycamore.
Phone*— Home SIS; Snnset Mack 733.
BABY TODDLES TO QUICK
DEATH IN CYANIDE GAS
El Modena Child Pushes Open
Door of Rancher's House
Being Fumigated
SANTA ANA, Oct. 24.—Toddling to
the steps of the home of her adopted
parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Shadowen
of El Modena, 19-month-old Esther
Marie Shadowen pushed open the door
and walked with babyish confidence
into a death laden atmosphere from
which she was carried dying a few
minutes later. She breathed once or
twice as she was carried out by Mr.
Shadowen, who had found her lying
on tho floor. Tho house was being fu
migated with a mixture of cyanide,
.sulphuric acid and water, extensively
used in fumigating orchards. The
family was in the back yard, and,
missing the child, made search, only
to find the little one overcome by the
fatal fumes of the overpowering gas.
The Shadowens, who live on a
ranch near El Modena, took the little
child when she was but three weeks
old, the Children's Home society of
Los Angeles being the means of find-
Ing the home for the child. Only a
short time ago she was legally adopt
ed by the Shadowens, who are deeply
affected by the tragedy.
MARRIAGE LICENSES
BANTA ANA, Oct. 24.—Marriage li
censes were Issued In Santa Ana today
to William Pollard, 39, of South Pasa
dena and Male L. Phillips, 41, of Los
Angeles; George W. Strength, it, and
Mary J. Webb, 39, both of Los An
goles, and Hezmer C. Belshe, 24, of
Perris and Lyda M. Saunders, 18, of
Buena Park.
SANTA MONICA
Circulation—Home 4689, Sunset 48»6.
Dorreapondent—Homa 4384; Sunset 34U1
MOTORCYCLIST HITS AUTO;
SUFFERS FRACTURED LEG
SANTA MONICA, Oct. 24.— H. Lus
kin, a Los Angeles youth, was removed
to his home in that city today from
the Ideal sanitarium here, where he
was taken following an accident while
riding a motorcycie. He suffered a
fractured leg, besides other injuries.
Luskin was riding rapidly on his
motorcycle when he collided with an
automobile driven by Earl P. Nittlnger,
lire chief of Santa Monica. The two
machines came together head-on and
the motorcycle was practically demol
ished. In the automobile were several
persons besides Nittlnger, including his '
wife, who is recovering from injuries
received in a bad fall from a street car
several weeks ago. Luskin was hur
ried %o the sanitarium in an ambulance
and the broken bone was set. The in
jured youth Is 18 years of age.
ANGELENO FIGHTS INDIANS
SEEN IN MOVING PICTURE
SANTA MONICA, Oct. 24.— H. H.
Doherty of Los Angeles paid a fine of
$10 in Police Judge Carrillo's court
today for disturbing the peace. Be
hind this charge lies an attack on a
cruel band of Indians holding forth in
a motion picture at a beach theater.
According to thi evidence at Do
herty's hearing he sat well up in front
at the picture show and exhibited deep
I interest in the scenes depicted. Fin-
I ally a frontior scene where red men
had captured an old prospector and
were preparing to burn him at the
stake proved too much lor Doherty's
heroic American blood and he made
energetic attempts to reach the cur
tain on which the picture was shown
' and disperse the tortures of the
: helpless miner. The police with diffi
culty explained to Doherty the futility
of his efforts.
SEEK STOLEN MOTOR MODEL
VENICE, Oct. 21—The police are
searching for a brass model of the
Lewis wave motor, which was taken
from the Venice lifesavlng station last
night. The model was placed in the
station for safekeeping by the inventor
and disappeared. It is valued at *125.
The police declare the theft to be the
work of boys.
DIRECTOR BARS PLAYING
OF AMERICAN FOOTBALL
OCEAN PARK, Oct. 24.-Ford M.
Jack, director of athletics in the Ocean
Park schools, refuses to allow the boya
of the grammar grades to play the
American Kami- Of football. Poecir
football is the nearest approach to the
game that is played by the students
here,
"The American game of football Is
by no means a game that can be safe
ly played by boya of the immature
physical development found in the
grammar Krades," says Mr. Jack.
MRS. MARY E*GfcONEY DEAD
MOUNT YKIIXUX, N. V., Oct M
.M.uy 10. (i.Mii'y, pr<Uldent n'-mral of the
Bpaniah-Amarlou W*r V't.i.uis auxiliary,
,ih.i at her homa n«r« today. Sho wu 60
run old.
LOS ANGELES HERALD: TUESDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 25. 1910.
LONG BEACH
CIRCULATION UKI'ARTMENT
IJS W. Orran. Hume 460; Siinnet Mil.
r»rr«-«iniiulfnt: Hnnn* 4BJ; Sumrt 11.11.
STATION MEN TO STOP
BUILDING OF CROSSING
Salt Lake Railway Objects to
Pacific Electric Laying
Track Over Line
LONG BEACH, Oct. 24.—The Salt
. Lake Railway company protests the
! right of the Pacific Electric company
to build a crossing over the steam
railroad'! tracks at Seventh street and
i AlumitO3 avenue, and men have been
guarding the Salt Lake tracks at that
] point for several days to prevent tho
work going ahead. Pacific Electric
representatives express themselves as
conlldent the difficulty will bo stralght
; •ned out to their satisfaction.
The Salt Lake track lies within a
/space of about twenty feet that inter
venes between the terminus of the Pa
cific Electrics old Seventh street line
and the city limits. The claim of the
Salt Lake officials la said to bo that
the other road's franchise over that
Bpaco had expired and that the electric
railway company did not give the re
quired notice of proposal to do the
work.
ALAMITOS WATER COMPANY
PLANS SYSTEM EXTENSION
LONG BEACH, Oct. 24.—The Ala
mitos Water company of this city is
contemplating extensive and costly ad
ditions to its present system. The plan
is to double tho system, so that it will
cover all parts of tho city, and to dou
ble the reservoir capacity. Tho com
pany's capital stock will be increased.
The company's chief engineer Is ex
pected to visit this city tomorrow and
make a further report to the directors,
who discussed the proposed Improve
ments at their last meeting.
PRISONER MAKES ESCAPE
LONG BBACH, Oct. 24.—Thomas
Branscomb, one of the men who were
arrested early this morning by Patrol
man McClelland, on charges of drunk
enness, escaped from the patrolman
and dashed down the street. Patrol
man McClelJand attempted to catch
him, shooting twice in the air, and In
the meantime the other man escaped.
He has not been seen since, but Brans
comb was found hiding in an alley
back of the Callahan furniture store.
PREPARE NEW PLANS
LONG BEACH, Oct. 24.— E. C. Denio,
local attorney for the Pacific Electric
company, said today that new plans
were being drawn for the corporation's
proposed new depot to be built east ot
the pier. He asserted that public criti
cism of the former plans, with refer
ence particularly to the roof lines of
the structure, had brought about a de
termination to have new designs pre
pared.
MAY START WORK ON BCHOOL
LONG BEACH, Oct. 24.—Tomorrow
morning the board of education and
the city engineer will visit the Poly
technic high school site and the en
gineer will run the levels and perhaps
act the stakes for the group of three
new buildings to be erected. The
buildings are to be completed within
ten months by Contractor Lynn. At
kinson.
LONG BEACH ITEMS
LONG BEACH, Oct. 24.— E. D. Herd
man, a well known East First street
resident who owns the Tally-ho livery
on East Fourth street, is reported as
recovering rapidly from a stroke of
apoplexy which he suffered yesterday
at his home.
Martin Brown, an employe of the
San Pedro Lumber company, was
kicked in the right side by a horse
which he took t* the J. F. Kempley
blacksmith shop this morning to hove
shod, and three ribs were broken. He
was attended at the shop by a physi
cian and was removed to his home at
59 Alamitos avenue.
Edward Chlttendon. a boy who lives
at 532 West Third street, ran bare
footed through a heap of hot ashes
while playing ball at Second street and
Daisy avenue today. Both of his feet
were burned severely.
The Rev. F. M. Rogers, pastor of the
First Christian church of this city,
reported this afternoon that sufficient
money was raised yesterday at the
dedication service of the East Rido
Christian church to pay all the out
standing debts of the church, amount
ing to about $900.
Mrs. Eliza Shirk, 1221 West Second
street, has reported to the police the
loss of a valuable diamond solitaire
rinp; either in this city or en route here
Saturday. It was in a small sack in
her purse.
A lecture will be plven November 4
by Dr. Henry Irvinpr Rasmus, new
pastor of the First Methodist church
lof this city. The proceeds will be de
i voted to the fund for payment of $1000
interest on the church bonds..
Francis Newell, 74 years old, died to
day at 11 o'clock at 142 Pacific avenue.
Mr. Newell and his wife came here
only four days ago from Cander, lowa,
and the body will be taken to that city
by his widow for burial.
CONTRACT FOR GEORGE
JUNIOR COURT HOUSE LET
POMONA, Oct. 24.—The contract has
been let for the erection of the new
$2500 courthouse at the George Junior
Republic on the Chino ranch, five
milos southeast of here, and another
cottage will also be built of cement.
Generous subscriptions to the work
of the Republic have recently been
made by friends, and the women's
auxiliaries of the Republic in Pomona,
Pasadena, Redlands and Riverside are
contributing several thousand dollars
annually.
There arc now about forty citizens
at flip Republic, all engaged in at
tending school and in useful pursuits
of farming 1 or manual arts. R. Water
hnuse, son of ex-Mayor Waterhouse of
Pasadena, has arrived in the Republic
and will take charge of the agricul
tural work.
NEW YORK BUDGET HEAVY
NEW YORK, Oct. 24.—The tentative
budget of .Ww York city for tne year,
as made public tonight, foots up $171,
--r>or>,7B7. an Increase of more than
$8,000,000 over 1910, as finally adopted.
The Increase is made of department
items, and the amount includes the
deficiency in collection of taxes.
SAN BERNARDINO
Office 438 Court Hreet.
rhonea—Home 4421 Sunset Malm 442.
WOMAN OF 80 INJURED
IN COLLISION, MAY DIE
Runaway Saddle Horse Dashes
Into Buggy. Throwing Occu
pant to Pavement
SAN BERNARDINO, Oct. 21.—Mrs.
J. Knight, 80 years old, was ln-
I jured this afternoon when a runaway
I horse ridden by Mrs. M. Krealing col
! IHocJ With the buggy in which shi.- was
I riding, throwing her out onto the pave
■ ment. She was carried to her home at
i the corner of Mount Vernon and Rialto
avenues, and It is reported by her
physician that she has but a slight
chance to recover.
The steed on which Mrs. Krealing
was mounted became unmanageable
and dashed up Third street at a ter
rible gait. At F street the horse col-
I lidod with the Knight buggy ami at
! tempted to hurdle over the terror
| stricken aged woman who was crouched
j in the rig.
Mrs. Krealing was also seriously
hurt, she being thrown completely over
the carriage and into the street on the
other side.
JAPANESE TO OBSERVE
BIRTHDAY OF MIKADO
SAN BERNARDINO, Oct. 24.—The
Japanese residents of San Bernardino
valley are preparing for a great cele
bration in this city on Thursday, No
vember 3, to observe the birthday of
the mikado. The Unique theater has
been secured as the place for the cere
monies.
City Attorney R. E. Swing will be
one of the speakers and the addresses
of the Japanese orators will be inter
preted into English for "the benefit of
the Americans in the audience. The
speechmaklng will be followed by a
play to be given by ten Japanese, in
which the native sword dances will be
exr/uted. In the evening there will bo
a display of Japanese fireworks.
DISCUSS FREIGHT RATES
SAN BERNARDINO, Oct. 24.—N0
complaints were registered today when
the state railroad commission opened
its session in San .Bernardino. Traffic
Manager F. P. Gregson, representing
the interests of the Los Angeles job
bers, was present. Before the adjourn
ment Gregson and George M. Cooley,
representing the merchants of San
Bernardino, engaged in a debate on
discriminating ratM to the Imperial
valley.
YOUTHFUL ELOPER SEEKS
REFUGE IN JUVENILE COURT
SAN DIEGO, Oct. 24.—Ouy H. Metz
ler, who eloped with Ada Scott of Santa
Barbara, and Is charged with passing
forged checks, caused a sensation in
court today when he declared himself
to be under age.
"I am but 17 years old," he said, "and
desire to bo tried in the Juvenile court.
I was led into this trouble by another
party."
Metzler said he was born in Michigan
in 1592. The district attorney will in
vestigate Metzler's story about his age.
in the meanwhile he is held In default
of $4000.
Miss Scott remains In the custody of
the Jail matron, awaiting the arrival of
her mother from Santa Barbara.
ORANGE PLANTER RETURNS
FROM PALO VERDE MESA
POMONA, Oct. 24.—1t. M. Teague of
the San Dimas citrus nurseries, who
has sold thousands of young orange
trees for spring delivery, has returned
from a trip to the Palo Verde and ;
Chuckawalla valleys on the California |
side of the Colorado river, where he
and A. R. Hueth of Los Angeles are
arranging to plant a square mile of
young orange trees on the Palo Verde
mesa.
Mr. Teague sees great possibilities
for citrus culture in this district, and
states that some of the wealthiest cit
rus fruit growers In the state are se
curing land there to plant to oranges.
Arrangements are being made for the
development of a large .water supply.
PLAN NEW ROAD SPRINGER,
N. M., TO SAN FRANCISCO
SACRAMENTO, Oct. 34.—Declaration of in- '
tention to build a railroad from Springer, N.
M., to San Francisco was contained In a let
[ ter received by Secretary of State Gurry to-
I day from H. S. Wanamaker, secretary of the
I Mountain Valley and Plains Railroad com
pany.
Wanamaker wanted news of the Incorpora
tion laws of this state, pointing out that the
railroad will cross four states and that, the
financing company wants Its charter to be as
simple as is compatible with the state laws
of those states. The company has its head
quarters at Amlstead, N. M. ■ : •■■■■■
OHIO ASKS CALIFORNIA
FOR ACCUSED EMBEZZLER
SACRAMENTO, Oct. 24.—Tho governor of
Ohio made requisition upon Governor Qtllett
today for tho return of Frederick Neff, who la
wanted In Franklin oounty, Ohio, for eniboz
eloment. W. G. ShollcnJierKer la authorizud to
ri'relve custody of tlio prlsODtr.
Ned Is accused of appioprlatini; funds be
longing to the Scloto Tribe No, 12, Improved
Ordw of lied Men, which were IntruiUd to
him aa treasurer of that organization. He dis
appeared on January 1 of tfcls year. It waa
discovered that J1326 was mi?"ing.
WILLIE HOPPE LEADS
NEW YORK, Oct. 24.—W111t0 Hoppe
took a comfortable lead tonight over
! Albert G. Cutler, the Boston expert,
i In the first 300 points block of an 1800
point billiard match here. Hoppe,
playing 18.1 to the Bostonlan's 18.2,
waa the winner by a score of 300 to
176. The match is for a purse of $500.
ROLLER BEATS PERELLI
BOSTON, Oct. 24.—8. F. Roller of
Seattle secured two falls from John
Perelli, the Italian wrestler, tonght,
the first In 25 minutes 6 seconds and
the second In 14 minutes.
SEA YIELDS HURRICANE DEAD
PUNTA dORDA, Fla., Oct. 24.—The bodies
of seven men, all victims of the recent hurri
cane, were washed un by the waves today.
Sin of the »even were sailors on Spanish Hull
ing smacks, which .went to pieces near Boca
Grand* during th» storm. Many more men
ma missing in this vicinity.
QUARTER MUST BE
ALL-ROUND PLAYER
Walter Eckersall, Greatest Foot
ball Player in History, Dis
cusses Needs of Position
CHICAGO, Oct. 24.—The duties of
,ive quarterback, the term being
applied to the man pliiytng be
hind the lino of scritnmn^e, iiro more
comprehensive this season than at any
time since the Inception of football.
He can do more to stop the attack nf
an opposing eleven than any other man j
on the team. Under the old rules the :
ive quarterback could play com- i
paratlvoly close up on the line without j
fear of being tricked into a pltcy. This ;
year ho has to drop back much farther.
Quick thrust*, outside tackle and for- j
Irectly over the line of ;
scrimmage are some of the plays he
muHt confront. probably no one is :
better qualified to speak with convlc- !
tion on the new duties of a quarter
back than Walter EckersaU, Chicago
university's former All-America play
er. Writing on the subject of defen
sive quarterback play EckersaU says;
"Now the qualification! ot a defen- ;
sive quarterback are different. Instead j
of being heavy and strong, a player i
occupying this position must be fast, '
alert, a good tackier, a good judge of j
distance, absolutely sure in catching ,
kicks and forward passes, and, above
all, ho must be able to direct his team
perfectly when his aggregation is
closely pressed near Its goal line. A
disorganized defense on the goal line
is the easiest thing in the world for an
eleven with a good offense to penetrate.
An equal distribution of weight and
strength on the goal line is the secret
of a successful defense, unless all
signs point to an attack at one place,
which oftentimes happens. Under the
present rules, with the push and pull
eliminated, it is practically a certainty
that no team is going to score by
sending one man through the middle
of the line. This was a bad enough
fault under the old rules, when the
man with the ball could be pushed or
pulled until his progress was stopped
absolutely.
"When a defensive team is hard
pressed the secondary defense is called
up, so that there is a halfback behind
each tackle and the fullback and quar
ter are stationed at other vulnerable
points. With practically two lines of
defense to penetrate, it is mighty hard
for an offensive eleven to make Its
required distance if the defense is
placed In the above mentioned manner.
"A player in the secondary line of
defense never should play so close to
the lino that it is impossible for him to
shift to the point of attack wjthout
being interfered with. On the con
trary, he should play in a position
where he can dash to meet the attack
so that his impetus also will have
some effect in checking an onslaught.
The defensive quarterback is in a po
sition to know just where plays will
be sent when the opposing eleven is
about to score. He should know
where the plays were sent which
gained most ground farther out in the
field, for It is an assured fact that a
good quarterback will use some of
these to place the oval across the line.
If the defensive quarter is wise
enough he will concentrate his defense
about these points instead of allow
ing it to be scattered about In po
sitions where it is absolutely useless
to a team.
"When an offensive eleven shifts a
player from one side of the line to the
other, the defensive quarter is the one
who orders his line to shift a position,
and the sooner the order is given the
better chance the defensive team has
of checking the attack. The secret
of such an attack Is to start the play
the moment the shifted player gets
into position, as the object of the play
is to hit the spot before the defense
is set for the attack.
"If the defensive quarter is an ob
serving player, it will be possible for
him to ascertain an opponent's attack
by watching the opposing backs close
ly. It Is only natural for a halfback
to look in the direction of the play
if his signal is called, or he may even
turn his head In the direction of tho
play. In this way the defensive quar
ter can direct the defense accordingly.
"With deception one of the secrets
of a team's gridiron success,- the de
fensive quarter now must be on the
alert for everything. He should play
at least five yards back of the line of
scrimmage nnd he should be constant
ly informing his teammates of the
possibilities of the attack. On every
formation he must be sure to scan the
side lines to see If a player is out
there to receive a forward pass. He
never should fail to see that the op
posing tenm does not take any ad
vantage of the rules by not having
seven men on the line of scrimmage,
and he must be certain to soo that nn
every forward pass the proper player
has- caught the oval.
"Tn many other ways be can be of
the nxoa*cvt assistance to a tenm
on the defense, but a player in this
position should know the game thor
oughly nnd possess those two gTeat
football qualifications, experience and
intuition."
STRIKEBREAKERS HURT IN
RIOTOUS DEMONSTRATION
Police Disperse Striking Express
Wagon Drivers
NEW YORK, Oct. 24.—A riotous
demonstration, in which two strike
breakers were badly injured, marked
the third day of the strike of drivers
and helpers of the United States Ex
press company at Hobokfin, N. J.
Night wagons, guarded by detectives
and manned by strike breakers, were
assailed by a crowd of strikers and
their sympathizers. Missiles were
hurled at the wagon crews and detec
tives. A detail of police dispersed the
crowd.
The trouble was renewed when three
wagons were driven on a ferryboat,
the fighting continuing as the bout
pulled into midstream.
Tho strike is fin- shorter hours and
an increase in pay.
OXY PREPS IN BRILLIANT
FINISH DEFEAT L. A. M. A.
Playing desperately to avert the de
feat which had stared them in the
face for three-quarters of the game,
the Occidental "preps," with a strong
burst of speed In their contest with
the Los Angrelos Military academy on
Baer-field yesterday afternoon, man
aged to cross the soldiers' line for
three touchdowns and two goals dur
ing the last quarter, winning a des
perately fought game by a score of
17-6. The academy had showed Its
superiority throughout the battle and
appeared easy winners until the final
quarter. '
JACKSON ENTHUSIASTIC
FOR BELL AND SPELLACY
Democratic Leaders Greeted
with Bells and Music
JACKSON, Oct. 24.—Following ;m
illuming meeting at Suttur Creek,
Theodore A. Bell and ills running
in Hi-, Timothy Spellacy, arrived in
this city today, when; they were
! '..nrmly by a largi crowd. The
;<li or the party was signal
cplosion of dynamite In the hills.
Escorted by a ba id and amid the noise
of cow bolls the Democratic candidates
• v to the place.
tandard bearer was
Introduced to the citizen*, of Jackson
: C. Bole.
Bell doi lared himself for thf- hi
development of the state, and reiter
ated hin statement that he will not be
dominated by any special Interest,
llacy followed the i
leader In Jtn assertion thai he has not
.use of the people.
sutter Creek and this city
today's itinerary Included Mokelumne
Hill, San Andreas, Angels and Sonora.
Shipping News
SAX PEDRO, Oct. 24. —Arrived: Steam
ship Iloanoko, from Portland, via San Fran-
I Cisco; steam schooner Melville. Dollar, from
Maine, direct; steam schooner MarshnolU,
from Hardy Creek; steam schooner Francis
IH. Leggett, from Eureka; steam schooner
I Excelsior, from Mendoclno city, via San
Francisco; steamer llanalel, from San Fran
cisco, direct.
Sailed: Steamship Roanoke, for San Di
ego; Bteam schooner Helen I. Drew, tor
Greenwood, via San Francisco; . steam
schooner Katherlne, for Eureka, via San
Francisco.
MISCBIAANKOCS NOTES
The steamer Melville Dollar, Capt. Fosen,
arrived today from Blalne with 886 piles
and 660,000 feet of lumber for various
wholesalers.
The steamer Roanoke, Capt. Dunham, ar
rived from Portland with passengers and
freight for the North Pacific Steamship
company and proceeded to San Diego
The steamer Francis H. Leggett, Capt.
Warner, arrived today from Eureka with
,500,000 feet of lumber for the National
Lumber company.
The steamer Marshftold, Capt. Ahlin, ar
rived from Hardy Creek today with a
cargo of lumber for various wholesales.
The steamer Excelsior, Capt. Buckard, ar
rived from Mendocino today with 16,000
ties for the Logan Lumber company.
The steamer Katharine, Capt. Jorgensen,
sailed for Redondo Beach today with par
tial cargo of lumber loaded at Eureka.
The steamer Helen P. Drew, Capt. Gun
derson, completed discharge of cargo today
and sailed for Greenwood to reload.
Q. F. Cooper, a first-class fireman on
the torpedo boat Truxton, while in the
coal bunker today, was hit on the head
by a falling coal bucket and suffered con
cussion of the brain. He was taken to the
marine hospital" at Los Angeles this after
noon*
The steamer San Pedro, Capt. Benedick
son, sailed tonight for Eureka to reload
lumber for this port.
ARRIVALS AND DEPARTURES
SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. Arrived:
Steamers Tahoe, George W Fenwick, San
Pedro; Santa Rosa, San Diego.
Sailed: Steamers Bear, Admiral Samp
son, San Diego. ■„ . -
NEW YORK, Oct. Arrived: Vader
land, Antwerp; Mlnnewaska, London.
PLYMOUTH, Oct. Arrived: Kron
Prinzessln Cecile, New York for Bremen.
HAMBURG. Oct. Arrived: Blucher,
Oct. 23.—Arrived: Columbia,
CHRISTiANSAND, Oct. 23.—Arrived: Os
car 11, New York for Copenhagen
LIVERPOOL, Oct. 23.—Arrived: Cedric,
New York, via Queenstown. !
CHERBOURG, Oct. 21.—Sailed Kaiser-
Ine Auguste Victoria. New York.
BOULOGNE, Oct. 22.—Sailed Nleuw Am-
BtHAV^B! {eOct! o 21.—Smiled: Floride. New
°BOSTON, Oct. 24.—Arrived: Canoplc,
Genoa and Naples.
KOBE, Oct. 22—Arrived: Aymeric, Seat
"^AUCKLAND. Oct. Arrived* Tofclo
Maru. Montreal. Oct. 24.—Arrived: Admiral
PORT SAID, Oct. 24.—Arrived: Admiral
Fourichon. Antwerp for San Francisco.
MOJI Oct. 24. —Arrived: Belle of Scot
land, from Shanghai, Portland, Ore.
DOVER, Oct.. 24.—Arrived: Kroonland,
New York.
MOVEMENT OF STEAMERS
Steamers carrying passengers are due from
northern ports via San Francisco and from
.outhern ports direct as follows:
Roanoke. San Diego >':7,5
Admiral Sampson Oct. £>
President, Seattle Oct. 25
Bear, Portland Oct. 25
I President, San Diego Oct. 27
Santa Rosa, San Francisco Oct. 28
DEPART
Hanalel, San Francisco Oct. 24
Roanoke, San Diego Oct. 24
Roanoke. Portland Oct. 25
I President, San Diego Oct. M
Bear, Portland Oct. 26
I Admiral Sampson, Seattle Oct. 27
President, Seattle Oct. 27
Santa Rosa, San Diego Oct. 23
TIDE TABLE
October 24 4:05 7:03 1:23 9:24
• 3.7 3. 5.1 0.1
October 25 6:26 9:41 3:06 10:30
" 4.1 3.3 4.9 0.1
(Note— Tides are placed in order of oc
currence, and high and low may appear at
I times in the same column. Figures und<!r
i time line show height of tides and compari-
I sons will show high and low designation.)
i imipi j^jh i m Tor coed trunk*
»j^r7ffVncjg*?x-/-i*JLcTj ravelins; bag»,
rv'n ****" ! rv>—»- L'^T'l md dreis •nil
I |f| ySJ G.U.Whitney
labllshed and most reliable trunk manula*.
i iarer. fitora uuci facturr, 2311 loiltb Malm.
IDIED
i, "-*>-*^ *>-^—■ ■—*-* "^— >-^~
VHiiS—At 5107 Woodlawn street. Ooto
' biT 20. Harriet Meyers, a native of
Pennsylvania,' aged 81 years. Interment
Inglewood Park cometury. 10-25-1
IRLINQBR—At 1012 East Sixty-second I
street. October 21. Anton Borllnser, a
native of Austria, aged 63 years. Inter
ment Inglewood Park cemetery. 10-25-1
WILSON —B. W. Wilson d)ed October 23.
Will be. burled October 25 at 2:30 D. m.
In Evergreen cemetery. 10-24-2
GUNNING —M. S. Ounnlng died October 22. |
Will be buried October 21 at 2 D. m. In I
Evergreen cemetery. 10-24-2
SPENCER —Thomas W. Spencer died Octo
ber 23. Will be buried October II in
Evergreen cemetery. ■ 10-24-2
DUNN— O. Dunn. October 23. Will be
burled October 25 at 1:30 p. m. In Ever
green cemetery. 10-25-1
(ill, —L. &I. Oilman, October 22. Will be
burled Ootober 25 at 2:30 p. m. In Ever
green cemetery. 10-25-1
JPUNERAL NOTICES
SPENCER—At 1128 East Thirty-second street,
Thomas XI. Spencer, age 68 years. Fu
neral today at 2 p. m. from W. 11.
Butoh'l chapel, 843 South Flgueroa street.
Friends Invited. 10-25-1
THE WEATHER
__JLq9_ANOELES. Oct 24, »»
Tjmej]^rornJThe£jJlum| Wlnd|Vlc.|WfatW.
5 aTm7 29.87 C~tT~\ 20 ! Ni: I 10 | Clear.
6p. m-1 29.82 I 87 I 11 I W I » I Clear. .
Maximum temperaturo, 90.
Minimum ternporature, 13.
FORECAST
SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. M.— Southern
California—Fair Tuesday; not so warm; light
north wind.
For San Francisco and vicinity—Fair Tues
day; warm in the morning: moderating e.t
night; light north wind, changing to south
west.
For Santa Clara valley-Fair Tuesday; mod
erately warm; light north wind.
For Sacrament') mid San Joaquln valleys—
Fair Tuesday; continued warm; light north
wind. _^^__^^^.^^««
MARRAIGE LICENSES '
GONZALES-HEREDIA—E. B. Oonzales, ag*
24. and Artclo Heredla, age 18; natives of
Arizona and residents of Los Angeles.
MERINO-SANDLIN— J. Merino, age 29,
and Nan Bandlln, age 24; natives of Cali
fornia and Kansas, and residents of Fresno.
ALFONTE-ANSLYN—W. A. Alfonte, age J3,
.nil Josephine Anslyn, ago 27; natives of
Indiana and lowa, and residents of Fort
Mackenzie, Wyo., and Los Angeles .
REINHAUDT-GRICH—Jan Reinhaudt, ago 81.
and Mattie Grlch, age 60; natives of Hol
lnnd and Illinois, and residents of Bakers
fleld and Los Angeles.
KNOX-HARDB—J. S. Knox, ago 5?, and
Marian O. Hards, age 36; natives of Tennes
see and Illinois, and residents of South
Pasadena.
HORSMAN-SALE-C. L. HoTsman, age 31,
and Hazel Sale, nge 26; natives of Canada
and Colorado, and residents of Bakersfleld
and Los Angeles.
WOODS-WOOD—M. S. Woods, ago 24, and
Margaret H. Wood, age 19; natives o Call
. fornia and Minnesota, and residents of Stock
ton and Alhambra.
SISSON-SMITH—E. L. Plsson, age 23, and
Rosci Smith, age 23; natives of Missouri and
California, and residents of Los Angeles.
O'CONNELL-MEYERS—F. G. O'Connell, age
41, and Edith M. Meyers, age 36; natives of
Canada and Pennsylvania, and residents of
Los Angeles.
KLI3PPINGER-STREIFF—A. C. Kleppinger,
nge 28, and Colleen L. Strelff, age 19; na
tives of Missouri and residents of Los An
geles.
WELLS-LOPEZ— Ores Wells, age 40, and Su
cana Lopez, age 38; natives of Hawaii and
California, and residents of Los Angeles.
DUDLEY-KNKELAND—H. McW. Dudley, age
22, and Sara L. Kneeland, age 22; natives Of
Virginia and Missouri, and residents of
Lynehburg, Va., and Los Angeles.
KENDALL-PURPHEISER—W. W. Kendall,
age 71, and Elizabeth J. Purpheiser, age 62;
natives of Indiana and residents of Long
Beach.
HERRON'-COOPER—D. E. Herron, age 31.
and Edith A. M. Cooper, age 30; natives of
Colorado and Kansas, and residents ot
Downey.
TEAL-HESTER—T. 11. Teal, age 45. and
Edith O. Hester, age 30; natives of England
and New York, and residents of Tonopah,
Nev., arid Bawtelle,
PINO-ESPOSITO-H. C. Pino, age 26, and
Angellta M. Espjosito, age 18; natives of
Colorado and California, and residents of
Los Angeles.
TIKKAS-MT;HLBERG— CharIes Tll;ka», age
' 30, and Ulrica Muhlberg, age 20; natives of
Russia and residents of San Pedro.
■ McCORD-ROBISON—H. M. McCord, age 28.
and Myrtle Robison, age 28; natives of Cal
ifornia and residents of Los Angeles.
YOUNG-MOORE-J. W. Young, ago 65, and
Sophia Moore, age 55; natives of New Jer
sey and lowa, and residents of Los Angeles.
BRYANT-BRYANT— M. Bryant, age 45,
and Mary E. Bryant, age 43; natives of
California and residents of Gardena and.
Santa Monica.
SAENZ-GANDARILLA— Saenz, age
[ 32, and Margarita Gandarilla, age 29; na
tives of Mexico and residents of Los An
geli-s.
EI.LEDOE-ANDERSON —W. C. Elledge, age
22, and Bessie A. Anderson, age 21: natives
of lowa and residents of Los Angeles.
MOHR-THULKE-H, J. Mohr, age 64. and
Julia Thulke, age 65: natives of Germany
and residents of Los Angeles.
' CROFT-SILVA—W. F. Croft, age 25. and Gen
evlevo Silva, age 23; natives of Colorado
and Missouri, and residents of Denver, Colo.,
and Gardena.
1 McCABE-SMlTH—Robert McCabe, age 41. and
Miriam Smith, age 28; natives of Canada,
' and Ohio and residents of Los Angeles.
GRANT-McINTYRE—Evelyn E. R. Grant, ag«
34, and Recta Z. Mclntyre, age 26; natives in'
Canada and Illinois, and residents of Los
Angeles.
STEVENSON-STOKEY — Guy Stevenson, ago
39 ,and Bessie Stokey, age 40; natives, of
New York and England, and residents of
i Los Angeles.
BIRTHS
I GIRLS
HAMMONDTo Charles and Josephln*
Hammond, 260$ Darwin avenue.
ABRAMOFF—To Aleck and Becky Abram
off 1942 East Second street.
LAWSON —To John and Christen*, Law
son, California hospital.
HOOPER —To Edwin and Opal Hooper.
California hospital.
CHAPMAN —To Harry and Blanche Chap
man. 4911 Guava street. •
SAGE—To Joseph and Melanie Sage, 123
South Pritchard street.
HAWLEY —To Romeo and Lena Hawleyi
605 West Sixty-first street.
CIECK— Bennard and Ruby Cieck, »29
East Fifty-first street.
AVERS —To William and Elizabeth Ayers.
3821 Central avenue.
BOYS
MANUR— Fred and Dorothy Manur,
807 West Forty-seventh street
ENSTEIN —To Myer and Jennie Bnsteln,
I 2202 Brooklyn avenue.
; HIYAMA — Mayiro and Tamt Illyaraa,
Los Angeles, California.
KIEBER To Frederick and Jeannette Kle
ber, 3851 Harvard boulevard.
DOLEZEL, —To Antone and Josephine Dole
zel. 1023 Madison street,
i POBANY To Charles and Maude Pobany.
409 West Fifty-third street.
GRIFFIN John and Catherine Griffin,
1420 East Forty-ninth street.
DEATHS
GONZALUS—Marios, California hospital,
native of Mexico, age 28. apoplexy.
ROSEN'THALJohanna, 1703 South Flower
street, native of Germany, ago 68, car
diac dilation.
I SMlTH—Robert J., Santa Fe hospital, aga
51, pneumonia.
JOHNSON— Mary, 135 Valencia street. na
tive of Pennsylvania, age 02, la grippe.
' MTJLLIN —Charlotte, 126 Pacific avenue, aga
42, tuberculosis.
(JEMETERIES—

INGLEWOOD PARK
CEMETERY ;i
Two miles outside the city limits, on tho
Los Angeles & Redondo railway; Sl><l
acres' of perfect land with Improvement*
outclassing any cemetery on the coast.
207 S. BROADWAY, ROOM 203.
Phones V 3303, Main 4669.
Superintendent's phona 10641.
8-SS-llmo.
ROSEDALE CEMETERY
An endowed memorial park, noted for It*
uatural beauty; endowment fund for per
petual care, over 1250,000; modern receiving
vault, chapel, crematory and columbarium;
accessible. City office, suite 302-30* EX
! CHANGE BLDU., northeast corner Third
! and Hill ats. Phones —Main 809; AlttO.
I Cemetery office. 1831 W. Washington at.
Phono* T2B6S; West 80. *-»-llmo
HOLLYWOOD CSMETERY
Rolling lawns, trees, shrubbery and beauti
ful lakes.
MODERN IN KVERY RESPECT
i situated In the most beautiful section o£
Southern California, the Ideal location, Just
Inside Los Angeles city limits.
Vtclrose and Colegrova ear lines to grounds,
A CEMETERY THAT IS SELECT
AII3I. 208 l.auehlln Bills. Main Ml,
Cemetery phones 5U035; Holly MS).
EVERGREEN CEMETERY
The Lot Angel** Cemetery association, lioyl.
Uelghts, near city limit.. Operated uade«
perpetual charter from I>r Angeles alt/,
Uuileru vhuuel and crematory, . ,
Offlre, «SB llradbury Building.
Phones—Main Mi; A 5408.
Cemetery—Home UI088; BvyU t.
, (-(-lira
3 INSERTIONS Of A lIIJHALII WANT AD
for tbe price of 2, or 1 Insertion* for tho
price of S. Ask The Herald counter us
10-11-U
13

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