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Los Angeles herald. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, October 27, 1910, Image 1

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MMBKRS6. i. lilL/Jil . OU i-S I'KK MONTH
FREDERICKS IS
HELD TO SCORN
BY WOOLWINE
Good Government Candidate Ad
dresses Large Audience
in Pasadena
MEETING SMASHES RECORD
Vote/s of Crown City Hear Earn
est and Stirring Appeal
with Eagerness
BRANDS OPPONENT S. P. TOOL
Shows Servility of District Attor
ney to Walter Parker
and Bossism
"It 1b not a question of whether Use
individual, Thomas Lee Woolwine, Is
elected, but—can you afford to re-eloct
John D. Fredericks?"
When Mr. Woolwlne, himself. Good
Government candidate for the office
of district attorney of Lob Angeles
county, uiked that question last night
In Woodman hall, Pasadena, before
the largest and mr it enthusiastic po
litical meeting ever held In that city,
loud cries of "Nol No!" came from
the voters who appreciated that the
speaker Is in the campaign for wholly
unselfiish reasons and not merely to
hold o»~ce. ,
Introduced by Mayor Thomas Ear
ley, a Republican of prominence, Mr.
Woolwine delivered an address to
which his audience listened with eag
erness. He spoke earnestly and di
rectly, calmly and positively.
"As I have often said," began Mr.
Woolwine, "I like to speak to a gather
ing of this kind much as I like to
add: ss a jury. I like to get closo to
them where I can look them straight
in the eyes," and suiting the action
to the word, he left the platform and
stood upon tl « floor.
"I am here as a man more than as
a member of any polltlc.il party," he
continued. "If you believe in me and
what I shall tell you, rote for me. If
you do not, bury me so deep In the
oblivion of adverse ballots that I never
shall be able to crawl out.
"Many charges havo been mnde
Rgainst me. My >nemles have said
that I am too young for the office.
Well, I am a young man, 3fi years old,
and I wish I were younger, but they
want you to believe that I am a school
boy—well, I've dug up a heap of trou
ble for a schoolboy!
"They charge that I did not serve
four years In the United States at
torney's office here. But I did. I
went in tinder a Democrat and I was
kept there by a Republican.
"They sny Hewitt, when city at
torney of Los Angeles, fired me for
inenmpetency. In a letter to me ho
Fays I was neither asked nor com
pelled to resign, nnd as to my effi
ciency, he says I p.-oved myself a vig
ilant and competent official.
ANBWEBB CHARGES
"I dislike to talk too much about
myself. My mother taught me that
self-praise is half scandal, but I must
answer tho charges.
"I am accused of being a radical,
but when I dug up all the stuff that
I did, what was I to do with It but
make it public? I never made a mis
statement about It.
"It is said that I did not back up
my statements with proof before tho
Harper grand Jury. I will tell you
why.
"The office of tho district attorney
is dominated by the Southern Pacific
political machine. I am making no
eleventh-hour accusations now—l said
all those things weeks ago in Simpson
auditorium and I am still waiting for
answers.
"But to go back a few years—to a
mayoralty campaign in Los Angoles
when there were two Republican can
didates, Gates and Lilndloy—Walter
Parker waited till ho saw who were
tho Republican candidates and he then
looked at Harper, the Democratic can
didate, and saw he would bo a bonds
man. The word went down tho line
from Walter Parker and Harper was
clivtcd.
"Everything wont along very well for
r.whllo, for Parker controlled the city
council, he controlled the board of su
pervisors, and as the keystone to the
arch, the office of the district attorney.
"I never havo worked in the office o?
Fredericks, but while I was working
under the city attorney at the police
station I was made a deputy district
attorney. While I was after the small
offenders I was the lovely' little prose
cutor.' Why, Fredericks used to send
word down to me that he wanted me to
handle this or that case because he
knew 'I'd land them!'
"Well, when I got Into the prose
cutor's office at the police tsation T
found there was a syndicate of graft
there —Harper and Kern and a few
othere —they were segregating a certain
vice. Some think It should bo permit
ted to exist, hut I ask you men if you
think it is rigfct for city officials to
wrest the last dollar from women?
Why, some of the poor creatures had
to pay as high ns *ir>o a month In rent.
HAMPERED IIV GANG
"When Fredericks showed no Inter
est In the story, I took It to the news
papers. A grand jury was called and
the members of It asked me to take
charge of the investigation. Meantime
Harper, thinking himself immune, de
manded that ho be investigated. Then
I told the grand jury that I would
conduct the Investigation if Fredericks
were kept from the room. Fredericks
said he would leave me alon« in the
investigation but he did not do so. I
was hampered In every way. Even
the night before I was to begin my
work with the Jury, a $30,000 libel suit
wai filed against mo. Finally the libel
suits rame so fast that all of them
totaled $115,000. I had one every morn
ing for breakfast. In a way they were
complimentary for they placed me ap-
(Continued ' yin luge Eleven)
LOS ANGELES HERALD
INDEX OF
HERALD'S NEWS
TODAY
■ , N ■ FORECAST
For to* Angele* and Tlolnltyi Fair
Thursday; Unlit north wind, changing to
south. Maximum temperature yesterday, 70
degrees; minimum temperature, 57 degree«.
LOS ANGELES
Executor of Baldwin estate denies claim
of Beatrice Anita Turnbull Baldwin.
PAGE 8
Hold preliminary hearing of Julia La
Fayette Roberta, charged with forgery.
PAGB 8
Citizens aid. Mrs. Dolores Vldal to save
home. PAGE 4
Women and children plead for life of bear
In market, and he la donated to park zoo.
PACE 4
Judge Church lectured husband seeking di
vorce on the evils of Jealousy. PAGE 8
City permits two employes to lay oft for
one year. PAGE 8
Johnson refute* rumor* of his Indisposi
tion. PAGE 8
Four-track system of Paqlfln Electrlo com
pany to Pasadena will shorten time If
run. > PAGE 10
Women help boy to kill rat In First street.
PAGE 16
Annual Methodist conference opens with
chicken supper. PAGE 8
Big steel plant planned for San Pedro.
PAGE 2
Hearing of Phyllis Roberts on forgery
chargo held. PAGE 8
Earl Rogers and Chief Seymour clash over
serving of subpoenas In Ban Francisco.
PAGE 2
Theater*. ■' 4 PAGE 4
Society and club*. .. PAGE 4
Mining and oil fields. PAGE 6
Building permits. . PAGE 6
Shipping. ' PAG® 6
Citrus fruit report. PAGE 7
Markets and financial. PAGE 7
News-of the courts. ' PAGE 3
Municipal affairs. PAGE 8
Editorial and letter box. PAGE 10
Politics. PAGE 11
City brevities ' PAGE 11
Sports. PAGE 12
Marriage licenses. - PAGE 14
Classified advertising. PAGES 14-15
SOUTH CALIFORNIA
Redlands woman • charges brother-in-law
with battery, but falls to appear in court.
PAGE 13
Member* of Pasadena Tournament of Roses
committee begin campaign. - PAGE 13
Contract Is let for 600-foot wharf at Ocean
Park, to cost $160,000. PAGE) IS
Borax combine files on 3000 acres near San
Bernardino.- -:.. V PAGE 13
Harbor official Inspects concession of Pa
cific Wharf and Storage company. PAGE 13
Hiram Johnson delivers address at Pomona.
PAGE 13
Speakers at Alhambra board of trade meet
ing oppose annexation of Pasadena, South
l'usadvna and Alhambra to Los Angeles.
,PAGE 6
COAST
Steamship UmatUla arrives from Nome with
1250,000 In bullion. " - PAGE 16
New Mexico constitutional convention safe
guards enforcement of corporation law.
PAGE 6
EASTERN
Ordinance bureau works on system to arm
and equip field- armies during war. PAGE 8
Columbia university establishes course In
artlstlo costuming. PAGE 8
British steamer Kalsenga arrives at Boston
after encountering monsoon. PAGE 8
One of big events at Belmont park Is Au
brun's flight of ten miles In seven mln- ■
utes. PAGE 2
Census dlreotor hears protests of Tacoma
committee. PAGE 16
United States consul at Quebec reports
new prohibition on crownlands does
not affect woodpulp supply for paper
making. PAGE «
Report Chicago -facing serious coal
famine. PAGE 2
judge Alton B. Parker In speech at
Oswego criticises Colonel Roosevelt.
FOREIGN
Aeronauts of balloon America II reported
safe. PAGE 7
Post and Hawley break all world* bal
loon records for distance. PAGH__I
FOUNDRY EXPLOSION IS
SHROUDED IN MYSTERY
PASADENA, Oct. 27.—An explosion
In the cupola of the furnace in the
Pasadena foundry at 10:30 last night
put the plant out of commission for
several days, and twonty-flve men will
be idle until repairs are made. The
cause of the explosion Is a mystery
and an investigation is being made.
The proprietor of tho foundry, T. V.
Wishart, says it could not have been a
gas explosion.
The cupola is about four feet in dia
meter. It is supplied with four wind
openings and tert other ventilating de
vices. The cupola is made of cast iron.
One of the four tuyere irons which en
circled it was broken by the force of
the explosion, and if the damage was
caused by any explosive, the powder
was placed near the demolished band.
The foundry is located at 369 South
Broadway. The men employed are non
union and declined to go on strike last
June when a strike was inaugurated
at foundries here.
SAN FRA'NCISCO MAIL SACK
LOST EN ROUTE FROM EAST
COUNOIL BLUFFS, la.. Oct. 26.—1t
was learned today that a registered
mail pouch destined to San Francisco,
was lost on Burlington train No. 15,
which left, Chicago Monday. The loss
was discovered when the mall trans
fer wa,s being made here to a west
bound train, but the fact was not made
public at the time.
The value of the pouch is unknown.
Secret service men have been put to
work on the case.
CONNIE MACK TO WED
PHILADELPHIA, Oct. 26.—A mar-
Hugo license has been issued here to
Connie Mack, manager of the World's
champions, and Miss Katherine Hallo
hiin, a West Philadelphia girl. The
marriage will take place within two
weeks.
SIGMA XI'S ADMIT WOMEN
PHILADELPHIA, Oct. 26.— Uni
versity of Pennsylvania chapter of the
Sigma XI, tho honorary scientific
fraternity, today decided that hereafter
women would be eligible to member
ship. •
THURSDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 27, 1910.
POST AND HAWLEY
SAFE; NEW WORLD
RECORD IS MADE
Aeronauts of Balloon America II
Travel Approximately
1350 Miles
LAND IN CANADA WILDERNESS
Out-Distance Count de la Vaulx'
Flight in 1900 from
France to Siberia
(Associated Press}
NEW YORK, Oct. 26.—Alan R. Haw
ley and Augustus Post, the aeronauts
of the balloon America 11, for whom
search had been prosecuted In tho
Canadian wilds, are safe and have es
tablished a new world's record for sus
tained flight.
They traveled approximately 1350
miles and came to earth in Chieoutlmi
county, Quebec, Wednesday, October
19, but were not heard from until to
day, when telegrams sent from St.
Ambroise, Quebec, reached New York.
The balloonlsts started from St. Louts
with nine other contestants in the in
ternational contest October 17. All the
other balloos have been reported.
Two messages from Hawley and Post
were received In New York early to
day. One was to William Hawley,
brother of the aeronaut; the other to
Samuel F. Perkins, pilot of the balloon
Dusseldorf 11, which until tonight had
been considered the winner.
RECEIVE MESSAGES
The message to Mr. Hawley read:
"Landed In wilderness week ago,
fifty miles north of Chicoutlml. Both
well. ALAN."
The Perkins message ran:
"Landed Pnribonka river, north Lake
Chilogana, 19th. All well. Returning.
"HAWLEY AND POST."
With receipt of the news there ended
a search which had come to be re
garded by many as almost hopeless,
and In which the governments of this
country and Canada were participating.
Young Perkins, who accompanied
Lieut. Hans Gericke in the Dusseldorf
11, conceded as soon as he received the
telegram from Hawley and Post that
he and the German had lost first place
to the New Yorkers. Perkins had esti
mated the distance traveled by the
Dusseldorf II at 1240 miles. He was
overjoyed at hearing from his long-lost
rivals and quickly dispatcher! this
message of congratulation to Hawley
and Post:
HRKAK WORIJVB RECORD
"Indications are that you havo
broken the world's record for sustained
flight in a balloon. Please accept my
sincerest congratulations on your skill.
You are the only ones I would be glad
to see win outside myself. I know
from my own experiences what you
must have risked to make such a trip."
William Hawley shouted with ela
tion when he heard of his brother's suc
cess and safety. For a week he had
been under constant strain and had
been in hourly communication with
points in Canada from which he hoped
to receive news of the landing. He had
sent J. H. Pope and Edmund Stratton
to Ottawa to carry on the search,- but
he notified them tonight of the happy
ending.
The new record established by Haw
ley and Post is unofficially estimated
at 1350 miles. Only this year Count
Odensoff of Russia claimert to hava
flown 1324 miles in forty hours, but the
figures were not officially verified.
If the estimated distances are made
official the long standing record of
Count De la Vavtfx of 1193 miles, made
in 1900 in a flight from Prance to Si
beria, has been broken by at least
three of the contestants in the recent
race _the America 11, the Dusseldorf
II and the Germania.
CAPTAIN OF DISABLED
SHIP STICKS TO CRAFT
GAL.VESTON, Texas, Oct. 26.—Dis
mantled, water-logged and with eight
feet of water in her hold, the four
masted schooner Hollis Wood of New
Orleans was towed into port late to
day by the British steamer Parkwood,
herself eight days overdue from Trin
idad.
Captain Walls of the disabled hulk
is still aboard his craft, after a har
rowing experience, refusing to land
unless so oidored by the schooner's
owners. The other seven men of the
crew were taken off by a New York
bound steamer several days ago, but
Walls, refused to go. The schooner
then was believed to be sinking.
The Parkwood tossed out of her
course by the recent gulf storm, sight
ed the Hollis Wood off the Campache
banks', about »aO miles from Galveston,
Oct. 19, apparently abandoned. Cap
tain Walls was found all but crazed
for the want of feod and water, and
in a critical condition from exposure.
At first It was decided to destroy the
hulk as a derelict. Walls again re
fused to leave her, and it was finally
determined to make an effort to reach
Galveston with the schooner in tow.
PHILIPPINE OFFICIALS
DEPART FOR WASHINGTON
MANILA, Oct. 26.— E. L. Worcester, a
member of the Philippine commission;
Frank W. Carpenter, executive secre
tary of the Philippines, and Charles H.
Sleeper, director of the bureau of lands,
will leave here for Washington Novem
ber 16. They will take with them all
the records bearing on the controversy
over tho friar lands in the Philippines.
Messrs. Worcester and Carpenter
have been charged with buying and
leasing friar lands, and they will be
prepared to appear as witnesses in any
investigation that congress may hold.
HIRE NON-UNION MECHANICS
SEDALIA, Mo., Oct. 26.—Fifty non
union mechanics went to work in the
Missouri Pacific shops here today. The
men were brought In from other cities.
The Relations of District Attorney Fredericks
and the Harper Administration
Showing How Fredericks Failed to Enforce the State Law and Close
Dives Protected by the Southern Pacific Machine Government.
Also How He Has Failed to Prosecute Two Offenders Indicted by the
Grand Jury in Connection with the Red Light District Scandal.
BECAUSE of the transcendent importance of the contest which involves the selection
of an honest, fearless man to discharge the important duties of district attorney
for this county, we desire once more to call our readers' attention to the relations
of District Attorney Fredericks and the late corrupt Harper administration in this
city.
In the'first place, it was shown by the admissions of Mayor Harper that he was
elected as the candidate of the Southern Pacific machine. This was also shown by the
fact that when the matter of Harper's resigning or being prosecuted for receiving money
from the red light district came up he consulted Walter Parker, the boss of that machine,
and acted upon his advice. , , , t
Mr. Harper took office in the first part of January, 1907. He appointed a board of
police commissioners, one member of which was the notonpus gambler and saloon
habitue, Sam Schenck. This appointment at once threw his administration under sus
picion of alliance with all the most evil elements of the city, and the suspicion was soon
verified. A red light district, presided over by Nick Oswald, was established in the city
and run in a more open and brazenly defiant manner than ever before. Ihe scandal ot
law defiance by favored parties had become so flagrant that in April, 1908, 1 he Herald
undertook to make an investigation of the matter. For this purpose it employed a detect
ive and purchased stock in corporations in which Harper and his fellow police commis
sioners were interested, in order to get at the facts. A few months' investigation by trie
very small force employed by The Herald was sufficient to enable it to ascertain and puD
lish to the people of the city of Los Angeles the following facts, among others:
First—That of more than thirty saloonkeepers who had purchased stock in corpora
tions in which Mayor Harper and some of his police commissioners were interested all
but one were flagrantly and openly violating the laws governing the sale of liquor in
S Second—That one of these men, Goings, was maintaining a dive of the lowest order
at Seventh and San Pedro streets in the city. where the Herald detective saw a girl in
short skirts led to her ruin after being plied with liquor in the cafe.
Third—That the disreputable Bisbee Tnn was run by another of these men as a place
for the destruction of girls; one instance being shown where two girls who had been in
veigled into the place had been compelled to appeal to the desk clerk for protection against
the men who took them there. , , ,
Be it also remembered that the maintaining of the red light district involved not only
moral degradation of the worst sort but the violation by numerous places of the liquor
laws by selling without licences. . ~» „.• r v, * .%,
In'the grand jury report made on February 10, 1909. which was so favorab eto the
Harper administration that it became known as the whitewashing report, this language
"Section 13 of the Penal Code, which has been a law of this state since 1872, forbids
houses of prostitution, making their existence and the renting of property for that pur
pose a misdemeanor. We found in regard to the so-called red light district as follows:
"When this grand jury was called there were about 100 houses of prostitution in the
city of Los Angeles and about 330 known inmates."
The maintenance of these houses being a violation of the law of the state, whose en
forcement was intrusted to the district attorney of the county of Los Angeles, ITPt-
CAME THE BUSINESS OF MR. FREDERICKS' OFFICE TO HAVE THEM
ABOLISHED AND STOP THIS VIOLATION OF LAW. But it will be remembered
that it was shown to a subsequent grand jury that these houses were being protected by
the city administration because the city officials were receiving from them a monthly
contribution to their pockets. '■
During all the time of the existence of this frightful evil m the city of Los Angeles
the district attorney's office could have stopped it by an effort to enforce the state law,
but that effort was never made. During this time Captain Fredericks, the district attor
ney of the county of Los Angeles, charged with the enforcement of the state laws against
places of this character, had at his disposal the county treasury and a force of from six
to a dozen detectives. The violations of the law, however, were so open and notorious
that they did not require the expenditure of any money or the employment of detectives
to discover them. They had become a public scandal, known of all men, reported in the
newspapers and freely commented upon, yet all this public knowledge and complaint
produced no action on the part of the district attorney's office toward the enforcement of
the state law forbidding these places cited by the grand jury's report. During this time
the district attorney with his great force of detectives and unlimited money at his disposal
did close a number of "blind pigs" throughout the county. whose proprietors had no
Particular influence BUT DURING THIS TIME HE DID NOT RAISE HIS HAND
FOR THE PURPOSE OF REDEEMING THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES FROM
THE MOST SCANDALOUS ORGIES OF LAW-DEFYING IMMORALITY THAT
FVER CURSED THE CITY. HAD HE ENFORCED THE LAW AS HE SHOULD
HAVE DONE, THE INCOME OF $500 PER MONTH BEING PAID'THE.CHIEF
OF POLICE, MR. SCHENCK AND MAYOR HARPER FROM THESE SINKS OF
INIQUITY WOULD HAVE BEEN STOPPED. In other words, had the district at
torney done his duty the city government which the Southern Pacific machine had in
flicted upon the city of Los Angeles would have been interfered with, and he would have
been going contrary to the sentiments of the officials constituting that government.
We would commend these facts to the careful attention of Dr. Chapman and the
members of the Anti-Saloon league, who sometime ago passed a resolution indorsing Mr.
Fredericks' candidacy. Do they think that the suppression of a few ' blind pigs through
out the county is sufficient to have wiped from Mr. Fredericks* record the stain of per
mitting a hundred places of the kind described in the grand jury's report to exist in the
city of Los Angeles? Places where the evil committed was a dozen times greater and
more fatal to the morals of the community than any evils arising from the blind pigs
which Captain Fredericks very properly closed out?
Furthermore, when Indictments were returned against some of the men responsible for th! a fri ß htful
condition they Were permitted to escape without prosecution by District Attorney Fredericks. The
gramjm-y succeeding^ c one whose report we hay 9 quoted from Indicted Broadhead Sehenck and Os
wald The former wan Indicted for receiving money for permitting houses of prostitution to remain
open'while he was acting as captain of the police of this city Schenck was the mavC «a. s. h"7" .b y the
evidence before the graund jury, through whose negotiations the proprietors of the red light district had
been brought In touch with the members of the city government. Oswald was the man who owned
and developed the red light district and received the money from its Inmates which was paid to the city
Broadhead was tried and promptly acquitted, but notwithstanding the fact that in
dictments against Schenck and Oswald have been standing for something like eighteen
months, NOTHING HAS BEEN DONE TO BRING EITHER ONE OF THESE
CASES TO TRIAL. On the contrary, the records of the court show that they have both
been removed from the docket and no attempt has been made to do anything with them.
Yet District Attorney Fredericks, having in his charge the prosecution of these men and
having it in his power to impose punishment upon them, is recommended by Dr. Chap
man and the members of the Ant-Saloon league as a fit man to be charged with the en
forcement of the laws of the state against vice and immorality.
Furthermore, the grand jury that indicted Broadhead said in its report: It is the
unanimous belief of this grand jury that large sums of money were paid for the protec
tion of prostitution in the so-called red light district to certain officials of this city under
investigation other than those indicted. However, owing to the lack of sufficient cor
roborating evidence, we are of the opinion it would be impossible to convict such offi
cials if indicted. Finally, it is the opinion of this grand jury that the investigations into
official misconduct can best be carried on secretly by the district attorney without the aid
of a grand jury " . .
Thus we see that the grand jury submitted these matters to the district attorney in
the confident belief that he would carry on the investigations and institute other prosecu
tions HE HAS NOT ONLY DONE NOTHING OF THE KIND BUT HE HAS NOT
EVEN PUSHED TO A TRIAL TWO OUT OF THREE INDICTMENTS WHICH
THE GRAND TURY FOUND AGAINST MEN RESPONSIBLE FOR THESE EVIL
CONDITIONS IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES.
Do Dr Chapman and the gentlemen of the Antl-Saloon league who Indorsed Mr. Fredericks want to
keep In office a man who deliberately refused to enforce the state law nnd by so doing permitted the
existence of a hundred deadfalls In this city for the destruction of humanity?
Do the people of the city of Los Angeles feel that Mr. Fredericks, who failed to enforce a plain law
of the state and thereby suppress an evil which had become so flagrant and shameful that It was dally
• commented on by the newspapers of the city. Is a fit person to be again entrusted with the enforcement
of the law in this county for the next four yars?
If Mr. Fredericks failed to enforce the law, and thereby destroy the hundred places
of prostitution existing in this city by the grace of the Harper-Southern Pacific machine
city government, because certain members of that government were receiving $500 a
month from these places, is it not possible that he might find it to his advantage to per
mit other criminal laws of the state to be violated during the four-year term for which he
js now a candidate? •
Good citizens must answer these questions to themselves when they go to the polls
to vote on the Bth day of November.
GTMI^T V\ COPTIC • DATLV to. ON TBAINS »«,
bJJ> XX XjEjk KjKJX: XJIiO . SUNDAYS 6«. ON trains io*
BELL STRIKES
ANVIL BLOWS
AT S.P. VIPER
Crowds Turned Away from Great
Chutes Park Democratic
Meeting
STATE LEADER HITS BOLDLY
Says Special Privilege Will Rot
Nation at Core if Not
Halted
CHEERS DROWN STRONG TALK
Impressive Address of Candidate
for Governor Thrills the
Vast Audience
BELL'S ITINERARY TODAY
10 a. Guest of Dr. Malabr at
Pasadena until noon.
H:l& p. —Open air meeting- at
Pasadena, leaving there at 2 p. m.
7:15 p. m.—Speech at Kedondo Beach.
8:80 p. —Speech at Venice. ,
Theodore A. Bell, Democratic nomi
nee for governor; Timothy Spellaey,
Democratic nominee for lieutei
governor, and a corps of newsp...
correspondents representing several of
the big daily newspapers of the north,
arrived in Los Angeles at 8 o'clock
yesterday morning and were met on
their arrival by a large number of
Democrats and Republicans, with
several of whom the two state stan
dard-bearers immediately advised con
cerning the local political situation.
Mj\ fcjpellaey went immediately to his
offices in the Citizens National Bank
building where he passed the after
noon besieged by visitors and endeav
oring to wade through a vast amount
of personal business and correspon
dence that had accumulated during
his three weeks' absence. Mr. Spel
laey appeared to be in the most op
timistical mood.
"This election is going to bo the
biggest surprise that California has
ever witnessed," he said. "Bell will
come to the Tehachapi with 40,000 plur
ality, if riot more. San ; Bernardino,
Riverside and San Diego counties are
absolutely safe. I'ou know mpre about
Los Angeles county perhaps than I
do, because I have been away for a
few weeks but if conditions are even
one-half so favorable as they are re
ported, Mr. Johnson's plurality will not
exceed 3000 votes, if, indeed, Mr. Bell
does not carry it.
"People may think that I am overly
euthusiastlc or hypnotized, but having
traveled up and down the state, meet-
Ing thousands upon thousands of peo
ple, I want to say to you the election
of Mr. Bell is absolutely assured. Tha
campaign of abuse, misrepresentation,
slander and vilification indulged in by
Hiram Johnson has made many thou
sands of votes for Mr. Bell."
ADDRESSES STUDENTS
Mr. Bell's speech before the 2000 stu
dents of the Polytechnic high school
at 10 o'clock yesteruay morning, was
not in the nature of a political, or
partisan address, but dealt largely
with the present educational system,
its urgent needs and benefits. He also
spoke on the advantages of a thorough
education, and told of his own boy
hood struggles, when, working with
his father in the field, he had often
paused to rest upon the handles of his
plow and gaze Into thu future, yearn
ing in his youthful way for the ad
vantages that a college aducation
would afford him, so that he might go
out into the world and more success
fully combat with it.
"But I had never looked Into a col
lege door," he said, "even up to tha
time that I was elected district at
torney of Napa county.
"An education is almost Invaluable,
but greater than education, and more
to be desired than fame, power or
riches, is character. That is the one
firm corner stone on which the suc
cessful structure must be built. Honor,
ntegrlty, loyalty to ideals, a living
conscience, the fearlessness t
and to do which we know is
'Just, even thougli we meet
measurable opposition."
Mr. Bell's speech was lo
plaudod by the students of
nic, who gave him unusufc]
found attention and seemed
eagerly to every word of it.
Mr. Bell was given a most entail
tic reception at South Pu.saden .
lu> s; ike for about a half an 1
night. Ho tnaUe It quite oh
he had given his opponent cr
'You may rest assured," h
"that there will be. no Williar- !
rln or political bureau of the
era Pacific or ony other corp-
in the government of Califon
am elected governor. I have my rec
ord to Lack up my promise. I ask:
you, has my nnpon •■*?
HKFERS TO MKRRIN
"There will be no William F. Her
rin to tap legislators and governor on
the shoulder and place his men in
Judicial positions. Hiram Johnson
knows ttiat I am sincere and I de
cline to reply to him by any Insinua
tion tending to discredit his reputa
tion for honesty. He is trying to
blacken my reputation, and make it
appear that I have deserted, the fight
of a lifetime.
"If I cannot win the governorship
in a manly, decent manner, I don't
want the Job. I ask you to remem
ber that four years ago I went out as
a volunteer and spent my own money
flghting Ruef and Schmidt and all
their gang. I received no fee. My
patriotism was not measured by the
size of a loe.
"At midnight, on September IS, Just
before I started out on this terrlllo
campaign, I called around me at head
quarters in San Francisco all the men
2 CENTS
(Continued on Pas* lira)

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