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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, October 27, 1910, Image 11

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THE CITY
Strangers are Invited to vinli <he exhibit"
•I California products at the Chamber of
building, on Broadway, bptween
First and Second streets, where free Infor
mation will he Riven on all subjects pertaln-
Inc to this section.
The Herald will pay $10 <-> ->«h to any
one furnishing evldpnee that will lead to
the arrest and conviction of any person
caught steallnpt copies of The Herald from
*h« premises of our patrons.
Membership (n the Los Anireles nealty
board Is a virtual guarantee of reliability.
Provision Is made for arbitration of any
differences between members and their
clients. • Accurate Information on realty
matter! Is obtainable from them. Valua
tions by a competent committee. Direc
tory of members free at the office of Her
bert Burdett. secretary, 1525 Security Bulld
tar. Phone Broadway IS9I.
The T,e«ra! Aid society at SS2 North Main
street Is a charitable organization main
tained for the purpose of aldlnsr In legal
matters thoso unable, to employ counsel.
The society nee*l» financial assistance anil
seeks Information repardlnir worthy cases.
I'hone Home A 4077: Main 8361.
The Herald, like every other newspaper.
Is misrepresented at times, particularly In
eases Involving hotels, theaters, etc. Tho
public will please take notice that every
representative of this paper Is eonlpped
with the proper credentials and more par
ticularly equipped with money with which
»o piv n i, i.iii, TTTB! WTCnAT.T).
TABLE OF TEMPERATURES
Mln.
Atlantic City, X. 3 *''
Boln, Idaho 38
Uimliir, Mii*h 41!
Buffalo, N. V 40
< hiirlcHton, S. C 511
Chicago, 11! BO
Denver, Colo 44
Dm Motnen. la 44
Eastpolt, Mr no
<i:ilvi'slon, Texan "
Uniterm), N. C. 8*
Helena, Mont 84
Jacksonville, Ma •>»
KuiiHUa City, Mo 68
I.«h An^eleN. Cat. •.....•••■•» 57
Louisville. X}- 44
Mi-iiiiililn. Tenli 88
Montgomery, Aln ™
New OrlraiiN, I.n 84
New York. N. V ■*-
North Platte. Neb 86
Oklahoma, Okla '"•"
Phoenix, Ariz (i-
Plttuburir, Pa *"
Portland, Ore 40
liiilrleli. N. C 40
Itapld City, S. D 40
Rnsuell, N. M 38
St. Louis, Mo 5;
St. Paul. Minn 46
Salt Lake* City, Utah 40
San FrnntlNro, Cal 58
."Hull Ste. Marie, Mlrh S3
Sheridan, Wyo «■;
Spokane, WMb SB
Tampa, Flu *»
Toledo, O **
Tononnli. Nev JO
Washington, 1). C 44
VtlllMon. N. D •}"
■\VlnnlpeK. Man *"
AT THE THEATERS

AUDITORIUM —"A Stubborn Cinderella."
BKI.ASCO —"The Blue Mouse."
IJI HIIANK—"The Eternal Three."
KM PI HE "My Friend from India."
GRAND—"Kins Dodo."
I-OS —Vaudeville.
MAJESTIC—John Mason.
MASON—Dark.
OLYMPIC—Musical farce.
OKPHEUM—Vaudeville.
VANTAGES—Vaudeville.
PRINCESS—MusicaI farce.
AROUND TOWN
WILL GIVE BENEFIT
A benefit will be given for Mr. and
Mrs. William Baker, the blind singers,
at the First Methodist church today at
2 o'clock. Mr. and Mrs. Baker will
sing and give their experiences in the
evangelistic. work. Miss Jessie Staf
ford, the noted whistler, will assist in
the program. .
WILL HOLD LADIES' NIGHT
An innovation in the Southern Cali
fornia Hotel Men's association will be
the celebration of ladies' night tonight.
The entertainment will include a the
ater party at the Orpheuin. Following
the play, refreshments will be served
at the Angelus hotel. Preparations
have been made to entertain about lOfl
persons.
VETERAN PRINTER DIES
The funeral of George M. Cornwall,
veteran printer; will be held this after
noon at 2 oVloek from the undertak
ing parlors of J. D. Button, 410 North
Main street. Interment will bo in
Inglewood I'ometery, to which place a
funeral car will bo provided for
friends. Mr. Cornwall resided for a
long time at 4417 Central avenue.
SET DATE OF FUNERAL
Funeral services of Henry Rich, a
retired woolon goods manufacturer,
will be held tomorrow morning at 11
o'clock at the family home, 2248 Har
vard boulevard. Mr, Rich was 72 years
old, and came here five years ago from
Baraboo, Wis., where he had been en
gaged in woolen goods manufacture.
He Is survived by his wife and one son,
Albert H. Rich of Los Angeles. The
body will be cremated at the Rosedale
crematory.
BEGIN HOTEL IMPROVEMENTS
Extensive improvements have been
begun by the management of the Hay
ward hotel and about $60,000 will be
expended in remodeling and rearrang
ing the lobby and the entrances. Work
was begun yesterday in removing par
titions in the lobby. By this more
room will be given by permitting the
moving of the desk back several feet.
Cf"*.tracta have been let for the re
modeling and redecorating of tho cafe.
The hotel was recently enlarged by
the addition of the annex, in keeping
with which the improvement is now
being made.
TRACTION MAGNATE ARRIVES
After an absence of two months in
the east Henry E. Huntington has ar
rived in Los Angeles and is at the
Jonathan club. He arrived homo two
weeks earlier than was expected by
officials of his companies in the Pa
cific Electric building.
LA FOLLETTE REGAINS HEALTH
ROCHESTER, Minn., Oct. 26.—Sen
ator and Mrs. LaFollette left Roches
ter today for Madison, Wls., their
homo. Senator LaFollette has com
pletely recovered from his recent surgi
cal operation.
BUYER TRIES TO PICK OUT
HIS CORN; QUARREL; FINED
Because he contended that custom
ers have the right to sort over ear* of
corn when milking a purchase and sub
sequently struck ii clerk, C. M. Wright
paid ■ fine of *15 In Police Judge Hose's
court yesterday.
Wright got into an altercation with
Hoy Teel, a clerk In a Main street gro
cery, several days ago over the question
and when the latter told Wright that
the store could not afford to allow cus
tomer* to pick out their corn, Wright
Im alleged to have struck him.
All the Latest News and Notes in the Realm of Politics
tUNE SCORES
G. 0. P. OPPONENT
Holds the District Attorney Up to
Voter's Scorn in Speech
at Pasadena
FREDERICKS' RECORD BARED
Brands Republican Candidate as
Tool of the Southern Pa
cific Railroad
(Continued from Page One)
parently in the financial class to which
1 was never entitled.
"I put Kern on tlio stand. I. had
him subpoenaed at the last minute
so he could not get to Fredericks, but
he teemed to have done so. I asked
him it' he had had any conversation
with any one between the time he was
subpoenaed and the time he took tho
stiind. He turned red and pale and
back again and looked at Fredericks.
Finally he said, 'Yes. 1
"I told him to tell what It was
and of what it consisted. He again
korned red and pale in. turn and again
looked aI. Fredericks, who jumped up
and objected to the questions I was
asking Kern. I asked the foreman of
the grand jury to let the jurors vote
as to whether I should continue with
the work, but he denied my request. I
WEI stopped because I was reaching
for Fredericks, who discharged me
from office.
"The grand jurors wanted me put
back, but Frederick! refused. They
wanted him and his deputies put out
of the room, but he said he would
stand upon his legal rights. The jurors
addressed a letter to him, but he still
clung on.
"Walter Parker wan almost con
stantly in the Office of Fredericks while
the grand Jury was in session—Parker,
the man who tried to put through the
river bed franchise steal and who, In
the Hotel Alexandria, tried to bribe
Harry Lelande to sign it. Fredericks
was asked about Parker's being In his
office, and he said: 'Tel, he was there
and he'll be there again.' Later he sent
word to the man who asked him that
he had been in a fit of anger when he
made that remark and 'pk'ase don't
mention it.'
TALKS ABOUT S. I. TOOLS
"Talking about the Southern Pa
cific and its tools, see how the trus
tees of San Pedro tried several times
in a year to give away valuable har
bor frontage and were stopped only
by the tiling of civil suits in the courts.
They did not care fur their reputa
tions. Many men think money is val
ue received for a good name, bat you
cannot get value received for that.
The trustees knew they wore immune
from punishment for trying to give
away the frontaje.
"Consider the county's road bond Is
sue of $3,000,0(K) and what the super
visors did. They tried, at a secret
session, to sell the bonds under mar
ket value at what would have meant
an ultimate loss to the county of $400,
--000. Do you know that the district
attorney Is the legal adviser of the
supervisors and that he must oppose
their actions when he deema them un
just or illegal?
"Fredericks did not do one thing to
stop the supervisors from selling the
bonds and the people had to obtain
an injunction in the courts. Why. in
one of the suits against the supervis
ors, Fredericks even appeared for the
'solid three.'
"If I had been in the office of district
attorney, I'd have had a grand jury
in session In twenty-four hours and
I'd- have found out who was at fault
if the jurors were kept in session
until doomsday!"
Mr. Woolwine then went Into details
of the notorious attempt of a former
city council to stonl the riverbed,
noting that Percy, Hammon, a member
of the city legislative body at that
timer BOW occupies a position as depu
ty district attorney. He also called
attention to the fact that Fredericks
made no effort nt that time to Stop
the attempt at the steal and the no
body was brought to justice. He then
told of an affidavit made by a man
who formerly acted as a detective un
der Fredericks, who went to him with
a card bearing Walter Parker's "O.
K." and was put to work' immediately.
TWO FORGED WILLS
Mr. Woolwine reiterated the accusa
tion he frequently has made In the
campaign to the effect that Fredericks,
who Is charged with the
of folonies, had his attention called to
two forged wills and that all he did
was to suppress the forgeries, cover
the felonies and loot the estate of $12,
--000 by Inveigling two of the heirs to
sign contracts by which they were
to give him 50 per cent of what he
could get for them.
"The records are in the court house,"
declared Mr. Woolwine, "and they will
prove It. And there also is the con
tract In Fredericks' own handwriting
for that fee which Shylock, in his
palmiest days, never would have
taken."
Mr. Woolwine then told of his in
tention, If he is elected to office, of
seeing that the poor man is treated
as well as the capitalist. He declared
his intention of asking the courts to
appoint the best legal counsel in the
county to assist the poor who are
unable to pay for attorneys, an action
which is according to law and which
frequently spursi lawyers on to greater
efforts In behalf of non-paying clients
than for wealthy ones, as an acquittal
is a matter of personal pride.
E. J. Fleming, formerly a deputy
district attorney under Fredericks,
spoke briefly before Mr. Woolwine,
telling of his pleasure to address Pas
adenans because of the strong stand
they take for law and order.
"The thought I want to impress upon
you," said Mr. Fleming, "is that effi
ciency 1b the most Important quality
for a public official, whether he be a
United States senator or a district at
torney.
"I want to show wou two pictures of
district attorneys. One, Folk in St
Louis, who prosecuted the higher ups,
who proved his efficiency as a public
official, was advanced to the position of
governor of Missouri and may go even
higher. The other figure is that of
Jerome of New York. Before he was
chosen as district attorney he had been
a police Judge In the metropolis. After
being elected to the higher office he
raided gambling dens and proved him
self such a great prosecutor that he
w: s re-ejected. He was proving him
self an inspiration to other district at
torneys all over the country until final
ly there came to him tho supreme test
—the Insurance scandals.
"He was called upon to prosecute the
LOS ANGELES HERALD: THURSDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 27, 1910.
Denis' Indorsement of Fredericks
Is Shattered by "Logic Chopper"
A letter written by Georprn .T. Donis Indorsing the candidacy of J. T>.
Frederick! was printed In yesterday's edition of the Times. The letter has
drawn the following pointed roply from a weU known Los Angeles man, who,
for excellent reasons, signs himself merely "X>ogic Chopper."
LOS ANGKLKS, CaL, Oct. 26, 1910.
Editor Herald: In today's ifsue of the Times I Jind a letter indoi
J. D. Fredericks for district attorney of Los Angeles county. It Is I I
by an attorney, one George J. Denis. The letter, judged by it.s grammar and
logic, is scarcely an indorsement of which Fredericks may be proud.
It is hard to determine whether the object of the letter is to inform the
public of the high positions the writer has held and the great men he has
known, or to permit Fredericks to make such use of the letter ;ts he "may
see lit to put it to." As the writer's name is "Denis" (misspelled, I assume,
for Dennis), he is probably Irish, which may account for his Ignorance of
English. This violation of the well known rule against ending a B< n1
with a proposition reminds me of the statement of that rul I by a teacher in
these words: "Never use a preposition to end a sentence with." In the same
tion of that office stands as the most efficient of any of your predecessors."
tlon of that offie stands as the most efficient of any of your predecessors."
By the rales of grammar and by logical reasoning that statement makes
Frederick* one of his own predecessors, in other words, Fredericks outdoes
and o'erleaps himself, and I guess that is about it. Tf Mr. Woolwlne was at
one time stenographer in Denis' office, it is evident the employer ought to
have taken lessons in grammar and logic from his stenographer. ■
• Denis reasonß that because the Hon. Henry T. Gage "would not be con
nected with any ra.se thai Involved a dereliction of duty," and because Fred
ericks was connected with Mr. Gage in the King case, therefore Fredericks
is equally innocent. T. question the logic of that conclusion. Jlr. Gage
occupied no official position requiring him to prosecute c. case of forgery.
Fredericks did, and therein 'lies the dereliction on the latter's part.
As the writer says he has "an intimate acquaintance, with Henry Gage"
and as he asserts in the last paragraph of the letter that he does not know
Fredericks, 1 conclude that if he knew I^redericks he might not be so ready
to class him with Mr. Gage, or to absolve him from dereliction of duty.
The exception that Fredericks once kept company with M. Gage does
not prove that old rule that "a man Is known by the company he keeps."
Denis argues that a district attorney is permitted by law to take private
cases. He makes the proviso, however, "that they attend to their official
duties efficiently." That proviso just fits the case and condemns Freder
icks, That is the King ease exactly. It was Fredericks' official duty to
prosecute the forgery in that case. Instead of performing that official duty
he took the case as a civil one, used the time, stationery and detectives
belonging to the county for his private gain, and was derelict in duty
to the people, whose paid .servant he was, when he failed to prosecute the
crime. Mr. Denis' name is Dennis, and so will be that of his candidate just
before the ides of November. Selah!
Yours truly,
LOGIC CHOPPER.
CANDIDATES TO SPEAK
AT COUNTY MEETINGS
Democratic Leaders to Present
Party Principles to Vari
ous Gatherings
Robert G. Loucks, Democratic nom
inee for justice of the peace, Los An
geles township; Minor Moore, nomi
nee for associate justice of the second
district court of appeals, and Frederick
L. Dwyer, nominee for county auditor,
will address a Democratic mass meet
ing to be held tonight in El Monte.
C. O. Hawley, Democratic nominee
for the state assembly from the Sev
enty-second district; E. C. Mayham,
nominee for assembly from the Seven
ty-third district, and W. T. Harris,
nominee for sheriff, will be the princi
pal speakers at a mass meeting to be
held tomorrow night in the Pico
Heights picture theater, 2698 West Pico
street.
Stephen G. Long, nominee for superi
or court, will address the citizens of
Puente Saturday night, October 29, on
the platforms of the two parties, the
meaning of their similarity and a com
parison of the two candidates. In his
speech Judge Long, who is city attor
ney of Long Beach and known as one
of the most fearless and progressive
leaders of the good government work
in Los Angeles, and also a strong ad
vacate of removing the judiciary from
partisan politics, will show wherein it
was necessary for the Republican, par
ty of California, under its new insur
gent leadership, to copy the Democrat
ic platform and take up the Democratic
reforms so successfully advocated by
Theodore A. Bell.
This, says Judge Long, was done to
prevent the election of Theodore A.
Bell.
Lorin A. Handley, Democratic nom
inee for congress from the Seventh dis
trict, also will address a mass meet
ing Saturday night at Arcadia.
Saturday night there will be a Good
Government meeting at San Pedro, at
which Thomas Lee Woolwine, Guy
Kddie, Dr. A. C. Pratt and Walter
Desmond will be the principal speak
ers.
insurance scroundels but he equivocat
ed, delayed, m and finally the thieves
escaped. When he wanted a third
term, the people demurred. He tried
to explain at a mass meting, but the
people would have none of him. His
sins of omission had condemned him
with the people. lie was condemned,
not by what he had done but by what
he had failed to do.
"Judging by what Woolwine has done
In Los Angeles by wiping out the
Harper regime, the most iniquitious
that the city ever has endured, and
bringing Into power the Alexander ad
ministration, tho best that the city
ever has had, he has proved himself
one who will follow In the footsteps
of Folk.
"Though Fredericks may" fool a few
of the people, we say to him: 'Though
you closed a few blind pigs and gam
bling hells in Los Angeles county, you
can't use that to get Into office. We
repudiate you, not because of what
you have done, but becauso of what
you could have done and failed to do.'
"We must condemn his actions in
the Harper regime. The grand jury
would have Indicted Harper and Kern
if Fredericks had advised it to do so.
We might have convicted them but
that they were protected by the high
er ups—the Southern Pacific and its
allies. That's why he did not do it,
in my judgment. In his eight years
in office the solid three have ruined
the court house —three men who have
disgraced their office. What would
Folk have done? And what do you
think that Woolwine would have done
had he been in the office of district
attorney?
"Fredericks twice has gone before
the people and succeeded in having his
office force increased, obtaining depu
ties who receive from $200 to $250 a
month and has had his own salary
raised to $6000 a year. Tlie increase
in his office force was not for the ben
efit of the public. No, he was bene
fltting himself. Ho did not have time
to serve the county himself, as he WU
engaged in private practice. I have
heard him plead in a courtroom for a
fee of $10,000 in a private ea
"Why, when he is given $UO(.O a year,
should he not serve the people who pay
him that? Why should ho mako $30,000
a year? If Roosevelt could examine
Into the records of (Fredericks and
Woolwino he would say that Woolwine
and not Frederick.-! is the man for the
ofjiee of district attorney."
Howard J. Fish, a prominent Repub
lican of Pasadena, occupied the plat
form with Mayor Earley. and Meaars.
Woolwino and Fleming.
G.O.P. IS COMPARED TO
DR. JEKYL AND MR. HYDE
Stephen G. Long Asserts Repub
licans Merely Imitating
Democratic Policies
Stephen G. Long, city attorney of
Long Beach, delivered the p"rin
clpal address at the mass meeting held
in San Fernando last night. The meet
ing was held in the plaza in front of
the band stand, and other speakers be
sides Judge Long were Lloyd W. Mc-
Atee, Democratic nominee for county
clerk and W. T. Harris, nominee for
sheriff. Judge Long said in part:
"The Republican party realized that
it could not pi-event the election of
Theodore A. Bull, and that Mr. Bell
would carry his agitation to a success
ful issue in this campaign, unless the
Republican party could make the recent
political phenomenon appear to be a
natural evolution, and, regardless of
the psychology of politics, suddenly
become a champion of the same re
forms advocated by the Democrats
four years ago.
"This astounding transformation
took place under the shrewd manage
ment of the wise heads that had pre
viously directed the fight against Mr.
Bell. But this Jekyl-and-Hyde met
amorphosis is merely an imitation.
Theodore A. Bell is the people's candi
date—the man who fought the fight,
and, by every token of truth and sin
cerity, the man who is going to win
It."
Judge Long also spoke on the ne
cessity for keeping the judiciary out
of politics, and said:
"Both parties favor a non-partisan
judiciary, and the selection of judges
for their qualifications, not for their
political affiliations. As was said by
Judge Benjamin P. Bledsoe, one of
the Democratic candidates for justice
of the supreme court, 'A candidate for
a judicial office should have no plat
form save his own record, no policies
save those of the performance of his
judicial duties without fear or favor.'
Voters should advise themselves by
investigating the records and reputa
tions of the Judicial candidates and
cast their votes for the men best qual
ified for the position by reason of
their experience in the practice of the
law and their knowledge of the law,
acquired by education and experi
ence."
FAVOR LUCIUS P. GREEN
FOR JUSTICE OF PEACE
Members of Bar Association In
dorse Good Government
Candidate
To indorse him as the Good Govern
ment candidate for justice of the
peace of Los Angeles township, a
number of the members of the Bar
associates and friends of Lucius P.
Green entertained Mr. Green with a
reception and dinner in the banquet
room of the Hollenbeck hotel last
evening. The gathering was a pre
liminary affair to be followed by an
other at the HollenbeLk next Wednes
day noon, when an organization for
the purpose of furthering Mr. Green's
candidacy and for work on election
day will be completed.
After dinner speeches were made by
Frank L. Miller of the firm of Miller,
Gardner & Miller; D. E. Bowman, G.
T. Sweet, A. M. Strong and Mr. Green.
Mr. Miller acted as toastmaster. The
following resolutions were adopted:
"Whereas, there are numerous can
didates for the office of justice of the
peaco of Los Angeles township, to be
voted for at the election November 8,
and that office is of great importance
to the average citizen, for the reason
that a large portion of the litigation
of our olttsens is handled by the jus
tice's court; and
"Whereas, we have personally known
/Lucius P. Green, Good Government and
Democratic nominee for that office,
for a number of years, and know him
to be well qualified, by education and
temperament, to perform the duties of
a judicial officer;
"Therefore, be it resolved, that we
unanimously Indorse Mr. Green's can—
illdacy for justice of the peace and
highly recommend him to the voters
at the coming election "
BELL ARRIVES IN GOOD
HEALTH AND SPIRITS
Democratic Leader Confident of
Election—Scores Empty Fulfill
ment of Rep. Promises
"My health is finr, my spirits good.
X ;il* fe^l that I slinll be elected."
So spoke Theodore A. Bell, Demo
cratic candidate for governor of Cali
fornia, now in Los Angeles on a tour,
when Interviewed In the parlor of the
Hollenbeck yesterday.
"How do you stand the strain?" was
aske^.
"Just my natural strength, I sup
pose. You know, I was always fond
of athletics.' 1
"In San Francisco you used to do a
great d>al of walking over the hills?"
"Yes. and other outdoor exercise."
As he. stood up at thut moment a
perfect type of physical manhood,
height, 6 feet, l l-n Inches, weight I!' 6,
his Clear complexion and steady gaze
showed that he was In the pink of
condition.
"Feel of that grip," he ventured, ex
tending a hand embodying crushing
strength.
"Mow about the stories of being
broken .jy fatigue?" was suggested.
"Judge for yourself," was his la
conic comment.
"Mr. Bell, why do you think you will
v in this great fight?"
"Because the people are behind the
new awakening of the public con
science. It is the people's fight, not
mine. lam only their standard-bear
er, and if I win the honor is theirs,
for it is the people v.ho are doing it
all."
"Yes, but what seems to bo nearest
their hearts-, and your heart?"
"The people feel that they h:ive not
had a square deal, and look to the
Democrats to bring in the newer, hap
pier day. The Republican party has
been in power a long time and has
promised much, but I say to you the
unrest in our nation is deep and the
people are tired of promises and empty
fulfillment."
Jtt this point Mr. John F. Murray,
secretary of the state Democratic
committee, San Francisco, who was
with Mr. Bell in conference, took up
the talk, Mr. Bell excusing himself.
Mr. .Murray said:
"Mr. Bell has been very busy since
he arrived from the north.
"You can imagine the interest in his
campaign when I tell you that four
of the San Francisco papers have
writers accompanying him."
H. A. Blanchard of San Jose, candi
date for clerk of the supreme court, a
stenographer and lawyer, is with Mr.
Bell on the southern tour.
JOSEPH A. DELGADO OWNER
OF FIRST CALIFORNIA FLAG
In the article on the flag bearing the
facsimile of the original California
state seal which appeared In The Her
ald of Tuesday morning, the name of
the person who had owned the flag for
many years, should have read Joseph
A. Delgado. Mr. Delgado's grand
father, Martin Delgado, was one of
the first three merchants to come to
California from Mexico in 1840 and
was one of twenty-five settlers who
were given land grants by the Mexi
can government ranging from one to
ten thousand acres. Mr. Delgado was
given 10,000 acres. Flour sold at that
time at $40 a sack in American money
and other provisions were on the same
scale. Small schooners plying between
Los Angeles and San Francisco were
fitted with oars to be used to propel
the ships in calm weather.
APPOINT COMMITTEES TO
ARRANGE BELL MEETING
LONG BEACH, Oct. 26.—For the
Bell-Spellacy meeting at the auditor
ium Friday night the following com
mittees on arrangements have been
appointed and were announced last
night at a meeting of the Democratic
precinct committeemen:
Music, B. W. Hoag. S. G. Long,
George Hoodenpyle, Walter J. Des
mond; one fireworks. Dr. Price, K.
Lee Wilson, Attorney R. M. Sherwood;
advertising, Attorneys Whealton and
Spicer and Luther L. Mack.
The meeting will be preceded by a
parade, headed by a band. There will
also be a display of red fire along the
bluff.'
REPUBLICANS WILL HEAR
THEODORE BELL AT VENICE
VENICE, Oct. 26.—Indications are
that a large percentage of the crowd
that is expected to attend the rally
under the auspices of the Bell-Spel
lacy club at the Venice auditorium to
morrow night will be Republicans.
Many of the latter have bolted their
party's candidates for governor and
lieutenant governor in favor of the
Democratic candidates, who will speak
at this meeting. Dr. J. M. White,
president of the club, will have charge
of the meeting. Timothy Spellacy will
make the opening address, while Theo
dore A. Bell, who will arrive later in
the evening, will explain to the voters
why he should be elected.
FORAKER QUITS CAMPAIGN;
REFUSES TO COOL SPEECH
CLEVELAND, Oct. 26.— Declining to
accede to an alleged request of tile Ke
l.ul.llcun state executive committee to
"modify bit speeches," former s-enator
Foraker has withdrawn from partici
pation In the Ohio state campaign and
has canceled all his speaking engage
ments.
The senator in an address last week
made plain his opposition to the "new
nationalism" advocated liy Theodore
Roosevelt, describing it as "treason."
This brought on heated replies from Die
stump and the controversy had tuken
first place in the state cumpaiKn so far
as IMWtpapw attention wan concerned.
In a telephone luci-wicr to Chairman
Charles Craig of the Erie county cen
tral committee, Mr. Foraker announced
the state committee had requeued him
to modify his speeches, that he would
make them as he chose or not speak
at all, und that therefore he would
cancel his Hitndiuky address tomor
row, am well as all other speaking
dates.
Human Limitations •S,
are today not recognized as the same human limi- |
tations that were accepted as the working condi-. I
tions of even only ten years ago. More is de- 1
manded. To keep abreast of the times your zone I
of influence must be widened, your reach length- g
ened, your force increased I
The Long Distance j
Long Distance I
Homephone
adds to the ordinary human limitations the al
most unlimited capabilities of a perfected me
chanical system, reaching instantaneously the
very person you may have in mind,
HOMEJffI
TELEPHONEjPi^
in »» £ TCI fQ ofifl^J (k h
wSyW W I iwfia*^* \1 II
716 S. OLIVE SIGaSSIr
y^mmm^v Brass Bed
Sftruk \\\\'\\h X T ilta Cut
j&^ Handsome brass bed in fine finish.
Continuous post model, like cut.
■'■' Worth $30—this week $15.75.
£OCTM£ Your Credit
=j^^{= Is Good
INTERESTING ROUTES OF TRAVEL ■
SPEND THE WEEK AT
, santa CATALINA ISLAND
THE FALL WEATHER IS DELIGHTFUL
Saturday Evening Boat Leaves San Pedro at 6.
HOTETy M3STKOFOLK IS OPEN. >;.
BANNING CO., Agents^ 4493- 104 Pacific Electric Bldg.
HOTELS-RESTAURANTS-RESORTS
Ye Alpine Tavern
JL ■ i
Situated on Mt. Lowe. A mile abovs the sea. . American plan, $3 per day.
Choice of rooms in hotel or cottages. No consumptives or invalids taken.
Telephone Passenger Dept., Pacific Electric Ry., or Times Free Information
Bureau for further Information.
Cracked Crabs I --- r'r— th cafe Bristol
UIUUHUU UIUUO|Hi.WiI»r,mT j and ronrth »treet».
PASSENGERS TOO FEW FOR
VOYAGE BACK TO AFRICA
The first Ethiopian-American back
to-Africa ship, which was booked to
sail on November 6 from Los Angolei
harbor to Liberia, will not sail untU
January 1. The change was made nec
essary by the want of sufficient pas
sengers to warrant the boat making
the trip.
The movement to encourage the re
turn to Africa of American negroes
was .started by the Rev. J. D. Gordon
and the Rev. J. T. Hill of the African
Baptist church. It is said that at
least 2000 negroes are preparing to go
to Liberia to make their future homes.
About 300 families are preparing to
make the trip in January.
It was announced a.t the Mount Zion
Missionary congress, recently held in
this city, that nearly 1000 families will
Los Angeles lor Liberia and
that about a thousand in and near
Denver will also sail for Africa.
WILL APPOINT NEGRO TO •
HIGH FEDERAL OFFICE
WASHINGTON, Oct. 28.—President
Tafti it wai stated today, lias de
cided to appoint a negro to the high
est office in an executive branch of the
government ever held by a member of
that raoe. William H. Louis, at
present an assistant district attorney
in Boston, is to be made an assistant
attorney general of the United States.
The appoint*-- • has been agreed on
by the president and Attorney Gen
eral Wlckeraham.
I.' wis la a graduate of Amherst anil
Harvard and played on the Harvard
football team as center rush. He won
the reputation Of being one of the
boat players In that position thut Har
vard ever bail.
Get Back Your
Back Bone
BE THE MAN YOU SHOULD BE—
STOP TRYING TO GET THE BEST!
OF THAT LITTLE DEVIL THAT 13
ALWAYS SUCCESSFUL IN PULLING*
YOU DOWN HILL—YOU CANNOT
HARM HIM. WHY, MAN, THAT;
LITTLE DEVIL IS THE POISON
IN YOUR SYSTEM and has control of
every move you make to QUIT.
THERE IS BUT ONE REAL WAY.
and that's with help—THE RIGHT
HELP, THE HELP THAT CON
QUERS—THE HELP THAT BRINGS
BACK YOUR GRIT and makes you
the MAN YOU SHOULD BE. THE
DRINK HABIT is nothing more than
a disease—a poison in the system. INi
THREE DAYS. AT THE NEAL IN
STITUTE. THAT LITTLE DEVIL'
(the poison) will be out of your system
for good. This we guarantee and if you
are not quite satislUnl YOUR MONEY
IS not accepted. WE CERTAINLY
CANNOT MAKE A MORE SATISFAC
TORY ARRANGEMENT THAN TO
(iI'ARANTEE YOU TO BE A
STRONG CONQUEROR OF THAT
DEVIL THE DAY YOU STOP TAK
ING OUR TREATMENTS. THERE'S
no publicity about it. the neal.
home IS YOUR HOME—quiet, re
fined and uvory home comfort. WE
a 11,1 BE GLAD TO SHOW AND
READ Vor MANY LETTERS FROM
THOSE THAT HAVE BEEN CURED
BY THE NEAL WAY AND WHO
HAVE REQUESTED rs TO USH
THEIR NAMES. DON'T WAIT, if
that devil !■ in your body—get rid of
it—lT'S DOING YOU HARM. YOU!
NEED HELP NOW.
Call—Phone—or WRITE at once.
NEAL INSTITUTE,
M 6 SOUTH OLIVE STREET,
LOS ANGELES, CAL.
Home A 4072; Bit way. 406.'i.
If. v ««7 to cecur* a Miriam in a w4
automobile, through want advertuinf. an II
wed to tw—and »ttU ia—to mciw* • harm
auil canlafa.
11

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