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Los Angeles herald. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, October 29, 1910, Image 13

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NEWS FROM NEARBY CITIES
Correspondent—■
Re*, phone
Sunset 4807.
PASADENA
OFFICK, SO WHOT <XMX>RA r>o HTKKBT. Phone* tC27.
PASADENA OFFERED WATER
FROM TU JUNGA CANYON
Board of Trade Considers Plan to
Develop 1500 Inches Now
Going to Waste
PASADENA, Oct. 20.—Representa
tives of the Tn Junga Water «<• Power
company appeared before the board u(
water committee last evening
with a proposition to dolivor to the
city from 1000 to 1500 miner's inches
of flood water from the Tv Jiiiiwi oan
yon guaranteed to he free from legal
i Htiuiglemonts. It was stated that the
proposed water supply Is not at PTM
ent impounded and that, being Hood
water, it could not bo claimed by any
one elso when onco dammed up.
The matter will be taken up with
the subcommittee on Independent
water supply at a meeting Wednes
day evening. Thomas M. Dack and
I >r. Homer Hansen of Los Angeles,
Charles S. Wilson of Hollywood and
the company's attorney, F. E. Davis
of Los Angeles, represented the com
pany.
The subcommittee on additional
water supply reported that a visit to
tho San Gabriel narrows showed the
ground saturated with water at pres
ent, with at least ten miner's inches
running to waste. Members of tho
committee are investigating tho legal
and engineering phases of the Ques
tion of developing a supply from that
source. It was pointed out that power
from the municipal lighting plant
could be used for pumping at a cost
far lower than estimated several years
ago, when the Narrows property was
purchased by tho city and it was pro
posed to Install steam plants for
pumping.
The subcommittee on consolidation
of the present private water companies
reported that a meeting had been held
With the directors of the three prin
cipal companies and that tho latter
bave appointed a committee to work
OUt a plan to submit to the stockhold
ers. It is argued that with tho pres
ent companies consolidated the pres
ent water supply could be more evenly
distributed and that matters would be
in better shape for purchase by the
city if such course should bo decided
upon in the future.
Other subcommittees submitted par
tial reports and promised definite
statements at a future meeting per
taining to the Owons river supply, the
question of condemning the existing
private plants and the question of de
termining the value of property of the
existing companies. No report was
submitted from the subcommittee on
nays and means of raising money to
defray expenses of investigations being
made by tho several committees.
Ernest H. Lockwood, who has re
cently returned from a northern trip,
told of wonderful enginei-iing feats,
building plans and other civic under
takings in Seattle, Portland and other
cities, and by way of comparison
pointed out that Pasadena and South
ern California should plan for the fu
ture.
"We are an ambitious and Intelli
gent people," he declared, "but we
need a leader who win guide us out
of the wilderness of narrow thought.
We should take a broad view of the
(luestlon and plan to develop the whole
country surrounding Pasadena," he
siiitl, "and not confine ourselves to de
veloping: a small supply of water ana
scattering It over too much territory."
ROSE TOURNAMENT QUEEN
TO BE CHOSEN BY BALLOT
PASADENA, Oct. 29.—The feminine
population of Pasadena is enthused
over the final decision of the all-civic
boosting committee and the Tourna
ment of Roiei directors to Inaugurate
a popular voting contest for queen of
the mil tournament. The announce
ment was made yesterday at the board
of trade luncheon, at which 200 or more
were present.
Voting will begin Tuesday morning.
The editors of the local papers and
the local correspondents of the Los An-
geles morning papers have been ap
pointed as a committee to manage the
contest. Ballot boxes will be Installed
at the offices of the local papers.
Rules governing the contest will bo
published this evening and detailed In
formation for those who wish to enter
or who have friends whom they wish
to enter can bo had at any time during
the day fit the local paper offices or In
the evenings at the branch offices of
the Los Angeles papers.
Bach member of the Tournament as
sociation is entitled to one voting slip
good for 100 votes for queen. The first
voting slip cast for a candidate places
her in nomination. The object of the
contest i.s to encourage friends of tho
candidates to obtain memberships to
get the votes.
It is figured that with 1000 or more
members the association will be ablo
to finance the coming pageant without
calling upon tho few enthusiastic mer
chants for a guarantee fund as in the
past. Membership Is open to men or
women.
TUo board of trade luncheon yester
day at Hotel Maryland, called for the
purpose of boosting the Tournament of
Hoses, wound up with a burst of en
thusiasm which resulted in obtaining
fifty new members for the Tournament
association.
Joseph Scott, president of the Los
Angeles chamber of commerce, lauded
the civic' loyalty of the 200 business
mid professional men who laid aside
their business for two hours during
the middle of the day to attend a
boosters' gathering. He attributed the
increase in population of Pasadena and
other Southern California cities to ad
vertising received through the rose
tournament and pledged the support of
the Los Angeles civic bodies to the
annual pageant.
Prof. lieroy Ely, principal of tho
local high school; Ernest 11. May,
PASADENA CLASSIFIED
PASADENA BUSINESS COLLEGE
OLDEST AND BEST BCHOOL IN THH
city; new building, Individual Instruc
tion positions guaranteed. Day and even
ing «ohool. Enroll today. 349 N. KAUI
QAKH. 9-27-tf
PASADENA CLEANERS & HATTERS
WORK CALLED FOR AND DELIVERED.
All kinds of alterine and repairing. 79 N.
naymnnd aye. PHONE 308«. 10-10-tf
PASADENA SHOE HOSPITAL
MEN'S SEWED SOLES AND 11KEI-3. Hi
Udlerf »sc. IB* N. FAIH OAKS AYE.
W-l-U
Circulation Dept.
Home 1642
Sunset 1710
president of tho First National bank:
Rev. Albert Hatcher Smith, pastor of
the First Baptist church; Frank G.
Hogan, president of the Tournament
i it lon, and the Key. Robert J.
Burdette spoke on different phases of
the advantage of the rose festival to
Southern California in general and
Pasadena in particular.
PASADENA SPORTS
PASADENA, Oct. 29.—Thronp aca
demy will moot Santa Ana high school
Polytechnic elementary school foot
ball field, near Tournament park.
Tho baseball team of the Pabuco
club of this city will play tho team
from Heald's Business collcgo of Los
Ingeleg this afternoon at 3 o'clock on
Hi. Carmellta grounds.
Tin" Junior A gym class of the T.
M. C. A. will indulge In a miniature
marathon race this forenoon at 10:30
o'clock, tho course being from tho as
sociation rooms down Colorado street
to Fair Oaks avenue and return.
The Knights of Columbus and Pasa
dena furniture men are organizing
teams to enter tho local bowling
league, which will begin play next
week. Other teams are the Platt
Juniors, Myers Cubs, Pasadena Star,
Pasadena News, Pasadena Plumbers
and Pasadona Grocers.
The senior physical department
members of the Y. M. C. A. met last
evening to organize a basketball
league. Four teams will play a regu
lar schedule of games.
Twenty-two members of the Crown
City Motorcycle club have joined the
Federation of American Motorcyclists
and futuro motorcycle events held by
tho club will be under F. A. M. rules.
Miss Baber, with a score of 122, has
wrestod the woman's local bowling
championship from Mrs. Charles Platt,
who formerly held the record of 104.
PASADENA SOCIAL NOTES
PASADENA, Oct. 29.—A Hallowoen
party for Los Angeles and Pasadena
society people will be held this even-
Ing at Hotel Maryland. An old-fash
ioned dinner will bo served from 6:30
to 8 o'clock. A ranclng party will be
hold tonight In the music room. Sym
bols of witchcraft and other wierd
decorations will be used.
Instead of the usual Saturday after
noon social gathering of .the Shakes
peare club there will be a meeting
tonight at which Professor Halg C.
Arklln will give nn Illustrated lecture
on the paintings of old masters. It is
announced that guest tickets may be
used.
Friends of the Pabuco club of the
Pasadena Business college will be en
tertained this evening in the club
rooms of the college with a Halloween
party.
The local council of the Royal Ar
canum will entertain the "booster
bunch" of the Los Angeles council this
evening. The guests will come In a
special car. Kenyon Warren will de
scribe his recent trip to Tahiti.
♦-•-#
PASADENA PARAGRAPHS
PASADENA, Oct. 29.—A preparatory
class In orchestra work Is to be or
ganized at the high school to furnish
musical recruits for the high school
orchestra in future years and to pro
vide musical training for eighth grade
puplla of the grammar school. In
struction In musical classes Is free to
the pupils and credits are given on
their musical ability.
Jliss Gladys Mcßurney, 456 West
Walnut street, who suddenly disap
peared from her home Monday, re
turned yesterday afternoon as mys
teriously as she disappeared. She will
make no statement as to her where
abouts during her absence.
E. L. Carpenter, a fireman of South
Pasadena, was overcome with heat and
smoke yesterday at the fire which par
tially destroyed a cleaning establish
ment on Monterey road. He was car
ried to his home and it is said ho will
recover.
Members of the Throop Debating
club will attend the Hiram . Johnson
meeting at Simpson auditorium in Los
Angeles tonight. They attended the
Theodore Bell meeting here Thursday.
It is expected they will hold a debate
on some political question In the near
future.
I. C. CARTER, GAS PLANT
CONSTRUCTOR, IS DEAD
POMONA, Oct. 28.—1. C. Carter,
noted gas plant constructor and super
intendent, who was well known t«
many residents here, Is dead at his
recent home in Honolulu.
Mr. Carter, who was popular and
well liked here, was superintendent of
the Pomona Gas and Electric Light
company before that plant was sold
by the owners, J. A. and A. M. Dole,
to the Edison company, of which sys
tem it Is now a part. Mr. Carter had
been In the gas business all of his life
and went to Honolulu in 1903 to be
come superintendent and manager of
the Hawaiian Gas company. Ho Is
survived by a widow and daughter.
MILITIAMEN PLAN BALL
FOR THANKSGIVING NIGHT
POMONA, Oct. 28.'—The members of
company D, Seventh regiment, N. G.
C, this city, are arranging for a grand
military ball to be given at the ar
mory on West Second street on
Thanksgiving night.
Tho committee for general arrange
ments is composed of Sergts. A. B.
Cleveland, Homer Benson, A. L. Ste
vens, Corporals McDoyell and A. Flatt, %
O. D. Hooppell, P. J. Welch and R .D.
Johnson. The ball will be an Invita
tion affair, and music will be fur
nished by a large orchestra.
CLASS CHOOSES OFFICERS
POMONA, Oct. 28.—The senior class
of the local high school has elected the
following board of directors for the
school paper, the Cardinal: Miss
Rowyer, editor in chief; Miss Frcden
ila.ll. associate editor; Miss Leading
ham, art editor; Hal Fleming, busi
ness manager; George Roe, advertising
manager; Miss Whipp, alumni editor;
Alister Cummins, Josh editor; C. Mc-
Kirn, athletics. The class is one of
the largest in the history of the school.
SLASHES MEXICAN'S THROAP
SANTA ANA, Oct. 28.—Quarreling as
to whom was "boss," Jose Garcia and
another Mexican whose name was not'
ascertained engaged In a fight today
at Anaheim, with the result that
Garcia had his throat cut. He was
hastily brought to Santa Ana hospital
and it is believed ho will recover. The
men were both section hands.
MARRIAGE LICENSES ISSUED
SANTA ANA, Oct. 28.—The following
marriage licenses were issued in Santa
Ana: Joseph M. Simmons, 38, and
Hadio M. Wright, 44, both of Los- An
i k tober 27; Ernest G. Carter, ft,
ami Basel J. Cutnimiitfb, 20, both of
LOS ANGELES HERALD: SATURDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 20, 1910.
LONG BEACH
CIRCd-ATION DEI'ARTMKNT
US W. (li'imiii. Hump 4GO; Kiinurt 5411.
Correipnmlrnt: Hnnif 48B; Hun-iO 11.'.1.
P. E. AND SALT LAKE RY.S
SETTLE CROSSING DISPUTE
LONG BEACH, Oct. 28.—The tem
porary disagreement between the Salt
Lake Railway company and the Pa
elflc Electric regarding the building by
the electric road of a crossing over
the Salt Lake's tracks at Seventh
si net and Alamltos avenue has
settled amicably and tho Pacific Elec
tric has men at work excavating, in
preparation to put the crossing In.
Tho Pacific Electric is to maintain
the crossing and to give steam trains
the right of way. It is roported that
the East and West Seventh street
lines will be completed at once and
the Willows line operated in conjunc
tion with that on West Seventh street,
the East Seventh street line being
operated separately.
WOMEN PLAN FIRST CITY
IMPROVEMENT MEETING
LONG BEACH, Oct. 28.—The Wom
en's Civic league this morning accepted
the Invitation from Dana Bartlett and
delegates were appointed from the va
rious wards to attend the first annual
city planning conference to be held in
Ijos Angeles November 14-16.
The women's league is taking active
steps to secure certain civic improve
ments. They are agitating the removal
of electric light and telephone pole 3
from the streets to the alleys and have
the statement from the city authorities
that the corporation agrees to the re
moval of the poles as soon as ex
pedient. The women also are working
for better conditions In public comfort
stations.
LONG BEACH WOMAN DIES
LONG BEACH, Oct. 28.—Mrs. Mary
Beach, mother of C. C. Lord and H.
S. Lord, members if the tlrm of Lord
& Co., owners of three stores and a
shell goods factory here, is dead at
806 Atlantic avenue, where she lived
with her son, H. S. Lord. She was a
native of England but had lived In
California twenty-five years. Before
coming to this city three years ago
she made her home in San Francisco
and Pasadena. Advancing years had
caused a gradual decline, but Mrs.
Beach had been seriously ill only since
last Saturday night. Funeral services
will be held from 1 the Cleveland chapel
at 2 o'clock tomorrow afternoon, the
Rev. H. K. Booth officiating. Burial
is to be In Sunnyslde cemetery.
FUNERAL OF MRS. HEWSON SET
LONG BEACH, Oct. 28.—The body of
Mrs. Eliza C. Hewson, who committed
suicide yesterday at her apartments
In West Eleventh street, Los Angeles,
will be brought to the undertaking
rooms of Fay and Dlckerson, this city,
tomorrow morning, and funeral serv
ices will be held at 2:30 o'clock In
the afternoon from the home of her
son, Gonrgo H. Laraway of 720 Loma
Vista drive. The Rev. F. M. Rogers
will officiate. Burial is to be in Sunny
side cemetery. Laraway, who Is a
salesman in a local department store,
knows no reason for his mother's act.
She was 73 years old and apparently
in good health.
TO BUILD NEW GAS PLANT
LONG BEACH, Oct. 28.—The manu
facture of gas at the Inner Harbor Gas
company's old plant at Second street
and Alamitos avenue will be discon
tinued in a few days. The business
of the combined Inner Harbor and
Edison companies will be carried on
after November 1 under the name of
the New Consolidated Gas company.
A new plapt is to be built on the flats
west of town. Generators have been
removed from Second and Alamitos to
another plant on the flats, where gas
will be made for the present. This
plant occupies a part of the site for
the new institution.
NEGRO WOMAN DISMISSED
LONG BEACH, Oct. 28.—Sustaining
the demurrer of Attorney George
Spicer, based on the ground that the
charge was unconstitutional, Police
Judge Hart today dismissed the charge
of conducting a notorious resort which
had been brought against Ellen Norris,
a negro. The woman was arrested
last Sunday morning.
PLUMBING BIDS THROWN OUT
LONG BEACH, Oct. 23.—Because the
lowest bid was not accompanied by
a certified check, the board of educa
tion has decided to throw out all bids
received on plumbing fixtures for the
polytechnic school and to readvertlse.
Other small contracts may be awarded
the first of next week.
SENIORS WIN AT BASKETBALL
LONO BEACH, Oct. 28.—The fresh
men girls made eight points to tho
senior girls' eleven In the first two
thirds of the championship interclass
basketball game, but the seniors won
the cup by good work in the final
third, the total score being 25 to 11.
SAN BERNARDINO
Office 48» Court »treet.
Phone*—Home 443; Sunset Main 442.
SAN BERNARDINO ACTIVE
FOR CHARTER REVISION
SAN BERNARDINO, Oct. 28.—Activ
ity in the revising of tho charter of the
city has been resumed and Chairman
F. P. Oster has called a meeting of
the sub-committees for Tuesday even
ing to go over the final steps in pre
paring the amendments for submission
to the voters.
It is the plan to submit the amended
charter, if approved at the special elec
tion, to the legislature in its next ses
sion. The various amendments will bo
voted on by the committee of sixty
one before returned to the mayor.
OLD WELL FLOWS AFTER
7 YEARS OF TEETOTALISM
SAN BERNARDINO, Oct. 2S.—After
having been dry for over seven years,
an old well on the property of J. B.
Tyler at Arrowhead avenue and Tenth
street, has commenced to flow.
The tapping of the artesian belt In
the lower end of the valley by numer
ous big wells belonging to the Riverside
Water company drained all the high
lands, but recent wet winters and ef
forts c.i conservation nave oaused tho
water to again run from old aban
doned wells in the higher parts of the
city.
ROOT CLAIMS T.R.
WORKS FOR TAFT
Senator Declares Strenuous Fight
of Roosevelt Is to Save
the President
CALLS FOR A SECOND TERM
Former Cabinet Member Asserts
Only Radical Victory Can
Defeat Chief Executive
(Associated Press)
NEW YORK, Oct. 28.—"1f Mr. Taft
continues to make as good a president
a.s ho. is making now, ho will bo the
natural and Inevitable candidate of
his party in 1912, unless one thing
happens—that the pooplo of the United
States shall repudiate the administra
tion of Mr. Taft by such a crushing
and overwhelming defe.at of his party
that it will be apparent that Mr. Taft
cannot be re-elected."
This was the statement made to
night by United States Senator Elihu
Root, In a speech at Manhattan ca
sino.
Senator Root addressed himself par
ticularly to those Republicans who
stand willing to vote against the Re
publican gubernatorial candidate for
the sake of rebuking Theodore Roose
velt. He declared that Republican de
feat In the state this fall would bo
even more of a blow to the national
administration than to Colonel Roose
velt.
WOULD IIEI.F RADICALS
In , fact, Root said, a Democratic
victory in New York would more likely
turn the next national convention
away from a national administration
which could not hold its party to
gether, and toward Mr. Roosevelt, or
"to one of the far more radical lead
ers now looming- up on the political
horizon in north and middle west."
Cntrary to some expectations, Sen
ator Root brought no direct pledge
from Colonel Rosevelt regarding hia
attitude toward the nomination In
1912.
"A great many Republicans at this
time," said Senator Root, "seem dis
posed to ignore all the grave and sub
stantial issues which are before the
people of this state, and to vote at
the coming election upon no issue
whatever, but simply as an expression
of feeling against Mr. Roosevelt,
whose course regarding national af
fairs they disapprove for one reason
or another, but whom they desire to
punish by defeating the party to
which they belong.
T. R. AIDING TATT
"No one understands better than
Mr. Roosevelt that the strenuous ef
forts he Is making in behalf of the
Republican candidates, not merely in
New York, but in a dozen of other
states, are serving in aid of the Taft
administration, and tend toward the
renomlnation of Taft In 1912.
"What gave Roosevelt the leadership
of the Saratoga convention? There
was an issue before the convention in
which the people of the state are deep
ly interested. Roosevelt espoused the
right side of that issue against the
Republican organization. A majority
of the delegates voted with him, be
cause upon that Issue the people who
elected them were with him. The is
sue was a revolt against the tyranny
of the party machine and party ma
chinery. ,
"It was a part of that great rebel
lion -which has been going on all over
the Union."
CROWDS AT RIVERSIDE
GIVE JOHNSON WELCOME
Candidate for Governor Is Also
Recipient of Honors at
San Bernardino
(Associated Press)
RIVERSIDE, Oct. 28.—Hiram W.
Johnson was welcomed tonight at two
gatherings held in San Bernardino and
Riverside counties. He spoke to two
audiences that greeted him with en
thusiasm. Johnson was the guest at
dinner of a Joint reception committee
from two counties, which Included tho
mayors of tho cities of San Bernar
dino, Riverside, Redlands and Colton.
A. A. Adair acted as chairman of the
meeting here which was held in the
Woman's club building. The hall was
crowded to its capacity.
JOHNSON BIDS DEFIANCE
TO SO. PACIFIC MACHINE
SAN BERNARDINO, Oct. 28.—1n the
greatest meeting of his campaign, Hir
am Johnson, Republican candidate for
governor, tonight addressed 2000 vot
ers. The address was the most forceful
yet heard here In tho campaign. He
openly defied Bell to deny that he hud
the open support of Herrin and his
followers throughout the state. Thia
being a railroad town, where a thou
sand employes are voters, he outlined
his railroad policy as being directed
at railroad activity in politics and not
directed against the business activity
of a railroad. Tho meeting was the
largest held in this city In years.
TO OPERATE 15 STEAMERS
BAY CITY TO NEW ORLEANS
NEW ORLEANS, Oct. 28.—Plans for
the organization of a now steamship
line, which, it is understood, would
compete with the transcontinental rail
roads, were presented to commercial
bodies of Nevy Orleans today by Ber
nard M. Baker of New York.
Mr. Baker is president of the Na
tional Conservation congress. He de
clared that the proposed company
would be capitalized at $10,000,000 and
would operate fifteen 10,000-ton steam
ers from the Northern Paolflo coast via
San Prancißco and from Colon to- New
Orleans and New Yor«.
BOWLING
On the Grand alleys yesterday aft
ernoon Taylor and Dullard again
showed they are the "Candy Kids" as
a team for they handed It to Lacey
and Glllman of Venice to the tune of
five straight.
In the Interurban the Grand, juniors
took three straight from the Morley
Giants. Schram of the juniors had
high game and Masett of the Giants
had high average.
DESMOND'S
Cor. Third and Spring Sts.
Douglas Building
You know pretty well the kind of clothes you can generally buy for $15 or $20;
these prices, which a good many men have fixed in mind as the limit for clothes.
We want to tell you that here, at $15 and $20, we're offering values in special
Hand-Tailored Suits and Overcoats for Men and Young Men that are SIMPLY,
AMAZING. You'll hardly believe, without seeing them, that such fabrics, such
tailoring, such finish are possible in clothes at $15 and $20.
Any of these clothes is a demonstration of the fact that buying clothes here is
a paying proposition for you.
We have every size up to the largest, and we can satisfy every taste in weave
and color. We guarantee complete satisfaction or money back. Take as much
of our time as you choose and look for your special suit or overcoat here, where
you'll find the most important showing of finest clothes ever brought together.
See Our 235 Feet of Show Windows
Men's and Young Men's Suits & Overcoats
$10.00 to $50,00
Sole Agency Open This Erening Sole Agency
Dunlap Hats Until 10 o'clock Hawes $3 Hats
MONEY COMES TO
SAVE VIDAL HOME
$400 Still Needed to Keep Widow
and Children from Being
Turned Out
HOPE RISES AS FUND GROWS
Subscriptions Sent to Mayor or
Received by Herald Will
Pay Assessment
With a lighter heart than she has
had In many a day, Mrs. Dolores Vldal
is going about the simple tasks in her
humble home at 62G Mission road. Her
fear that her home may be taken from
her because of her Inability to pay the
lien against it resulting from an as-
sessment for the improvement of Mis
sion road, is lessened daily as more
sympathetic people add to the fund
being raised to help her.
Twenty-three dollars and fifty cents
was received yesterday, $5 being paid
in to the mayor's office and the re
mainder being sent to The Herald. In
addition two envelopes, one containing
two dollars and the other one dollar,
have been left at the widow's home.
The amount of the lien standing
against her home is $512. Little more
than a fifth of this has been raised, but
contributions are coming in more rap
idly and it Is hoped that the amount
needed will be raised soon.
"I am sure that everything will come
out right now," said Mrs. Vidal yester
day, in discussing her prospects. "With
all the interest that is being shown
by the people, especially by the Amer
ican people, with what I can do ray-
Bell and with what the other people are
giving me, I feel that I can save my
home. I am very grateful to our mayoi
and to The Herald for the interest that
they have shown and aroused in my
behalf."
In widening the Mission road to pro
vide a broader and more beautiful
thoroughfare for automobllists to Pas
adena, the property owners along tho
road were assessed sums In proportion
to the amount of property owned, to
carry out the improvement expenses.
The Vidal pnnperty at 626 Mission road,
wus assessed $117. Mrs. Vidal was un
able to pay tho amount and was un
successful in her endeavors to borrow.
The Interest p;rew and finally the lien
was sold for more than $500. The prop
erty was In danger of being sold to sat
isfy the mortKac-o. It was then that
the matter was learned of by Tho Her
ald through a petition sent by tho
widow to the mayor.
Subscriptions received by The Her
ald follow: i
A Friend * 5.00
JUHtiru =°<>
T. 11. B 3.00
C. A. N J.OO
Friend £■«»
J. Nelderer company 5.00
Two Friends M-00
Mr. and Mrs. A. J.. East Hollywood 2.00
Cash W-««
Dr. C. Jackson 2-HO
Sympathizer •>■"'
Cash, Los Angeles 1.00
a. A. Seery 6.00
Charles F. Brett ».00
THEY WOULDN'T MIX
Owen Seaman, editor of Punch, was the
principal cuest at a dinner of tlie l*m
flon Authors' club recently, which was fol
loweil by a discussion on "Humor." The
Plttsburg Chronicle-Telegraph Hays that Mr.
Seaman began with a story deprecating the
spoiling of a aood dinner by any discus
sion at all.
There were three characters In the story,
a bluebottle and two Bootchmen. The etoi-y
at once struck a note of probability by
showing the Scotchmen drinking whisky.
The bluebottle buzzed on tha pane: otherwisu
silence reigned.
This was broken by one of th« Scotch
men trying to locate the bluebottle with
zoological exactitude. Said the Scotchman:
"Sandy, I am thinking if yon fly is a
birdie or a beastle."
The other replied: "Man. don't 'poll good
whisky with religious conversation."
If you are a prospective real estat.
purchaser road Herald wants today
und every other day.
INDIAN TRAPPER FALLS ON
FACE AT SIGHT OF BALLOON
Canadian Farmer Shoots at the
America ll—Hawley at Montreal
MONTREAL, Oct. 28.—The final
stage of the remarkable journey of
Alan R. Hawley, pilot, and Augnistus
Post, aid, of the victorious balloon
America II Into Canada ended today
with their arrival In Montreal. During
the night a sleet and snowstorm swept
over central Quebec, and the aero
nauts" final glimpse of the wooded
hills gave them a blank and dreary
picture suggestive of a fate that might
have overtaken them had they been
less successful In managing the big
gas bag or in woodcraft. They were
met here by representatives of the
Montreal Automobile and Aero club,
and were the guests of President An
son and the directors of that organiza
tion at breakfast at the Place Vigor.
They left on the Delaware & Hudson
railroad at 10:05 and are due to arrive
in Now York at 10:30 o'clock tonight.
Some interesting side lights were af
forded during conversation today.
"We would have gone farther," de
clared Mr. Post, "but as it was we
went a little too far."
BOTTLE OF FEROXIDE
"We were well eqipped when we
left the America II," sai<l Mr. Hawley.
"We took three blankets, three cans
of soup, a small saw, instruments,
arms, ammunition, six pounds of bis
cuit and a bottle of peroxide."
"Peroxide! For what?" asked a re
porter.
"Well, it Is a secret," broke in Mr.
Post, "but my friend Hawley is very
keen on natural history and is always
on the lookout for freaks for the Bronx
zoo. We thought if we could catch a
muskrat dark in color what we had in
tho bottle might transform It into a
freak of nature from the Canadian
wilds."
"At the edge of a small lake just be
fore we landed we saw an Indian trap
per on the shore with a gun," con
tiniK',l Mr. Hawley.
"As the shadow of the balloon crept
across the water he looked up and
then threw himself on his face. We
shouted, but he was too scared to
answer. Later we passed a quiet
looking old gentleman, who, after we
had crossed his property of forest and
shrub, let fly two charges of shot
at us."
289 MILES IN SIX HOURS
BREAKS AVIATION RECORD
ETAMPES, France, Oct. 28.—Mau
ri,.,. Tabuteau broke the world's .avia
tion records for time and distance to
day by Hying 289 miles in six hours in
a continuous trip.
Tabuteau's remarkable feat WEB ac
complished in the aerodrome here
while he was trying for the Mlchenn
cup, which is awarded annually to th«
aviator making the longest sustained
Illffht within the year. A premium of
$4000 goes to the winner.
The previous record for time and dis
tance waa held by Oliesiagor, the Bel
aviator, who covered 244 miles
in five hours three mlnUtei and live
seconds on July 10 last.
$75,000 PLEDGED FOR BIG
BAY CITY AVIATION MEET
SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 28.—That an
intiTiiational aviation meet will be
held in this city from November 23 to
December 3 was assured today when
at a meeting of business men 375,000
was pledged for prlaea and exponyes
and committee* were appointed to ar
range the details. It Is expected ''
procure the attendance of the avia
tors now competing in the eaat, and
effort! will be made to obtain reduced
portation rates on railroad and
unship lines.
Tin; meet has the- sanction of the
American Aeronautical awociatton,
and will be held under the auttplcM of
the Aero Club of the Pacific.
sown" oats
"It's no (rood looking at mo ll!<e that,
tathor," said Augustus Frederick, 13 years
old, bb his parent, having punished Sebas
tian Claude, 14 yean uIJ, for being In
o( a packet of lioso of tho Prairie
at threepence the box of ten, locked eearcf>
ingly at him. "You know perfectly well
I chucked smoking when I was 8." —Lon-
don Globe.
PASSION PLAY CHRISTUS
WILL VISIT HOLY LAND
Anton Lang to Gratify One of His
Life Ambitions
BERLIN, Oct. 23.—Anton Lang, the
potter of Oberammergau, world famed
as the Christus of the "Passion Play,"
is shortly to gratify one of his life
ambitions by a visit to the Holy Land.
He and his wife have been invited to
accompany an American tourist party
as guests of honor, and Lang has em
braced the opportunity with delight.
He has been away from hla native
highlands In the Bavarian mountains
only twice before—once when he made
a pilgrimage to Pope Leo XIII and a
little later when he visited England
as the guest of British admirers.
Lang has thoroughly established his
reputation as one of the world's really
great actors by his Interpretation of
the Savior's role for the second tlma
during this year's "Passion Play."
Apart from the essential predominancn
of his part, Lang's personality has
towered head and shoulders over all
the rest of the Oberammergau cast.
Spoaking of his forthcoming tour of
the Holy Land, Herr Lang said: "I
know that the Holy Land of Jesus
era no longer exists. I am familiar
with the painful and distressing strug
gle which rival sects have waged
around the holy sepulcher, and I
real in ■ that modern improvements
have done much to change the physi
ognomy of Jerusalem and the other
holy piaces. But I am sure that per
sonal contact with the scenes in which
I have lived In spirit since childhood
will be of everlasting profit and satis
faction."
CLEVELAND'S NEW AMBITION
Cleveland recently had a flag-raisins day.
Tho municipal flag was hoisted In the chief
square and the city clerk In an enthusiastic
■I ii on Cleveland's growth and development
said:
"■A million In 1920' haa been used as a
slogan since the last renaus return* were re
calvcd. It la well to look forward to a growth
of that kind, and there Is plenty of evldencn
that Cleveland will In time outstrip Chicago
In size and Industrial Importance."
Bh-h! Sing low there, you Clevelanders, or
Census Director Durancl may become suspl
clom nu'l order a recount.
Automobile
Directory
Amplex
(Formerly American Simplex) and Atlas
Guaranteed self-starters.
BEKINS MOTOR CAR CO..
1062 S. Olive St.
F3MS. Maln 1"1'
Apperson and Reo
LJDON T. SHBTTIJBR.
(83 South Grand Avenue.
Main TOS4i Home 1018?,
Autocar
M. 8. BTFIK.VBY * OCX.
1110-11 South Grand, ay*
Home !2J»».
Buick
HOWARD AUTO OOMPANT.
1144 South Olive street.
Main «TTT.
Corbin
CORBIN MOTOR CAR OCX.
ion-:* South OUve M.
Hema AIOOT.
Glide
45-li. p. •■1911" models. SIOOO to. b. fao.
Tory- After ten years made and sold oa tH«
basis an any other staple commodity.
BHAFER-GOODU MOTOR CO.,
Tenth and OUve. Broadway 1831; F257*.
Kissel Kar
"ASK ABOUT XISSmCj BBRVICBL"
TUB KISSEL AUTOMOBILE CCV,
1241 a. Blower st. Fits?.
Knox
DOEHR-BROWS CO.,
1205 South Olive St.
Main 7853: Home F6847.
Locomobile
LOS ANOBX4S3 motor CAR CO,
Ploo and Hill streets.
Main tg!4{ Home 144(1.
Studebaker-Garford "40" *
B. M. T. 10; rTJLITDtUtm ML
IjORT. MOTOR CAR 00.
1011 South Olive st.
M«4n *««.i L .»««B ! a Ittk,
13

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