OCR Interpretation


Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, November 04, 1910, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-11-04/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

16 PAGES
vot. \xxin. TRICE: 50 CENTS by carh/er
WIMBXBB4 IKILJii: OU V-dfcllN 1 O fiin sidMII
EBELL MEMBERS
FIR SUFFRAGE,
79 VOTES TO 31
Conservative Club Women Are
Swayed by Forceful Argument
of Mrs. Lillian Gpldsmith
READING FROM SHAW DRAMA
Mrs. Sumner Hunt Presents Rea
sons Why Women Should
Have Ballot Privilege
FLORENCE BOSARD LAWRENCE
PKbotl club women, most conserva
tive and guarded In their expressions
concerning political situations, were
amazed yesterday by the dramatic
and forceful argument in favor or
•woman suffrage presented by Lillian
Burkhart Goldsmith. A straw ballot
was taken and from the 111 votes cast,
seventy-nine favored votes for woman
" and thirty-ono were opposed. One
woman was courageous j enough to
write herself "on the fence," and this
despite Mrs. Robert J. Burdette~ who
offered the suggestion to all cluD wo
men that "Indecision la the paralysis
of usefulness."
This outcome of the meeting of thu
bookV and conversation section with
the "Literature of Suffrage" for the
general subject was most -surprising.
No one of those women present could
have anticipated the emotions which
would possess them when Mrs. Gold
smith stood before them and gave her
own testimony. No penitent, shiver-
Ing woman on the "mourners' bench
ever made a more humble acknowl
edgement of error of conviction, nor
more proud and trmnKful assertion
that she had experienced a change of
heart.
MRS. GOLDSMITH'S ADDRESS
Mrs. Goldsmith opened her speech
by quoting from the mob scene from
Elizabeth Robins' play, "Votes for
I Women," and continued with these
words: ,
"It was my privilege recently to
listen to Mrs. Yon Wagner of the
housing commission In a talk on the
unspeakably wretched conditions thai
cxi.'it here in ,our home city and I
said to myself as I walked away from
that talk: 'Suppose motherhood is my
sphere. Suppose I have a little child
to bless and comfort me as 1 journey
through life. Suppose I have a hus
band who has kept every promise,
who is my protector' and provider.
Suppose I am sheltered, and that I
have a comfortable home and a lovely
garden to dream in. Suppose the
Great Power that controls the universe
has given me all tnese things, what
right have I, If I personally do not
need suffrage, what right have I to
say I don't care whether women vote
or not. I don't want to vote; it doesn't 1
interest me?.' "
Mrs. Goldsmith cited some of the
cases of horrible indignities which wo
men have to suffer here in Los An
geles, and then said: r
"It is conditions like these that make
me say to those or you who are on
the fence, to those who, like me, shiv
v er and tremble at coming out in the
open and saying against the prejudice
of all the ages '1 am a suffragette! I
want to vote!' I want to say to you,"
continued the speaker, "don't be afraid.
It is coming, and it Is right that it
should come."
Following Mrs. Goldsmith in the pro
gram came a reading of Bernard
Shaw's play, "Press Cuttings," which
was greeted. with constant laughter
and applause. Every argument dear
to the heart of the suffragette was
' introduced, and always in such witty
I manner with an aptness of meaning,
that its strength was doubled. The
women in the various roles were de
lightfully clever and Infused consid
erable dramatic spirit in their read
ing. Parts were assigned to Mrs. Jay
B. Millard, as' "Mrs. O'Farrell;" Mis»
Helen Louise Kimbail, as "General
Mitchener;" . Mrs. West Hughes, as
"Premier Balsqulth;" Mrs. Stephen S.
Wilder, "Lady Corlntha;V Miss Aug
usta Lang, "Mrs. Banger," .and Mrs.
Fred Selwyn Lang, "The Orderly."
CLEVER LINES FROM SII.UV '
The lines of this piay, especially
some spoken by Mrs. O'Farrell, will
btiar repeating. In discussing with
General Mitchener the plan proposed
by the premier to shoot the women who
do not obey the dictates of the rulei's,
Mrs. O'Farrell wisely says:
"But you cannot. fc>ur« if some en-
em/ was to come In here and kill
three-fourths of you men now, wo
could replace you with the help of
th« other one-quarter, but if you were
to kill three-fourths of us, how many
people would Kngland have in the
next generation?"
Mrs. Sumner T. Hunt road a short
paper on suffrage for women, present
ins some excellent and logical argu
ments.
•'Women need the ballot for their
own development, and will soon learn
to train men so that they will make
fewer mistakes," she said; and added
that in Kngland women have not
made any headway in gaining political
suffrage since li>66, while they used
conservative methods, but with the
adoption of Mrs. Pankhurst's radical
methods tremendous progress had been
made.
Mrs. Eugene Pettigrew had the oppo
site side of the argument and present
ed the nine generally accepted argu
ments against extending the privilege
of suffrage to women. -Both papers
w^ere carefully prepared.
The meetings of this section will be
discontinued during December and
the next meeting will be held the first
Thursday, of January with -the literary
men who love music for the topic.
G. O. P. CANDIDATE WILL
NOT VOTE FOR CANNON
CHICAGO, Nov. 3. — Congressman
George E. Foss, chairman of the house
committee on naval affairs, and can
didate xor re-eleetlon in the Tenth
Illinois district, last night announced
he would not vote for Joseph G. Cau
non a« speaker or' the house.
"in the event of a Republican bouse
and the present speaker's candidacy.
I shall vote for some, other Hopubli
can," said Foss.
LOS ANGELES HERALD
INDEX OF
HERALD'S NEWS
TODAY
FOBECAST .„{:,■
For I,on Angeles and vicinity: Clondy
and iiiinrltlcil Friday) shower*t light south
wind. Maximum temperature yesterday, 67
degrees; minimum temperature, 58 degrees.
LOS ANGELES
Jim. C. A. Fesont. witness In Times
dynamiting case, suffers nervous
breakdown. PAGE 4
Screams of telephone girl put high
wayman to flight. PAGE 13
Federation of Improvement Associations
prepares for social function. PAGE 11
Ebcll club women hear forceful arguments
• on question of woman suffrage. PAGE 1
Fifteen thousand union men and women
participate In great street parade at
night. ; PAGE 3
Old Plaza church Is threatened by fire In
adjoining buildings. PAQ|3 4
Friends subscribe to fund for purpose of
saving homo for Mrs. Dolores Vidal. PAGE 4
Wife of conductor who lost legs In saving
passenger struggles to feed family of 9.
PAGE] 4
Shower of .09 Inch brings season's rain to
.64 Inch better than last year. PAGE 4
Los Angeles Federation Parent-Teacher as
sociations hold meeting. N PAGE 6
Elopement ends Mexican romance extending
over four years. . PAGE 5
Chief Engineer Mulholland declares story of
general strike on aqueduct Is untrue.
PAOH »
Effort Is made to send aged woman to \
asylum; court threatens perjury prosecu
tions. ' . PAGE 8
Superior court grants five divorces; fly»
new actions file* yesterday. PAGE %
Negotiations for $1,000,000 of aqueduct bonds
to be concluded in few days. PAGE 8
Salt Lake, city and county agree to have
concrete bridge at Pasadena avenue erod
ing. £ PAGE «
Attorney Guy Eddie sheds light on con
spiracy to advance Fredericks. PAGE 5
Prison matron blames divorces for Klrls'
waywardness. PAGE 9
Attorney E. ,M. Drake comments on Import
ance of Judge Bledsoe's decision on "fel
low servant" doctrine.l PAGE li
King's Daughters and Sons of Southern
California hold annual convention. PAGE 16
Captain Louis Ilansen arouses enthusiasm
on subject of deep outer harbor. PAGE 18
Aged negro and son must explain In court
possession of alleged stolen articles. PAGE IK
Highwayman strikes woman In face, but
falls to secure her purse. PAGE 16
Theaters. PAGE 4
Society and music. , PAGE 5
Mining and oil fields. PAGE 6
Building permits. , PAGE 6
Citrus fruit report. . PAGE 7
Markets and financial. PAGE 7
News of the courts. ■ PAGE 8
Municipal affairs. PAGE 3
Editorial and letter box. f PAGE 10
Politics. PAGE 11
City brevities. PAGE 11
Sports. PAGE 12
Marriage licenses, births, deaths. PAGE 13
I Classified advertising. PAGES 13-15
SOUTH CALIFORNIA.
Mrs. W. W. Gerlach leads candidates In
raoe for queen of Pasadena Tournament
of roses. PAGE 13
Charles McFarland knocked In surf at Long
Beach by comber and rescued. PAGE 13
Brilliant opening of third annual flower
show at Pasadena Gardeners' association.
, 0 PAGE 13
San Pedro police notify San Diego officers
to watch for charity solicitors. PAGE 13
COAST .
Six men indicted on charge of de
frauding government out of Alaska
•4*l land. ; PAGE 1
Delegate to Arizona constitutional con
vention defends proposition restricting
injunction. PAGE 3
Hiram Johnson, In speech at San Fran
cisco, blames Southern Pacific for
charges against him. PAGE 3
Bell greeted with noisy demonstration
at Oakland, where he captivates au
, dience. , PAGE 3
EASTERN
Leaders of striking garment workers
assert victory is in sight. PAGE 13
Nine ranchmen in Nebraska Indicted for
conspiracy to drive settlers from claims.
PAGE 1
Colonel Roosevelt rides on public train ■
through Ohio and Indiana. PAGE 3
Government probe Into "bath tub trust"
elicits testimony of refusal to deal with
those not In combine. PAGE 2
Navy Secretary Meyer ends tour of coast
and gulf inspection. PAGE 2
Collector Loeb begins to stamp out smug
gling by securing prison sentence for
musician. : PAGE 3
Detectives guard witnesses in suit in St.
Louis. . ' PAGE 3
MINING AND OIL
Ed T. Browne and Al D. Meyers invest In
Hassayampa property.- PAGE 6
Consolidated Midway new well, 'section 32,
flows 1080 barrels a day on^test. PAGE 6
Survey is made for power line about King
man. _, _ PAGE 6
I '
BRIAND ANNOUNCES MEN
WHO WILL FORM CABINET
PARIS, Nov. 3.—M. BrUmd lias or
ganized the new cabinet as follows:
Premier and minister of the Interior,
'Ar tide Briand; Justice, Theodore Gi
i lard; foreign affairs, Stephen Pinchon;
! war, Gen. Bruu; marine, Boue de Pap
i yi'-rc; public instruction, Maurice
I Faure; finance, M. Klotz; commerce,
Jean Dupuy, agriculture, Maurice
Kaynaud; colonies, M. Moret; labor,
Loula Lefferre; public works, M. Pu
reh.
Under secretaries have been appoint
ed as follows: Martne, M. Guisthau;
finance, Andre Ijafevre; war, M. Nou-
U'lik; fine arts, M. Dujardin-Beaumetz.
M. Briand sought to retain M. Mille
rand In the cabinet on account of his
service in the direction of the railroads,
but the former minister of public
works, posts and telegraphs declined to
abandon the doctrine of compulsory
arbitration between companies and em
ployes or to agree to restricting the
unionization of public servunts.
Of the new cabinet ten members have
never before served in a ministerial ca
pacity.
Parliament has adjourned until No
vember 8, when the new ministerial
program will be read.
ACCUSE SEATTLE MAN OF
PADDING CENSUS RETURNS
TACOMA, Nov. 3.—Furman J. Shadd
of Seattle was brought before United
States Commisslouer Bridge* today,
having been arrested at South Bend,
Wash , on the charge of submitting
false returnß in the Seattle census. He
,was placed under bonds of $2500.
It is charged that Hluulil made false
return! in three precincts in Seattle,
returning fourteen Chinese Croia on*»
rooming house and fifty roomers from
a boarding houa*.
ShacUl was Indioted by the federal
Ifrund Jury in Taconia
FRIDAY MORNING. NOVEMBER 4. 1910.
INDICT RANCHMEN
ON CONSPIRACY TO
GRAB HOMESTEADS
Nebraska Stock Raisers Accused
of Forcing Owners to
Abandon Claims
RUSH ONE VICTIM TO ASYLUM
Nine Prominent Stockmen Must
Face Trial for Threatening
the Lives of Settlers
(Associated Press)
OMAHA, Neb., Nov. 3.—lndictments
returned by the federal grand jury
Wednesday eight against nine ranch
men of western Nebraska were made
public today.
The indictments charge conspiracy
to drive from their claims at the point
of guns, homesteaders who took sec
tions of semi-arid land under the Kln
kaid homestead law by the defend
ants.
Those Indicted are Perry S. Yeast ot
Hyannis, Neb.; his son, Frank W.
Yeast, Leslie E. Ballinger, M. C, Hub
bel, Emil Anderson, Will M. Emerson.
Harry Sutter, Boone B. Hawthorne and
Dr. Harry H. Huff.
Dr. Huff, a physician, and Sutter,
county attorney of Garden county, are
members of the insanity board. Yeast,
one of the largest ranch owners in tho
state, was convicted two years ago of
fraudulently securing title to home
stead land, and paid a flue and servud
a jail sentence.
There are four counts in the indict
ments, and the specific overt acts men
tioned indicato an unusual frontier
condition.
KAU.HOAD SETTLER TO ASYLUM
According to the charges made in
the indictment, Yeast and his asso
ciates carried their efforts so far as
to secure the incarceration In tho in
sane aylum at Hastings, Neb., of one
of their alleged victims.
When the Kinkaid homestead law
was passed, many persons went to
Grant, Banner, Garden, Cherry and
other western Nebraska counties and
took up quarter sections. The land is
in tho sand hills country, but contains
many fertile valleys. Several big
ranchers, among them Yeast and his
associates, have heretofore depended
on this valley land for their hay and
winter feeding and the settling of the
homesteaders was resented.
The indictment charges that a band
of about thirty persons headed by
Yeast, went to the homes of these
homesteaders, among them Cashier J.
Davaher, George Carpenter, Golda
Graves, George BabcocK, Henry S.
Coulson and others, and by intimida-
I tion and threats of taking their lives
and those of their families, forced
them to leave their claims.
The specific case of Davasher is
mentioned in detail. It Is charged that
Yeast and the other defendants, ac
companied by a band of cowboys, vis
ited Davasher's home and after threat
ening himself and family with death
if they did not leave the country, de
stroyed his home, broke up his ma
chinery, cut his harness to pieces and
in other ways mistreated him.
INSANITY' BOARD ACCUSED
Later, according to the indictment.
Yeast conspired with members of the
county Insanity board and secured
Davasher's Incarceration in the asy
lum. y._
The latter act, according to the in
dictment, was conducted in a high
handed manner. The Insanity commis
sioners, it is alleged, went through a
mock examination, declared Davasher
insane and issued a warrant for his
arrest. This was served on the spot
and within an hour he was rushed
off 'to the asylum without being per
mitted to have the advice of coun
sel.
Davasher's case was brought to the
attention of the superintendent of the
institution, who conducted an investi
gation. He at onue decided Davasher
was not insane, and Davasher was re
leased by habeas corpus proceedings.
According to an official of the inte
rior department, the present Indict
ment covers one of the most remark
able attempts at land grabbing which
has recently been brought to the at
tention of the department. A letter
written to President Taft by one of
the victims is said to have caused the
investigation which resulted in the in
dictments. A special grand Jury was
summoned to consider the evidence.
Many thousands of acres of grazing
land is contained in the tracts In ques
tion.
U.S. GUNBOAT PREPARES
TO FIRE ON HONDURAS
Commander Hayes of Princeton
Threatens Gen. Valladares
with Bombardment
(Associated Preps) • .
NEW ORLEANS, Nov. 4.—The
United States gunboat Princeton, off
Amapala, Honduras, is cleared for
action, and its guns are trained on
the governor's residence occupied by
General Jose Valladares, leader of the
revolt against the Davilla govern
ment.
The dispatch received here this morn-'
ing fr«m Honduras states that Valla
darei attacked the American consular
agent und threatened to fire on his
residence. When Commander Hayes of
the Princeton heard of this he sent
word to the revolutionists that if any
foreigner was molested he would fill
the governor's palace full of bullets.
Xh«"dispatch adds that chaos reigns
throughout western Honduras and
foreigners are fleeing to places of
safety.
FREDERICKS' FAILURE TO ENFORCE LAW
BRANDS HIM WHOLLY UNFIT FOR OFFICE
REPEATED AND NOTORIOUS VIOLATION OF LAWS
WHEN REDLIGHT DISTRICT FLOURISHED IGNORED
BY COUNTY OFFICIAL WHO NOW SEEKS RE-ELEC
TION—CODE SPECIFICALLY POINTS OUT THE DUTIES
BUT FREDERICKS FAILED TO PROSECUTE OFFENDERS
IF we may judge from the poor sucess which our Republican morning contemporary is
having in putting up a defense for District Attorney Fredericks, Ins case must be very
bare of defensive material indeed. In an editorial appearing in its columns yesterday
morning intended to slur Mr. Woolwine, whose exposures of District Attorney I-rede
ricks' record are challenging such widespread attention among the voters of this county, Mr.
Fredericks' Republican defender says:
"When a grand jury more strenuous for public economy than for private purity refused to
put a stop in the redlight district to wicked practices which have been going on somewhere
ever since Eve offered the apple to Adam, Tommy would not have condoned the moral laches
of the grand jury; he would have smitten the redlight denizens and their patrons, even as the
Amalekites of old were smitten." . . .
There may be some very good wit or humor concealed somewhere in this, but to a citizen
having a decent respect for the laws of his country and an honest desire of seeing these laws
enforced it will be hard to find it. .
And by the way, it was not the failure of the grand jury to interfere with the redlight
district,'but District Attorney Fredericks' failure to interfere with it, that Mr. \\ oolwine, in
common with all good citizens, objected to. . . .
That we may'understand exactly the degree of Mr. Fredericks' culpability in allowing this
redliffht district to exist openly and notoriously in the city of Los Angeles, let us look at
the laws of the state which should govern every citizen of the state and most assuredly should
govern the officer selected by the people to enforce them.
Mr Fredericks was elected district attorney of tho «ounty of Los Angeles, and he took
an oath to discharge the duties of his office as those duties are defined by law.
Wtion 4?56 of the Political Code, in defining the duties of the district attorney, among
other th?n4 provide : ''THE DISTRICT ATTORNEY IS THE PUBLIC PROSECUTOR
AND MUST INSTITUTE PROCEEDINGS BEFORE MAGISTRATES FOR THE AR
REST OF PERSONS CHARGED WITH OR REASONABLY SUSPECTED OF PI.T
lPcmdffenses when he has information that any such offenses
have been committed."
Section 315 of the Penal Code of the state provides: "Every person who keeps a house ot
ill-fame in this state, resorted to for the purpose of prostitution or lewdness, or who wilfully
rp«iV!r<; in such house is euiltv of misdemeanor, and in all prosecutions for keeping or re
ordng to such a house gCOMkON REPUTE MAY BE RECEIVED AS COMPETENT
EVIDENCE OF THE CHARACTER OF THE HOUSE, the purpose for which it is kept
Thus we see that common repute may be used as evidence upon which to sustain a
violation of this section. Certainly common repute should have been sufficient for justifying
the district attorney in taking some action against the violation of this section under that
provision, of the law above quoted which makes it his duty to "institute proceedings before
magistrates for the arrest of persons charged with OR REASONABLY SUSPECTED of
PU Now let'ua see what the grand jury, which did ' everything possible to whitewash Mr
Fredericks ■ and would have done so had it not been for the minority report of six good
citizens headed by Wesley Clark, who were members of it, had to say upon the question
of evil houses in the redlight district of the city of Los Angeles. In its report the grand
jury said:
"We find in regard to the so-called redlight district as folows:
"When this grand jury was called there were about 100 houses of prostitution in Los
Angeles city, and about 330 known inmates. We further, find that the liquor ordinances'of
the city were openly violated in these houses with the knowledge of the mayor and part
of the commission and the heads of the police department."
The grand iury, after commenting upon the negligence of the police officers in failing to
close thfse places, BUT CAREFULLY REFRAINING FROM' COMMENTING UPON
THE NEGLIGENCE OF DISTRICT ATTORNEY FREDERICKS IN FAILING TO
ENFORCE -THE STATE LAW AGAINST THEM, SAYS: '
"We refrained from finding an accusation against the officers by reason of the fact that
during our session THE AUTHORITIES ORDERED ALL HOUSES CLOSED UPON
THE ADVICE OF THE CITY ATTORNEY, at that time showing their position was
defThui e appears that THE EXISTENCE OF A GRAND JURY IN SESSION IN THIS
CITY WAS THE CAUSE OF THESE PLACES BEING CLOSED. Arul so the statement
of our Republican morning contemporary that a "grand jury refused to put a stop in the
redlight district to wicked practices" is not justified by the facts, but it would have been
abundantly justified by the facts had it said "the district attorney refused to put a stop m
the redlight district to wicked practices, which were forbidden by the law and which was
specifically made a part of the district attorney's duty to put a stop to when he was sworn
to enforce the law." The trouble, however, was that Mayor Harper, one of his police com
missioners and his chief of police had been, before the grand jury convened, getting $500
a month each for permitting these .place's to run. Mayor Harper and his government were
products of the Southern Pacific machine in this city, and that machine was interested in pro
tecting him and his administration in every way. Mr. Fredericks did not see fit to live up to
his oath of office and enforce the law of the state, and thereby expose the Southern Pacific
machine municipal government that was bringing this disgrace upon the city.
In this connection, how do the' Rev. Mr. Chapman and the other ministers who have
signed a certificate of character for Mr. Fredericks square their action in that respect with
the indisputable fact that the man whom they have indorsed permitted the existence of this
frightful plague of evil in the city of Los Angeles, conducted in a manner more open and
defiant than ever before in the history of the city, 2nd accompanied by the illegal sale of liquor,
which Mr Chapman is devoting his life to preventing. And yet that all this was true is
abundantly shown by the report of the grand jury above quoted, a body the majority of
whom were so favorable to District Attorney Fredericks that, while calling attention to the
failure of the police to enforce the law against these evil places, FAILED TO CALL AT
TFNTION TO THE FAILURE OF MR. FREDERICKS TO ENFORCE THE STATE
LAW PROHIBITING THEM, WHICH HE HAD SWORN TO ENFORCE AND WITH
THE ENFORCEMENT OF WHICH HE HAD BEEN CHARGED BY THE MAJORITY
OF THE VOTERS OF THIS COUNTY. To realize exactly the strength of the case
against Mr. Fredericks these facts must be borne in mind :
First During all the time that this shameful violation of a state law'above quoted was
going on in the city of Los Angeles, he had upon the payroll" of his office from six to a dozen
detectives who were supposed to be devoting their time to ferreting out and reporting to him
violations of the law which he was sworn to enforce.
Second—The maintenance of the redlight district in Los Angeles was so shamelessly
notorious and open that no detective force was needed, and the district attorney not only
must have suspected but must have known of this violation of the law, because it was a
matter of such common notoriety throughout the city as made it necessary for the public
journals devoted to decency, to take it up and comment upon it., •
Third The existence of the redlight district in the city was an open and notorious vio
lation of the law which he was sworn to enforce and which it was his duty to enforce by in
stituting proper proceedings before local magistrates as required by section 4256 Code of Civic
Procedure, above quoted.
COAL COMPANY DENOUNCES
LACKAWANNA RAILROAD
Demand $55,239 as Reparation
for Unjust Freight Charges
,
WASHINGTON, Nov. 3.—Denuncia
tion of the Delaware, Lackawanna &
Western Railroad company, which is
charged with repeatedly attempting
to drive a competing company out of
business and an arraignment of the so-
called "anthracite coal trust" are con
tained In % complaint filed with the
interstate commerce commission by the
Marian Coal company of Wilmington,
Del., reparation in the sum of $55,239
becauso of ulloged excess charges is
demanded.
The complaint not only attacks the
alleged unjust discriminative rates to
which the Marian company have bees'
subjected as "based on a monopoly
maintained through the device of the
Temple Iron company, the directors of
which are the directors of the railroads
constituting the anthracite coal trust,"
but charges attempted dictation of pro
duction. Interference with prospective
purchasers of the plant, diversion of
water supply and heaping of fuel on a
fire that threatened destruction to the
Marian company's washery at Taylor,
Pa.
The Marian washery Is on a Lacka
wanna division switch, which also
serves three collieries alleged to be
long to the Luckawanna interest.
OTTVrr^T i- 1 i 'Ol*l • nvir.Y 2c. on trains fie.
O±i\ <jrJLJ-4 KjKJJI J.XJO . SUNDAYS So. ON TRAINS 10»
PULLMAN CAR BURNS; ONE
PASSENGER MEETS DEATH
Theory Advanced Explosion of I
Gas Caused Fire
EL< PASO, Texas., Nov. I.—Tha Pull
man cur Zeura attached to the Rock
Island train which left Delhurt, Tex.,
last night, was burned today while the
train was nearing Texhora.
One passeiiKer was burned to doath.
His ticket showed him to be H. L.
Travess, of Huron, S. 1)., who boarded
the train at Tueumcari. N. M. H. R.
Uurns, a traveling salesman, rescued a
woman. i
2 CENTS
INDICTS ON FRAUD
CHARGES HOLDERS
OF ALASKA LANDS
Federal Jury Accuses Northwest
Residents of Conspiracy to
Secure 20,000 Acres
GROUPS WORTH $200,000,000
Gov. Gillett and Congressman NP-
Lachlan Figure as Assignees
of Arctic Coal Claims .*
fAssoelated Press)
SPOKANE, Wash., Nftv. 3 -Federal
indictments charging conspiracy to
defraud the United States government
out of more than 20,000 acres of Alaska
coal lands valued at $200,000,000 wero
returned in the United States court by
the federal grand jury today against
Xix men who control these groups of
coal lands in the Kayak mining dis
tirct in Alaska, which represents 131
claims of 160 acre 3 each.
Those indicted are: Raymond
Brown and William £.. Dunn of Spo
kane; Charles M. Doughton, formerly
of Spokane, now a resident of Seattle;
former Mayor Harry White of Seattle,
now a resident of Los Angeles; Chas.
A. McKenzie, capitalist, of Seattle, and
Donald A. McKenzie, lobbyist, capital
ist and promoter of Washington, D. C.,
Seattle and Alaska.
The charges are that the six men
indicted had agreements with tho
claimants whereby they were to have
a half interest in the claims, which
would g'.ve them more land than was
allowed by coal land laws of the Unit
ed States.
Among the most prominent persona
who were assignees of one or more
claims were former Governor John H.
McGraw, Governor James N. Gillet of
California, Representative McLachlan
of California, Henry T. Oxnard of New
York and California, president of the
American Beet Sugar company and
former Mayor Harry White of Seat
tle.
The. coal lands involved In the in
dictments are in the vicinity of Katal
la, in the Bering 1 river fields near tho
Bering glacier, in the Kayak mining
district. The Dunn and Brown
groups adjoin each other and are lo
cated near Katalla.
INDICTMENT FOR FRAUD
SURPRISES SEATTLE MAN
All Alaska Coal Land Entries to
Be Canceled
SEATTLE, Nov. 3.—Of the six men
indicted in Spokane for alleged con
spiracy to defraud the United States
of Alaska coal lands, only one is in
Seattle—Charles A. McKenzie, a real
estate and loan agent.
McKenzie had not heard of the in
dictment until told by the Associated
Press and expressed surprise, saying
that his, attorney had assured him
there was no possibility of Indictment.
His cousin, Donald A. McKenzie, a
promoter, is no^ in Washington, where
he was well known as an Alaska lob
byist. I
Charles M. Doughton Is at his home
in Pearson, Kitsap county.
Harry White was mayor of Seattle
fifteen years ago and resigned suddenly
after serving a few months. Former
Governor John H. McGraw died last
July. The McKenzies and the McGraw
estate own the Alaska townslte of
Nelson, named in honor Senator Knuta
Nelson, chairman of the Ballinger in
vestigating committee. Efforts wer«
made some time ago by Harry Whits
and others interested in Katala coal
fields to finance a railroad from the
coast to the coal. Many of. the claim
ants In the Harry White group are
relatives of White and his wife. The
claims which White promoted are
known aa the M. A. Green gToup.
Surgeon General Walter Wyman of
the public health and marine hospital
service is a claimant in this group.
The allegations of the fraud in th»
Spokane indictments are similar to
those made in the Tacoma indictment
of Charles P. Munday and other pro
moters. It was stated at the time of
the Tacoma indictments that thera
wal no intention of prosecuting th»
claimants aside from those Indicted,
many of whom acted in good faith.
It is understood to be the purpose
nf the government to cancel all the
coal land filings in Alaska and release
land estimated to bo worth one billion
dollars. , . ,
M'LACHLAN DENIES HE IS
INVOLVED IN LAND FRAUDS
Declares He Purchased Alaska
Coal Lands in Good Faith
Congressman McLachlan denied last
night that ha was involved In any way
in the alleged frauds against the fed
oral government in Alaska coal land
locations. After learning the content*
of the Associated Press dispatch from
Spokane he prepared and gave out tho
loHowlng statement:
"Some time ago I purchased an inter
cat In a coal claim In Alaska. I pur
chased It from a Mr. Green, who pro
fessed to know all about tho claim. He
claimed to have been upon the ground
and said he knew everything about it
was all right. He was acting for the
irisinal locator, whoso name I liavo
forgotten and whom I never saw. I
simply took Green's word for It anil
paid him for the Interest of the original
locator. If It shall develop that tho
original locator had no valid claim, I
am probably out thi> amount I paid
for an interest he never had."
Hairy White, former mayor of Sea
attle, who ia one of the six men Indict -
ed, according to the Associated Press.
Is now in Seattle. As most of his ln-
(Continued on rags Two)

xml | txt