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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, November 06, 1910, Image 3

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-11-06/ed-1/seq-3/

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■v^ AMUSEMENTS
HAMBURGER'S MAJESTIC THEATER Aninth:
Los Angeles' Leading Playhouse— Oliver Morosco, Manager.
BEGINNING TOMORROW NIGHT
MATINEES WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY »
VIOLA
ALLEN
(Llebler & Co., Manager^
Accompanied by JAMES O'NEILL
And the Greatest Supporting Company Ever Organized, Including
MINNA GALE and HENRY STANFORD
la F. MARION CRAWFORD'S I.usl and Greatest I'lay, j
SWHITE
c SISTER
. "A NUN AND A SOLDIER FACING DANGER,
PERHAPS DEATH, THAT OTHERS MAY LIVE" |
, PRICES SOc TO $2.
Beginning Sunday Night, Nov., 13
And Including Sunday Night, November 20
BEST SEATS »1 AT' MATINEE WEDNESDAY. NIGHTS AND SATURDAY MAT
INEE BOC TO 11.80. ?HB MESSRS. SHUHERT PRESENT THE SENSATION OF
TUB LAST NEW YORK SEASON,
THE CITY
t
THE LAST, BEST AND MOST POWERFUL PIIAT BY THE LATE CLYDE FITCH.
SIMPSON AUDITORIUM ~~T' LB ' Sanaukb!
Tomorrow Night, Nov. 8:15 o'Clock
Introductory Piano Recital by
PEPITO ARRIOLA
PHENOMENAL HOT PIANIST.
WHAT THE CRITICS HAVE SAID:
AMERICA: "The Greatest Star of the Season." —New York Herald.
MEXICO: "An Angel at the Piano." •
ENGLAND: "The Reincarnation of Mozart."
GERMANY: "The Colossal of the Piano."
RUSSIA: "The Wonder of the Wonder." . _
TICKETS NOW ON SALE AT BARTLETT MUSIC CO.
' PRICES—7SC. tl-00. 11.50, 12.00. »2.50.
MOROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER ~~~ " u£2L™2fZ:
| LOS ANGELES* LEADING STOCK COMPANY.
Beginning matinee today, by personal arrangement with the author. GEORGE M.
u'OHAN'.S latest and greatest musical comedy,
THE YANKEE PRINCE
First time hv «ny company except Cohan's own production. I.C 25C, »OC.
NIGHTS? :se, 50c. 7r,c. MATINEBfI SATURDAY AND SUNDAY, 10c, 25c, 60c.
PAH.TT'Ar'TI'e THWATITP New, Coiy, Absolutely I in-proof.
ANiAUliib LtititA LDiK. Broadway. Between Fifth and Sixth.
UNRIVALED VAUDEVILLE— OF ALL NATIONS.
ARIZONA JOE I three snows tomght "A Glimpse of
COMPANY MA6T 8i^K !00 8 B:3o Prairie Life"
SIX OTHER BIG ALL-STAR ACTS—IOc 2 oc. 30c. WEEK COMMENCING MONDAY
MATINEE. DAPHNE FOIXARD. - ' |_
T EVY'S CAFE CHANTANT ,™ib ° N A™ 0 » 0 AI^ AI B
Levy's Best Yette Program
UKATTIi; 13LAKE, Rapid Change Artist; LILLY LILLIAN, Vienna Royal Grand Opera
Singer: CLEMENTINA MARCELLI, Operatic Soprano: MLI.E. BEATRICE and M. \
FRANCO, French Dancers from the. Folios; THE MINALO DUO, Scenes from Grand
Opera, and KAMMERMEYER'S ORCHESTRA. |
BASEBALL —Pacific Coast League
PORTLAND VS. V"EBNON—Tuesday, Nov. 1; Wednesday, Nov. 3; Thursday,
Nov. 3; Saturday, Nov. 5; Sunday. Nov. 8. at Chutes Park, 2:30 p. m. Friday.
Nov. 4. at Vernon. 2:30 p. m.; Sunday. Nov. 6. at Vernon. 10:30 a.. m. Ladles free
every day except Saturday, Sunday and holidays. Klda' day Saturday.
NEW RATE WAR OF
SHIPS PREDICTED
Pacific Coast Company Hints at
Fight by Changing Sched
ule of Boats
(Speuial to The Herald)
SAN PKDRO, Noy. 5.—A new sched
ule for tlie steamers of the Pacific
Coast Steamship company, almost
identical to that inaugurated last year
when the rate war between the steam
er St.. Croix and the other steamship
companies began, will go into effect
December 8. Thfs is about the time
the turbine steamers Yale and Har
vard will begin the new service of the
Pacific Navigation company.
Under the new schedule a steamer
from San Francisco will arrive every
third day instead of twice a week.
The big liners President and Governor
will be laid up for a few weeks for
their annual overhauling. Their
places will be taken by the steamers
City of Pueblo, Queen and Umatilla,
which have been running to Nome all
through the summer season.
Another rate war Is predicted by
shipping men. The rate war last year
ended with thi: burning of the St.
Croix In November. Should another
follow the entry of the Yalo and Har
vard Into the field the results prob
ably will bo more fan-reaching. The
Yale and Harvard will each carry
nearly 800 passengers, and with 8 daily
service the traffic doubtless will reach
such proportions that it may involve
the raHroads in the rate war.
A. D. Q. Kerroll, general passenger
agent of the San Francisco and Port
land Steamship company, who has
been in Lob Angeles several days, re
turned to San Francisco on the steam
it Beaver this morning. While he
would not admit that a rate war is
likoly, ho made the significant com
ment that It Is not likoly the other
steamship companies and the railroads
'will allow the Yale und Harvard to
get all the business.
POPULATION OF IOWA
SHOWS DECREASE OF
7082, OR 03 PER CENT
WASHINGTON, D. C, Not. s.—The
population of the state of lowa is 2,
--224,171, according to the enumeration In
the thirteenth census made public to
day. This is a decrease of 7083, or .»:!
per cent under 2.231,853 In iiw». The
Increase from 1890 to 1900 was 519.572,
or 18.7 per cent. The decrease lv (he
population of lowa dirl not surprise cen
mw bureau officials, as It was In line
with what was expected in the agri
cultural regions of the middle west.
Director Durand attributes the falling
off to the fact that the hind In ulready
occupied and the general tendency to
ward larger farms.
CHICAGO PEACE AGREEMENT
RPUDIATED BY STRIKERS
Garment Workers Said to Be An-
gered at Head of Union
CHICAGO, Nov. 6.— agreement
between President T. A. Rickert of the
United Garment Workers of America
and the firm of Hart Schaffner,<% Marx,
entered Into today for the piifpoae of
ending the differences between that
firm and its employes, was repudiated
later at various meetings of the gar
ment workers.
Rickert, it is Mid by some of the
strikers, was almost mobbed when hi'
appeared at one of the meetings with a
copy of the agreement. Cries of "Throw
him out!" were heard in all parts of
the hull, and Hickert is said to have
left the meeting 1.
Jane Addains of Hull house was act
ive in the negotiations with Hart
Schaffner & Marx.
The strike was called for the purpose
of compelling recognition of the union.
The agreement provided that the em
ployers and strikers should each ap
point a member of a committee to con
sider grievances and that these two
blmulil -select a third. The committee
was to consider only working condi
tions, compensation, etc.
LOS ANGELES HERALD: SUNDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 6, 191.0.
T. R. OPENS FIRE
ON GOV. HARMON
Roosevelt Reviews Ohio Execu
tive's Connection with d H.
& D. R. R. as Receiver
STUMPING IN BUCKEYE STATE
Former President Delivers First
Speech in Toledo, N Making
a Personal Attack
ROOSEVELT AIDS TAFT
IN HOME STATE, OHIO
CLEVELAND, ..Nov. | 5. — Theodore
Roosevelt came (o the aid of the Re
publican party today In President Taft'H
slate, where It is having one of Its
hardest fights. lie made a campaign
trip over the state severely attacking
Ohio's Democratic governor, Judson liar,
mon, and defending the policies of the
ltepubllcan party.
In the iiii.M of an attack upon Gov
ernor Harmon In Cleveland, Roosevelt
was Interrupted by repeated calls from
the audience, "How about Balllnger?"
The colonel stopped I>lm speech ab
ruptly and nbouted: "He is not run
ning for office In Ohio."
This answer did not satlftfy bis au
dience and the calls were repeated.
Finally Roosevelt (topped again and,
after waiting a moment for quiet, he
Bald, waiving but arm emphatically:
"If I ever ask yon to vote for him
yoa can come and ask me questions."
(Associated Press)
TOLEDO, Ohio, Nov. 5.—A severe
personal attack on Gov. Judßon Har
mon of Ohio was made by Theodore
Roosevelt here today in his first speech
In the campaign in Ohio. Col. Roose- j
velt reviewed Gov. Harmon's connec- i
tion with the Cincinnati, Hamilton & I
Dayton railroad, of which he was re- \
celver, and said the governor had,not |
performed his duty to the state faith
fully.
Col. Roosevelt's address was dcliv- [
ered in the Valentine theater. He be- I
gan his address by saying that "in the i
Democratic press" there had appeared i
today a telegram addressed to him and
sent "apparently on Gov. Harmon's
behalf by Mr. Howell, a former Demo
cratic candidate for governor."
The telegram read:
"Gov. Judson Harmon is the same
Judson Harmon who as special counsel
traced the crime of rebating to Paul
Morton, resigning when you refused to
proceed against this member of your
cabinet."
The message asks Col. Roosevelt why
he did riot act against Mr. Morton.
The colonel asserted that Mr. Har
mon failed completely to trace the
crime of rebating to Mr. Morton.
The attorney general, then Mr.
Moody, reported to him, Col Roosevelt
said, that Mr. Morton had produced no
effort whatever to justify his recom
mendation of action against Mr. Mor- |
ton. Mr. Harmon, he said, proposed to
indict Mr. Morton any way, "apparent
ly on the theory that evidence might
subsequently be found that would con
nect Mr. Morton with misconduct."
PUT CASE UP TO COURT
Col. Roosevelt went on to say that he I
had sustained the attorney general's |
opinion, directing him to lay all the ;
evidence on which Mr. Harmon made
his recommendation before the court,
"The case was brought up before a
Democratic judge, Judge Phillips," Col. I
Roosevelt continued, "and ii. his opin- j
ion from the bench he specifically' and j
absolutely justified the course of the j
attorney general, statins that there j
was no evidence in the csie that In any
way implicated Mr. Morton."
Sayim? Mr. Harmon had sought to
discredit an innocent man, Col. Roose- j
velt took up the receivership of the
Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton, which
he said was pwned by Wall street, "it
being, as I am informed, onn of the |
Morgan properties, and the Morgan
people, or whatever Interest it was In ;
Wall street, applying to have their j
friend, Mr. Harmon, made receiver."
"He received a salary of $25,000 a I
year," Col. Roosevelt continued. "It is
shown by actual record that while he
was receiver the road under him was j
engaged continuously in paying dam- .
age claims to certain parties for the j
purpose of holding business, under cir- j
cumstanees which clearly indicated j
that the payment of such damages
served the same purpose as the pay
ment of rebates."
L.E. BONTZ PURCHASES
THE SACRAMENTO UNION
SACRAMENTO, Cal., Nov. s.—An- ]
nouncement is made of the purchase of
the Sacramento Union, the oldest daily
newspaper on the coast, by L. E.
Bontz from Sidney M. Ehrman.
Mr. Bontz acquires the entire prop
erty. The new owner of the "Union
was formerly part proprietor of the
paper and has been connected with it
as manager in the past.
"77"
Humphreys' Seventy-Seven
Breaks up Grip and
COLDS
A Good Remedy
For Coughs, Colds, Grip, Influ
enza, Cold-in-the-Head and Sore
Throat, "Seventy-seven" is a
good remedy, can be relied upon
to give prompt relief.
"Seventy-seven" acts directly
on the sick part, .without disturb
ing the rest of the system.
"Seventy-seven" is free from
all habit forming drugs, is harm-
Jess, only doing good, never
harm.
A small vial of pleasant pellets,
fits the vest pocket. At all deal
ers in medicine 25c, or mailed.
Humphreys' Hmneo. Medicine Co., corner
William and Ann itruela. New York.
TAFT WILL ATTEMPT TO
CUT DOWN U. S. EXPENSES
President to Take a Hand in the
Economy Policies
■WASHINGTON,- Nov. President
Taft Intends to take a hand in the
economy policies he is anxious to see
introduced in all the government's de
partments. He will have a heart to
heart talk today with the committees
of government employes which have
been appointed -/ the various secre
taries to work out plans for economiz
ing.
Each department has appointed a
committee of three or more, so about
forty men, comparatively the rank
and file of the forces, will meet the
president. Frederick A. Cleveland, who
lias been named, by President Taft to
bead the -called economic commis
sion which Is to pass on all sugges
tions, will be present.
It Is said the president may touch
on the suoject of dismissals of old em
ployes.
ASK LOWER CATTLE RATES
WASHINGTON, Nov. T,.— A cut of 50
per cent on rates on cattle from Cali
fornia points to Tacoma, Wash., is
asked in a complaint filed with the
interstate commerce commission today
by the Carstens Packing company of
Tacoma and Seattle against the South
rrn Pacific and Oregon Railway &
Navigation company. Shippers say the
present rate is 50 per cent higher than
on I'rfsli moats.
A FREE
Lecture
Every Wednesday
Eight P. M.
at the » *
Truth Curative
Institute
338| South Hill Street
Under the Auspices of
The Health and
Success Club
jf. B. Short, pithy speeches will l>e
made by prominent speakers—Fronds
Truth, Dr. H. 8. Tanner, Prof. E. B.
Uarmnn and others. Are yoa Interested
in getting well and keeping well?
COME
NO COLLECTION
WHERE A DOLLAR DOES FULL DUTY
• j
FACTS OVERCOME PREJUDICE
Our Shoe Values Tell a Convincing Story
Many people spend money with their eyes practically closed; they either don't know
—- or don't care that there is a difference in shoe stores.^--^.y %
H*i But, if you are open to conviction on the question of \ I \
T^fe?Jw which shoe store offers the best assortments and strongest values \ 4
mk fete, —it's decidedly to your advantage to visit this establishment. We , 1 ««Q\ |
/ H WKI positively present the largest range of classy styles, and sell reliable 1 -*Q )\ ,
/,;' WoSjkl footwear at lower prices than any other store in this city. vUa V,
S^S\s3.oo Specials for This Week Only id /\
P»^^||X , Regular $4.00 and $4.50 Values I^Sf J' J
\<S^ Here's an offering of shoes at a short price which will make the f J*
m~. J oMk methods of mojit other Stores look like extortion. It's a case of j rfw I
.w|'te^!^i ' sacrificing profits to make new friends. Don't miss it. >By 4:/ f \ Mil
FOR MEN—Button, Blucher FOR WOMEN—Many new styles, J£; I
I^m P^y and Lace patterns in every de- including the popular "Hobble" but- y™* 1
"- *bM Bi pendable leather. Classy shapes ton boot, in Patent, Tan or dull leather, /^^gi^^
-sizes to fit ail feet. Every Pair Guaranteed. W^g^^
—Cut Prices on Children's Shoes ~ 30 s. ®. H.
We propose to make this trie biggest week we have ever had in our Children's Green Trading Stamps
Department. Down go the price bars so a lean purse can easily get over. FREE
FOR MISSES AND CHILDREN: Fifty new designs in shoes for dress or play. .
- ■ . _. _^_ jJl'mm besides those given regularly with
Si«e» H* H' *% C SIZCS <£ 1 C/\ SIZOS (1 V^ your shoe piirchase If you present
Su s tO 8 * •'*'■> %i0.ii:.51.50.. iu6toa*i.«s NORTON'S SHOE STOtt
Regular $1.75 to $2.50 Values ritth Main
NORTON'S SHOE STORE FIFTH & MAIN
/*■ ' ■ ■ 235-239 South Broadway 234-244 S. Hill St. '"" "' ■■
Corsets, Petticoats and Misses' Garments
Now on the Second Floor
Last night the corsets, the petticoats and the misses' garments
were moved to the second floor, rear, alongside the Millinery
Department. More room, better light, more convenient and
comfortable fitting rooms—all of which will be highly appre
ciated by our corset customers, particularly.
Rich Kimono Flannels lip
tWKIIiMAw === Galore ===== jnjjjk
rlllllllCrj French flannels in a seemingly
===== endless variety of designs suit- W^Kl
Smart Hats for a ble forkimonos,vvaists,dressing wmW
Winter Wear Mi Mil
SdS^JSrtrtS- sacques and house dresses. |«1|
SijT!^ qSiet ich- Plain^rench funnels 65c to 75c. Fancy French {jg ■
simplicity ana quiet riui- d 75 F h flannels in dainty and high- fill WK\
ness; some sufficiently " a ; olored Persian w designs , 75c . Scotch flannels IfeSiH
daring in size, shape ana f o r house !dresses 35c 40c and 45c. 'JESERhI
coloring to please the fad- „, . « c^ iße§s4lPl
dists; an possess grace "Viyella" Flannels 75c Jl«
and individuality; •none The uns hrinkable flannel advertised in the^Sl |^IkJ|3
priced prohibitively high, monthly publications, here in over a hundred new
(second Floor.) designs, 75c a yard.
Good Bedding=<md Plenty of It
*^*^ <46£2 - So long as you MUST have more warm
A '* bedding, WHY NOT GET IT NOW?
VA Heavy white wool blankets, eleven- sheet, one side covered with silk
O /Y^nP^J^l^X^i quarter size, with pink or blue bor- mull with 9-inch border of plain
V. i ■ /7^~WB {■ ders, $5 a pair. silk and the other side covered with
v (J) 1/'^ V X' t , . . silkollne, $4.50.
V ifii I J Extra heavy gray wool "anketß d own-filled comforters
IjM KJ4H& specially priced at $4 a pair. with best quallty sat n.
V ' r\ 'l\ Eleven-quarter blankets of soft, 6-75
' Mfi '■ ' "lX . thick, fluffy, white wool with two- Baby comforters— sizes and
r^/^MM§ \ inch sllk bindlnE doubly stitched, grades—U to W0.60.
; V fj^ill V A '' 5° Bed ri iUoW3 of best grade Amos
v H&S, 3 )^^ Heavy white wool blankets of keag ticking and filled with thor
f. M% 1a T 'S\ ' still finer quality, eleven-quarter oughly cleansed feathers, %2 to $6.50
iI) lM§ j*** " !"^M\ size*wlth wide sllk bindinß> *8 a pr- a air
\'/ \ttei IiBIIS^IISKK«\ Twelve-quarter blankets— ex- Best quality down pillows with
\i JQl^Ff'ffPiifiiT %. lra large size: 80x90 !ricnes-° tine German linen ticking, $7 a pair.
V ~^~////nSMf Iflfilß \'lN white w°ol wltn wi<U silk I)iniling ' Floss,- felt and hair mattresses
U CV /'V I lllf V'V doubly stitched, $10 a pair. made to order.
-_J:.'.-.r\,^/ \\'' Lilil^l.. 72x78-lnch comforters filled with 6x7-ft. wool batts— pounds $3,
J^??S^^c'^.^aß^^-^^^?y^v¥''!l snowflake cotton carded in one 3 pounds $4. (Third Floor.)
*?'''?•%"•'■* * — "'v — ' >^L~r"j^ l^lL '' V .^ J —_ J —, j
Hftrald Want Ads Are Best
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