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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, November 07, 1910, Image 1

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L BE;^n. PRICE: 50 CENTS KkftSSK?
GOAL INDICTMENTS
FORCE BALLINGER
TO DEFEND STAND
Secretary of Interior Declares
"Interests" Are^lot Opposing
Alaskan Reservations
EARLY PROSECUTIONS ASKED
Taft Cabinet Man Says Pacific
Coast Agitation Is Keeping
Question Unsettled
(Assoclftted Press)
WASHINGTON. Nov. 6.—Secretary
Ballinger tonight made public a state
ment in which he assails those who
charged him with being an opponent
of conservation and blames them for
unsettled conditions in Alaska.
The statement was brought out by
recent indictments against Alaska coal
claimants. In this connection the sec
retary says:
"These are but further steps in the
effort being mada- by the government
to clear and settle this whole ques-
tlon."
Since the withdrawal order wns
made to enable congress to de
cWe upon a definite policy of dealing
with this resource, the secretary Bays,
"there has been throughout the coun
try much agitation regarding- Alaska
coal—an agitation a large part of
which Is based on false statements.
"Whatever has been the motive be
hind the agitation, it has rosultetd in
keeping the whole question unsettled
and is largely blamablo for the inac
tion of congress."
The secretary points out that there
nre two essentials for clearing up the
situation:
"1. An early prosocutloln nnd dispo
sition of pending cases, investigating
charges of fraud and conspiracy
against existing claimants; and
"2. Congressional action definitely
deciding the manner in which Alaskan
coal lands may be acquired."
BAYS INTERESTS DON'T OPI'OSE
As the Pacific coast Is obliged to
draw Its goods from the Atlantic
coast, the secretary says, the charge
has arisen that the "interests" are
the beneficiaries of the policy which
prevents the opening up of lurge fuel
deposits.
"There has been much talk," Secre
tary 3allinger continues, "of the 'in
terests' opposing the so-called con
servation which makers for reserva
tion rather than use, but as a matter 1
of fact the 'interests' naturally favor
rather than oppose the reservation
and non-use idea.
"To my mind, a continuation of the
present situation is the direct antithe
sis of national conservation. Consider
that for each five tons of Atlantic
coast seaboard coal transported to tho
Pacific coast one ton is used up in
transportation—or a total waste of 20
per cent—and you will see that exist
ing methods do not conserve, but
destroy.
"It is most sincerely to be hoped
that congress will determine early in
the coming session the manner in
which Alaskan coal mny^be taken out
and placed In the markets of the Pa
cific coast before these markets are
absorbed by foreign importations."
SPAIN TO PASS "PADLOCK"
BILL; AWAIT ROME'S REPLY
Papal Nuncio Holds Interview
With Premier Canalejas
MADRID, Nov. 6.—lt Is expecetd
that the "padlock bill" will be prompt
ly passed in the chamber of deputies
following its adoption in the senate
Friday by a vote of 149 to 6».
It is pointed out in official circles
that It is now Rome's turn to speak
and declare whether the negotiations
on tl.e revision of tho concordat will
be resumed.
The conservative press is pleased
that Premier Canalojas has taken his
present attitude and sees no reason
why the Vatican should not resume
pour parlers for a permanent law of
associations and a revision of the
concordat. .
The papal nuncio already has had
several interviews with tho premier
on the subject.
NEW SAN JOSE MINISTER
DROPS DEAD IN PULPIT
SAN JOSE, Nov. 6.—Rev. H. H.
Clapham of Santa Clara fell dead in
his pulpit in the Episcopal church
there this morning while reading a
psalm to his congregation.
Rev. Clapham was preaching his
first sermon in the church, having just
come here after a pastorate of four
teen years in Trinity church at Ta
coma. Wash. .He was 64 years old
and leaves a widow.
RELATIVE OF ROOSEVELT
HURT IN AUTO ACCIDENT
MIDDLETOWN, N. V., Nov. 6.—A
chauffeur was killed and three promi
nent New York city men injured when
an automobile in which they were rid
ing turned over :iear Walden today.
The dead man Is Aiex Ehbel, and those
injured are John B. Roosevelt, a rela
tive of Colonel Roosevelt; John-T. Sill,
a financier, and J. H. Robinson. JUr.
Rooaevelt was badly bruised about the
legs, Mr. Sill had both wrists frac
tured and Mr. Robinson was cut and
bruised.
SHOCKS FELT AT ST. LOUIS
ST LOUIS, Nov. 6.—Heavy earth
quake shocks were recorded on the
seismograph at St. Louia university
this aft -icon. The distance from St.
Louis was calculated at 4160 miles,
■which, it is said, would place the
earthquake shocks in the Aleutian
islands, off Alas '.
LOS ANGELES HERALD
INDEX OF
HERALD'S NEWS
TODAY
t
FORECAST
For T.on Angeles and vicinity: Fair Mon
day; light west wind. Maximum tempera
ture yesterday, 78 degree* | minimum tem
perature, 84 degree*.'
LOS ANGELES
Hundred Rough Rldnr* participate In
tournament of equestrian sports at
Indian village. PAGE 2
l»uls Cluernsey, Democratic nominee fur
assembly, distinguishes himself by en
erßy and system In campaign. PAGE 3
Judge Conrey has no opposition for ap
p.llate bench. PAOK 3
Police are after man who orders $6 cash
and candy by telephone. PAGE 6
Secretary of chamber of commerce asks
Los Angeles meh io vote for Panama
exposition bonds. PAGE 6
Police look for thief who takes fat tur
keys and leaves lean ones in their
place. PAGE 6
Assessor Mallard and campaign commit
tee of associated realty board Issue
statements on proposed tax amend
ment No. 1. PAGE 8
Coal oil lrfmp explodes, burning man
and destroying building. PAGE 9
Footpads threaten South Frlchard
strout man with death. PAGE 12
Announced that neddlng-Herbert opera,
whose scene In at Santa Barbara, will be
staged In. Philadelphia. PAGE 8
Editorial and Letter Uox. PAGE 4
Politics. PAOES 3 an<J 8
City brevities. PAGE G
Sports. PAGES 6-7
Mining and oil. fields. PAGE 9
Theaters. PAGE 9
Classified advertising. PAGES 10-11
SOUTH CALIFORNIA
Motorcycle tire explodes and rider at
fifty-mile pace Is seriously Injured.
PAGE 6
Interesting story of city's growth told
In report of Long Beach auditor.
PAGE 10
Runaway auto, carrying I^os Angeles
party, dashes down steps toward Ven
le« lagoon. PAGE 10
Lancaster boy severely bitten by his
pet burro. PAGE 10
Plucky woman of desert ready to sell land
shu held at point of gun. PAGE 10
COAST
Eight are killed In worst freight wreck
In history of Great Northern railroad.
PAGE 1
Kissel Kar leads In auto race to Phoenix.
PAGE 2
Sixteen men killed by explosion In Wash
ington coal mine. PAGE 1
Delegates in New Mexico constitutional
convention will discuss prohibition ques
tion. PAGE 3
Bell predicts victory by 20,000 votes and
Johnson's managers believe state will
be Republican by 20,000. PAGE 8
EASTERN
Landslide may give Democrats control
of senate as well as bouse.
PAGE 1
Philadelphia lawyer claims Information'
of Dr. Crlppen's wife in hiding near
Chicago. . PAGE 1
Secretary- Meyer favors establishment of ...
two drydoeks on Pacific coast. PAGE i
Candidate Stlmson of New York Issues
"last appeal" in gubernatorial cam
paign. PAGE 12
Baltimore aviation meet ,proceeds ' de- ""
spite blue law efforts of police. PAGE 12
Woman Suffrage association receives re
plies in canvass of candidates for
congress. PAGE 12
Indictments in Alaskan coal case force
Secretary Balllnger to defend himself.
PAGE 1
General strike of drivers may be called
In Now York today. PAGE 2
President Issues 3>hanksglvkig day proc
lamation. PAGE 2
It Is predicted Grand Friz record will be
smashed at Savannah. PAGE 2
Roosevelt to make seven speeches as
windup to" New York campaign. PAGE 8
MINING AND OIL
Mexican mines enter period of prosper
ity. " PAGE 9
Third rig Is ordered for Midway North
ern. PAGE 9
More oil burners will b« Installed on
Pacific liners. , PAGE It
OJal Valley completes eleventh well in
Kern river. ! PAGE 9
LANDSLIDE MAY WREST
U.S. SENATE FROM G.O.P.
Democrats Need 14 of 24 Retir
ing Republicans' Seats
to Gain Control
WASHINGTON, Nov. 6.—Great as
aro the odds against such a contin
gency, a general political landslide at
the polls next Tuesday may result in
a Democratic senate as well as a
Democratic house.
Of the ninety-two seats in the senate
thirty hecome vacant March 4. Twenty
four retiring senators are Republicans.
They are:
Aldrich, Rhode Island; Beverldge,
Indiana; Bulkley, Connecticut; Bur
kett, Nebraska; Burrows, Michigan;
Carter, Montana; Clapp, Minnesota;
Clarke, Wyoming; Depew, New York;
Dick, Ohio; Dupont Delaware; Flint,
California; Hale, Maine; Kean, New
Jersey; LaFollette, Wisconsin; Lodge,
Massachusetts; McCumber, North Da
kota; Nixon, Nevada; Oliver, Pennsyl
vania; Page, Vermont; Piles, Wash
ington; Scott, West Virginia; Suther
land, Utah; Warner, Missouri.
The Democrats are making vigorous
fights for many of these places, but
the Republicans are strongly en
trenched.
The Republican majority now Is
twenty-four, and to attain control It
would be necessary for the Democrats
to gain fourteen of the twenty-four
Republican seats, and In addition to
hold all of the »ix seats now held by
Democrats.
The Democratic senators whose terms
■expire March 4 aro: Culberson, Texas;
Frazier, Tennessee; Money, Mississippi;
Rayner, Maryland; Swanson, Virginia;
Taliafcrro, Florida.
SCHWARTZ, MILLIONAIRE
BREWER, KILLS HIMSELF
NEW YORK, Nov. 6. — Anton
Schwartz, millionaire brewer and pres
ident of the firm of Bernheimer &
Schwartz, shot and killed himself to
day. Grief over the death of his son
is attributed by friends as the cause.
MONDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 7, 1910.
8 DIE WHEN TWO
TRAINS CRASH ON
GREAT NORTHERN
Heavily Laden Freights Plough
Into Each Other and
* Wreckage Burns
COLLISION OCCURS IN CUT
Nineteen Blazing Cars Are Jam
med Into Space of Ordi
nary Living Room
(Associated Pressi
SPOKANE, Wash., Nov. 6.—Eight
are known to be dead and four more
or less seriously injured as a result of
one of the most disastrous freight
wrecks in the history of the Grea,t
Northern railroad, near Chattaroy,
Wash., early this morning.
The wreck was the result of a head
on collision around a sharp curve in a
deep cut, fairly at the bottom of two
steep grades. Two heavily loaded
trains, running at an exceptional rate
of speed, combined almost every con
dition possible to make an impact dis-
astrous.
Traffic on the main line of the Great
Northern will have to be suspended
from forty to forty-eight hours.
Train No. 451, running on its regular
schedule, westbound, collided with the
"Apple extra," ekstbound, running on
a fast schedule between Hillyard,
Wash., and Troy, liont. Every man
of both train crews who happened to
be near the head of his train, is dead.
One brakeman saved himself by Jump
ing, but he is seriously injured. The
brakemen who were in the rear of the
trains escaped with minor Injuries/
DEBRIS CATCHES FIRE
The loss to the company Is very
large. A pile of nineteen cars of train
No. 451, jammed into the space of an
ordinary living room, caught fire Im
mediately and was speedily reduced to
ashes and tangled Iron.
The dead are:
H. L. HEPBURN, engineer No. 451;
body recovered.
JOHN BLANCHARD, fireman No.
461: body recovered.
JOE KEEFE, conductor No. 451;
body not recovered.
ALLEN GLASS, engineer apple ex
tra; body not recovered.
TWO UNKNOWN MEN, No. 451;
charred remains e^moved from fire.
TWO UNKNOWN BOTS, No. 461;
charred remains recovered.
The injured are Scotty Dempster,
fireman apple train, shoulder dislocat
ed, bad cut on head; Horsfall, con
ductor apple train, bruised; Charles
Bolton, brakeman No. 451, head cut;
R. J. Armstrong, Chopaka, B. C, slight
bruises. ■ -. _ .
CRIPPEN'S WIFE IS
SAID TO BE ALIVE
Philadelphia Lawyer Declares
Belle Elmore Seen Hiding
Near Chicago
PHILADELPHIA, Nov. 6.—Belle El
more Crippen, for whose murder Dr.
Hawley H. Crippen is to be hanged
Tuesday next in London, is declared to
be alive in this country by Francis
Tracy Tobin, a lawyer in this city, ac
cording to an interview which the Phil
adelphia Press will publish tomorrow.
Mr. Tobin declared he had "received
letters from those 'vho have seen her,"
and says he knows "she is living and
is hiding in this country, not far from
Chicago." , t>.<-'i*i
He states she "was first seen in San
Francisco at tho time Dr. Crippen was
first being sought hy the British police,
charged with her murder."
Mr. Tobin's statement continues: If
anything is going to be done, we had
better make haste. There is very little
time to spare now. The proper means
for me to pursue is to at once get in
touch with the secretary of state at
Washington and set before him the
facts in my possess-.on.
"Then we want to get him to cable
the American ambassador at London,
who in turn will lay the case before
the home secretary and ca.use him to
order a stay or to commute the sen
tence pending our Investigation."
FIGHTS MURDER VERDICT
AND HIS LIFE IS SPARED
Man Once Sentenced to Be Shot,
Now Gets 20 Years
SALT LAKE CITY, Nov. 6.—Thomas
Vance, once convicted of the murder
of his wife and sentenced to death by
shooting, was today found guilty of
assault with intent to commit mur
der, by a Jury which had deliberated
for nine hours. The penalty is from
one to twenty years. Vance is to be
sentenced next Saturday.
Vance has been in jail for three
years, following the death of his wife,
who, It was alleged, was beaten by
him. It was also charged that he had
C yen her poison. In 1908. after nu
merous delays, Vance was tried and
convicted of first degree murder and
sentenced to be shot. An appeal to
the supreme court of the state resulted
in a reversal of the lower court, and
he was granted a new trial.
BIR CLIFTON ROBINSON DIEB
NEW YORK, Nov. 6.—Sir Clifton
Robinson, managing director and en
gineer of the London United Electric
tramways, and director of the Under
ground railways of London, died to
night on a Lexington avenue street
car.
S. P. POLITICAL MACHINE IN CONTROL
OF CORONER'S OFFICE
WALTER PARKER'S GANG GETS "RAKE-OFF" FROM
THE DEAD AS WELL AS THE LIVING. TWO UN
DERTAKING FIRMS GIVEN 75 PER CENT OF BUSINESS
BY HARTWELL
THE HERALD feels that it will not have discharged its duty to the cause of good govern
ment in this county did it not, before election day, very earnestly call to the attention ot
the voters some facts in the career of Calvin Hartwell, the Republican candidate for cor
oner in this county.
In the first place it should be realized by every voter that the position of coroner is one of
very great importance and responsibility. Not only is an efficient administration of that ottice
frequently the means of detecting crimes against human life and securing the punishment ot
the criminals, but it has a most important influence upon the cause of justice and right in the
manner in which the coroner conducts the numerous inquests that are held pver the bodies ot
people killed by public service corporations. *
SO IMPORTANT IS THIS PART OF THE CORONER'S DUTIES THAT THE DE
SIRABILITY OF CONTROLLING THE CORONER'S OFFICE IS RECOGNIZED B\
THE PUBLIC SERVICE CORPORATIONS, AND PARTICULARLY BY JHE SOUTH
ERN PACIFIC COMPANY, AND TO THE MISFORTUNE OF HUNDREDS Ot PEO
PLE WHOSE RELATIVES HAVE MET DEATH AT THE HANDS OF PUB
LIC SERVICE CORPORATIONS IN THIS.COUNTY DURING THE PASr TWENTY
YEARS, THE CORONER'S OFFICE HAS BEEN PRACTICALLY AT ALL.TIMES
CONTROLLED, BY THE SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY IN ITS OWN INTEREST
AND IN THE INTEREST OF THE PUBLIC SERVICE CORPORATIONS THAT DO
POLITICS WITH IT. This, as every lawyer knows, and as the members of the family ot ev
ery person whose death at the hands of a public service corporation in this county has been in
vestigated by the coroner's office knows, is no idle statement but is the absolute truth.
The fact that Mr. Hartwell occupies the place of coroner at the present time is probably the
best evidence of the desire of the Southern Pacific company to control that office. MJK JIK.
HARTWELL HAS, DURING ALL HIS POLITICAL CAREER IN THIS CO UN IV,
BEEN A RECOGNIZED AND EFFICIENT MEMBER OF THE SOUTHERN PACIFIC
POLITICAL MACHINE. He at one time held the office of county recorder in this county,
but four years ago Mr. Walter Paker, who was at that time in complete control of the boutn
ern Pacific Republican political machine in this county, wanted a man with which to beat the
late lamented Ben Ward for assessor.
Mr. Ward's defeat was especially desired by the Southern Pacific company and its allied
corporations, because during the term as assessor which he was then serving he had, for the
first time in the history of this county, endeavored to make a thoroughly honest assessment of
the properties of public service corporations. In doing this he; of course, raised the assess
ments of the Southern Pacific company and of other corporations which previous to that time
had been shamefully low, and by doing that he equally, of course, made enemies of these cor
porations.
SO HIS POLITICAL DESTRUCTION WAS DECIDED UPON AND MR. PARK
ER HAD MR. HARTWELL RUN FOR COUNTY ASSESSOR, AN OFFICE CARR\ING
NO GREATER SALARY THAN THAT OF RECORDER WHICH HE ALREADY
HELD IN ORDER TO USE HIM FOR THE PURPOSE OF DEFEATING BEN WARD.
And inasmuch as Mr. Parker absolutely controlled the Republican county convention held at
Venice four years ago, which even to this day is still a stench in the nostrils of political de
cency in this county, he, of course, succeeded in giving Mr. Hartwell the nomination for as
sessor, thereby defeating Ben Ward. The good citizens of the county who appreciated Mr.
Ward's efforts to discharge the duties of his office honestly, and loved him for the enemies that
he made by doing so, resenting the disreputable political job of which Mr. Ward had been
made a victim by Mr. Walter Parker's Southern Pacific machine, induced him to run
as an independent candidate for assessor and elected him. This left Mr. Hartwell out of a job,
and he was temporarily taken care of by being appointed chief deputy in the sheriffs office.
However, not very long after this, Coroner Lanterman, also a selection of the Southern Pa
cific machine, lost his office on account of some outrageous conduct that he had been guilty
of, and it became necessary for Mr. Parker to look around to find a man to fill that position of
great importance to his client, the Southern Pacific company.
HE AT ONCE SELECTED MR. HARTWELL, AND A COMPLAISANT BOARD
OF SUPERVISTORS APPOINTED HIM CORONER TO SUCCEED LANTERMAN.
Just how subservient Mr. Hartwell has been in this position to which he was appointed by Mr.
Parker's influence, and to which he now asks the voters of Los Angeles county to elect him,
may be shown by one thing. \
There is a class of patronage which belongs to the coroner's office which if wrongfully and
unjustly used may be of very, great value. This is tife disposition of the bodies of the dead that
come under his charge. There are certain funeral expenses attached to the final disposition of
every body on which he holds an inquest, and these expenses are either paid by the relatives or
estate of the deceased, or where there are no relatives or estate, by the county. OF COURSE
IT IS A GRUESOME SORT OF PATRONAGE, AND ONE WHICH NO MAN WHO
HAS THE SMALLEST RESPECT FOR HIMSELF OR FOR HIS OFFICE WOULD
THINK OF USING FOR THE PURPOSE OF MAKING MONEY EITHER FOR HIM
SELF OR FOR ANYONE ELSE. Let us see how the records show that Mr. Hartwell used
the patronage of his office.
There are in the\city of Los Angeles nineteen firms doing business as undertakers. Two
of these firms are Pierce Bros, and Bresee Bros. During the past twelve months the records
show that the coroner has held inquests on 630 bodies in the city of Los Angeles, AND OF
THIS NUMBER 167 BODIES WERE SENT TO BRESEE BROS. AND 147 TO PIERCE
BROS.—JUST 50%, LACKIN6 ONE, OF THE TOTAL NUMBER.
Of the other 50%, which were distributed among the various undertakers of the city, the
relatives or friends dictated the distribution of one-half. So that we see that of the number of
bodies which the coroner had the power to place with undertakers, 75% WENT TO THE
TWO FIRMS OF BRESEE BROS. AND PIERCE BROS., AND 25% TO THE REMAIN
ING SEVENTEEN FIRMS OF UNDERTAKERS IN THE CITY.
The Herald some time ago published a list of the stockholders of Pierce Bros, which came
into its hands, and in that list were the names of Walter Parker and several other prominent
members of the Southern Pacific political machine of this county. While The Herald has been
enable to secure a list of the stockholders of Bresee Bros., it has been informed, and it believes
reliably that some time ago the name of Mr. Williams, the chief deputy in Coroner Hartwell's
office, appeared in that list, and that other members of the Southern Pacific machine were stock
holders in that company.
Certainly, judging from the fact that the stock of Pierce Bros, was so largely owned by
Southern Pacific politicians and the patronage given that firm by the coroner's office, it is fair
to assume that a similar condition exists with Bresee Bros., when we find that they got a little
more of the 75% of the business distributed to those two firms by the coroner than did the
firm of Pierce Bros.
Of course, it should not be necessary to argue that where a coroner so far forgets the duties
of his-office as to use its patronage for the gruesome purpose of making money for his political
friends and sponsors, as Coroner Hartwell has done, he is also capable of forgetting the duties
of his office and favoring the Southern Pacific company and other public service corporations
to whose influence he knows that he owes his position.
IN ALL THE SCANDALS THAT SOUTHERN PACIFIC POLITICS HAVE
BROUGHT UPON THE GOVERNMENT OF LOS ANGELES COUNTY, NOTHING
HAS BEEN WORSE THAN THIS USE OF THE CORONER'S OFFICE FOR THE
PURPOSE OF MAKING MONEY FOR MR. WALTER PARKER, THE BOSS OF THAT
MACHINE, AND HIS FELLOW MACHINE POLITICIANS. We do not believe that the
voters of the county of Los Angeles will stand for that sort of thing. We believe they will
resent having one of their offices thus brought into disgrace and ill-repute by defeating Cor
oner Hartwell on November Bth and electing the Democratic and Good Government candidate,
Dr. A. C. Pratt, in his place, and we are strengthened in this belief when we consider the fact
that Dr. Pratt is what a coroner ought to be, a physician of standing and ability. No man
without a good medical education can possibly discharge, with the highest efficiency, the du
ties of the coroner's office, and Dr. Pratt's standing and reputation both as a physician and as a
man in this city and county is a guarantee that if elected he can and will discharge efficiently the
duties of that very important office.
Furthermore, the fact that Dr. Pratt has for years, as a member of the Good Government
organizations of this city, devoted himself to the cause of decent government should and will
be accepted by voters as a guarantee that he will administer the duties of his office in the inter
est of decent government. This would be a change indeed, for up to the present time it is a
sad and shameful thing to say that the duties of the coroner's office, upon which the rights of
widows and orphans so frequently depend, has been administered in the county of Los Ange
les in the interest of the Southern Pacific machine and its allied corporations and not in the in
terest of decent government and the people who elected the coroner.
QTTST PT V COPIES • DAn *«• ON TRAINS Be.
OIIN L*J-i-Ei V>V^JTAXL(O. hundavb So. om trains 10a
15 MEN KILLED BY
2 EXPLOSIONS IN
WASHINGTON MINE
Coal Diggers Entering and Leav
ing Shaft Caught in Ter
rific Gas Blasts
DEBRIS BLOWN OUT OF PIT
Heavy Timbers Hurled Half a
Mile and Residents Think
Earthquake Occurred
SEATTLE, Nov. 6.—Two explosions,
occurring within a few minutes of
each other shortly before 7 o'clock
this morning, resulted in the death of
fifteen men in the Lawson mine at
Black Diamond, thirty miles south
east of Seattle.
Three men, standing within 100 yards
of the mouth of the shaft, were struck
by timbers shot from the portal and
were badly injured.
The dead are:
JULIUS PUYSOW, married, one
child.
OSCAR BAEL, married, one child
CAESAR BAEL, single.
CYRIL MAES, single.
FRANK GARDINI, single.
ISADORE GARDINI, single.
JOSEPH KUMERS. single.
MAETILI FANSTIRIA, married,
three children.
FRED SETTI, married, one child.
DAVE LONDON, single.
C. BEAGI, wife in Italy,
DOMINI GREGORY, siogle.
ALBERT FONTANA, single.
FRANZ VERGAN, single.
JULIUS CAPPIATI, wife in Italy.
The injured are Arvilia Martina,
Louis Marino and Louis Khuntz.
Ten men going down o shift and
five men coming up were caught be
tween the first and sixth levels, and
it is considered certain that all per
ished. All the men were foreigners.
Natural gas combustion is assigned
as the cause. The force of the ex
plosion was terrific 1. Showers of earth,
timbers and bits of clothing, believed
to be that of the miners, were blown
from the slope of the mine. Timbers
measuring sixteen inches thick and
eight feet long were blown half a
mile.
A big section of steam pipe was
blown a similar distance and sank
fifteen feet in the ground.
The shock was felt for miles around.
Many thought there had been an
earthquake.
As soon as the extent of the disaster
was known rescue parties were at
work on the water level to attempt
the rescue of any men who might be
alve. As far as is known, the twelve
men in the tram cars were the only
ones in the mine at the time of the
explosion.
The coal mines at Black Diamond
are owned by tho Pacific Coast com
pany.
MINK SOON CAVED IN
Soon after the explosion, the mine
began to cave in, indicating that all
the supports had been blown out, and
the tunnels wrecked.
It is doubtful if the mine witl be re
opened. The damage is estimated at
$250,000.
The only cause mine officials are
able to assign for the explosion Is that
a fissure of gas may have opened and
the gas ignited from a match struck
by a workman in the cage while as
cending to the surface.
The company has rules prohibiting
the men from entering its mines with
matches in their possession. It is as
serted, however, that the five men who
entered the shaft Just before the ex
plosion had not been searched in ac
cordance with the rules.
The shock of the explosion brought
the miners and their families hurrying
from their homes. Superintendent
James Hamm at once marshaled 200
men and led thi attack on the mine.
It was planned to enter the shaft at
once in the hope that some of the un
fortunates might be alive. This hope
was soon dispelled, however, when it
was found the shaft and tunnels were
choked with debria. In splto of the
fact that there was no hope of the
twelve men having escaped instant
death, Mr. Hamm determined to con
tinue the effort to force an entrance
and the men were organized for thia
purpose.
The Lawson mine was one of the
deepest In the world, the shaft extend
ing downward 2200 feet. Its monthly
output -was 10,000 tons. It had been in
operation since ]894 and gave employ
ment to 200 men. Today's disaster is
the second in the history of the mine,
thirteen men having lost their lives in
an explosion there twelve years ago.
ENDS LIFE WHEN SEATED
BESIDE FIANCEE IN CAR
PHILADELPHIA, Nov. 6.—Unable to
find employment which would enable
him to support a wife, Lafayette Mad
dox, aged 26, today killed himself while
in a street car beside Miss Nellie Cal
lahan, his 18-year-old fiancee.
The 26th of this month had been set
for their wedding. Maddox, It is said,
endeavored to Induce the girl to enter
a suicide pact. She refused Jto consider
the proposition, and did not believe he
was serious until Maddox sent a bullet
through his brain.
JAIL DELIVERY HALTED
AFTER 3 MAKE ESCAPE
INDIANAPOLIS, Nov. «.—Three
men escaped from the Marlon county
Jail here today and a fourth was
halted just as ho slid down the rope
of bed sheets.
It la believed a wholesale jail deliv
ery had been planned, as the cell win
dows had been sawed. A resident near
the Jail, seeinp the rope dangling from
the second story window, called the
police and prevented the success of
the plan.
2 CENTS
(Associated Prexs)

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