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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, November 10, 1910, Image 1

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NUMBKII4O. I'KlL'Jli. &U PPNT^ run MONTH
M MBKli 40. ittLKjCJ. OU KjXdFi J.O IKK MOM II
I . -
319,198 POPULATION OF LOS ANGELES; GAIN 211.5%
NEW CONGRESS
DEMOCRATS' BY
30 MAJORITY
Complete Returns Prove That
Tuesday's Upheaval Gives Safe
Working Vote in House
SENATE STILL REPUBLICAN
Upper Branch Will Measure Up:
G. 0. P., 51; Opponents,
40; Doubtful, One
RESULT OF GOVERNOR RACES
Jeffersonian Tickets Elect 13 Ex
ecutives; Republicans 12,
and Fusionists Get 1
(AssorlaleA I'rfssl
WASHINGTON, I). C, Nov. 9.—The
political upheaval of Tuesday uhs fol
lowed yt-Mtfrdny by a general survey
of the field which disclosed with greater
detail and precision Junt what has been
accomplished.
Latest calculations on the national
house of representatives, b;ised on com
plete but unofficial returns, show the
Democrats will have a safe working
majority of 3d.
The outcome of the I'nited States
senate la now definitely settled. The
Republicans are assured of it new
senators, which, with .11 holdovers,
gives a total of 61. The Democrats are
assured of It new senators, which, with
2b holdovers, gives them a total of 40.
One scnatorship is stiil in doubt—the
BUCCt ssor of Senator Carter In Mon
tana, where there Is a prospect of a tie.
These determined totals, however,
leave a Republican majority in the
senate at follows:
Total • membership. 92: necessary to
majority, 47: Republicans, 51; Demo
crats, 40: doubtful, 1. -
The 17 I.epubliean senators consid
ered assured are from California, Con
necticut, Delaware, lawn. Massachu
-B?ttn, Minnesota, Michigan, Nevada,
Nort'i Dakota (two), Pennsylvania,
Rhode Island, Utah, Vermont, Wash
ington, Wisconsin and Wyoming.
The 16 Democratic senators consid
ered assured are from Florida, Indiana,
Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Missouri,
Mississippi. Nebraska New Jersey, New
York, Ohio, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia
and West Virginia.
CHOICE or CJOVEKNORS
A summary of the contest for gov
ernorships shows the following Demo
cratic governors elected with the ap
proximate plurality:
State. Governor. Plurality.
New York, Dlx 66,000
N«w ,t< •■■*. -v. Wilson 30.000
ronneulU-ut, Haiti hi *.. . 3.500
Massachusetts, Fobs - 33,000
Ohio, Harmon ■■■■ 60,000
Oklahoma. Croc* ' ;
Oregon, West
Wyoming, Cares
Alabama, O'Neal 60.000
, Si>uih Carolina, Blea»o 60,000
Texas, ColgulU
North Dakota, Burke 3.000
Colorado, Shafroth ..;
The Republican governors elected,
with their approximate pluralities fol
low:
State. Governor. Plurality.
Pennsylvania, Toner 33.000
Now Hampshire, Bass 7,000
Rhod* Island, I'othler 900
lowa. Carroll ' 10.000
Kansas. Btuhbs 10.000
Mlclilßßn, Osborne 40,000
Minnesota, Kberliarilt 50.000
Nebraska, Aldrlch r..000
South ' Dakota, VeßEey 111,000
■Wisconsin, JlcGovern
California, Johnson 25,000
Nevada. Oddl«
•Tennessee, Hooper 12.000
' «Fuslon candidate.
- The governorship of Idaho is not yet
reported as being beyond doubt.
JUDGE BALDWIN REPEATS
HE WILL SUE ROOSEVELT
NJEW HAVEN, Conn., Nov. 9.—Judge
Simeon Baldwin, just elected governor
of Connecticut, in replying to congrat
ulations of hi 3 class of the Yale law
school today, reiterated his intention of
bringing action against former Presi
dent Roosevelt because of certain
statements reported to have been made
by the latter concerning Judge Bald
win.
In a brief reply to the students, Jurtgo 1
Baldwin said: "In my campaign I was
assisted by a controversy I had with
a certain ex-president, and I have come
to the conclusion that this ex-president
knows less law than you and I do, and
I am going to teach him some."
TAKE MORE POWER FROM
SPEAKER, SAYS MURDOCK
WICHITA, Kan., Nov. 9.—Victor
Murdock, who yesterday was re-eleotad
to congress from the Eighth district,
said today:
"I read in the congressional elec
tion news a plain and unmistakable
command of the people to congress to
take more power away from the
sppeaker.
"The people know that correction has
not been completed. The power to
appoint committees should b^ taken
from all future speakers and put back
in the house."
PAYNE LEADS FOR CONGRESS
AUBURN. N. T., Nov. 9.—The total
vote (or congress in this district shows
Sereno K. Payne, author of the tariff
law. 8730: Colmey. Democrat, 6095.
LOS ANGELES HERALD
Views in Business Section of the Los Angeles of 1910, Showing Scores of Fine
Structures Which Have Marked Great Growth of City During the Last Decade
JOHNSON IS GIVEN
20,000 PLURALITY
Complete Returns from Nearly All
Precincts in State Indi
cate Decisive Victory
SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 9.—Complete
returns from 2999 out of 3159 precincts
in the state, received up to 11:30
o'clock tonight, give:
Johnson ... • • 147,553 !
Uell 136.994
Wallace 104,270
Spellacy 102,692
Melvln ... v 112.363
Slurs .. 118,212
When tabulation of the returns was
closed tonight, the indicated plurality
of Hiram W. Johnson, Republican can
didate for governor, was approximately
20,000.
The returns from the entire state are
still incomplete, but the result In the
cities and more populous regions is
definitely known and the missing vote
of the remote and sparsely settled dis
tricts cannot materially alter the above
figure.
I'LIRAMTV OF STATE. TICKET
With the exception of : Wallace, for
lieutenant governor, who may run
somewhat behind Johnson's vote,. the
entire state ticket will closely approxi
mate the plurality given' its head. This
figure harmonizes with the estimates
made by Mr. Johnson's managers to
night.
In addition to the returns as sup
plied from the usual sources, the John
eon people late today made special in
vestigations In pivotal counties, and to
night do not claim a plurality exceed
ing 20.000, and admit it ma' run a few
hundred below that figure. ' .--
The admitted surprise of the election
among close political observers of both
parties was the result in San Fran
cisco. Even 8S late as election eve,
odds of 2 to 1 were available that Bell
■would carry the city, but the official
vote, with two small precincts missing,
gives Johnson a plurality of 1487. ■
STRONG VOTE TOR WILSON
The surprisingly strong vote in this
city of J. Stitt Wilson, Socialist candi
date for governor, is used as an ex
planation of the result. Wilson polled
9391 votes in San Francisco, and it. is
claimed that by far the greater part
of this was drawn from what would
normally have been Democratic
strength. Wilson's total vote in the
state is estimated at between 40.000
and 50.000.
The return* Of the vote on the va
rious eonstitufcionsil amendments and
proposal! submitted yesterday are
practically entirely absent tonight,
but the x'anama-Paciflc exposition
managers: say their advices are that
the state bond issue has carried by a
very large vote. 141 three counties the
vote for the exposition tax of $5,00J000
was 46,769 for and 4149 against. Th's
practically insures the fact that the
state has regarded the proposition fa
vorably.
In the same three counties, Ran
Francisco, San Joaquin and San Be
nito, the constitutional amendment
providing for the separation of state
and local taxation received 30,865
affirmative and 16,304 against.
SAN FRANCISCO COUNTY
SAN FRANCISCO. Nov. 9.—Com
plete returns for this city in yester
day's .'lection show a total vote of 8,
--400 and virtually a clean sweep for tho
Republican ticket. In the contest for
governor the division of votes estab
lished by last night's figures was main
tained to the end. the flnsil result be
ing- Johnson 24,877. Bell 23,390 and Wil-
Hon, Socialist, MU.
For lieutenant governor Bpellacy,
Democrat, outran his ticket by many
thousands, the final result being Wai'
lace, Republican, lfl.Tuu: Bpellacy, 27,
--838: Wheeler, Socialist, 8691
The only other straight Democratic
candidate to outstrip the ticket w,asi
(Continued on I'ime Ninri
THURSDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 10,1910.
ABOVE (AT LEFT)—SIXTH STREET, WEST FROM LOS ANGELES. ABOVE (CEN
TER)—BKYLIXK IN IH'SIXBBS SECTION, SHOWING MANY NEW BUSINESS
•'STRrCTCRES. CENTER—INTERNATIONAL HANK HOLDING AT LEFT AND
NEW FEDERAL, BUILDING AT ■ RIGHT. BELOW—BROADWAY, NORTH FROM
POINT NEAR EIGHTH STREET. AT RIGHT—SIXTH STREET, EAST FROM
POINT NEAR BROADWAY. *
OLD GLORY TORN TO BITS IN MEXICO
DURING ANTI-AMERICAN OUTBREAK
Newspaper Office Stoned and Windows of United States Business
Places Smashed in Demonstration in the Capital City
Caused by the Recent Lynching in Texas
(Associated Press)
MEXICO CITY, Nov. 9.—Through
insults to the American flag and as-
Hiiults made openly upon American
citizens In the streets, an anti-Ameri
can demonstration which began last
night with the stoning of the Mexican
Herald offices, developed ths afternoon
into an affair of international impor
l.llllf.
A vigorous protest was registered by
the American ambassador with the
Mexican department of foreign rela
tions and at the same time the facts
were telegraphed to Washington and
instructions asked for.
Tonight the attacks were renewed.
Windows in a dozen American business
places were smashed. All about town
shutters were hurriedly drawn and es
tablishments closed. Forces of police
appeared in the streets and kept the
crowds moving.
An attack was made upon the plant
of El Imparcial and the melting and
distributing departments on the
ground floor were completely wrecked.
The mob attacked the heavy doors
leading to tins editorial and composing
rooms above with heavy timbers and
fned the wreckage. Then the mounted
police charged with drawn swords.
One of the attackers was run through
and killed.
POLK'K LOOK ON
While the police looked on and seem
ingly made no effort to prevent it, an
American flag floating in front of a
candy store in the business district
was torn down this afternoon by a
■ roud of students and others, trampled
upon and torn to bits. Later photo
graphs of the crowds were taken be-
I'oie the office* of the Diario del Hogar,
a Mexican newspaper, with many In
dividual! waving bit;-, of the tattered
banner.
The demonstration today was a con
tinuation of the affair of last night,
,1 by antipathy aroused among
the people by the burning at the stake
of Antonio Bodrigues at Rock Springs,
Texas, on the night of November 3.
Publication of volenl -attacks on
Americans by several Mexican papers
,i further to incense the medical
students, who were the promoters of
last night's demonstration.
Shortly before m.on the crowd as-
sembled before the now Juarez monu
ment in the Alameda and proceeded to
the municipal palace, where several
who were arrested last night were
being examined by the authorities. A
company of mounted police followed.
From the palace the students
marched through Avenida San Fran
cisco, the principal business thorough
fare, stopping in front of the candy
store, where the flag incident occurred.
Windows in the San Francisco hotel
were broken.
SCHOOL CHELD&EH STONED
At the head of Juarez avenue, around
tlir famous statue of the iron horse,
speeches were made denouncing all
Americans, and a passing street car,
conveying school children to the Amer
ican school, was stoned. One child was
struck and severely injured.
In the progress of the students about
the city Governor Land a Escandon of
the federal district, Felix Diaz, chief
of police, and Joaquin Oasasus, former
ambassador to the United States, fol
lowed in automobiles.
At the municipal palace Governor
Lanclit addressed words oi approval of
the students' protest, but cautioned
them against violence
Ambassador Wilson, in hia note to
the foreign office, described the oc
currence as a disgrace to the Mexican
people, and expressed surprise that in
asmuch as his office had warning in
advance of the demonstrations the
Mexican authorities had none, or hav
ing It, took no action.
DEMANDS REPARATION FOR
LYNCHING OF RODRIGUEZ
WASHINGTON, Nov. 9v—Protesting
vigorously on behalf of the Mexican
government. Senor De La Barra, am.
bassador to the United States from
Mexico, presented a claim for repara
tion to the state department today be
cause of the lynching of Antonio Rod
riffuei at Hock Springs, Texas, on No
vember 3. -
; Rodriguez, who was a Mexican cit
izen, confessed to the murder of Mrs.
l,< in Henderson at Rock Springs and
was burned at the stake.
Mayor Alexander Predicts Greater
Growth During Next Ten Years
GEORGE ALEXANDER
Mayor of Los Angeles
Remarkable as the showing is, I believe that no one who has
seen Los Angeles grow from 50.000 in 1890 to 319,198 in 1910 will
hold otherwise than that the growth of the next two decades is to
be more astounding. We are only entering on
our period of prosperity, and the numbers coming
all the time to make this county their home will
be greatly augmented for several years to come.
The completion of the aqueduct plans will
help make Los Angeles grow faster than ever.
But in addition to these aids I think we can
almost apply arithmetical progression to our fu
ture increase in population. The members of a
family coming to Los Angeles to live bring
friends here, not only from their home town but
from other points as well, as any real estate man
will testify. The great feature of our present
growth is that Los Angeles in its climate, its chances for living
and its character of citizenship has made good with the newcom
ers; it is only natural that they should tell others about it, and
they in turn, when citizens of Los Angeles long enough to know
what living here means, bring others.
I believe that the prophecies which have been made as to the
million population here will be realized as early as our realty ex
perts anticipate. In connection with the publication of the census
report it should be noted that the class of population in Los Angc
less and Southern California is extremely high. Southern Cali
fornia is dominated by. people who are of unusual refinement and
culture, whether in our cities or on the ranches — men and women
who make the finest type of citizens.
GAYNOR ISSUES LETTERS
TO END EXPRESS STRIKE
NEW YOUK, Nov. 9.—Mayor Gay
nor issued two letters tonight which
promise to bring the strike of express
company employes to a head tomor
row.
, Briefly, he forbids the operation of
wagons by unlicensed drivers, thus
eliminating the strike breakers.
Mayor "VVittpenn of Jersey City had
already taken this stand, and n test
caM is mow in the Jersey City courts.
John Williams, commissioner of labor,
is due from Albany tomorrow, and
with Mayor Gaynor's action and a
threat of state intervention it is hoped
a settlement will be reached.
The mayor's letters are addressed to
the American Express company and
Mayor Wittpenn of Jersey City re
spectively.
ELDEST SON OF FORMER
SECRETARY OF NAVY DIES
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo., Nov. 9.
—Victor Nicholson Metcalft eldest son
of Victor H. Metcalf, former secretary
of the navy, died here today after an
illness following an attack of pneu
monia a year ago. He \v;is born Feb
ruary JO, 1882, at Oakland, CaL, th«
fumllv residence, whither the body ■will
be taken Saturday for burial.
C |V/'| I/ 1 I "OI>I • n\U.Y tc. ON TRAIN'S sc.
nli>ijlljli< vUI IJjO. si'Mi.WH sc. ON TRAINS 10c.

V
WIFE OF MILLIONAIRE
ACCUSED OF POISONING
WHEELING, \V. V.-i., Nov. 9.—Mrs.
Laura Farnsworth Schenck, wife or
John o. Schenck, a millionaire pork
packer of this city, was arrested to
nlght on a nan-ant Issued by the
prosecuting attorney, Charging at
tempted murder of her husband by
administering poison in his food.
Schenck was taken to the North
Wheeling hospital two weeks ago, nnrl
Blnca that time repeated attempts oC
Mrs. Schenck to have him taken back
to their home In Wheeling have been
contested by Mr. Schenck's relatives.
He i« in a critical condition.
CONGRESSMAN FAILS WITH
LIABILITIES OF $275,000
sriiANTON, Pa., Nov. 9.—Benjamin
j. Focht, congressman from the I7tli
district of Pennsylvania, filed today
a voluntary pfitition in bankruptcy In
the United Btatei district court. Hi*
liabilities approximate 1375,000, and in*
assets about 1175,000, He did not claim
the exemption allowed by law.
.Mr. FOCht authorised a statement a.s
follows: "The necessity of my petition
was due iii part to the depreciation of
holdings dating back to the panic of
1907. a large part of my llab!Htlen
..insist* of claims now iii litigation,
growing out of Indorsements and com
plications arising from failures of other
parties."
2 CENTS
CENSUS SHOWS
CITY IS AMONG
U.S. LEADERS
Southland Metropolis Makes Re
markable Jump from 36th to
Sixteenth Place in Rank
GROWTH TREBLE IN 10 YEARS
Figures in 1900 Were 102479,
While Increase Since That
Time Is 216,719
HEADS PLACES OF ITS CLASS
Washington Officials Amazed by
Leaps of Business and Com
merce as Well as Size
"Los Angeles, 319.198," is the
message that flashed from Wash
ington to The Herald last night.
Quickly it spread through the
city, stirring the pride and arous
ing the enthusiasm of the thou
sands who, by their coming with
in the last decade, helped to make
possible the magnificent showing,
and those other thousands whose
earlier coming laid the foundation
of the great city of today.
Two hundred and eleven and
five-tenths per cent is the city's
gain in ten years. Its population
in 1900 was 102,479. Its gain in
population was 216,719. It still
ranks as the second city on the
Pacific coast, leading Seattle,
Portland and Tacoma by large
margins. Its wonderful growth
has put it in a small group of the
nation's greatest cities. Los An
geles will rank 16th, appearaing
in the list just ahead of Minne
apolis. In 1900 Los Angeles
ranked 36th and Minneapolis
19th.
Bert L. Farmer, who took the
census in Los Angeles with a
corps of assistants, said last night.
that Los Angeles showed a
greater increase in percentage
that any other city of its size.
"In Washington," he said, "they
have always looked on us, even
to a later date, as a city in the
100,000 class. The figures which
have just come from Washington
have astounded the census offi
cials. Hart Momsen, special in
spector from the census bureau,*
who was out here checking over
the figures in certain districts,
told me he had no idea Los An
geles had grown in population as
it had. It was possibly this, to
gether with a desire to show Ta
coma and Seattle that all cities
were being treated alike that Mr.
Momsen was sent here. I am glad
lie was, for in no part of this
country can they intimate that
I.os Angeles' figures were padded.
The east could scarcely grasp the
import at first that Los Angeles
was no longer a tourist town but
a metropolis.
Business Also Leaps Ahead
"There is even a greater sur
prise," continued Mr. Farmer, "ill
store for the cast and many of our
new residents when they leant
the figures from the census taken
among the manufacturers and in
dustries of various kinds. Tin's,
even greater than the resident
census, shows a most remarkable
increase in point of growth and
expansion. Firms in business
years ago as mere drops in the
bucket of commerce now show a
growth that is astonishing. These
figures will probably not be made
public before five months.
"I would add that Los Angeles
has been the best checked city in
the United States. That her peo
ple most readily responded to the
call of the census man and that
in the canvass of all these thou
sands only three persona were ar
rested, while in other cities 06
much smaller size there were ar
rests by the score.
"Mr. Momscn shortly after h«
arrived here remarked on
number of people he saw in tin:
streets. He had been in the
ice ten years but had nevi
to Los Angeles, and he told me
(Continued on I •«• Fwu

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