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Los Angeles herald. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, November 15, 1910, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-11-15/ed-1/seq-2/

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Mr \£*f*-^fi6fftffowGoods Smpf
Phoenix mufflers of silk and mercerized cot
ton—all styles in white, black and colors—
50c to $2.00.
(Women's Neckwear Dept., near Main Entrance.)
Butterick patterns and publications for De
, cember are ready.
(Main Floor, roar.)
ITmttfftifiaf'nf! Now' if y°u want to give a housewife some
JLlllDrOluere« thing useful something she's sure to ap-
Bed Linens predate-
One 81x99-inch sheet and a pair of 45x36-inch pillow cases
made of Pequot sheeting, neatly hemstitched and with
beautifully embroidered initials—all packed in fancy box—
' $3.50 a set.
(Linen Dept., Main Floor.)
ITnfiarmtldin Stiil a sPlendid selection of undermuslins
UnaerXllUMlll kft from yester d ay - s sale of short lots and
SaleContinuedsiightiy soiled goods—
75c Garments.. 45c i $3.50 Garments $2.00
$1.00 Garments 75c ;| $4.00 Garments $2.50
$1.50 Garments 90c > $5.00 Garments $3.00
$2.00 Garments $1.10; $7.50 Garments $5.00
$2.50 Garments $1.50 ij $9.00 Garments $6.00
(Main Floor, rear.)
- - - ?V- . -, —^
TP{*«*» ABCI Toy furniture large enough and strong enough
•** J • ••" £ or t he children themselves to use.
IsQllS A four-piece set consisting of 2 light oak chairs,
a large settee and a table with drawer, for $4.00.
Red iron chairs, $1.50 each; round or oval table, $2.50; large
settee $3.50. These can be used indoors or outdoors—will
stand the weather.
Large airship that sails around the room with acrobat
swinging from bar, 50c ; others in form of birds and beetles
at 25c and 50c.
Skin-covered rocking horses for as little as $5.
Trains that climb mountains, cross bridges, etc., $3.50 to $5.
Our Big Beauty Dolls—23 inches high, with shoes and
stockings and sewed wigs—for a dollar.
Character Baby and Boy and Girl Dolls, with and without
sleeping eyes, $1 to $3.50 each.
Dolls' clothes, shoes, stockings, jewelry, etc.
Bring the children and let them play in the sand pile, chute
the chutes, etc.
(Fourth Floor, rear Elevator.)
J. W. ROBINSON CO.
235' 239 So. Broadway 234-244 So. Hill Street
"Match for Revolutionary Masterpieces
in Street Cur Curds."
r.D.Uilverwooa
Oth and Broadway 221 H. Spring
Long Bench Maricopa
Bakemftclil San Bernardino
Bja^najMlßH I t IJMMft \
Copyright Hart :ttjtliicr Si Mill
When you consider what it
means to step Into ready-to-wear
and wear well, clothes correct
in style and perfect fit— clothes
such bb Sllverwooi —
Hart Schaffner <&> Marx
—clothes, you'll fully realize
what a great epoch of progress
we are really in. And you can
buy such clothes for
$20—
The Office Boy
The American t\vo-l>lt iiie.o Is
better than the I.uiin Quarter of
farcin
Th* liom.t of
Hart brlinfTni-r i Marx
Clotbea
t" ST. 1900 ~T
GATLIN INSTITUTE
LOS ANGELES CALi _ SAN FRANCISCO
*?l Yr?c& O*WR,Tf "JI&Sj
— r
It'a n» «aJ7 *o secure a Bargain In a uan<]
automobile, throujfli want •vdvertialne. v It
u»M to Da-ana «tIU l»-to ••euro a bom
»nd carri««fc
MORGAN TO ERECT FREE
TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL
American Financier Will Give a
Modern Sanitarium to French
Watering Place
new YORK, Nov. 14.— J. Pierpont
Morgan's latest philanthropy consists
• pi' the erection of a free tuberculosis
hospital nil modern American plans In
thi little French watering place of
Aix les Bains, where Morgan has
gone for treatment at frequent hit r
vals since 1800. The building, which
will cost upward of $10,000, will be a
subsidiary department of the Aix le^
Baina municipal hospital, to which
Morgan gave J50.000 some years ugo.
Dr. Paul Quyeaot, one of the best
known medical authorities In Europe,
is now in New York at the invitation
of Morgan, to stiuly tli" methods used
in this country for isolating tubercu
losis patients. On his return to Franco
next month, he will take his plans
for the erection of the new pa\ilion.
"This country in very mu'-h in art
| vance of Europe in Its care of tube,-
--j culpsis," says Dr. Guyenot. "The hos
pitals I havi seen Impress me as :x-
I ceedingly progressive and th"-
Of course, In Europe there are not
such large sums of money to be ex
pended on these institutions. The New
'■ Fork Lylng-ln hospital, and the
I Rockefeller Institute hospital .'ire the
! two finest institutions of their kind
j in the world."
Dr Guyenot will visit hospitals in
i Baltimore and other
before sailing 1.
CWRITER OF PRINCETON'S
COLLEGE HYMN IS DYING
PRINCETON, N. J., Nov. 14 —Prof, j
Carl A. Longlotz, writer of "Old Nas
sau," the .sacred college hymn of 1
Princeton, la dying of paralysis at his
homo in Trenton.
Professor Longlots is a native o
Munich. lie came to America
years ago and taught music in Prli c<
ton. [1 hile he was thu>* engaged
that he composed "Old Nassau," lovi d
by e\ ■ry Prim etonian an>i class*
one of the best college hymns ever
written.
year the alumni took up the
matter of raising a fund for him In his
declining days.
Paralysis struck him down a short
time ago.
QUARREL OVER CHILD IS
CAUSE OF STREET SHOOTING
SAX FRANCISCO, Nov. 14.—As a re
sult of a quarrel over tae question
of the guardianship of his 12-year-old
daughter, Albert Logue shot John
Leonard in the ba-k las) night, in
fllcting a fiesli wound.
The hhuotins occurred on the street
and durin;, th« excitement that tol«
lowed Logue slipped away and has
not yet been arrested.
Logue's child, it la s;iid. had been
reared Viv Leonard and hi.s wile, and
when recentlj Logue demanded that
she be returned to him, tho Leonimls
refused to give her up.
INCH OF SNOW FALLS
HURON, B, 1)., Nov. 11.-An Inch "f
snow covers the ground throughout the
Jim river valley, the fir-i "t 1 thi
son and twenty days later than iHt
year.
LOS ANGELES HERALD: TUESDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 15, 1910.
DRAGGED TO DEAD
IN 'THIRD DEGREE'
Negro, Gazing into Eyes of Slain
Child. Swears He Is Inno
cent of Crime
JAIL SURROUNDED BY A, MOB
Prisoner Arraigned in Cell by the
Asbury Park Authorities*
Who Fear Lynching
(Associated rress)
ASriCRY PARK, N. J., Nov. 14.—
Thomas Williams, the negro whose
arrest followed the discovery of liitle
Mario Smith's mutilated body in the |
woods yesterday, was not removed i
from his cell for court proceedings to
day, SO fearful were the police of mob
i\e. A crowd surrounded th' 5 j.iil
.ill day, and had not dispersed late
tonight.
To carry out the requirements of the
law, the negro was informally ar
raigned as he stood in his cell, at.d
was held without bail for further ex
amination.
William H. Smith, chief of police of
Ashbury Park, held a conference with
the prisoner, and announced after
wards that Williams apparently had
established an alibi. Many persons are j
inclined to think the man a victim of
circumstances.
The child's mother is still in a seri
ous condition from gßicf and shock.
In an attempt to wring a confes
sion from, the prisoner, the child's
body was brouprht into the jail cor
ridor this evening. The negro was
led forth and halted beside it.
"I swear to God I did not harm the
girl. I had nothing to do With it," he
said firmly.
"Get down and look into her eyes
and say that," was commanded.
Williams leaned forward until hP
was gazing straight into the dead
eyes. His gaze did not waver and l.c
exclaimed:
■'God is my witness that T did not
kill this pirl. I did not touch her. I
did not harm her. I do not know who
did."
Again and again he repeated this
while his hand lay on the body. Th™
he added:
"I thank Ood I can say I did not
do it. I am sorry for hor nnd so ry
for her family, but I had nothing t»
rtn with this."
MINISTER ACQUITTED FOR
WEARING SAILOR'S UNIFORM
Court Sustains Preacher Who
Disguised to Get Evidence
SEATTLE, Nov. 14.—The Rev. F. S.
A. Jensen, formerly well known as a
boxer and football player of the Uni
versity of Chicago and now leader of
the fight against "blind pigs" in the
navy yard town of Charleston, has
been acquitted of the charge of having
worn unlawfully the uniform of a
United States sailor.
Charleston is by law but not in fact
"dry." Pastor Jenson, in the uniform
of a United States marine sergeant,
found it easy to buy liquor and ob
tained evidence under which they were
prosecuted.
The Enlisted Men's club, which con
ducted a sort of canteen, prosecuted
Jensen for violating the new law for
bidding a civilian to wear the garb of
a United States sailor. The trial judge,
ruled that the law was unconstitutional
and pointed to women in the courtroom
who were wearing sailors' caps and
blouses.
NEW MEXICO DELEGATES
DIVIDE ON PROHIBITION
Adoption of Constitution Prom
ises to Be Arduous Task
SANTA FB, N. M., Nov. 14.—The
prohibition question and the appor
tionment of tile state into legislative
and judicial districts are practically
the only propositions yet to be con
sidered by the constitutional conven
tion.
Tin-re i.s apparently a strong- senti
ment among .some of the delegates
thai the prohibition issue has no place
In the constitution. The final adoption
of the constitution promises to bo an
arduous task, as there are SOO
tiona and under the rules a roll call
will be required on each .section after
it is reported by the revision com
mittee. Each mii call requires twenty
minutes, so that the delegates (ace
about ninety-six hours of roll call;
COURT DECIDES PACKERS
NEED NOT PRODUCE BOOKS
TRENTON, N, J., Nov. 14.—The state
i ourt of errors and appeals tins after
noon reversed the decision of Supreme
■ '< urt Justice Swaze, directing the N i
o ii Packing company and the other
big pi i ing con cms to produce their
books before the Hudson county m\m.l
The grand jury had round Indict
ments i ainst a number of the officials
! mi the packing concerns on chaws ol'
conspiracy to maintain high prices
Bfh the operation in Hudson
county of cold storage plants/ The
i jury wanted to continue Its in
riulry and sought the books. The de
today makes it unnecessary for
to be produi ed,
CLERK MAKES MIDNIGHT
TRIP IN SENATORIAL WAR
HELENA, Mont., Nov. 14.—With a
toga lie, the fight for control
of the Montana legislature will begin
at oi •• In i; c numerous countks where
ill. vote was close, and be waged until
a i Fniti'.' i tor is elected.
• |un< i!',n. the i
(if St >unty made a mid
night trip ti in' county .se;it last night
and i cati of election to
the 1 ■ ■ i' pregentatlve, who bas
a plurality of 13 vot( "ii th< f*ofi Ol
tho returns.
BANK STATEMENTS CALLED
WABHINOTON, Nov. 14.— The romp
lroller of thi currency Ihim4 b ''•'"
i"<i;iy for Btatements of thl vonditi<m
„i ;iil national banks at the close of
business, Thursday, Nov. 10.
8-YEAR-OLD GIRL
SAVES DROWNING CHILD
nTTSBTOO, Not. Stripping off
her coat. 8-year-old Martha Stauffer of
Ellsworth, a suburb, jumped Into a pond
yesterday and reacned from drowning
her 3-year-old brother who had fallen
while throwing stone*. The child swam
to the bank in four feet of water, nip
porting her little charge. *
« « »
EMPLOYES OF EXPRESS
COMPANIES RESUME WORK
Four Thousand Men and Hun
dreds of Teams Again Active
in New York City
NEW YORK, Nov. 14.—Four thous
and striking express men went back to
] work today, wearing their union l»ut
tnn.«. For the flrst time In two weeks,
the 1000 teams of the Adams, Wnlls-
Fargo, I'nited States and American
Express companies were traveling un
hampered about Manhattan, Brooklyn,
Jersey City and Hoboken. Slowly the
great congestion of express packages
was being relieved. ,
The only dispute of the morning took
place on the Communipaw dock of the
United States Express company When
the company objected to taking back
ten former employes. About 150 men
gathered about the place and the strik
ers announced that If these ten were
not allowed to return to work no one
formerly employed there would go
back. Liator the trouble was adjusted
and the strikers returned to work.
Although the express drivers nro
back at work, the striking chauffeurs,
numbering nanrly 1000, were still out
tonight. They struck first in sym
pathy with the express men, but soon
formulated demands of their own.
Recognition of the union is the chief
one.
MISSOURI PACIFIC SHOPS
STRIKE WILL BE SETTLED
PEDAIJA, Mo., Nov. 14.—Striking
employes of the Missouri-Pacific shops
and the heads of the raiiway system
will be asked to arbitrate their dif
ferences.
This course was decided upon at a
meeting here today under the auspices
of the local Commercial' club. Repre
sentatives of every city which is a di
vision ponit of the railroad in Mis
souri, Kansas and Arkansas, and thq
governor of Arkansas, were present.
The parties to the dispute win be
asked by resolution to submit their dif
ferences to arbitration.
S.P. ORDERED TO ERECT
DEPOT AT MIDLAND, ORE.
Railroad Commission Decides
Facilities Are Necessary
MIDLAND, Oro., Nov. 14.—News of a
victory, the most important ever won
in this city, haa just reached here in
the form of a copy of the decision of
the Oregon railroad commission, which
has decided the Southern Pacific rail
road must build a passenger and
freight depot in this city and provide
an agent who shall sell tickets and
handle shipments.
For a long time this city has been
without any railroad facilities, al
though what will be the main line of
the Southern Pacific from Portland to
San Francisco when completed, passes
through. Freight consigned to Midland
was takon to Klamath Falls, seven
miles north, and then hauled back to
this city by wagon.
SUICIDE IN RESERVOIR
TIES UP MINE AND MILL
JACKSON, Cal., Nov. 14.—Because he
liked the reservoir of the McKenzie
Mining company to end his life the
mill and mine was forced to suspend
operations for two days during the
search for the body of O. Johnson.
Incidentally the r.wners of the mine
and the Pacific Gas and Electric com
pany clashed over the expense of
emptying the reservoir and it was only
after the Pacific company had agreed
to stand for the cost that the storage
pond was emptied. The body was re
covered yesterday.
Johnson jumped into the reservoir
from a raft.
YOUTH SHOOTS STEPFATHER
IN DEFENSE OF MOTHER
YRKKA, Cal., Nov. 14.—Emmctt
Frazier, aged 19. is in the county jail
and \V. J. Brown, his stepfather, is
lying near death in his home at Happy
Camp as tin: result of the boy's ef
fort to protect his mother, an Indian
woman, from the abuse of Brown.
The mother • of Fraaler became
Brown's wife about two years ago.
Thursday Brown returned home In
toxicated and is said to have aim ed
his wife. The boy took up the quar
ivi and ordered Brown from the house.
Brown went to a saloon, where Fra
zier followed, and the quarrel was re
newed. Frazier fired two shots,
wounding Brown in the breast.
BODY OF MASTER MECHANIC
■IN DELAGUA MINE RESCUED
TRINIDAD, C<jo.. Nov. 14.— The
mangled body of James Young, tho
master mechanic, wai removed from
the Wrecked Delagua mine today, rais
ing the total number of victims i
ered to seventy-five with four more
known to be in the mine.
Yesterday the body of F. M. Lewis,
the superintendent, was found in the
main slope and that of a Slav miner
also was taken out.
GUNBOAT VICKSBURG RETURNS
SAX FRANCISCO, Nov. 14.— The
United States gunboat Vicluburg,
c 'iiiritna.nder Alexander S. Halstead,
commanding, arrived here today from
the central American coast. The Vicks
burg was stationed at Cortnto for the
protection of American interests during
the revolution In Nicaragua and re
cently it was relieved by the Yorktown,
whlcii is now at Amapala.
ROBBERS DRIVEN AWAY
EL PASO, Texas, Nov. 14. — Bobbers
the vault of the bank ;it
Texallno, Texas, early today, but tho
explosion aroused tho town arvl cltl
drove 11n» robbers away b
thej had opened the s;ife. The explo
sion wrecked the vault and bank
building.
HOLD KILLING OF
MUNK ACCIDENTAL
Coroner's Verdict Finds Football
Player Not Purposely Slain.
Will Free McCoy
(Associated Press)
WHEELING, W. Va., Nov. 14.—The
inquest held tonight by Coroner Rogers
into the death of Captain Rudolph
Munk of the West Virginia university
football eleven in the game hero Sat
urday with Bethany college resulted
in a verdict of accidental death.
The warrant for the arrest of Thom
as McCoy of Canton, Ohio, the Bethany
player charged with causing the in
juries that resulted in Munk's doath,
•will be withdrawn at the instance of
the coroner.
McCoy was not present at the In
quest but was represented by a,ttor
neya.
The verdict said:
"The evidence in this case is con
flicting, therefore we believe that Ku
dolph Munk came to his dea-i, No
vember 12, 1910, 'by colliding with
Thomas McCoy in a game of football
played in Ohio county, state of West
Virginia."
"That means accidental death," said
Coroner Rogers, "and ends any prose
cution of McCoy."
The most important testimony came
before the Jury in the shape of a spe
cial delivery fetter to the coroner from
Homer Young, the former Michigan
player, who officiated as umpire at the
game. On Sunday he had given tes
timony tending to show McCoy had in
tentionally struck Munk, and it was on
the strength of his- version of the af
fair that the warrant for McCoy was
issued.
STATEMENT WEAKENED
In his letter, placed be.ore the jury
tonight. Young says:
"I cannot state with absolute pos
itiveness that McCoy struck Munk, al
though it appeared to me that he
struck at him. I cannot state with
absolute positiveness that the act was
done intentionally, although there may
have been circumstances from which it
may be inferred there was no inten
tion and deliberation to strike."
P. H. Rudy of Millersburg, Ohio,
left halfback of the Bethany eleven,
said McCoy struck Munk with his fore
arms crossed and not with his
clenched fist, as had been stated.
Robert L. Ramsey, prosecuting at
torney of Brooke county, a spectator
at the game, testified to hearing Mc-
Coy say:
"They have been slugging me all
through this game, but i got him
(Munk) that time."
This remark of McCoy's was re
ceived with hlssea from spectators
who heard it.
PLAN PLAYER'S FUNERAL
CONNEL.IiSVIL.LE, Pa., Nov. 14.—
Funeral service for Rudolph Munk
will be held here 'Wednesday morning:
from the Church of the Immaculate
Conception, of ■which Munk was a
member. The members of the Con
nellsville high school team, to which
he formerly belonged, will attend.
SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR
TAX DECISIONS UPHELD
Supreme Court Rules Govern
ment Must Repay Collections
WASHINGTON, Nov. 14.—The su
preme court of the United States de
clined today to review eight decisions
of lower federal courts in which the
right of the government to collect the
Spanish-American war Inheritance tax
on estates of persons who died within
the year preceding July 1, 1902, was
attacked.
The effect of the decision of the court
today will be that the decrees of the
lower courts in these particular cases,
holding that the government had no
right to collect the tax and must repay
it, will stand as the law in these par
ticular cases.
The action was taken nothwithstand
ing the decision of the supreme court
last spring that the tax was "imposed"
on such estates and that the govern
ment had a right to collect it and, hav
ing collected It/ had the right to re
tain it.
COACHMAN SUDDENLY MADE
RICH BY EMPLOYER'S GIFTS
Retired Oneonta Manufacturer
Bestows $10,000 Largess
ONEONTA, N. V., Nov. 14.—Grover
Henderson, coachman to John L. G.
i Muller, a retired manufacturer for
merly of New York city, went to bed
last night $10,000 richer than he was in
the morning. His employer, who has
been ill for some time, called Hender
son to his bedside and said:
"Grover, I'm a pretty sink man and
you've always been a good boy. I
am going to make you out a check
for $5."
"Yen sir," said Henderson, and
waited. When he took the check he
was almost overcome with astonish-
liient to .see that it read for $5000.
Mr. Muller found It so delightful to
give pleasure that before Henderson
left the room he added another check
tor a like amount.
ASSAULTS POLICEMAN WHO
SAVES HIM FROM DEATH
Man Asleep on Rails with Train
Coming His Way
CHICAGO, Nov. 14.— W. F. Cowley,
sleeping comfortably under a detached
baggage car with his head on a rail
as a locomotive was about to back
into the car, assaulted Policeman
Beimer when the latter grabbed him
by the hair and cheated the coron<-r
oi an inquest.
I did not have a fraction of a sec
<>ml to lose," said BPimer In court to
day, "and yanked him out by tho hair.
he sailed into mo with both
fists and abused me for Interrupting
his slumbers.' 1
Beimer entered a charge of trespass
Rnd disorderly conduct against Cow
ley.
EL PASO POLICE CHIEF HERE
1.. 1\ Jenkins, chief of police of Xl
I'uao, Texas, in a visitor in Los An
geleo, stopping at the Rosiyn.
', AMUSEMENTS '_: :-;;=:;: s
Spring Rt., Between Second and Third.
V^W^>\^^»%J^V^* Mntlnee KTpry l>ay at 8115.
THE STANDARD OF VAUDEVILLE ,
1 EL PRIMBRO BALLERINA V PANTOMIMISTB DB MUNDO j
LA TORT AD A
Presenting a Pantomimic Dance Novelty. "Adventure of a Toreadore. 1
John P. Wade W*JM Meyers, Warren
CSi Co. (Ft. *j£^ Lyon
offering a delightful play -rrSS, who with "A Little, of **'
of southern life. "Maree rj&k - erythlng" entertain most
Shelby's Chicken Dinner." Sj&is&r charmingly with song and
QUinn%.=n<i. 4v^W **«-"-
In a funny satire on real \ \ M if Half a dozen clever Amer
estate hooming. entitled \V liljflll lean tumblers who make
"The Land Agent." "j^^^ Arab" ashamed.
The Flying / I Jos. Adelmann
Martins /\ < *^iS Family
well known circus aerial- / ' ■aS '\">!^^M Premier Xylophonlsts, who
Ists, who thoroughly de- f S~l '.- ''Mil make most artistic music
serve the title. "Far above /' ■ ' t ' > ! ;ffl on unusual Instruments.
Hal Stephens Ifl^fl Orpheum Motion
*■ Co P Pictures •
presenting their unique ... PPP^ Always the latest, freshest
rles of "Famous Scenes / F| «nd best moving pictures
from Famous Plays." J^ shown.
EVERY NIGHT—IO-25-50-75C. MATINEE DAILY—IO-25-50c
HAMBURGER'S MAJESTIC THEATER kbaSS^SiJ™:
Los Angeles' Leading Playhouse Oliver Morosco, Manager
This Including Next Sunday Night
The Messm. Shubert present the sensation fT\4 />T^f<lT T 1
n( the last New York season. Clyde Fitch's 'II V_ _, v ■ II \/
last and most powerful play. Best seats M j~| |_L ■ ■ | W
51 at matinee Wednesday. Nights and _, I_JLV-/ >— JL JL. JL
Saturday matinee. 60c to $1.50.
. ■ -i Messr*. Sam 8. and Lee Shnbert (Inc.) Tresent
| next NAZIMOVA
WEEK
Hon. ana 'lue. Bveninga T Trpmr tt> r»vfll TT
BFGINNING nnil Wed. Mnt.. "'"'' LUILCi EjXKJIjP
Wed. and Thur. Evenings A r>«->T T i(j WfITTQI?
MONDAY nil.l Thnrii. Mat., lbaena A DOLL t) rtUUSiI/
Frl. and Sat. Evenings TT-TTT TTATT?V TAT T3 1 •
«qtt | H nd Pat Mat.. Bchnlttler*. THb fAIKY 1 AL.Hi
■ ' MME. NAZIMOVA will be supported by
21 THE NAZTMOVA THEATER COMPANY
| I skat SALE THURSDAY. MAI I, OltPT.ua NOW.
MOROSCO^i" BURBANK theater "iwLlTSxfi
LOS ANGELES' LE.\DINQ STOCK COMPANY.
Pass Up the Drug Store— Bring Your Dyspepsia to Us
THE YANKEE PRINCE
PRICFS- 58C.60C. 75c. MATINEES SATURDAY AND SUNDAY. 10c. 250. 800.
Neat Week: "THE <;RAyn ARMY MAN." Wartleld'a Greatest .Success.
W^fTi ACf> f\ THE FOREMOST STOCK
DtLAdWU COMPANY OF AMERICA
Belasco-Blßckwood Co., Trops. and Mgrs. Mala St., Between Third and Fourth Sts.
TONIGHT AND ALL THIS WEEK,
LEWIS B. STONH and the Belasco theater company present Plnero'i best play.
The Gay Lord Quex
With Mr Stone as Lord Quex— Eleanor Gordon as Bophey Pulgamey.
MATINEES THURSDAY, SATURDAY ANT) SUNDAY. Popular Belasco prices.
NEXT WEEK—THE SEASON'S NEWEST PLAT,
LEWIS 6. STONE and the Belasco company will give the first production on any
stage of LEILA BURTON WELLS', new military play,
THE CASE OF SERGEANT WILDE
SEATS FOR THIS IMPORTANT EVENT ARE NOW ON SALE. Regular Belaseo
prices. ; - 2
TIT , ATTT~vTTr-»r>TTTlwr "THEATER I. E. UKIIY.MEK,
HE AUDITORIUM beautiful" Manager,
Third Successful Week.
BEVANI GRAND OPERA CO.
Tonight—"Verdi —With entire Bevani Company.
Wednesday matinee —
Wednesday evening—"Martha."
Thursday —"Aida."
Friday evening~"Love Tales of Hoffman."
Saturday matinee —"II Trovatore." ..
Saturday —"La Traviata."
A Great Chorus That Can Sing. Popular Prices— 50c, 75c, $1.
Seats on sale at box office
+8* ifAfi?!?/ J? f? VAUDEV I L.LE
*cv JirlULbLv vaude v i lle
MATINEE EVERYDAY— * SHOWS EVEKY MOHT.
' 8 BIG FEATURE ACTS THIS WEEK
The |ii;eßt and hot Mil ever offered at popular prices, 10c, 20n. Bg"._ >
GRAND OPERA HOUSE guNDAY.^on'e^laln IBM.' Horns'l*l967.'
! THE SEASON'S SMASinNG SONG SUCCESS
Ferris Hartman and X^l r\VC\f\ fWCk Prices" Hartman
his big company. 2/ L\Jl UUUI CL PrlcM'
NEXT WEEK— Year's Biggest Offering-, "THE SrKINO CHICKEN." Seat.
Selling.
MASON OPERA HOUSB WT££££;
1 VIUV NIGHT. MATINEES WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY. firiOCIAL
THANKSGIVING DAY MATINEE, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24. \
m Fortune Hunter wlth rKEI> 1^ *Bd
Ul2. I? Ol LllllC XXIIIILCI the Original tompanr.
PRICES- EVENINGS . THANKSGIVING AND SATURDAY MATINEE. 800 TO $2.00.
WEDNESDAY MATINEE. 50c, 75c, $1.00. SEATS NOW ON SALB.
PATVTT'Ar'TJ'O TUCATITR Sew, Coxy, Absolutely Fireproof.
AJMIAUJI.O ltttjALEjK Broadway, Between Fifth and Sixth.
Unequaled —European and American Stars
MATINEE TODAY 2:30
s—Leojoe Troupe—s I — A RTf , I 4—Henrys—
Bessie Tannehill SHOW Edw. & Blanche Kunz
Weiser & Dean I &"uwl Bros. Carpos
BIOGRAPH— Intensely Interesting moving pictures.
Two shows tonight. 7. 9. Come early—loc. 20c. 800. _,
Lttxia nAnv Corner Washington and Main Sts.
UNA PARK • . ' . la the Heart of Los Angeles.
Opening Saturday, Nov. 19 ATTRACTIONS
Royal Hungarian Band Concerts Twice Miniature Railway.
Dally The Diving Venus. Carousal. Aerial Swing.
Hyman's Vaudeville Theater (with La- Open Air Skating Rink.
dies' Orchestra of 7 Pieces—Four A«ts Joy Wheel. Shooting Gallery. .:
of Vaudeville and Two Reels of Tic- Figure Eight. Temple of Palmlstrj
.'...) The Zoo. . Refreshments.
NO LIQUORS BOLD ON THE GROUNDS. ADMISSION lOC. ' ____
LTTI7VC caw PH4NTANT. third AND MAIN sts,
ENTERTAINERS WHO ENTERTAIN, DANCERS WHO DANCE. SINGERS
WHO SING. AIIRIMBA BAND from the Amazon river. MILANO DUO, Scenes
from Grand Opero. M1.1.K. BEATRICE and M. FRANCO. Parisian Ballet and Acro
batic Dancers. THE NEVER-BETTER TRIO—SINGERS AND COMEDIANS. ■ .
OT VTV/fOTr* THITATITR Main, Between Fifth and Sixth.
iilMrlC 1 tltliA X ass Cool—Commodloas—Comfortable.
Arphin and Fargo offer th« a tartllng, sizzling. sensational success,
"BOHEMIA"—10 big musical specialtiesfeaturing Jules Mendel. Two show*
tonight, 7:30 and 8:15. Matinees Monday, Wednesday, Saturday, Sunday, 100, 20c, 260.'

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