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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, November 18, 1910, Image 4

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BLAMES STOMACH
ACHE TO POISON
Anaylsis of Sick Man's Food Dis
proves Theory That Fair
Cook Was a Borgia
DOBICK WRITES SUSPICIONS
Pretty Girl with Pumpkin Has a
Wonderful Result on Ital
ian's Imagination
Mike Dobick, an Italian living at 523
New High street, bad a stomach ache
night before last and as a result Mik*
took himself and his ache to the I
hall bright and early yesterday morn
ing. What is more, he took the un
eolnfortable ache away with him, |
though he had confidently expected to
leave It behind as a .souvenir wlt.li
City Chemist B. H. Miller, to whom
he applied for help.
Mike ia not much of a talker, but
he has literary aspirations and abil
ities and he possesses a lively imagi
nation. Therefore, before he set out
for the city hall he proceeded to write
a letter to "Dear .*ir," explaining U\<
difficulty. This epistle once written,
Mike placed it in his pocket, together
■with •■Exhibit A," and set out to be
his own mail carrier.
The trip to the city hall was made
slowly, as tho man stopped every few
minutes and doubled over in an at
tempt to ease his ache; but he per
sisted and finally he arrived. He wan
dered into the city clerk's office first
and startled the deputies by calling
out excitedly that he had been poi-
Stmed. Somebody finally directed him
to the health department and there
he was) turned over to the tender mer
cies of tho city chemist.
WIttTKS HIS SUSPICIONS
Mike bowed and scraped and pro
duced his letter. The letter tells his
Story, and here it is, just as he
wrote it:
"Dear Sir —I am compelled to seek
your protection, as for reason I feels
that I may lie poisoned from this piece
food.
"A few days ago I was offered by
the girl whom I suppose never paid
much attention. The result was this.
I got a stomach-ache ever, since. I
am unable to resolve mystery.
*• "But I thinks the pill poisoned that
piece food which I had swaJlowed. I
don't accuse no-one but I beg you to
examine this piece food which is a
small part of that big piece which I
was offered voluntary by the girl.
"If it contains any artltfles which
bears any signs of polslon I like have
Justice to be used upon that girl which
I will disclose her name.
"from the mine standpoint I assume
that it wasn't good because I got a j
terrible ache rfeht after I swallowed
it and I have ev\er since.
"Tours very truly
"MIKE DOBICK."
Exhibit A, the "small part of that
pig piece" of foodt was a pumpkin rind
which had been baked. Mr. Miller
examined it carefully and reported
that it contained no poison and was
apparently healthful fond. All of
which means tha,t "justice not have
to be used upon that girl."
MiKe finally left the city hall, taking
his ache with him. but convinced that
he really hadn't been poisoned after
all and that his trouble was nothing
more serious than a temporary at
tack of indigestion.,
TRADER SAYS WEARING OF
FURS NOW UNFASHIONABLE
BBATTLJE, Wash., Nov. 17.—That
the wearing ** furs has gone out of
fashion is given by WilDiam J. Erskine,
manager of the Northern Commercial
company, as the reaajon for the as
tounding fall in price* of raw furs,
which affects all classes of skins from
sea otter to muskrat, ermine being the
only important one that did not fall
in price.
Alaska produaes three-fourths of the
world's expensive furs, but the price
is fixed in London. Mr. Brskine's com
pany, with ninety-four skins, had a
corner on the silver tip fox market but
was obliged to sell at half of last year's
prices, which ranged from $4uo to $500
a skin. Muskrat skins, used in coun
terfeiting seal skins, have fallen 30
jier cent because seal skins arc less
fashionable und Imitations consequent
ly let-.s In demand.
METAL TRADES DEMAND
OPEN SHOP AT BAY FAIR
SEATTLE, Nov. 17.- -The directors
of the proposed -'.i la-Paclflc
national • Francisco
wen notified last night that the I'nit
ed Metal Tradei as oc v , Wash
ington and Oregon would co-operate
in thu work of obtainln cmi nt
of the government for San I'i.i
-only "ii condition that ti.i' fair b
structud under the prin
. l|i]i This action was end ij the
Seattle Empli tion.
The United -Metal Trades ai
tion . imprii i a the Iron work-
Ing lndu trie! and ship plants
of Seattle, Portland, Tacoma, Sp ■-
kaiv. Everett, Bellingham and other
Pacific northwestern cities.
TWO CALIFORNIANS AMONG
NAVY TYPHOID PATIENTS
ANNAPOLIS, Md., Nov. 17.—Two
more midshipmen were Bent to the
naval acadi my hospi . suffering
from typhoid fever, making thirteen
cadets in all who are d< vrn with the
venteen as was errone
ously reported.
Among them are T. 3. Starr Kinir
and Reginald B. H. Venable of Cali
fornia. The cases iv< di clared to be
of a. mild natui
RAILROAD COMMISSIONERS
TO MEET IN WASHINGTON
WASHINGTON, Nov. 17.—Deciding
to hold its twenty-: inven
tion In thli ' ity ' >. the
National Association oi Com
mers elected I ;: 11.
rfud 'in Burr, Floi Ident; W.
H. Connolly, ; 11 >■ try of the
interstate commerc , sec
retary, and William Kllpatrick, Illinois,
assistant secretary.
MAN HELD ON MURDER CHARGE
BAN JOBE, Nov. 17. Li .1'
gherty's . ourt thie morning
• tonlo Ortiz, alias Jo( Pot
lirld to an t" er for th" kll< «
<if Jom Bsi "\ al. n i 'bed t'i
death in tlim city on tho night of the
at ii inst. <
Mme. Nazimova, Noted Actress, Who
Comes to the Majestic Next Week
/ / MM HI I 1
N^^S*^^—
TAX COLLECTOR ADVISES
RAPIDITY IN PAYMENTS
Date of Delinquency, with Penal
ties. Now Less Than Two
Weeks Away
With less than two weeks remaining
hefore the date of delinquency, taxes
paid into the office of City Tax Col
lector Clarence Taggart now total only
$766,411.99. The total amount charged
against this office for collection Is J4,
--237,532.90, of which one-half will be- ]
come delinquent if unpaid Novem
ber 28.
Mr. Taggart said yesterday that he j
expected his office force to be literally
buried in work from now on.
"The rush already has begun," he
continued, "but it is nothing now to
what it will be next week. Ordinarily
we collect about three-fifths of the to
tal at the time of the first collection.
This means that we should have in by
a week from Monday more than $2,
--600,000, so you see we have only a fair
start with our present total of three
quarters of a million.
"With the facilities we have here
and the space ; lioted to us we shall
not be able to handle the business on
time unless most of it comes in by
mail. I hope taxpayers generally will
adopt this plan. We will send them
their bills on request and if they will
then mail checks for the amounts they
wish to pay they will gTeatly expedite
our work and at the same time will
save themselves the Inconvenience of
standing in line before one of our win
dows."
CLEARING HOUSE CITIES
IN STATE MAKE REPORT
SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 17.—The
bank clearings as reported by the '
clearing house cities of California for j
the week ending November 17, with
comparison for the corresponding week
of l'.iuit, are as follows:
Ban Francisco, *52,542,222.13; Increase.
10.6 per cent. Oakland, $3,317,650.69;
Increase, CO per cent. Sacramento, $1,
--932,741.12; increase, 32 per cent. San
Diego, $1,499,810.94; increase 37 per
(-nt. Stockton, 008,2^1.29; increase, 25
pi r cent. Fresno, $1,066,324.00; increase,
27 per cent. San Jose, *585,40f,.00; in
crease, 17.8 per cent. San Bernardino,
no report Pasadena, $877,146.89, no re
port last year.
CONSUL SAYS MAIZE CROP
BRINGS AFRICA SUCCESS
WASHINGTON, Nov. 17.—Returning
prosperity to British South Africa lias
I een marked by extensive inoreas s In
agricultural production, according to
a. report from American Consul E. S,
Cunningham, at Durban, Natal, but the
pal factor has been the luge
production "f maize,
than five years ago, Ami
maize was sold at Johannesburg, but
My not only has sufficient Indian
corn been produced to supply the home
consumption, but enough to suppo t
export trade as w< U.
FATHER FINDS BASE IN
HOME WITH DEAD MOTHER
SAN DIEGO, Nov. 17.—When N. T. !
ti i and paper hanger
residing in a local rooming house
■ from lii- work last evening lie
found t i- d or "i hli apartment louxed.
o ked until he attracted the at
tention of li!s infant son and on en
tering the room C< and the baby alone,
its mother lying di
Will! ■ wife I'll died Of heart fail
ome time during the afternoon
and was In a heap on 1 lie floor when
her husband was admitted by his Bon.
TO REPORT ON IMMIGRATION
KAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 17.—For the
purpo dlinf? in Hie preparation
of the final reporti of the United
immlgatlon for presentation to e.>n
grass ir v. William R, Wheeler,
manager of the traffic bureau of the
Merchant exchange, left for Washing
ton thli morning. The Pacific coast
report a.l particularly with or
i Immigration, especially that of
the i- and Hindus.
ALABAMA POLITICIAN DIES
MOBILE Via., Nov. 17.—Leslie B,
Brook ■ in, formerly i
I tional Board of Trade,
editor, prominent In Alabama politics
and poi tma ti r al Mobile dv
i 'leveland'i Si I tej-m, died here i I
night aj'ter a short illness.
LOS ANGELES HERALD: FRIDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER IS, 1010. .
ORANGE GROVES PROMISE
RECORD-BREAKING YIELD
General Passenger Agent Peck of
Salt Latce Route Tells
of Inspection
T. C. Peck, general passenger agent
of the Salt Lake route, returned yes
terday morning from a two days' in
spection trip to Riverside, San Ber
nardino, Redlands, Highland and Col
ton. Ho brought an encouraging re
port as to the outlook for a success
ful winter season.
Mr. Peck toured the country not
reached by the Salt Lake lines in an
automobile, and paid special attention
to the condition of the oranges and
other citrus fruits. He says the pros
pects point to one of the largest or
ange crops in the history of that in
dustry, the trees being, without ex
ception, loaded with fruit.
"It looks the best ever, 1' said Mr.
Peck yesterday. "Never did I see
things looking s-j good, prosperous and
plentiful, and I have been here fifteen
years traveling over and inspecting the
same country, Why, it Is wonderful to
see the new groves being set out —
the new nurseries for young citrus
trees being planted—the efforts the
ranchers are making to get every par
ticle of land under cultivation."
"We did not .=ee < ne poor grove In
all the country through which we tray.
eled and we saw a good many groves.
Everywhere the trees are loaded down
with their golden spheres, and I can
not see anything but a record crop
ahead.
"To properly handle this crop I no
ticed thUt the packing houses through
out the citrus belt are being rebuilt
and enlarged. New ones are also
springing up—old ones being torn down
to make room for larger buildings.
More modern machinery with which to
handle the oranges and lemons is being
installed.
"And the growers themselves" are
happy and optimistic. At Riverside 1
made it a point to talk with as many
business men as I could nnd I did not
find a pessimist among them. Every
body, in every line of work throughout
the citrus belt, is optimistic over th«
present outlook for good crops and
good times, and an outsider, like my
self, catches the same spirit If he stays
long enough."
WASHINGTONIANS WORK TO
BUILD MEMORIAL HALL
WASHINGTON, Nov. 17.—Two mil
lion dollars as tho share to be raised
by the Ge"rpre Washington Menvnial
ii and $250,000 to be rased
by Washlngtonians, is the basis upon
wliich Granville Hunt, chairman of the
ntiona committee of tlm Wash
ington chamber of commerce is work-
Ing to obtain a memorial hall for
the national capital.
Mr Hunt arid Mrs. Hpnry F. Dim
ock, sister of the late William C. Whlt
of New York and president of the
c Washington association, are
working earnestly in an effort to
1 get a hall with adequate facilities for
tmodating the largest of oonven
] lions.
OFFICERS FAIL TO FIND
SLAYER OF POLICE CHIEF
OKLAHOMA CITY, Nov. 17.—A re
ulated last, night to the effect
ir Ouet, a supposed Mexican,
wanted for the killing of the chier of
it Anadarko, Okla., had been
captured al Chlckasna, Okla., is un
; whereabouts was not known
today.
The city of Anadarko has increased
the reward for his capture from $SOO
LIOO.
CONFESSES USE OF BAD CHECKS
NORFOLK, Va., Nov. 17.—An admis
sion that he is the man wanted by the
Seattle lice on the charge of passing
bad chocks was obtained today from
Joseph Gardner, alias M. Cohen, ar
rested here yesterday on his way to
South America. Gardner said he -was
glad the suspense was over, as he was
tired of being pursued. Police Justice
Duncan ordered Gardner held for the
Seattle authorities.
RE-ELECTED TO 20TH TERM
TOLEDO, Ohio, Nov. 17.—At the i"n
cluding bui Ini hs seasion of the fortieth
re-un Society of the Army of
the t. i... today, Council Bluffs,
In., tii i Major (ieneral Oren
viiie M. I '■. president of the so
ciety, wai »n fbr the next annual
reunion. lor General Hodge was
re-elected tg ; crve his twentieth term,
NAZIMOVA ACHIEVED HER
SUCCESS BY HARD WORK
Gifted Russian Studied Long Be
fore Making Bow Before
Metropolitan Audience
Although, as an English speaking
actress Madame Nazimova achieved
success in a single night, her career
in her native land, RuHla, was by no
meant meteoric. Born at Yalta. Cri
mea, in 1579, the daughter of a chem
ist, she was taken by her parents to
Switzerland at the age of 3 years and
placed In a school at Zurich until she
was ten years old. There she was
taught to speak French and Cerman,
and it was not until 188! i, when the
family moved back to Russia and Nasl
mova placed In a convent In Odessa
that she learned to speak Russian.
In this connection it is interesting to
note thru she found it it. much more
difficult thing to learn it than she aft
erward did English.
At the convent she w«s< given what
(TOUld correspond with a college edu
cation in this country, and among oth
er things was taught to play the violin.
Slip graduated at the age of 16 and
after returning to Yalta lor a year She
entered the i)ram«tic school of the
Philharmonic society at Moscow at tho
age of 17. Here, for three years, she
studied every brunch of dramatic art,
fencing, ballet dancing, singing, stage
direction and all that could possibly
be of use to her aa an actress. She
graduated tlrst in her class and re
ceived the title of ''excellent pupil."
the highest honor that could be con
ferred.
Although the recipient of a number
of offers from St. Petersburg managers
Nazimova decided to remain as a "vis
iting pupil" at the Artistic theater In
Moscow, in order to study stage man
agement. She was the first and only
woman who was permitted to do this,
for it gave her entres to every rehears
al at the celebrated theater. Leaving
the Artistic theater she again had flat
tering offers from St. Petersburg man
agers, but to be perfectly sure of her
art before making her debut to a met
ropolitan a*idience, Nazimova buried
herself for three years in the darkest
towns of Russia. The first yoar was
spent in the small towns of the north,
In the White sea country. The second
year found her in the Caucasian moun
tains in the south, and the third year
was spent in Polland. In each com
pany she was the leading woman and
played every role in drama, comedy,
tragedy, opera, operetta and even
danced In the baliet. In 1904 she at
last accepted an engagement as lead
ing woman In tho Dramatic theater of
St. Petersburg and played there the
entire season. During tho summer
months, in company with Paul Orlen
off, considered by many the greatest
Kussian actor, she went on tour in a
play called "The Chosen People."
The Russian censors forbade the
play and the players then went to
Berlin, London and finally New York
with It. It was in this way she came to
America. Madame Nazimova will ap
pear at Hamburger's Majestic theater
in "The Fairy Tale," week beginning
Monday, November 21.
PLAN ON FOOT TO EQUALIZE
RATES OF PULLMAN BERTHS
WASHINGTON, Nov. 17.—Reform o£
sleeping car abuses by a governmental
requirement that a less toll shall be
exacted for an upper berth than for a
lower Is expected by students of rail
road problems to be the eventual out
come of proceedings now under way
before the interstate commerce com
mission.
Already the first federal move has
been made by such a change ordered
by the commission on sleeping car
rates between Chicago and St. Paul,
and St. Paul and Seattle and other
points.
The sleeping car companies, under a
decision of Judge Grosscup, enjoined
enforcement of this ruling. The three
cases of Loftus vs. the Pullman com
pany, ' involving this question, along
with the separate cases of the states of
Indiana, Oklahoma, Kansas and Ar
kansas against the Pullman company,
involving tho same principle, will be
heard before Commissioners Lane and
Clark at Chicago November 30.
FRANCE TAKES U. S. OFFER
TO REFUND LIBERIAN DEBT
PARIS, Nov. 17.—The French gov
ernment announced yesterday its for
mal acceptance o* the American 1 ropo
sition to refund the debt of the African
republic of Liberia. This, however, is
made conditional upon Liberia's rati
fication of the 'frontier deilmination,
and an agreement that Liberia shall
grant liberty of commerce to France,
and that France shall have the right
to maintain certain military posts,
which will be evacuated as soon as
acceptable Liberian forces are sub
stituted.
It was further announced the United
States had given assurances that these
conditions would be met.
ALLEGED POISONER IS
GRANTED A NEW TRIAL
SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 17.—A new
trial was ordered today by the district
court of appeals in the ease of John
\V. Wilson, convictod of the murder of
Henry Boas, who received poison
through the mail.
Error by the trial court in having
refused to admit testimony presented
by Wilson, purporting to show that
iJoas was in the habit of writing let
tors to himself, is given as the ground
for the ruling.
\\ Ilion was sentenced to life impris
onment.
13 NATIONALITIES ENGAGE
IN ELECTION OF DELEGATE
EAST ST. LOUIS, 111., Nov. 17.—An
election was carried on in thirteen
tongues at a packing liouse here yes
terday. It was for the choice of a
delegate to the quarterly meeting of
the Employes' Benefit association in
Chicago, and Thomas A. Crow wai !"••
elected by a scant majority of two
•..t s in a total of 1500.
There were eight names on the bal
lot and an official interpreter was on
hand to explain in thirteen languages
how they .should be marked.
GRAND JURY WILL HEAR
SCHENK POISON CHARGES
WHEELING, W. Va., Nov. 17.—
There will bo no preliminary bearing
for Mrs. Laura Sehenk, who Is In Jail
Charged with having administered
poison to her millionaire husband,
John O. Bchenk.
Announcement was made today that
hit ca«e would be presented to the
special grand Jury tomorrow.
NATIONAL STANDARDS
FOR TEACHERS URGED
Chiefs of Instruction from More
Than 30 States Confer
at Salt Lake
SALT LAKE CITY, Nov. 17.—More
Improved methods In determining na
tional standards for"teachers In the
public schools and a uniform Inter
state certification are the ends sought
by superintendents of Instruction and
commissioners cf education who, a.-)
representatives of more than thirty
states, met here today In a conference
that is expected to last through the
remainder of the week.
Pleas for. the unification of • the edu
cational system of all the states "ill
be heard during the sittings of the con
ference. Prominent among the dele
gates here is Prof. Harlan Updegraft
of the National Bureau of Education.
In his address today I'rof. Updegraff
predicted that results of far-reaching
effect upon the future plans and work
of the nation's educators would follow
from the discussions.
In his address, which Occupied most
of the business session today, Prof.
Updegraff said that twenty-eight
states recognized certificates Issued by
other states with various limitations,
while twenty do not. In the United
States there are 642 different forms of
licenses for teachers. To establish
common standards of proficiency and
unify the Certification system the
United States. Bureau of Education has
prepared a plan which Prof. Updegraff
explained. ' . ,-
CUTTERS WILL PROTECT
MARINERS ON ATLANTIC
President Taft Issues Order to
Prevent Winter Wrecks
WASHINGTON, Nov. 17.—The win
ter's toll of shipwreck* and death
along the Atlantic coast probably will
be lessened this year because of an
order President Ti^rt. has given for the
protection of seafaring men.
December 1 ten of the revenue cut
ters on the Atlantic side will go to
sea from their home stations to begin
a patrol which will not end until April
1, 1911. The Woodbury, Gresham,
Acushnet, Androscoggln, Mohawk, On
ondaga, Apache, Pamlico, Bomllo and
Yamacraw have been chosen for the
work.
With the exception of brief visits to
ports for supplies they will be con
tinually at sea, patrolling the coast
from Kustport, Me., to Cape Canaveral,
Fla.
Last year the revenue cutters
brought relief to 156 vessels and saved
many lives. The cargoes of saved ships
alone were valued at more than JlO,
--200,000.
MAN CLEARED OF MURDER
COMMITTED DURING FIGHT
BEATTYVILLE, Ky., Nov. 17.—
Charges of murder against Clay Craw
ford, nephew of the late Judge James
Hargis of Breathitt county feud fame,
were dismissed by the commonwealth
atorney here today, after a jury had
been sworn to try Crawford and Glisha
Johnson for the killing of Miles Craw
ford, the former's cousin, during a
light over an alleged illicit distillery.
The trial of Johnson proceeded.
Crawford's brother, Matthew, was
assassinated by Charles Little at Jack
son, Ky., two weeks ago. Little sub
sequently confessed the crime and was
sentenced to death.
RELIEF PARTY SEARCHING
FOR BOAT LOST IN CANADA
SELKIRK, Man., Nov. 17.—0n an
order from the government at Ottawa,
the marine department dispatched the
steamer Lady o£ the Lake today with
a relief party to look for the missing
steamer Wolverine, which was report
ed overdue November 10. At that time
it was said that there were 200 fisher
men from North Lake Winnipeg fish
ing stations oik the boat, homeward
bound.
Lake Winnipeg is 300 miles loiik and
eighty . dies wide. Its shores are a
wilderness inhabited by occasional
tribes of Inu ins.
FIREBUG MAKES ATTEMPT
TO BURN BARN IN STOCKTON
STOCKTON, Nov. 17.—An attempt
was made by a firebug to burn the
barn of F. Weyland of this uity last
night. Mr. Weyland discovered the
blase shortly after it started and ex
tinguished it with a garden hose.
Investigation revealed that coal oil
had been poured on the building and
sacks saturated with oil were found
piled against the sides.
Two other barns we re burned recent
ly under suspicious circumstances, and
the police believe, all of the fires were
started by the same man.
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA'S
ALMOND CROP TOPS 1909
LODI, Cal., Nov. 17.—Northern Cal
ifornia surpassed last year's record for
almonds by 1500 tons. While th<» crop
did not come up to expectations of
grower* this year, it is believed that
dry weather was responsible.
The crop as estimated before the
harvest time was 3100 tons and by of
ficial figures complied by Manager J.
P. Dargitz of the California Almond
Growers exchange, the yield will not
reach more than 2000 tons, and even
may 'oe less than that.
CANDIDATE WHO FAILED
ADMITS HE SPENT $1396
DENVER, Nov. 17.—"My traveling
expenses were my board and lodging.
Gave no cigars, drinks, candy or chew
ing gum. Was too poor to do more,"
declared John R. Stephen, defeated Re
publican candidate for governor, who
today filed his campaign expense ac
count with the secretary of state.
Stephen spent $1396, divided as fol
lows: To the Republican state com
mittee, 11250; for traveling expenses,
$146.
RED CROSS TO ISSUE SEALS
NEW YORK, Nov. 17.—Red Cross
seals, replacing stamps sold f-or sever
al years in aid of the antl-tulu iru
losia niuvitniMits and us<<l extensively
uti letter* during the holiday ■<
will be available this y<ar on and
after the first of December, it was an
nounced hero today.
HI BRASS CRAFT WORK fj
IS the newest phase of art, endeavor. Tho work In
tensely interesting and the aft of rtnliiK the work IS
easily acquired. The brass covered articles such aa
candlesticks, handkerchief boxes and photo frames,, come
all stamped with designs ready for piercing. The pierc
ing outfits, cost from 60 cents to $2.25.
■ > M Art Papers and Cardboards H
<dp Indies find Innumerable uses for tinted papers and «6
S» various thicknesses cardboard carried in our artists teg
V material department. •
Our Store Is the Supply Depot for Art Students
in Every Line i
I Jyj 735 South Bvoadwctj/. Ip
To Be Given Away at
DESMOND'S
Cor. Third and Spring Sts.
ESußshOr * ■''* Bwl it' m i 1
EVERY visitor to our store IS INVITED to register
HIS or HER NAME and ADDRESS WHETHER
A PURCHASER OR NOT. j
lON (NEXT) JANUARY 4, 191 1, ONE of the visi
tors will become the proud possessor of this BEAUTI
FUL PACKARD LIMOUSINE. ♦
Call Today, Register, and Tell the
Man Where You Wish It Sent
The Famous Jgay&
Is the Lamp of Real Beauty —
because it gives the best light of all
lamps. The Rayo gives a white, soft, J I
mellow, diffused light—easy on the f \
eye because it cannot flicker. You . y^ *>v
can use your eyes as long as you wish / \
under the Rayo light without strain. / \
The Rayo Lamp is low-priced, and 1 1
even though you pay $5, $10 or $20 for - U JL^ W/f
other lamps, you may get more expensive \ \WMJJ
decorations but you cannot get a better Sse!l*SJK
light than the low-priced Rayo gives. A /«P^*^*iil
strong, durable shade-holder holds the 4S^aksi££Q3|
shade on firm and true. This season's xHi£^gF
new burner adds strength and appearance. P^^
Once a Rayo User, Always On©. Jr\
Dtaltrs Enryvlitrt. If not a* yan-M. frtt* for descripttVt i^TOiTllSr^k
circular to tkt utefst agtncy of t)ii Jmr^'^K
j&W Standard Oil Company^^^^^p
Ml (Incorpor«Ui) _^
® This Fine Morris Chair
[mm) W-'3
\ WH^kw^vby Solid Oak or Mahogany Finish Mor
|J jt ris Chair, Hand Carved Frame,
with Reversible Velour Cushions;
"" . Worth $12.50—N0w $8.75.
Your Credit fe^6 |7Jys?l!l3!DM^
Is Good =P^Bg^liH B=
; — r ■ : —■—,_
Thanksgiving Day
EXCURSION
Round trip tickets will be sold
good going Nov. 23, and 24 be
tween all points in California
where the one way fare is $10 or
less. Good to return on -or be
, fore Nov. 28. 1910. ■ .
BEE AGENT .
SOUTHERN PACIFIC
I<» Angeles Offices, 600 B. Spring, Arcade Station. Fifth and Central Arena*.
, l';.Bii.lrn» Office, 148 E. Colorado St.
Herald "Want Ads Bring Largest Returns
SB.OOO SHARES
. of tba Capuai taiuck ot
Mutual Home Blag. Corporation
Now offered at 11.30 p«r ihar.
m-ioa iuuuins buloin
10c a Button, $1.00 a Rip
• Dutchess Trousers
at
F. B. SILVERWOOD'S
Sixth and Broadway

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