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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, November 30, 1910, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-11-30/ed-1/seq-1/

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WEATHER FORECAST;
Fair, frost, brisk north wind.
vol. xxxiii. PTJTPTT*' f^rt ■ PI?N rIV by carrier
NUMBER 60. A lilV^Jil . O\J KjJllDi 1 » PKK MONTH
FOUNDRY OFFICIAL
AND PASTOR HURT
IN AUTO ACCIDENT
W. B. Percival and Rev. C. M.
Carter Are Seriously Injured
When Car Hits Machine
MEN FLUNG INTO THE STREET
Clergyman and Friend Seeking
Site for Mission When
Run Down
An ai tomobile belong to W. B. Per
ceval, an officer of the Porcival Iron
Works, 306 North Los Angeles street,
carrying Percival and Rev. C. M. Car
ter, paster of the First Baptist church
of this city, was struck by a Loc An
geles railway car on the Sail Pe.dr©
line yesterday afternoon, both occu
pants , f the automobile being hurled
to the street and seriously injured.
The accident occurred at Flrty-tir»t
street and South Park. Perolval and
Dr. Carter were rushed to tfie office of
a physician at Forty-first street and
South Park, where a superficial ex
amination of their injuries was made.
A little later they were removed to
their homes and the family physic.ana
railed. Tercival is thought to have a
hadly Injured spine, besides suffer:ng
internal injuries, which may prove fa
tal. Dr. Carter is said to be inter
nally injured. He also received a
scalp laceration and several contusions
about the arms, legs and body.
SEEK MISSION SITB
Dr. Carter, who has been recently,
appointed to the local church, started
out soon alter noon with Perclval in
.search for a location for .a new Bap
tist city mission which both men are
interested In establishing. About S
o'clock they reached Smith Park avenue
and drove south. They kept in the
middle of the street car track and for
several blocks a car followed tho au
tomobile. At Fifty-first street the
iar ciinie dOM behind them and then
suddenly crashed into the rear end of
the machine. The automobile was
thrown clear of the track and both
Occupant* flung into the street.
According to the motorman of the
car, he rang his gong for fully a
minute before the collision. He said
he expected the machine to leave tho
middle of the track momentarily and
s<> didn't slow his speed. As nearly as
he could explain the accident, the au
tomobile suddenly slowed and the car,
which was following only a few feet
behind, could not be stopped In time
to avoid the crash.
Dr. Carter lives at 1225 Ingrahnm
street and Percival at 530 South Boyle.
BUTCHER GOES TO HOSPITAL
FOUR TIMES WITHIN ONE DAY
Surgeons Detain the Patient for
Treatment on Last Visit
NEW YORK, Nov. 29.—Four times
removed to a hospital in twenty-four
hours is the record Max Setter, a Har
lem butcher, has Just established. His
Injuries were the result of an attack
by thugs which occurred in broad day
light in it deserted street near his
home. Ho was picked up unconscioub
:ind rushed to a hospital, wharo the
surgeon! revived him, and set a couple
of broken bones.
Setter started home and fell against
»-ra.iltng mid was again picked up
unconscious and taken to the hospital
for treatment. On his way home he
collapsed, and was rushed back for
further treatment.
After two hours' rest he was taken
home and the hospital physicians sup
posed they had seen the last of him.
But eight hours later there came an
ambulance call a dozen blocks from
Seiter's home, and presently the at
tendant came in with Seiter again. He
had left his home for his place of
business and on the way had taken a
header. This time the patient was de
tained for treatment.
CHICAGO POLICE PUT BAN
ON DIVA'S SALOME WIGGLES
Mary Garden Refuses to Modify
Features of Dance
CHICAGO, Nov. 29.—Following offi
cial criticism from the Chicago police
r.epartment through Chief of Polico
Stfiwart the production of "Salome,"
in which Mary Garden had twice ap
peared here, was withdrawn from the
grand opera program Friday night.
The chief of police informed the man
agement tnat offensive features, par
tieulaiiy the "head" scene, should be
toned down.
Miss Garden strenuously objected to
rliminating any of her lines or poses,
and accordingly the production for
that evening was withdrawn.
PART OF FELS' WEALTH IS
DUE TO VISION OF GYPSY
Millionaire Asks Funeral Delay So
He Can Attend
SANTA MONICA, Nov. 20. Joseph
Fels. millionaire roap manufacturer of
Philadelphia, has sent word to have
tho funeral of a gypsy queen postponed
until he ran cross the country to at
tend it.
The gypsy is Queen Dolores Cortez,
who dieri in Santa Monica last night.
Incidentally, the Philadelphia mil
lionaire's request has let out the secret
that part of his great fortune is found
ed on advice which was given him by
the gypsy, and which, it is declared,
is based on "visions." Queen Dolores
was ronsidered a remarkable seer, and
In common with the habits of her peo
ple, made a practice of foretelling the
future. Fels Ik said to revere her
memory for the service she thus did
him.
Th« M'leen'fc body wirl be shipped to
Spain, where It will rest beside that
i>f her father, who was Marquis Cortez.
LOS ANGELES HERALD
TROUBLE IN POWER
HOUSE CAUSES CAR
CRASH LONG WAY OFF
Mire trouble In the power bonne of the
l.on Angeles Railway company resulted
In a rear-end collision between two
street ran of the Blmlnl | Baths line
near Virgil avenue last night, when sev
eral persons were slightly Injured by
flying glass.
far No. 2.11, In charge of Motorman
Hade, was coasting down the hill on
the private right of war near Virgil
avenue when the power failed and the
■.. t jit out. At the foot of the hill
• or No. 274 wan at a standstill and be
fore Motorman Bade uw the other car
and coil Id bring; hU own car to a stop
the crash came.
The forward end of car No. 281 and
the rear end of the other ear were
shattered, the broken glass raining on
the passengers. v
INDEX OF
HERALD'S NEWS
TODAY
LOS ANGELES
On» hundred women to start campaign -
today to Day off T. W. C. A. debt
of $40,000. PAGE 4
Oil land eases affecting $50,000,100 are
submitted to Judge Ross. PAOK 2
Realty board suggests plan whereby
city engineer's department can get
outside help without charge. PAOB 4
Aviation committee starts arrangements
for great flying meet here In Febru
ary, . PAGE 3
De. Boto Improvement association starts
movement to recall city council.
PAOHJ 3
OKjl_plannlng committee appointed by
Mayor Alexander. PAGE 14
Couple who cared fur aged John Nel
son start contest to secure his (10,000
' estate. , ~ PAOB 5
Chairman of finance committee says
there la error In mayor's Teport on
aqueduct funds. PAGE 6
Council committee may stop street cars
crossing three streets unless railway
company grants concessions. PAGE 14
City Railway company of Los Angeles
Is Incorporated as subsidiary concern
to Los Angelas Railway corporation.
PAGE 14
Men hide In Ice box when lynx makes
escape. PAGE 14
Arts and.crafts exhibition at the Ebell
club atracts much attention. PAGE]" 5
Rev. C. M. Carter and W. B. Percl- '
val seriously Injured when automobile
is hit by street car. PAGE )
Police Judge holds that mistake In writ
' ing names does not protect man from
forgery charge, PAGE 14
Julie Opp says she Is a suffragette, but her
husband is more of a one. PAGE 6
Russian dancers. In Los Angeles, arrive
like a traveling village from czar's land.
PAGE 3
Spiritualists, In' divorce suit, tell about
"vision of a snow white. pig." PAGK 14
Ban Francisco Is selected for biennial
meting of Ntatonal Federation of Wom
en's dubs. PAGE 11
Prince John contradicts statements made
by i Los Angeles man claiming to be
king's ion. ■ , , , . PAGE 3
■Produce men organizing social club. PAGE 3
Editorial and. Letter Box. PAGE 6
Society, clubs and music. , PAG 10 7
Sports. » PAGE 8
Mining and Oil. PAGE 11
Markets and financial. PAGE 10
Shipping. PAGE 10
Marriage licenses, births, deaths. PAGE 11
Classified advertising. PAGES 12-13
Weather report. PAGE 11
Subsidiary corporation takes over the Do-
I mestic Gas company. . PAGE 4
Los Angeles Bar association will advocate
code revision. PAGE 4
SOUTH CALIFORNIA
San Bernardino charter revision commit
tee, delivers report. PAGE 9
Pasadena expert reports against big Tv
Jtwga river water project. PAGE 9
EASTERN
Government's $230,000,000 suit against
sugar trust falls to excite Wall street.
PAGE 1
Former congressman testifies foreigners
maintained lobby In Washington to
kill ship subsidy legislation. PAGE 1
Witnesses tell Interstate commerce com
mission that railroad* are making
tariff preference do work of rebates.
PAGE 1
Woodrow i Wilson addresses governors*
conference at Frankfort. Ky. , PAGE 2
Senator Hale expects coming congress >
to accomplish little. PAGE 2
FOREIGN
Eleven Mexican cities and large area
of country held by revolutionists.
PAGE 2
Civil war Is threatened In Ireland if
home 'rule wins at coming election.
. . PAGB 1
MINING AND OIL
Tom Reed production for thirty days re- .
turns $56,000. ' PAGE 11
Abandonment of large mineral area In
Butte county reveals scheme of West
ern Pacific and H. H. Yard. PAGE 11
WHAT'S GOING ON TODAY IN
LOS ANGELES
AMUSEMENTS
Auditorium—Anna Pavlowa and Mlkall
Mordkln with the Imperial Runsian Ballet In
ocular opera. 8:15 p. m.
Belasco —Btackwood-Belasco players in "The
Test. 8:15 p. m.
Burbanls—Morosco player* tn "Texas." 8:15
p. m.
Grand opem house—Ferris Hartman rind
company In "The Office Boy." 8:1K p. m.
levy's Cafe Chantant—Continuous vaudeville
3:30 p. m. to 12:30 a, m.
Iyis Angeles—Vaudeville, 2:90, 7:3« and 9:15
p. in.
Luna park—Outdoor amusements, vaudeville,
hand concert and moving pictures. 10 a. m.
to 12 midnight.
Majeatio—William Faversham and company
In 'The World and His Wife." 2:15 and S:ls
p. m.
Olympic—Musical farce, "The Follies of
1911." 3, 7:30 and 0:15 p. m.
Orpheum—Vaudeville, 216 and S;ls p. m.
Pantages—Vaudeville. 2:30, 7:30 and »:1S
p. ni.
Princess—Musical farce, "The Undertaker."
3, 7:46 and 0:16 p. m.
"Who's Baby?" Labor Temple auditorium.
OF INTEREST TO WOMEN
Arts and Crsfta exhibit—Ebell club, all day.
Coemoa club, Ebell club house—Musical, aft
ernoon.
Wednesday Morning club—Spanish luncheon.
Ruskln Art club—Literature of Spanish-
America, afternoon.
Exhibition of Jean Mannheim's paintings —
Hallefs studio, afternoon.
MISCELLANEOUS
Brotherhood meeting for men. Clime's the
ater, South Broadway, noon. Bishop Joseph H.
Johnson will speak.
Federation club luncheon. Wright and Cal
lender building, noon. J. F. Olbbs will speak
on "The Political Menace of Mormonlnm."
Sierra Madre club dinner. Night. '
WEDNESDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 30, 1010.
TRUST LAUGHS AT
$230,000,000 SUIT
BUT FEARS PRISON
Civil Action Fails to Scare Sugar
Magnates, Who Have Been
Through Fire Before
WALL STREET NOT FLUTTERED
Operators Cite Recent Failures to
Collect Big Fines as Cause
for Safe Feeling
(Special to The Herald)
NEW YORK, Nov. 29.—Barring a
flutter on the stock exchange there
was practically no aftermath today to
the filing yesterday by the government
of a petition asking for the dissolution
of the American Sugar Refining com
pany and twenty-nine other companies I
••■imposing the so-called sugar trust
and having a capitalization of $230,- !
nnn.ono. The action has proved a ono
rlity sensation in the newspapers, and
its effects on Wall street have resulted ;
in nothing like the effects a similar j
prosecution would have evoked a few j
years ago. The general market tone,
in fact, shows improvement over that
of a week past and Sugar is holdtns
its own, despite yesterday's action of
the federal authorities.
Tho utter lack of excitement in finan
cial circles following the bringing of a
suit of such vast proportions and in
volving the very existence of one of
the largest corporations of the country
was the cause of general comment
both on the stock exchange and in |
legal circles today. The opinion seemed
settled that the large corporations have
little to fear from civil actions Involv
ing merely fines and dissolutions, as
In no instance has this procedure by
the government brought any radical
results., The failure of a similar action
heretofore against tho sugar trust and ■
a recent failure in a civil action
against the Standard Oil company
were widely cited and had much to do
with the calm way with which news
of the government suit was received
on the stock exchange.
One prominent operator in speaking
of the matter today said: "Sugar is
firm under the latest government at
tack because the action begun yester
day is merely civil and all similar civil
actions have failed of their purpose.
The opposite has been true of the
criminal prosecutions, and the sugar
trust is one of the corporations which
has the greatest experience In this
fact. The prosecutions of Heike and
others by the government are too re
cent to need recalling. At the time
of these prosecutions sugar stocks
slumped heavily, the big men in the
trust were badly frightened and con
siderable results, both financial and
moral, were obtained. Wall street and
the trust magnates are shy of that sort
of prosecution. But when It comes
to fines and dissolutions—well, no
fines have been collected yet, and
Standard OH and the rest are still do-
Ing business at the old stand. They
can afford to laugh and are laughing
at civil prosecutions."
SAN FRANCISCO DAILY SUN
SETS FOR LACK OF FUNDS
Publisher Hopes Newspaper Will
Be Resumed Soon
(Special to The Herald)
SAN FRANCISCO. Nov. 29.—The
San Francisico Sun, launched Immedi
ately after the primary election as a
Democratic morning newspaper, set
tonignt, like its prototype, hut unlike
it, will not rise I morrow. Formal no
tice of the suspension of the news
paper was made this evening by the
publisher, H. J. Bartlett.
For somo days past it. had been
known that the end of the enterprise
was imminent. The funds subscribed by
State Senator Caminetti and the other
stocknolders had been exhausted and
lack of advertising contracts together
with failure to obtain a circulation of
rr.oro than 10,000 rendered the. out'ook
critical. The management was unable
to pay salaries last week, and the
staff had been cut down to a nominal
number/
"We have decided to suspend pub
lication for the time being," was Bart
lett's statement this^vening, "but we
hope to be able to resume within a
short time." Others, however, aie not
ko sanguine, and believe that the
eclipse is total.
DOCK CONTAINING 300 MEN
SWEPT TO SEA IN STORM
Scores of Ships Sunk and Many
Lives Lost in Russia
ASTRAKHAN. Russia, Nov. 2!>.—
During 1 a sudden tempest in the Cas
pian sea today a landing stage on
which were 300 Persian dock workers
was dragged from Its moorings and
swept out to sea. The storm was so
violent that attempts at rescue were
futile, and all hope that any of the
men will he saved has been aban
doned.
Scores of ships, spveral with th^lr
crews on hoard, were sunk at Uwlr
moorings at different Caspian coast
towns.
Seven towns along the roast were
flooded, hundreds of inhabitants tak
ing refuge in liiysfarks. The plight
of the sufferers is pitiable, aa Intense
cold has added to the general misery.
PEKING DOUBTS AMERICAN
LOAN WILL BE CONCLUDED
PEKING, Nov. 29.—Serious doubt
that a projected loan of $50,000,000 to
China by an American financial syn
dicate will be concluded Is expressed
in Peking. Difficulties have arisen
among them owing to the unwillingness
of China, to accept a foreign advisory.
Without such control, it is said, the
promoters are unwilling to supply the
loan.
Why Not Try a Jail Sentence on Him, Uncle Sam?
Efforts to discipline the sugar trust in New York are expected to result in an order for dissolu
tion and a prompt reorganization by the trust. —News Item.
SAYS FOREIGNERS
HAD LOBBY IN U.S.
Former Congressman Testifies to
Efforts to Kill Ship Sub
sidy Legislation
NEW YORK. Nov. 29.— Testimony
that steamship companies owned
abroad control American shipping ab
solutely and have spent money freely
to foster legislation against an Amer
ican merchant marine was offered to
day before the congressional commit
tee holding sessions here to investigate
charges that a sttamship lobby was
rnaimained at Washington.
William H. Douglas, who formerly
represented a New York district in
congress, was the witness who made
these statements.
"As conditions are now, ' Mr. Doug
las testified, "the American merchant
is handicapped. The foreign steam
ship owners make a rate at Hamburg,
London and Paris that' controls the
export shipment of an article to this
country. Even if the American should
charter a steamer for his own freight
he would not be able to obtain addi
tional freight to make up a cargo."
Similar conditions govern trade be
tween the United Ktafs and youth
America, Mr. Douglas said, as all the
lines plying between the two countries
are owned abroad..and foreign steam
ship companies, he asserted, had spent.
money freely to influence sentiment
against American shipping.
■While you were a member of con
gress did you ever know of money
being spent thero by agents to Influ
ence legislation through the giving of
dinners or anything else?"
"I think there was."
Mr. Douglas added that although
loreign companies had used whatever
influence they possessed in influenc
ing shipping legislation and had paid
men to represent them in Washington,
he believed that, strictly speaking,
they had not violated any law.
JUDGE HOLDS COURT ON
FAST RAILROAD TRAIN
Attorneys Argue Contested Will
Case as Cars Speed On
MONTICKLLO, N. T., Nov. 29.—Pas
sengers on a train between Port Jervis
and Blnghamton were tueated yester
day to an odd scene when W. L.
Thornton, judge and surrogate of Sul
livan county, held surrogate court be*
tween those two points as the train
was speeding on its way.
Judge Thornton had made arrange
ments to hear the protested will case
of the late George \V. Gould of L,ong
Eddy, and when he was called aud
d niy to Blnghamton he decided to
hold court on board the train. The
Gould heirs and their attorneys joined
him at Port Jervia, and by the time
the train had left the Station the party
was in the midsf* of the proceedings,
which continued to within a. short dis
tance of Binghamton.
CLUBMAN DRESSES AS A
TRAMP AND BEGS LODGING
HOUSTON, Tex , Nov. ».- Poalng as
the "man without a dime," Irwln A.
Brown, wealthy clubman of Denver,
Colo., was arrested heir lust night at
an establishment which fun
cheap lodging.
Brown had gone there in pursuit of
his sociological investigations and was
attired as a tramp, rfia only offense,
lie declares, was to ask for a bod, ex
plaining that he was penniless. He was
released «hen lflentitled by a news*
paper man.
UNABLE TO RESIST LIQUOR
REALTY DEALER ENDS LIFE
Unable to break away from tho
drink habit, John Cunningham, 45
years old, 347 West Forty-second
street, committed suicide last night
by taking gas at his home. Cunning
ham Is a real estate dealer with of
fices in the Pacific Electric building
nnd leaves a widow and stx children.
KIDNAPING CASE IS
BEHIND BOMB OUTRAGE
Explosion Wrecks Saloon of an
Italian Who Refused to
Pay Ransom for Son
NEW YORK, Nov. 29.—The kidnap
ing ease, originating five years ago,
in which the late Lieutenant Petro
sino, who was murdered in Italy,
played the. part of investigator, is
believed to have led indirectly to a
bomb explosion in the early hours to
day which shook up one of the most
thickly populated blocks in New York,
did extensive damage and created a
panic hi the neighborhood. The bomb
exploded in the doorway of BeiUt
Trlnaorla'i saloon In the heart ot the
Sicilian .settlement in Elizabeth street,
It completely wrecked the saloon,
the front of which was blown Inward;
badly damaged adjacent floors, hurled
sleepers In the tenements above from
their beds and cracked windows for
blocks around. The police lvserves
had their hands full quieting the panic
stricken foreigners who flocked to the
streets by hundreds. Francesco !.»<•
blarbera is the owner of the saloon.
He had left the place about an hour
before the explosion. Today he grave
the police his theory of the animus
behind the outrage. Five years api,
he said, his son Pietro, 6 yeais old,
was kidnaped and he has not heard
from him since. The police were no
tified and Lieutenant P<?troslno worked
on the case. Leblarbera received
many letters threatening his life if a
large sum of money was not paid for
the return of the boy, but paid no at
tention to them, and It is believed by
him that the kidnapers are now start
ing in their revenge.
HONDURAS ATLANTIC PORTS
TAKEN BY REVOLUTIONISTS
Government Forces Sent to Re
take Territory Join Enemy
SAX JUAN DEL BUR. Nicaragua,
Nov. 29. -Advices received today from
Tegucigalpa state, that, the Atlantli
ports of Honduras and the department,
of. Comayagua have been captured by
revolutionists under the leadership of
former President Manuel Bontlla.
Government forces sent to retake the
territory joined the enemy.
Gen. Bonilla brought about an un
successful revolt against 111-- govern
ment of President Davlla last summer.
Later he sought refuse in Guatemala,
from which country he was deported.
Recently ho was reported to lie in Now
Orleans organizing an expedition which
was to attach the Atlantic coast or
Honduras. Bon ilia's cause was helped
somewhat by the rebellion of Gen. Jose
VaJladares, the governor of the Island
of Amapala. The latter was recently
deposed and came- to this country.
STREET SPEAKERS JAILED
FRESNO, Nov. 23.—Tho second in
vasion of the Industrial Workers of
the World brought the largest number
of arrests in a single evening yet re
ported here of the Industrialists.
Twenty-six of the "orators" were ar
rested fur street speaking tonight.
CTTVmT T? ( ""OPTF^! • DAIXY «c. ON TRAINS 80.
OliMljlJ.jij V^VJX LEiO. SINKAVS So. ON TRAINS 10«
TARIFFS DO WORK
OF R.R. REBATES
More Witnesses Stamp Proposed
$27,000-000 Increase
as Unjust
WASHINGTON, Nov. 29.—Five ox
perts for shippers testified today be
fore the interstate commerce commis
sion in its investigation of proposed
rate increases.
On adjourning, the commission an
nounced arguments of the eastern and
western increase cases, consoldlated,
would be heard December 9.
Today's testimony tended to show
that the proposed increases which the
roads claim will involve a net addi
tional revenue of $27,000,000 in the of
ficial classification territory, extend
ing from New England to the Missis
sippi river and nortli of the Ohio and
Potomac, were unjust and unfairly
distributed.
C. O. Ives of Boston, representing
shipping Interest! in New York, Now
Kngland, Pennsylvania, New Jorsey,
Maryland and Virginia, and said thn
rebate had been abolished effectually,
but that when the practice txistert the
rebates rearhed 35 or 40 por rent.
Mr. Ivos maintained the railroad
men were sincerely trying t<> do away
absolutely with preferences.
"The preferences that exist today are
in those tariffs themselves?" a. feed
Chairman Knapp.
■•Absolutely." replied Mr. Ivea,
Contending that it was unjust to at
tempt a blank advance in class rates
from the seaboard to western territory,
lie maintained that a 20 per cent ad
vance from Chicago to Illinois and
Wisconsin and west of the Mississippi
would not equalize a 20 per cent ad
vance from seaboard to Illinois.
Mr. Ives called attention to lake and
rail advances aggregating from 10 to
25 per cent In'the last decade in addi
tion to the changes In classification.
He claimed the proposed horizontal in
crease, is arbitrary.
Tho 20 per cent advance on the first
five classes, declared Mr. Ives, while
an excessive Increase, is not the max
imum contemplated, for, he said,, large
additional burdens are laid upon the
lake transportation, which does not
even have the justification of any ex
traordinary Increase In wages.
LIKES TAFT. BUT, VOTE FOR
HIM? AH! THAT'S DIFFERENT
President Finds Time to Tell a
Story on Himself
WASHINGTON, Nov. 89.—President
Taft hag been exceedingly busy the
last few day;; working on his message
to congress. In the few leisure mo
ments he h i i had, however, he baa
l»en telling H Btorj on himself. it
happened ;>t Richmond the other day,
•■There isn't a bit of politics In the
reception they give you. I know this
lutely," lid Mr. Taft.
in substantiation of this, Mr Tafl
then proceeded to relate a. story told
him by Major .1 C, Herophlll, former
Ij odltor of tne Charleston .v ws-
Courler, but now editor <>r the Rich
mond Tin* s-1 ilspatch
a Democratic gm'st »t tho Taft
luncheon, sittinK nrxt to the maj'>r,
nthusiastle about the pre«l
,i, nl
"Taft Is simply a bully fellow," de
clared the guest. "He Is the kind of a
man you lovo."
"You bet ha Is," remarked the major.
"But. by the way. are you going to
vote for him next time?"
"Vote for him? Vote for him " ex
claimed the astonished guest. I'd see
him In hell flr't.'
THE HOME PAPER OF
GREATER LOS ANGELES
IRISH CIVIL WAR
IS THREATENED IF
HOME RULE WINS
Unionist Proclamation Declares
That Swords May Soon
Flash in Erin's Isle
POLITICAL BATTLE RAGES
Balfour Cries 'Don't Trust the
American Paymaster Who
Calls for a Tune'
RIOTERS THROW EGGS
AT WINSTON CHURCHILL
COM HK>]'KR, England, Nov. 20.—
Riotous M'rnrs attended t lin appearance
here, tonlpht, . of Winston Spencer
Churchill, home wecretary. Thousands
congregated In the street*, Jeering and
shouting. Many of thnm gathered
around Mr. Churchill's carriage, at which
they threw fish, <■««•< and other* mis
sile*.
Many of the window* in the liberal
headquarters were smashed. A targe
draft of police was sent out to patrol the
street*.
(Absociated Presat
LONDON, Nov. 20.—Politicians of all '
parties are straining every nerve to
crowd into a few days work that In
ordinary elections Is spread over weeks
or months. Nearly all the heavy guns
were in action tonight.
Arthur J. Balfour, leader of the op-
position in the house of commons, bo
fore a meeting in Albert lia.ll, when;
he warmly supported the referendum,
described the government as puppets,
dancing to tho tune of John Redmond
and his American paymasters.
The issues are narrowing down daily. -
The conservatives make much of the
menace of home rule. They proclaim
the plan of the liberals for the reform
of the house of lords means a single
chamber government, ,and put to the
front their new policy of referendum.
There is a great fervor among the
Liberals, a feature being the sudden re- .
forming zeal of the present lords who
claim ,that Lansdowne's referendum
scheme Is a snare because the part Its
would be unequally yoked together un
der it, that conservative measures
would always sail smoothly through the
house of lords while the referendum
would be Invoked only for Liberal bills
distasteful to the peers.
Moreover, they estimate the cost of
each appeal to the people at $10,000,
--000.
SPLIT ON TARIFF
An Interesting factional cleavage has
occurred in Balfour's party over the
tariff reform. The Spectator, the
spokesmen of the unionist free trad
ers, has proposed that the tariff re
formers plodge themselves to submit
the question to a referendum if the
party wins, it not being a leading is
sue of the campaign.
The moat ardent tariff reformers,
led by the Morning Post, contend that
it is the foremost principle "of the
party. , , .
"The Unionist party breaks into
fragments," says the Post, "if a Union-'
ist victory does not mean tariff re
form."
Mr. Balfour tonight announced his
willingness to leave it to a referen
dum In the meantime, the leaders
are making every appeal to the Inde
pendent vote, believing it controls the
issue.
The Irish unionists sent a message
of defiance of home rulers to Mr. Bal
four's meeting and deputations from
the non-conformist association of Eng
land and 600 ministers of non-Episco
pal church in Ireland, have addressed
Mr. Balfour in opposition to home ml".
The reading of the message from tr-o
Irish unionists at Albert hall cause.)
much enthusiasm. .
THREATEN fIVII. WAR
"In all solemnity," said the message,
"we now declare that homo rulo will
bring Ireland not peace, but the
■word. If an Irish parliament is set
up the unionists of the south, allied
with the men of Ulster, will not ac
knowledge its authority. They will
neither obey its decrees nor pay its
taxes."
Mr. Balfour pronounced strongly in
favor of the referendum as the best
method of settling deadlocks between
the two houses without requiring re
form of the house of lords, and said
it could be carried into effect before
the house of lords was reformed.
This he declared to be Lansdowne's
plan.
The cost of a referendum, he said.
would he nearer $1,000,000 than Liberal
Mr. Balfour denied the vctoconfer
estimates of $10,000,000.
ence had been broken up by the un
yielding attitude of the lords. He said
the government was threatening a
revolution, based on the wants of one
particular section, who boasted they
had not yielded an inch from the posi
tion of Parnell.
He concluded by declaring the cabi
net was governed by its noisiest mem
bers, who s/ere goverened by John
Redmond, who was governed by Pat
rick Ford.
"Don't trust th« puppets who ar«
performing their parts qn the stag',"
admonished Balfour.
"Don't trust, tin- Irish wire-pullers.
Don't trust the American paymaster
who calls for a tune. Trust, alone th*
sound judgment and enlightened pa
triotism of the people of this country."
.1. H. Seaverna, who was a member
of parliament for the Brlanton division
of Lambeth in l!)0t>, and who whs at
ore time a resident of Boston, has be
come the Liberal candidate In th«
same constituency against Davidson
Dataiel, Unionist, onco a resident of
New York.
GAYNORS ASSAILANT CHARGED
NEW YORK. Nov. 39.- James J. Gal
lagher, who shot Mayor Oayuor laat
June, was indicted today by the grand
jury In Hudson county, N. J., charged
with assault with intent to kill th«
mayor and William Edwards, street
cleaning I commissioner. ,•

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