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Los Angeles herald. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, December 05, 1910, Image 2

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NAVY ESTIMATES
SHOW DECREASE
Secretary George Yon L. Meyer's
Figures Indicate Saving
Over Current Year
$989,000 FOR BREMERTON
Official Asks Greater Fund to
Purchase Provisions for Men
of Department
■■•. I I! .
[Associated Prcssl
WASHINGTON, Dec. 4.—Estimates
of Secretary of the Navy Meyer for the
fiscal year 1912, which show a saving
of 85,000,000 as compared with the ap
propriations for the current year, pro
vide for an expenditure of $8,135,827 for
public works at navy yards and sta
tions. These are for items regarded as
essential and are based-upon a recent
inspection by Secretary Meyer.
. The original recommendations for
these works reached $28,621,530, but In
the interest of economy Mr. Meyer was
able to make a reduction.
Some of the estimates are:
New York navy yard, 81.468,000.
Pearl harbor, Hawaii, naval station,
12,287,000.
• Norfolk navy yard, $347,500.
Olongapo, Philippines, naval station,
8300.000.
Philadelphia navy yard, $227,000.
Marine barracks, $290,000.
Puget sound navy yard, $989,000.
The secretary says that to construct
the collier which congress directed
shall be built at a government yard
on the Pacific coast, it will be neces
sary to increase the limit of cost from
$1,000,000 to $1,500,000, of which $531,000
should be appropriated for next year.
The secretary asks for $7,630,000 for
provisions for the navy, which is an
increase of $158,299 over the current
year.
Provisions for the marine corps are
estimated at $820,000, an increase of
$96,457.
As the first year's appropriations for
new vessels which the secretary rec
ommends, he names $6,090,000 as neces
sary for construction and machinery
and $6,750,428 for armor and armament,
which is $3,494,194 less than appro
priated for the new building program
this year. In addition he asks for $10,
--453,615 for the continuation of, work
on vessels now under construction,
which is $6,792,105 less than the amount
appropriated for this year.
The total amount which will be sub
mitted to congress for the navy de
partment tinder the naval, legislative
and sundry civil bills for next year
will be $127,607,329, as compared with
$132,378,980 for this year, a decrease of
$5,311,651.
- - - —i
DELEGATES FROM CHINA
TELL OF LAVISH RECEPTION
Orient Shows Friendship for
American Exporters
' SAN FRANCISCO, Dec. 4.—Return
ing from an extended trip through the
Orient, several members of the com
mission from the chambers of com
merce of the Pacific coast, recently
sent to investigate trade relations be
tween this country and China, returned
today on the Manchuria.
Those In the party were Captain and
Mrs. Robert Dollar, and R. M. Hotal
ing, of San Francisco; Mr. and Mrs.
J. Furth, of Seattle, and their niece,
Mrs. Anna Turley, Secretary C. V.
Tribe; C. B. Bennett and Mr. and
Mrs. E. A. Young.
The returning delegates spoke of the
trip as a complete success. They re
port a friendly feeling toward Ameri
can exporters existing among the <^hi-
nesi . According to the delegates, the
field is practically devoid of Ameri
can agents, however, while Germany
and England are well represented. The
commissioners spoke of the lavish
style in which they were entertained
by the officials in nearly every town
they visited. i
TRADE GAINS AS RESULT
OF TARIFF WAR CESSATION
Germany Now Seeks a Definite
Treaty with Canada
BERLIN, Dee. 4.— Statistics are pub
lished showing the remarkable effect
of the cessation of the long tariff war
between Germany and Canada, and of
the conclusion of the provisional com
mercial agreement between the two
countries. The tariff war ceased at the
end of February, and the new pro
visional agreement came into force
March 1. During the first six months
the latter brought about an increase of
4S per ..-lit .'I Gorman exports to
Canada. <in the other hand, Canadian
exports to Germany increased 45 per
cent. German iron manufacturers
profited more than any other by the
cessation of the tariff war, for exports
of some kinds of Gen an hardware
increased by Iron. 300 to 40(> per rent.
German textile industries also reaped
a rich harvest. The exports el stock
ings doubled, and those of cloth, car
pets and gloves increased very con
siderably. German chemical, glass,
porcelain and toy manufactures all
shared in the Increased trade.
This remarkable advance In com
mercial relations with Canada causes
great satisfaction here. it is pointed
out that Germany would find a still
more favorable market in Canada if
her products could be placed on an
equality with those of Great Britain
in the matter of tariff dues. Germany's
efforts will now be directed toward ex
tending the present provisional agree
ment Into a definite commercial treaty
with Canada, whereby the present dif
ferentiation in favor of Great Britain
will be neutralized.
-».-».
POISON CLAIMS THIRD LIFE
NORTH YAKIMA, Dec. 4.—Loreno
D. S. Patton, 53 years old, one of the
five persons poisoned by ting home
preserved asparagus tips at a family
Thanksgiving dinner at the home of
Frank T. Kuehen, died last night. Mr.
Patton'a mother, Mrs. Carrie B. Ful
kerson, and his daughter, Mrs. Frank
T. Kuelien, both died last Tuesday.
6 NEW CHOLERA CASES IN ROME
ROME, >'■' . <.—Six new cases of
. holers lia ■ ■■ been reported from Pa
lermo In the last twenty-four hours,
nil being among the patients In the
asylum for the Insane, One death lias
also occurred. Two cases are report
ed from other districts
UNSETTLED WEATHER FOR
THE WEST IS PREDICTED
Rocky Mountain Disturbances to
Advance Eastward
WASHINGTON, Dec. 4.—Low tem
peratures will prevail over the country
east of the Rockies during the greater
part of this week, according to the
prediction of the weather bureau. West
of the Rockies unsettled weather is
forecast without any marked varia
tions in temperature.
The disturbance over the Rocky
Mountain region today will advance
eastward and is expected to reach the
Atlantic states by Monday night or
Tuesday.
Following this there will be a marked
change to colder weather that will
spread eastward and southward as far
as the gulf states.
CHINA'S EMPEROR ORDERS
FULL NAVY DEPARTMENT
General Staff of Imperial Army
to Be Organized on Mod
ern Lines
PEKING, Dec. 4. — important step
has just been taken by China to ex
pand and cease the efficiency of the
army and navy. The throne today Is
sued edicts crating a navy department.
which up to the present has consisted
merely of a tentative board for the
conduct of naval affairs.
Prince Tsai Hsun, uncle of the em
peror, who recently paid an extensive
visit to the United States, has been ap
pointed president of the new depart
ment and his full recommendations for,
the reorganization of the navy have
been approved.
The general staff of the army will be
reorganized along modern lines, as pro
posed by Gen. Ying Tschang, who for
merly was minister to Germany and
now is president of the war depart
ment.
The throne points out the necessity
of making the army and navy effective,
and with this in mind dismisses many
officers of the old school with a pension.
The most advanced Chinese, both pri
vately and In the newspapers, have of
late been pointing out that the alli
ances which China so greatly desires
with the United States could not be
attained unless China was able to show
her share of the common forces.
FALL IN STEEL PRICES
MAY PRECEDE RECOVERY
Conference of Interests Shows
Vulnerable Position
NEW YORK, Dec. The confer-1
ence of the steel interests at New
York last week clearly demonstrated
the vulnerable position of the indus
try, and although there is concerted
effort to maintain prices of finished
material by further reducing produc
tion and eliminating competition, there
is a strong feeling that lower prices
musts prevail for some products before
there is recovery from the present de
pression.
Prices of pig iron and coke have
been cut to the quick and fabricated
structural stseel Is about as low as
could be reasonably expected, but it
is claimed there is room for readjust
ment of prices of plain material.
Railroads placed a few more con
tracts for rails, but the Pennsylvania
contracts for 160,000 tons in 1911 were
given conditionally. In November, or
ders were placed for 2600 cars and
sevei.ty-four locomotives. It Is hoped
that rail contracts this month may
aggregate 300,000 tons.
Fabricated steel contracts last
week were light, aggregating about
1800 tons, making the total for Novem
ber 50,000.
Several new building contracts are
coming up, so that the December ton
nage will probably show a consider
able Increase.
Of pig Iron only about 25,000 tons
were placed in all sections last week.
November contracts aggregated 300,000
tons.
POLICEMAN AND PRISONER
FIGHT IN PATROL WAGON
Mexican Tries to Escape, but Is
Subdued in Battle
A. Rayes, a Mexican known to the
police, gave Officer Louis Canto a tus
sle in the patrol wagon yesterday aft- j
ernoon that Canto says he will re- j
member for some time.
Rayes was found drunk at Main and
Leroy streets and was held to await
the arrival of the patrol. There was j
no difficutly In getting the man into
the wagon, but as It noared the cen- j
tral station ho decided he wanted his
liberty. Making a lunge at Canto, who
was seated beside him, the Mexican
tried to grab the officer by the throat
and fling him to the street.
Canto and ; ayes struggled for ful'y
a minute, swaying to and fro in the
wagon. Finally the prisoner lost his
footing and Canto grabbed him by th
neck, pinning him to the seat. When
the patrol reached the station the of
ficer and the Mexican were exhausted. '
REPORT OF ALASKA INDIAN
UPRISING IS UNCONFIRMED
FAIRBANKS, Alaska, Dec. 4.—The
report of an uprising of Indians in the
Kantishna mining country, near Ml
McKinley, and the killing of six pros
pectors and trappers, is entirely uncon
firmed.
Federal officials have taken no action.
.Miners from Kantishna are expected
with news soon. There is a dog trail
i between Fairbanks and Kantishna.
THE ART OF LETTING GO
We lave no doubt that the students
lit Dartmouth will greatly appreciate
their esteemed president's views on
money, more especially those sentences
which ire calculated to Inculcate in the j
undergraduate mind correct views re
gardlng the proper way to let go of It—
let go of the ■ money.
So much has been said about accu
mulating wealth that a few ripe re
marks on diffusing it should bo widely
appreciated—more especially by the no
ble army of undergraduates.
What the country needs, according to
the Dartmouth president, Is a more
widespread wisdom In the spending of
money than of shrewdness in getting
it, and all the Dartmouth undergradu
ates must have eat up and taken de
lighted notice
"Put money In thy purse," said [ago.
"Remove it worthily," says President
Nichols.
Good combination.
A QUICK WORKER
"I don't belli •. In taking two bites
at a cherry,"
"Nor two sips at a cocktail, I notice."
LOS ANGELES HERALD: MONDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 5, 1910.
MARKETS ADVANCE
IN STOCK SUPPLY
Increased Receipts Cattle and
Sheep Reported in Seven
Interior Cities
SHORTAGE PREVAILS IN HOGS
October Shipments of Packing
House Products from Chicago
Maintain Early Averages
(Special to The Herald)
WASHINGTON, Dec. 4.—lncreased
receipts at the seven leading Interior
markets of cattle and sheep and a
continued shortage in the supply of
hogs are a characteristic feature of
the October livestock movement, as re
ported to the bureau of statistics of
the department %>f commerce and labor.
The receipts of cattle at these mar
kets, which for the present year aver
aged 166,943 head a month, show a
continuous growth, the October total,
1.188,324 head, exceeding like totals
lor the preceding two years, of 1,130.
--611 head in 1909 and 1,025,992 head in
1908, though falling short of tho Octo
ber figures in the three earlier years.
The receipts of sheep for the month,
2,263,079 head, show a continuous
growth since the end of the summer,
the October total being more than
double the monthly average for the
year and 56 per cent in excess of the
October average for the preceding five
years. All the large packing centers
except St. Louis and St. Joseph show
larger receipts of sheep, the gains be
ing particularly heavy in the case of
Chicago, Omaha and St. Paul. On the
other hand the October receipts of
hogs at the seven markets, 1,034,682
head, were the lowest monthly re
ceipts for the year except for Septem
ber, when, for the first time, the total
fell below 1,000,000 head. As compared
with the October average for the pre
ceding Aye years, the monthly receipts
of hogs show a decline of over 26 per
cent. The ten months' receipts of hogs
at the same markets, 12,786,278 head,
were about 23 per cent less than the
average for the corresponding period
in the preceding five years. Arrivals
of calves at the five packing centers,
which report them separately, show a
monthly total of 107,740 head, com
pared with the October average for
the five preceding years of 102,193 head.
RECEIPTS OF SEVEN MARKETS
Tho combined live stock receipts, in
cluding those of horses and mules, at
the seven markets amountel to 4,6#0,
--672 head for the month, compared with
4,062,236 head in October, 1909, and 4,074,
--565 head in 1808. The estimated num
ber of inbound loaded live stock cars
for the month isi given as 75,249, com
pared with 70,853 cars for October, 1909,
and 71,267 "cars for October, 1908. The
larger number is exceeded, however,
by the October figures in 1905-1907.
The volume of the inbound live stock
movement for the ten months of the
present year, as measured by the num
her of loaded live stock cars received,
567,109 cars, was less than In any of
the preceding five years.
October shipments of packing house
products from Chicago, 166,864,125
pounds, show but little variation In
volume from the totals reported for the
earlier months. As compared with the
October average for the preceding five
years a loss of 28 per cent is shown.
The shipments for the ten months of
the present year, 1,665,799,350 -pounds,
fell about 20 per cent below the ten
months' average for the preceding five
years, the largest decline appearing
under the head of fresh beef and cured
meats. The shipments of canned
meats, 59,063,400 pounds, while only
one-half of the total reported for the
corresponding period in 1905, show,
however, a 40 per cent Increase over
the ten months' total of the preceding
year. Lard shipments, while slightly
larger than during last year, were less
than one-half the quantity reported in
1907. The eastbound traffic movement
of provisions from Chicago and Chi
cago 'Junction points for the forty
four weeks of the year, 739,920 short
tons, shows a similar decline when
compared with corresponding figures
for the earlier years.
Stocks of meat at the end of the
month at five principal packing cen
ters are given as 90,170,870 pounds, the
total being the smallest reported for
the year. Live stock receipts during
the month at Boston, New York, Phil
adelphia and Baltimore, Included 91,
--365 head of cattle, 39,832 calves, 243,
--162 hogs and 311,965 sheep, all these,
figures being smaller than for October,
190S and 1909.
The foreign shipments of animals
! and meat product for the ten-month
period of the present year show a
notable decline since 1906, when the
foreign trade in these articles may be
said to have reached its largest de
velopment. Thus the ten months' ex
ports of cattle in 1906 were 428,741 in
number, compared with only 81,703
head exported during the ten months
lof the present year. The total value,
of animals exported during the ten
months of 1808 was 838,137,378, while
I like exports for the ten months of til
present year were valued at $11,914,246
only. The quantity of fresh beef
shopped during the ten-month period
In 1806 was 224,160,021 pounds, as com
pared with 46,834.991 pounds in 1810.
Exports of canned beef declined dur
ing the same period from 34,023,138
pounds to 8,355,827 pounds; those of
bacon from 318,704,312 pounds to 395,
--189,867 pounds; those of hams from 166,
--836.199 pounds to 110.301,603 pounds;
those of lard from 582,847,866 pounds
p. 302,185,736 pounds, while tie- value
of all meat products exported de
clined from 8171,720,366 for the ten
month period In 1806 to $105,013,113 for
the corresponding period in the present
year. _^^_
JAPANESE ALONG COAST
WILL RISE IN PROTEST
Death Sentence on Revolutionist
Arouses Subjects in America
SAN FRANCISCO, Dec, 4.—As a pro
test against the death sentence im
posed on Kataku Denjlrlo, the Japa
nese revolutionist, and the arrest of a
aeon of his followers by the govern
ment of Japan for alleged Incendiary
utterances in Japanese cities, a mass
meeting attended chiefly by his sym
pathizers in this city was held in the
Auditorium rink today. Many white
men were in the gathering.
The meeting was addressed by A.
[wasa, a Japanese student who repre
sents the national revolutionist party
of Japan He condemned the action
of the Japanese officials In the l>'jii'io
case and Bald that with the death of
the leader of the movement organiza
tion among the .0,000 Japanese now on
the Pacific coast would be actively
begun.
ROBBERS REPEAT CRIME
AT MALAGA POSTOFFICE
Safe Opened. Money Taken Twice
in Two Months
FRESNO, Dec. 4.— For the second
time in two months a suburban post
office has been looted In this county.
Two robbers at an early hour this
morning entered the postoffice at Mal
aga, five miles from here, and blew
open the safe with nitro-glyccrlne.
They obtained $175.
The robbery was not discovered until
this morning by Postmaster Hickmal,
on his visit to the postoffice, which is
in his store. He found the telephone
cut of order and had to drive to Fresno
to notify the officers. There is no clew
to the robbers. Two months ago rob
bers secured $1300 in the Laton post
office. ;
LAW STOPS WHEN LOVE
IS O'ER UNITED FAMILY
Officers Release Man Who
Braved Box Car Rigors to
Join Wife and Babe
SAN BERNARDINO, Dec. 4.—After
risking a solitary trip In a stuffy box
ear to reach the glorious land of the
west, Augustus Schmidt and his wife
and baby child met in the Santa' Fe
freight yards here. Schmidt was In the
shadow of the county jail, but the sight
of the happy reunion so softened the
heart of the railroad officer that he did
not hold the man.
Schmidt was a railroad fare evader
and had been found in a box car of a
train on the desert and held by the
trainmen for officers here.
The story of the little family, as re
counted to the officer and trainmen,
begins in Chicago, where tales of the
golden land of Southern California had
found fertile soil In the dreams of
Schmidt and his wife. After two years
of longing for the land of their dreams,
where the flowers bloom all the year
around and there are no pangs of cold,
there was only enough money in the
family treasure stocking to buy one
ticket to California, and it was decided
that Mrs. Schmidt should take the baby
and go. Schmidt was to follow 'by
freight train, and by the help of fellow
employes at the factory where he was
employed he was secreted with his pro
visions in a box car for Los Angeles.
San Bernardino was the appointed
meeting place, and Schmidt planned to
attract the attention of trainmen before
reaching Southern California, and get
out of the sealed car and complete the
journey as best he could.
When he clambered out of the car he
found that he. was close to his destina
tion, but in the hands of the law.
For several days the woman with her
child had been haunting the railroad
yards. As the two clasped In loving
embrace, the railroad men strolled
away.
WADSWORTH'S FATHER SAYS
HE GAVE COYNE SUPPORT
Denial That New York Speaker
Aided Turfmen
. BUFFALO, Dec. 4.—James Wads
worth sr., father of the speaker of
the assembly, was in Buffalo today.
Regarding the statement , made in
New York yesterday that James Coyne
was paid $42,000 . for services by the
race track men, and that he was rec
ommended . by Mr. Wadsworth, Mr.
Wadsworth said:
"It was not my son but myself that
recommmended Coyne to the Jockey
club. I recommended him as I would
have recommended him to any asso
ciation, solely because I knew him to
possess splendid legal ability."
«->-*
TROOPS UNAWARE OF FIGHJ
SAN ANTONIO, Tex., Dec. 4.—The
commandant- at Fort Sam Houston, the
point from which troops should move,
should the conditions warrant, had re
ceive* no advices as to the reported
fighting at Ojinga, Mexico, early to
night. So far as advices reecived here
are concerned, everything is tranquil
today.
V AMUSEMENTS
RAND OPERA HOUSE**™*"* VH«S_^__\t^_iVZA^
"HfMyAtIEH)"
EEALiyA hit
POSITIVELY ONE WEEK ONLY. -FATS KOR THIS GREAT MUSH.'. I'l.V AM)
l,Mil. SUCCESS NOW SELLING AT THE REGULAR (SCALE
OF POPULAR HARTMAN PRICES.
NEXT WEEK- First time in sine]'. "THE EARL AND THE GIRL." Scut* on sal«
today.
B™""" ""EFb A€£ if* _f% ™L FOREMOST STOCK j
DELLMO WW COMPANY OF AMERICA I
TONIGHT—FIRST TIME AT THE BELASCO— |
LEWIS STONE william gillette* SHERLOCK §
and the Delaaco company famous detective play,. HOLMES 1
will offer | I 1
MBMl— —^^ll^^^——^—»aW—^—^^——^——^M———S
MASON OPERA HOUSE w - T• X™£:
WEEK COMMENCING MONDAY. DEC. 12. MATINEE SATURDAY. SPECIAL
POPULAR LADIES' MATINEE WEDNESDAY, SPECIAL PRICKS, JOe, 7Se. si.
Rlanrhe Walsh ■"•*"« The °ther Woman
■i— >lC\llm/XX\m Yvatou success, by Frederick Arnold Rummer.
"At her best."—San Francisco Chronicle.
"ttn up-to-date play, an up-to-date company."San Francisco Examiner.
REGULAR PRICES: ,50c to It.SO. SEAT SALE THURSDAY. DEC. S. AT » A. M.
nF^^HBHRePVQPV'J^I New, Cozy, Absolutely Fireproof
f Ifn^W 4111 V i ¥i Matinees Daily, 2:30
1 B*^ j^rfa iH^fiiaiS^J Twice Nightly, 7 and 9
Elk ______ JKL OP| 1 jS A «I 2 l_ PRICKS lOC, 201. SOC.
j^!^ I.i>^i^i-fgj^dMjfflJj&gTO?pW-^1.i >^i^i-fgj^dMjfflJj&gTO?pW-^ Haader-LaVelle Troupe. Blgelow's Merry
KTt^^Tt«TtT7!vt^ "1 •-* LsUw^RUiKa V'oungsters. Hamilton Bros., Finn It Kuril,
f^_^!Jt.L!AMjiiX»iim^L\n Guldo Glaldlnl, ii.iin.iih hi .New Photo Plays.
OT \f\lCUm TUPATI7D ' .Main, Between Fifth and sixth
LiXmriKm ________• Cool—CooUßodloiM —
Week of Dec. I, THE EVENING s-T-A-R With Jules Mendel
The Great Big Show. Spelled Backward*. . and the Olyraplo Co.
2 SHOWS TONIUHT, 7:45 and 0:15. Mat. Mi.v., Wed., Sat., Sun., lOe, t>oe, M«,
CITIZENS DESIRE
CHARTER CHANGES
Belief Expressed That Council
Might Develop More Impor
tant Public Utilities
FAVOR BALLOT SHORTENING
Marshall Stimson and Judge Lusk
Discuss Plans for Better
City System
Several prominent citizens, when. in
terviewed last night as to what they
thought of the contemplated changes
in the city charter which will be given
final consideration tonight at a meet
ing cf the charter revision committee,
expressed themselves as being In favor
of many of the proposed reforms.
Mayor George Alexander said he j
would not like to express an opinion .
on the subject until he had looked into
the amendments more thoroughly.
Marshall Stimson. said he considered
giving the city council more power to
acquire public utilities one of the most;
important amendments, but that, in
fact, all of them met with his favor.
"I am pleased," he said, "at the ,
handling which would be made in the
election of city officials. The publlb |
would be given a better opportunity to
study the. different men in office. The
shortening and simplifying of the bal- j
lot is also another good feature. I j
think the charter revision committee j
has done good work and , should have .
the appreciation of the public. If this
revision is adopted the charter will be
more popular and will better meet the
needs of the public."
Judge Robert M. Lusk said the
shortening of the ballot appealed to
him and that he believed the measure |
would not only be a good thing for the
city, but similar laws would be for the
state as well. ■ •-, . ,
"I am pleased with the amendment
which would make all administrative
and'clerical officers appointive instead
of elective," he said. "The increase in
the bonding power of the council also
is a good tiling. I don't like the idea at.
governing by. a commission. 1 have
seen its evils elsewhere."
TOMMY BURNS TO RETIRE
FROM FIGHTING GAME
SEATTLE, Dec. 4.—Tommy Burns,
former heavyweight champion, an
nounces his permanent retirement from
the prjze ring in a letter received from
him tonight.
Burns, who is at present making an
exhibition, trip through Washington,
says that when he finishes his engage
ment at Cfe Elum on Wednesday night
he will never again appear as a boxer
before the public. He has asked Hugh
Mcintosh to substitute Jack Lester, the
Cle Elum fighter Burns is training, to
fill his London dates. He gives as his
reason for retiring the Injury «to his
knee sustained in a lacrosse game a
few months ago.
In his letter Burns says: "I am
through with the boxing game as a
pugilist. I have retired and this is
final. My knee will not stand hard
training any more.
"I received a cablegram from Mcin
tosh today. He wants me to box Lang
in January and Langford in February,
but 1 answered that my knee is still
bad and that I will retire. -1 am trying
to arrange with Mcintosh ta fight Les
ter against Lang in February and
Langford later. I am sure Lester can
beat Lang right now. Of course I don't
want Langford for him just yet.
"In ten or twelve months Langford
will have a little more than he can
handle in Lester. At least that is what
I think."
LOUISIANANS TO CLAIM FAIR
NEW ORLEANS, Dec. 4.—Headed by-
Mayor Behrman of New Orleans, a del
egation of Louisiana citizens left to
night for Washington to press before
congress the claims of this city for
an exposition to celebrate the comple
tion of the Panama canal.
; ...--.. AMUSEMENTS .-'.
ffOS ANGELES THEATRE
tfSfe&E&J UDEVILLE
8 NEW HEADLINE ACTS THIS AFTERNOON
This Is Him—He's Here
'BH'MpnHBMEHHeBsi !SlltWHbsßßHsßnwMß^Hnllll'^9S**flS^l^£thnM^i^^
£&* '■ *■?"- ■ t &*sssm '.>'^'.' <-'" r i '\ --^G^^^'^^i,
- '■'-'''W»«BMii!.Wf.. MttELyi- -\^K-"''t?!'-•" ;"■'-*'*T vol ' H
■ nt^ ' : ' • • '■■'" {mWrnsfiaWtim-' ' »mWm 1
HARRY VAN FOSSEN— Burnt Cork Wizard of Joy
He's Simply Thirty Minutes of Continous Laughter
T. NELSON DOWNS CAMPBELL & YATES
The King of Kolns. In "300 Miles from Broadway."
"CELEST" ' 3 ESCARDOS
Sensational Wire Aitflst. Thrilling Bounding Table Acrobats.
MARIE CHEVILLE '■','■ 3 IMPERIALS
Classic and Dramatic Dancer. - Music, Mirth and Melody. ; (! v
You Can't Beat It Anywhere for Such Prices loc, 20c and 30c
Matinee Every Day at 2:30— Shows Every Night at 7 :30 and 9
'^JLX^^\Wjl^^k,4.C'W''!^g^ Spring St.. Between Second and Third.
! THE STANDARD OF VAUDEVILLE
NEW BILL STARTING MATINEE TODAY
] #%VAV\r^B3kr^'t\%\.'^ls^. Rest, Now See the Beat" Third. | )
( fWfWW\»W Matinee I.vrry Day at 2:15.
THE STANDARD OF VAUDEVILLE
NEW BILL STARTING MATINEE TODAY
j "You've Seen th) Rest, Now See the Best" \ j
I ' Imperial
Russian Dancers
** ftfW By Special Permission of the Czar, , \
i' T '> Alexander Vollnlne of Moscow. , . /
( Lydla I^pokawa of St. Petersburg. I
I " +heodor I.apokawa of St. Petersburg. I
( Felice Morris & Co. j Barrymore, Rankin & Co. j
J Presenting a whopping funny little skit, ! With Miss Doris Rankin, making 'The J
) "A Call" for Help," full of mirth and S All-star Cast of Vaudeville." offering \
merriment. ) "The White Slaver."
; Three White i Mile. Camille j Gus Onlaw
Kuhns OBER Trio
!| Good men singer, are .1- Delightfully chic and ! Genuine darl n g and
( ways A HIT here. The daintily diverting French skill are shown in their )
j Kuhns are superlative. ) chanteuse and ,"|.'"J^;.^ J .. . _ every -""'*'. __ j
I Old Soldier .Fiddlers- J Frank Morrell
( These are prlre winners, these old boys \ "The California Boy" certainly prorea j
In blue and aons of Dixie, and their that the native son la right there with
fiddling Is wonderful. , ) the fun dope. Hear him.
" / i ORPHEUM MOTION PICTURES
THE LATEST - - - - - THE BEST
EVERY NIGHT—IOc, 2«e, BOc, 7.1 c. MATINEE 2:15 DAILY—IOc, 2Se, Me. j
OROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER , ', m^ A r BT s ?^:
MOROSCO'S BURBANKJTHEATER M^l„ ST S S:
LOS ANGELES' LEADING STOCK COMPANY
w'J'lk I comedy with A tabasco touch I
only, ' —— ; ■ !
n American Widow
THE GREATEST piVORCE SATIRE EVER WRITTEN
Him a .rin Every sentence a smile. Every speech a giggle. Rvery scene a
"uVh. A .cream""rrom curiam to eurtam. Oct In on thla before the seats are all
Mm'« ISO DOC. 73c MATINEES SATURDAY AND SUNDAY. 10c 26c. 60c
Next week* .bo great dramatic novelty. "A MBSSA.ii-: FROM MARS."
HAMBURGER'S MAJESTIC THEATER J%£_'l_
lOS ANGELES I.IvADIN'U PLAYHOUSE—OIiver Morosco, Manager.
NEVER BEFORE AT THESE UNHEARD-OF PRICES
WIIV 40() BBATB IN BBCOND BALCONY AT ISO.
« Wiggs & Cabbage Patch
NIGHTS AND SATURDAY MATINEE, 26c, SOc, TtC.fl. WED. MATINEE 25c, 60c, 75c.
■■"-'■ -. _ ' ' - nKOINNINO NKXT SUNDAY. DECEMBER
M UTTJffTnI _. -M 11, DANIKL \. ARTHUR PRESENTS
tmm^^^^Kmmm^JmZ^L^jjl^ '" 1118 sensational song-comedy success,
TlMTJSl^rl A MATINEE IDOL
K>l J^^^^mJm HxjHJBH m%^ Music by Silvio lleln.
With LOUISE DRESSER and That DANDY CHORUS
-1000 laughs without a single blush."-Now York Herald. I v -
SIMPSON AUDITORIUM l" X' "KSS:
SECOND EVENT—SECOND SERIES—PHILHARMONIC COURSE . •
TOMORROW, TUESDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 6
EMILIO DE GOGORZA . ;;'
THE EMINENT BARITONE
▼ T-« 'i 1 Only Concert Appearance Here. PRICES: 60c, 75c, *1, $1.50
In Recital l,',' n „A seat sale at bartlett-s. ,___
.- _ . _„ .J Corner Washington and Main SU.
UNA PARK Corner Washington and Main 8t».
—^jff'iMTTii'FN^Royal Hungarian Band Concerts twice dally; the Diving, Venua;
.'"",.,"; llyman's VaudeVille Theater (with Ladles' Orchestra of 7 plecea—four
ni ii v'th.lj.i (tii- and two rftelß of Pictures). s*'"«- °Pen A" Bk"t,n« R,nk ' F'^re
\TTItA,TioNS-Mlniaiu,e Railway, Aerial Swing. Open Air Skating Rink, Figure
ElglM The Zoo. Shoot, Gallery, Temple of Palmistry,. Refreshments. NO LIQUORS
BOLD UN THE GROUNDS. ADMISSION 10c. ■ ■
. . ■—~ r. Vnd#r New Management.
Tj/M4Ma«< I rtlC ' Hungarian Cooking.
1^ >J 111 ICTI I f\ IC Rainier Beer on Draught.
IVtUIUVI \^y^\m*m*.^ D OXEAKV 4 v , r _ MooiiK, PROPS.
. . . ~ T Broadway, Near Second. iamw^BNi

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