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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, December 10, 1910, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-12-10/ed-1/seq-1/

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WEATHERrFORECAST;
Fair, warmer; light north wind
VOI.. XXXIII.
N I'M UK II 70.
PRICE: 50 GENTS J i^&K?
WHAT! FAIRBANKS
GET TOKIO POST?
O'BRIEN SAYS NO
Ambassador to Japan, in Los
Angeles, Detiies He Is to
Be Ousted by Taft
DIPLOMAT BOUND FOR EAST
Story Wafted from Washington
Holds Plum for Former
Vice President
"If anyone else has been appointed
ambassador to Japan from the United
States I have no knowledge of such an
appointment," said Thomas J. O'Brien
United States ambassador to the land
of th« Kising Sun, at the Alexandria
yesterday. Mr. O'Brien was discussing
a press dispatch sent out from Wash
ington, IJ. C, to the effect that a suc
cessor had been named for the position
he now fills, and that he would be
transferred to some European post.
"I am retaining the position of am
bassador to Japan at the personal re
quest of President Taft," continued Mr.
oiiricn. "Before leaving the capital
for the Far Eaßt I had an audience
with the president, and the subject of a
successor was not mentioned.
"Of course," he said, smiling, "I
would not tell you if It had. If the
president had suggested the possibility
of a successor I would not mention It—
but he did not, so I can tell. Tho sufc
ject was not broached at the audience,
and since you ask, I am scarcely of
the opinjon that I would be allowed to
sal! for Japan and resume my duties
there If a successor were to follow me
at once. It would be far more reason
able to suppose that I would bo recalled
now bofore leaving.
"I shall stick to the ambassador job
as long as posible. It is at the request
of the president, and I feel it my duty
to do so. Beyond the article I read in
the^papers this morning TJmow nothing
of the new ambassador to Japan."
ON HIS WAY TO POST
Mr. O'Brien, accompanied by his wife,
arrived in Los Angeles Thursday, reg
istering at the Alexandria. They are
on their way now to Tokio, where Mr.
O'Brien will resume his duties of am
bassador of the United States to Japan.
Mr O'Brien Left Tokio October 18,' and
since that time has been visiting in
the United States. He went to Wash
ington before starting from his home In
Michigan and had a personal confer
ence with the president in regard to the
ultuation In the Far Kast, at vhich no
mention of any proposed change in the
present representation In Japan was
made. A prss dispatch" from Washing
ton Thursday stated that former Vice
President Fairbanks was slated t^, suc
ceed Mr. O'Brien.
Mr. O'Brien passed most of his time
here visiting with Edmond D. Barry,
an attorney in Pasadrna, whom he had
known in the east. He returned from
Pasadena in time to take the afternoon
train ior San Francisco, whence he
salts for the Orient. Mr. O'Brien ex
pressed himself as being vastly pleased
■with Southern California, and remarked
as he was abcut to leave his hotel:
"I am sorry I was not asked my
opinion of this beautiful country until
train time. I could talk about it all
day."
DEATH TAKES COL. CRAWFORD
DUBUQUE, la., Dec. 9.—C01. W. P^
Crawford, 80 years old, commander of
the guard at the execution of Mrs.
Surratt and others fpr complicity In the
assassination of President Lincoln, died
here today.
The |
Sunday Herald '
■. Magazine '} i
A great issue—one you can't'afford
to miss. ■ ■ •
Partial Table of Contents :
tStewart Edward White '
tells about Los Angeles and Cali
fornia In his new novel "The Rules
of £ the Game." ~, ."...- ■'. ■
A Los Angeles Bachelor Girl
informs ~ her v sisters * how to live
comfortably and even i luxuriously
■in ■•■ one room v on: a few dollars.; a
week. An instructive article, inter
estingly written and well illustrated.
** The Stock Company Problem
with especial reference to Los An
geles, ' discussed*. by '<j a prominent
New York theatrical manager.
Meredith Nicholson
author of the "House of a Thousand
Candles,", J writes "The Confessions
of a Best Seller.".', \gj ,
>?A Page of Books
THE HOME <;^
Valuable . and ' timely hints for the
housewife. ■■ a ;*j'» .• . ".;. •■■.'
• A Page for Boys and Girls
i 5: A Great Short Story s (
written for • The Herald by George
H. Ford. HEAIMr
HEALTH
An authoritative series of articles.
v ; The Brama
1 What to see this weak at Los An
' geles theaters, with photos of scenes
| and players.
|.'V Departments ;.
i The kitchen," poultry, gardening, etc.
j:' The Sunday Herald
1 If you are. Dot c. subscriber you'd
I better;order, from your, corner^ news
I dealer now. ■ ■ ■ :.,;
LOS ANGELES HERALD
U. S. AMBASSADOR
•TO JAPAN WHO WAS
IN CITY YESTERDAY
i SBBBBB& • '
THOMAS 3. O'BBIEN
INDEX OF
HERALD'S NEWS
TODAY
LOS ANGELES
City's bond offer la turned down by
New York syndicate. PAGE 1
Ambassador O'Brien denies Falrhnnks
i» to net hie jjost at Toklo. PAGES 1
Aviation meet fund reaches $42,000.
PAGE 1
Aviator Wlllard will make high flight
to Paaadena. PAGH 7
Alhambra man denied divorce from wo
man to whom he has been married
forty years. PAGE 7
Mis. Rachel Levy, aged nearly 97, and
John W. Merrill. 93, dlo same day in
Los Angeles. PAGE 13
Donation of $80,000 makes Occidental
college fund $310,000. PAGH 12
Police think Fine Arts fire was caused
by burglars. PAGE 12
WomaM Is robbed in crowd while giv
ing water to aged man who faints.
PAGE 12
Girl suing for daughter's share of Bafti
win estate demands production fit al
leged marriage contract. PAGE 12
J. Marlon Brooka Is reported dying in
the French hospital. PAGK .".
Mayor Alexander says Chief of Police
Oalloway went to San Francisco mere
ly to attend convention. PAGE 10
Editorial and Letter Box. PAOE 4
Clubs and mullo. PAGE 5
Theaters. PAGE B
Sports. PAGE «
Markets end financial. PAGE 9
Building permits. PAGE 10
Shipping. PAGE 6
Marriage licenses, births, deaths. PAGE 10
Weather report. PAQB 10
Classified advertising. PAGES 101 l
SOUTH CALIFORNIA
Woman captures octopus while fishing
off Long Beach pier. PAGE 2
Long Beach Consolidated Oas company
to build new plant. PAGE 6
Winery men lose test case against lo
cal anti-saloon laws. PAGE 6
COAST
Mob burns camp of Industrial Workers
of the World at Fresno. PAGE 1
Federal register and receiver decide
against land owners in Northern and
Central California. PAGE 2
Arisona constitutional convention com
pletes work and adjourns. PAGE 3
Official cenßus returns show Tncoini
loses 33.000 by recount. PAGE 3
EASTERN
Population of United States, about 91,
--600,000. to be announced at noon to
day. PAGE 1
Secretary of War Dickinson demand*
airships for army. PAGE 3
Secretary of State Knox grants re
quest of Italy for surrender of Porter
Charlton, accused of wife murder.
PAGE 2
Georgo W. Perkins retires as Morgan's
partner to help solve conflict between
capital and labor. PAGE 2
Child icadß New York police tofcldnaped
boy. PAGE I
Christian Science board makes formal
announcement of program. PAGE 2
MINING AND OIL
New Sonora railroad to open rich min
ing country begins grading. PAGE 6
Independent agency favors curtailment
of production. PAGE 6
WHAT'S GOING ON TODAY IN
LOS ANGELES
AMUSEMENTS
Bolatco — Eflackwood-Belaseo players In
"Shertock Holmes." 2:15 and 8:15 p. m.
Buibank —Morosco players in "An Ameri
can Widow." 2:16 and 8:15 o- m.
Grand opera house —Ferris Hartman and
company In "Nearly a Hero," 2:15 end 8:15
p. m. •
Levy'n cafe chantant—Continuous vaude
ville, 2:30 i>. m. to 12:30 a. m.
Lou Angeles—Vaudeville, 2:30 p. m., 7:30
p. m. and 9 p. ni.
Luna park—Outdoor amusements, band
concerts, moving pictures and vaudeville,
10 a. m. to mldniirht. •
Majestic—"Mrs. Wlggs of the C&bbase
Patch," 2:30 and 8:15 p. m.
Olympic—Musical farce, "The Evening
S-t-a-r," 3. 7:46 and 9:15 p. m.
Orpheum—Vaudeville, 2:15 p. ra, and 8:16
p. m.
Pantages—Vaudeville, 2:30 p. m., 7 p. m.
and 9 p. m. ,
Princess —Musical farce, "( oh»n tlio
Frenchman," 3 p. m.. 7:<5 p. m. and 9.15
OF INTEREST TO WOMEN
Federation of College Woman's clubs, Y.
W. C. A.. 2:30 p. m.
Muslcale, Hollywood school fof girls. 3
p m.
Garden party. Dr. Henrlette E. Swoet ami
Mlbs Jennie Lowe. 3311 West Temple, S
Cat club show continues all day In Pan
tages theater building, Broadway, between
Fifth and Sixth- streets.
SPORTS
Football—Los Angeles high vs. Palo Alto
htgh, state Rugby championship, Bovard
field, 2:30 p. m.
Baseball—San Diego vs. McCormlcks, Win
ter league, Vernon, 2:30 p. m.
MISCELLANEOUS
Conference of teachers to discuss plan to
legalize teaching of foreign languages In
intermediate schools In rfudttorlum of Poly
technic high school, forenoon.
Schoolmasters" club banquet, 349 Bouth
Hill street, tonight.
City club meets at 12:16 X* m. at West
minster hotul. Meyer Ussner will speak
on "Proposed Htatn legislation."
Legislation, committee meets In council
chamtwr at 9:SO a. m. to dlseusa Boyle
Heights brickyards
SATURDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 10, 1910.
GUY BOND OFFER
TURNED DOWN BY
N.Y. FINANCIERS
Aqueduct Funds Not in Sight, and
Tunnel Workers Laid Off to
Save $6000 a Month
WASHBURN GETS TELEGRAM
Mayor Says Sinking Fund Can Be
Used to Keep Up Owens
River Work
Hopes that \ money for construction
work of . the aqueduct and the -siphon
steel; would' be s forthcoming, at once
from the bond syndicate were banished
yesterday when A: W. Bullard, the syn
dicate's representative,, telegraphed W.
J. Washburn that the city's offer had
been. rejected. . j ■ ■ ■ . - * ■---' •
. In his message to the chairman of
the finance committee Bullard stated
that the offer, had been rejected as soon
as it had been ma.de, but as it was a
foregone conclusion that It would not
be entertained he had not considered It
worth while formally to notify the city
officials that such was the case. •£
i While city officers have been Issuing
manifestos back and forth and cover
ing reams of paper with, figures based
on the acceptance by the syndicate of
the city's proposition, there appears -to
have been no reason for It, because the
syndicate did not give any thought to
the matter at all, - but owing to the
failure of Bullard to notify Mr. Wash
burn, this was not known. : ... ;
• Feeling• that It was high, time the
syndicate was saying "yes" or "no" to
the city's proposal, Mr. Washburn sent
a telegram to Bullard Thursday after
noon, as follows: „', .'■ :■-••; ■•■•■'
■ "No reply, has been received to offer
made by council to : syndicate, through
you, under date of November 23. Pa
rers In this morning's issue quote two
members of syndicate as saymg that no
proposal has been received.' Is this an
error or did your message go astray?"
„. ■ LEAVES SINKING FUND FKKE |£ft
' In reply ■ to • this $ telegram Bullard
wired' yesterday afternoon:
j "Telegram December 8 received. Your
proposition was submitted to syndicate
both i after it ■ was : made November ,23
and tentatively prior thereto. As ten
tatively made syndicate declined to
consider it, ■' and they • had no other
thought after it was formally made. I
did not think it -• necessary to advise
you to this effect in a formal way."* j
"When Mayor I Alexander was told of
the syndicate's "refusal to accept the
proposition of which he was the author,
he said: V -'■• : -—-:■■■ '-_;;.".■
"■';"! hardly expected they would accept
it. But it is better'to have them re
fuse out offer than to ' accept: the pro
posal they made to tie; up our sinking
fund. We can go'right ahead and build
the aqueduct, and the I syndicate' must
elect February 1 if it Is to exercise its
option and take all the bonds. Mean
while,- if we get short of funds between
now and February 1, we can use the
sinking fund' to help along,'which we
could not do under any circumstances
if the syndicate's offer had been ac-
cepted."
The board ot public works yesterday
reduced expenses in the construction
of the aqueduct $6000 a month by dis
charging a gang of tunnel workers on
the Saugus division.
A. A. Hubbard, president of he board
of public works, said:
"If we had this money we would not
have had to reduce expenses, but could
have Increased them. At the rate we
are now running the city will lose ap
proximately $1000 a day that could be
saved with money enough to rush the
work at the maximum. The fixed
charges are about $1000 a day, and by
completing the work earlier we could
stop this expense."
20 RESCUED FROM TERRIBLE
PLIGHT IN LAKE ONTARIO
Steamer Grounds on Island in a
Blinding Snow Storm
OSWEGO, N. V.. Dec. 9.—Twenty
persons, ten on an island and ten on
a stranded vessel, \yere rescued In
Lake Ontario today. The steamship
John Sharpless of Chicago, grounded
on the shore «f Galloup island while
going from Chicago to Ogdensburg.
A snowstorm was raging and waves
rolled over her, flooding the boiler
room and putting out the fires.
Not until today was the vessel
sighted by the steamer Hlnckley, and
by that time, driven from the vessel
by the intense cold, Mrs. George Rus
sell, wife of the first mate, and half
of the crew had got safely on the
island by means of a lifeboat.
The Hinckley took all hands aboard
and brought them here. The Sharp
less was abandoned, but probably can
be saved.
JAPANESE STEAMERS GO
DOWN IN STORM; ALL LOST
VICTORIA, B. C, Dec. 9.—The Jap
anese steamer Kumumoto, 1993 tons,
was lost with her crew of thirty-four
men November 27 off Sado Island while
bound from Muroan to Tsing Tao with
ties. A number of'bodies were washed
ashore on the island.
In the same storm the steamer Tal
hel went down off Aklta prefecture and
ten of her crew were drowned.
The steamer Gensan was damaged
off Sado island, but reached shelter.
SIXTY MINERS ENTOMBED;
RESCUERS FIND TWO DEAD
Men Buried Alive by Explosion in
Alberta
VANCOUVER. B. C, JJec. 9.—Sixty
miners have been entombed in the
Bluebeard colliery at Frankfort, Al
berta, as a result of an explosion
■which occur/ed there today. Two
bodies have been found by the res
cuers.
It is believed some of the entombed
men may be alive, and strenuous ef
forta are being made to reach them. I
The Great Act, "American Dollars"
S
Waldorf Astor, son of the expatriated American millionaire, has been elected a member of
parliament.—News Item. _________________
ELECTION FIZZLE
A BLOWN TO LORDS
Undecisive Result May Prove the 1
Same as Defeat of Gov
ernment at Poljs
LONDON, Dec. 10.—More than two
thirds, or 460 members, of the new
house of commons have been elected
and the political parties stand prac
tically as they were at the dissolution
of parliament. The Unionists, who last
w-tek expected to grain at least twenty
thus far have secured but three.
The standing of the parties tonight is:
Government coalition: Liberals, 16;
-Nationalists, 63; Laborites, 29; Inde
rendent Nationalists, 6; total, 251.
Opposition: Unionists, 209.
Liberal gains, 14.
Unionists gains, 21.
Labor gains, 4.
Outside of the defeat of Timothy
Healy, Nationalist, in hid old constit
uency, Louth, which is attributed to
Cardinal Logue prohibiting the priests
participating in the election, todays
results did not produce any surprise,
unless it was in the failure of the Lib
erals to recapture Denbigh. The elec
tion in this Welsh borough Is charac
teristic of the whole election. W.
Ormsby-Gore won the seat last Jan
uary by eight votes, and today he wbn
by nine, although the polling on both
sides fell off. .
Mr Frewen has offered his seat for
Cork to Mr. Healy. but Healy has de
clined it, for he intends to try to up
set the election at Louth of Richard
Hazelton, Nationalist, alleging illegal
practices on the part of his opponents.
The most optimistic Unionists now
have no hope of making serious in
roads on the government majority.
Their leaders insist, however, that
the election was unnecessary, that the
result practically amounts to a vote of
a lack of confidence and that with the
Nationalists and the Laboritos exact
ing the fullest price for their support
it will be impossible for the cabinet to
remain in power.
To this the Liberals reply that the
Unionists, after the January election,
insisted that the government had re
ceived simply a mandate on the bud
get and that the election was not de
cisive on the question of the statutes
of the house of lords.
Now, they add, both parties have
placed the house of lords in the fore
front and even a reduced coalition
majority will justify them in proceed
ing with the veto bill, and if neces
sary in asking of King George a guar
antee to insure Its passage.
HINDUS FIGHT FOR COWS;
150 INJURED IN CALCUTTA
Riots Follow Dispute with Mo
hammedans Over Rites
CALCUTTA, Dec. 9.—One hundred
and fifty persons were injured In riots
here tonight. The trouble grew out
of the strong feeling between Hindus
and Mohammedans, brought about by
the intention of the latter to sacrifice
cows at the coming Mohammedan fes
tival.
The Hindus regard the cow as sa
cred, and endeavored to get the po
lice to Interfere and stop the proposed
sacrifice. The police, however, de
clined to interfere, and the trouble
followed.
GEMS STOLEN; SUES BOAT
CHICAGO, Dec. ».—Mrs. Rose Doug
las Lewis, wife of Col. James H.
Lewis, attorney, today filed suit in the
supreme court for $15,000 damages
from the Cunard Steamship company.
She charges that in 1909, while she
waa making a Europeean trip, Jewels
worth that amount were stolon from
her Btate room.
FRENCHMAN ASCENDS
10,499 FEET; BREAKS
AIR RECORD AGAIN
PAU, France, Dec. 9.—Ascending
from the aviation field here today,
M. Legagnieux broke the world's
altitude record, rising to a height of
10,499 feet. The Frenchman landed
half frozen after a remarkable plane
downward.
The previous official height rec
ord was made by Ralph Johnstone,
who in tile recent meet at Belmont
park, soared 9714 feet.
At Philadelphia November 23, J.
Armstrong Drexel made a remark
able high flight and claimed a
world's record. When this was dis
puted Drexel requested the officials
of the weather bureau to examine
his barograph. They did so and
credited him with an altitude of
9897 feet. These figures, however,
have not been accepted officially by
the Aero club of America.
$42,000 FOR AIR
MEET SUBSCRIBED
Herrin Gives $10,000 for Avia
tors—Date Fixed for Dec.
24 to Jan. 3
An aviation mast whtptt, it in claimed,
will be even bigger and better than
the one held last yuar, will be held in
Los Angelea December 24 to January
3, the proceeds from which are to go
toward creating a children's fresh air
fund. Already $42,0*0 has been raised.
The aviation committee, of which
William A. Garland is chairman and
Motley H. Flint secretary and treas
urer, met yesterday afternoon and set
tled on the date given. Both Domin
guei Held and Santa Anita were con
sidered by the committee as the proper
place for holding the meet, the matter
finally being laid on the table for fur
ther discussion when the committee
meets again today.
Roy Knabenshue, representative of
the Wright Brothers company, which
controls Aviators Walter Brookins and
"Arch" Hoxsey; R. H. Young, manager
for Glenn CurtlM, who controls C. F.
Willard and "Bud" Mars, and the
managers for Hubert Latham will meet
with the committee today. Jt will en
deavor to make contracts with these
flyers to take part In the meet. If
they find it impossible to secure sat
isfactory contracts the money sub
scribed wilr*be refunded ami the meet
called off.
During yesterday's meeting of the
committee a delegation of Pasadena
men, representing the Tournament of
Hoses in that city, appeared and pro
tested against a program being given
on the date of the Tournament of
Roses, January 2. It was agreed to
have no program on that date, and
Pasadena, as a return favor, sub
scribed $10,000 toward the meet.
President. Garland yesterday an
nounced the personnel of the general
committee or board of directors which
will control the meet. They are, be
sides those mentioned ir. yesterday's
Herald, Fred L. Baker, VV. G. Kerck
hoff and W. W. Woods.
In speaking of the meet yesterday
Mr. Garland said:
"We will have a successful aviation
mcct —one which will be a credit to
Los Angeles. I have sefcoted the board
of directors with the greatest care, and
think I Have h representative body of
lii.ii a buily wblotl will do things."
1 (Continued on l'agc Xwu)
CTXrr^T T? ITYPTI?Q • daily 2«. on trains 80.
ixJLiil K^KJt: JLEio. SUNDAYS Be. ON TRAINS 10*
MOB BURNS I.W.W.
OUT; STORMS JAIL
Industrial Workers Beaten at
Fresno When Police In
vite an Attack
FRESNO, Dec. 9.—Following an or
der given by the cliief of police to all
patrolmen to allow members of the
Industrial Workers of the World to
speak, unmolested, on the streets, and
a statement that the citizens might
do as they wished, a large mob gath
ered tonight about 7 o'clock, attacked
and severely beat a large' number of
the Industrial Workers who sought to
speak, then marched to the I. W. W.
camp outside the city limits and burned
a big tent in which the members lived,
together with all supplies kept there.
The members of the I. W. W. sought
to make resistance, threatening to
shoot if the mob crossed a certain
"dead line" near the camp, but broke
and ran when the crowd of men and
boys surged across. Some were forced
to flee in their underclothes, carrying
their outer garments in their arms.
After devastating the I. W. W. camp
the mob marched back to the city and
started for the county jail, where
about fifty members of the organiza
tion are imprisoned. Hearing of their
approach, the sheriff pu» a heavy
fcuanl around the juil to resist inva
sion shoi.ld an attempt he made.
For the second time in the history
of the Jail big double steel doors
which were installed for the purpose
of mob resistance were put into use.
When the crowd reached the jail a
demand was made for the prisoners,
but no violence was nttetmpted. The
men were finally persuaded to dis
perse after one or two short speeches
had been made to them.
WESTERN SPAIN RAZED BY
CYCLONE; MANY DROWNED
Vessels Sunk in Harbor; Villages
Are Flooded
CERBREBE, France, Dec. 9.—Ad
vices received here late today state
that western Spain lias been swept by
a cyclone that razed everything in its
path. Several small vessels were sunk
in the harbor of Corunna and a num
ber of persona wore drowned.
At Seville the river rose ten feet,
flooding the valley.
Several persons were killed and many
injured near Bilbao.
FLOODS THREATEN PORTUGAL
OPORTO, Portugal, Dec. 9.—There
are heavy floods in northern Portugal.
The Sousea river, normally a modest
stream, is today a raging torrent 36
feet deep- The pure water supply of
this city is threatened.
FIRST WOMAN JURY CALLED
TO PASS ON DIVORCE DECREE
S4N FRANCISCO, Dec. 9.—For the
first time in the history of this country
a jury of twelve women sat in a su
perior court today when Judge Graham
summon, d twelve feminine spectator*
to decide a modification of a decree of
divorce, whereby Mrs. Mary A. Black
acquired tlio i ustody of her minor son
from her husband, Owen A. Black.
SUES FOR LEOPOLD'S WEALTH
BRUSBELS, Dec. 9.—Attorneys for
Princess Louise of Belgium entered a
formal suit today for the recovery of
$8,000,000 which belonged to her father,
the late Kin^ Leopold, and is now held
by the Nieder Fullbac h founOailon. The
li.-lKhm government also claims the
money on the ground that ii came from
the lieituaii Congo und belongs to the
state. i
THE HOME PAPER OP
GREATER LOS ANGELES
91,500,000 IS LAST
CENSUS ESTIMATE,
FIGURES AT NOON
Bureau Computes Job of Count
ing All the Noses in the
United States
FIVE STATES ARE MISSING
Georgia, Montana, Washington,
Wisconsin and Wyoming to
Be Announced with Total
tAssuuiaie.l FieoSj
WASHINGTON, Dec. 9.—"When an
nounced by the census bureau at noon
tomorrow the total population of the
United States will be shown to ap
proximate 91,500,000.
This estimate is based on all the
states except Georgia, Montana, Wash
ington, Wisconsin and Wyoming, the
figures on most of which Director Du
rand has decided to withhold until the
total returns for the country at largo
are announced.
The states so far given have an ag
gregate population of 85,362,725. This
is an increase of 20.4 per cent over the
aggregate population contained by
the same states in 1900.
The five states not» included in the
computation had an aggregate pop
ulation oof 5,139,336 in 1900. If they
maintain the growth of the other
states, their aggregate will be brought
up to 6,186,774, giving a grand total
in the United States of 91,549,503.
Even if there should be no gain ;•!.
all, the total would be 90,502,061.
Washington is expected to show a •
increase of almost 100 per cent, an.
Georgia is counted on to sustain th •
average, but while Wisconsin prob>
ably will score a gain, it is not be*
lieved that it will reach 20 per cent.
There Is no doubt that the total will
be over 91,000,000. The computation 13
confined to the United States proper,
and excludes all possessions.
NAN PATTERSON BOBS UP
AGAIN, AS RICH MAN'S WIFE
Actress. Twice Tried for Murder,
Living in Seattle
I SEATTLE, 1 Dec. | 9.—Nan Patterson,"
member of the original "Florodora',\
sextet, who -was * twice tried ; for r the
murder of Caesar Young in New ; York,
is living in Seattle, thi* wife nt Captain
Sumnca-.- Preseott.': a '• veteran- of- the
Spanish-American war. • . , j
Captain Prescott and Miss Patterson ,
were secretly married In St. Paul the
latter part of October, coming to Seat
tle shortly afterward. Captain Prescott,
kept the identity of his wife secret, not
even telling: his parents, who live In
Chicago and are. said to 'be wealthy.
"I am sorry our secret has become
known," . said Captain Prescott ; last
night. .
Captain Prescott is head of a manu
facturing company in Marlnette, Wis.,
and since coming to Seattle has been
connected with a largo iron works.
»» » ' . , ■■:■
IN HOBBLE SKIRT, ROLLS
20 FEET DOWN MOUNTAIN
Wife of Mining Man Seriously In
jured by Fall
SAN BERNARDINO. Dec. 9.—Never
again, says Mrs. Harrison Allen, wife of
the secretary of the Gold Belt mining
group at Doble, in reference to a hobble
skirt as a desert garment.
While trudging up the mountains
above the water tunnel at the mines,
Mrs. Allen, who was clad in a hobble
skirt, fell. The climb up the steep and
rugged cliff is no mean task, and with
a hobble skirt, to use the expression of
the lady herself, "It is simply awful."
But the fall was not the end of the
troubles for which the hobble was at
fault. She rolled for twenty feet down
the precipitous side of the mountain
and was severely bruised. The day fol
lowing the accident the injuries proved
more serious than at first appreciated,
Mrs. Allen not being able to stand. She
has been taken to her Los Angeles
home.
BIG BEQUEST TO T. R.
REVOKED IN CODICIL
Former Admirer Changes Mind
About Gift to Roosevelt
SOUTH BEND. Ind.. Dec. 9.—Theo
dore Roosevelt was presented with 1000
acres of valunablo timber limd in Scott
county, Tennessee, by a former admir
er, whose will was probated in SoafcJi
Bend today, but this man, just beijjLe
his death, changed his mind and in a
codicil he bequeaths the entire property
to his brother.
Charles W. Hall, who died in Benton
Harbor. Mich., a year ago, left an es
tate worth between $100,000 and $200,000.
Ho is the donor.
SON IS NOT PRISONER,
DECLARES ENRIQUE CREEL
MEXICO City, Deo. 9.—Enrique Creel,
foreign minister, tonight emphatically
denied the report from San Antonio.
Texas, that his son had been captured
by revolutionists ana was held as a
hostage in Chihuahua. Mr. Creel said:
"My son, Enrique, has been visiting
me for several weeks and departed at S
o'clock tonight for Chihuahua. My
other sona have not been molested in
any way. The report is absolutely
false."
HIGH SCHOOL BONDS VOTED
S \N DiHGO, Dec. 9.—The question of
issuing bonds to the amount of $200,000
for the construction of a polytechnic
high s'-hoi.il was ■übmltted to the peo
ple today. Less than <!0 per rent of tho
voten went to tin polls, but the bonds
i by \.\u: overwhelming vote of
vm io soi.

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