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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, December 11, 1910, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-12-11/ed-1/seq-2/

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U.S. CENSUS GIVES
101,100,000 LIVING
UNDER OLD GLORY
Nation, Without Counting Foreign
Possessions, Has 91,972,
--266 Inhabitants
10-YEAR GAIN 21 PER CENT
Pacific Coast States Make the
Best Showing in In
creased Growth
fft;: ■= -
[Associated Press]
WASHINGTON, Dec. 10.—In the
United States and all its possessions
the Stars and Stripes protect 101,100,000
souls. This is the official estimate of
the united States bureau of the census
announced today, In connection with
the population statistics for the country
as enumerated in the thirteenth decen-
nial census, it includes the Philippines,
Samoa, tiuam, Hawaii, Alaska and the
Panama canal zone.
Within its borders on the North
American continent, exclusive of Alas
ka, the United States has a total of
91,972,266 inhabitants. In the last ten
years the states of the Union had an
Increase in population of 15,977,691,
■which amounts to 21 per cent over the
1900 figures.
Stnce the first census was taken in
1790 the country has grown twenty-five
times us large, the population then
having been 3,929,214, slightly larger
than the present population of Texas.
The growth of the country was great
er than has been anticipated by the ex
pert statisticians, who have closely
■watched the progress of the country's
population.
In a statement explainine the in
crease of the population of continental
United States to 91,972,266, Director Du
rand attributed the growth largely to
greater net additions through immigra
tions.
He finds a wider disparity In the
growth of different states in the past
decade than for any other. The range
Is from a decrease from 5.6 per cent to
an increase of 120 per cent in Washing
ton.
PACIFIC COAST IXCMSASKS
"The greatest change in growth is
found in the three Pacific coast states
and Nevada and New Mexico, all of
which grew far faster in the last ten
years than in the one preceding.
"The states showing the lowest in
crease, falling below 10 per cent," he
said, "are lowa, Missouri, Kentucky,
Indiana and Tennessee, the three north
ern New England states and Maryland
and Delaware.
"The states showing the next lowest
increase between 10 und 20 per cent in
clude Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Illi
nois, Minnesota, Nebraska, Kansas,
Virginia, North Carolina, South Caro
lina, Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi.
Htatea which show an increase from 20
to 30 per cent are, for the most part,
the great manufacturing states, includ
ing Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Con
necticut, Now York, Pennsylvania and
West Virginia, and the only other
states between 20 and 30 per cent are
-Arkansas and Texas.
'The states which show an Increase
exceeding 30 per cent are, with the ex
ception of New Jerßey and Florida, all
in the west and make up a belt com
prising one-third of the area of the
United States. South Dakota, Colo
rado and Utah had increases between
30 and 50 per cent, while North Da
kota, Wyoming, Oregon, Nevada, Cali
fornia, New Mexico and Arizona in
creased between BO and 100 per cent
and Oklahoma, Idaho and Washing
ton more than 100 per cent.
WEST FORGES AHEAD
"The increase in the ten years, 1900
to 1910, was greater than in the pre
vious decade in twenty-six of the forty
jiine states, fifteen of these being west
of the Mississippi river.
"The increase in the last decade was
losb than in the previous one In thir
teen states, most of which are east of
the Mississippi river.
"The population of the nine geo
graphic divisions are: New England,
6,552,281; middle Atlantic, 19,315,892;
east north central, 18,250,621; west north
central, 11,637,921; south Atlantic, 12,-<
194,695; east south central, 8,409,901; !
west south central, 8.784,534; mountain,
2,633,517; Pacific, 4,192,304.
"The population of the northern sec
tion Is 55,571,155; southern section, 29,
--389,330; western section, 6,825,821.
"The pencentages of increase from
1900 to 1910 in the geographic divisions
are: New England, 17.2; middle At
lantic, 25; east north central, 14.2; west
north central, 12.5; south Atlantic, 16.8;
cast south central, 11.4; west south
central, 34.5; mountain, 57.3; Pacitic,
73.5.
"Tho increase was J7.7 in the north
ern section, 19.8 in the southern sec
tion and 66.8 in the western section.
FIGUKKS AUK ANALYZED
"The fact that the increase of the
■whole was greater from 1900 to 1910
than in the preceding decade was due
entirely to the added growth in the
middle Atlantic, mountain and Pacilic
divisions. In all six of the other di
visions the increa-se in the last decade
"\vaa less than in the previous one."
Mr. Durand expresses the opinion
that later statistics probably will show
that more than 4." per cent of the pop
ulation of the country is urban—that
is, in places of iiiif'O inhabitants or
more. The population living in cities
of 25,000 <>r more has Increased much
more rapidly than that in the rest or
the country. The population of such
cities in I'JlO was 25.508.Q07, as com
pared with 21,078,189 for the Kama cities
in 1900, the Increase being 7,429,515, or
35.2 per c< ni.
In the north the proportion of tho
total p ipulatlon living in cities of 25,000
inhabitants was 10.6 per cent; in the
south it was 12.8 per cent;, la the west,
31.5 per cent.
The population in the rest of the
country, Including nmallei cities and
rural districts, in 1910, was G3,464,259,
as compai ed with &4,!U6,356 in 1900; the
increase, 8,557,i>i3, or only about a mil
lion more than tlio. increase of the cities
alone. The p.»r o*nt of increase was
15.C per cent, or leas than half the rat 9
shown by cities of 25,000 inhabitants.
FAIIMS HOLD II'.OI'I.K
Ho finds that "while there has been
probably a somewhat greater difference
between tho growth of urban popula
tion *Jld of rural population in thi last
decade than lv that preceding, the dif
ference was not as great as in tho doc
ade of 1880 to IS9O, or as it was in most
of tho earlier decades.
"The conclusion cannot, therefore, he
safely drawn that there is, in any
broad uense, an increasing tendency
by the population to leave the country
and go to the city."
The declino in rural population has
been eubstantlally s;an«ral throughout
the great | northern middle section lof
the country. In th« states of Ohio, In
diana, Illtnois, Michigan, ; Wisconsin,
Minnesota, lowa, Missouri, '• Kentucky
and Tennessee, which 11© in a solid,
body, 440 out of the 950 counties de
creased' In population from - 1900 to
1910. ■ ;
The director closes by saying:
"The decrease in rural population' In
the middle states Is by no means due
to lack of prosperity, as the agricul
tural statistics of the census - bureau
show an extraordinary increase in the
value of farm lands. and farm prop
erty throughout this section and»wlll
doubtless indicate a great Increase in
the income of the farmers when 'the
statistics are compiled."
Following is the summary of popu
lation: . „
SUMMAHT OF POPULATION | J
_ Years Inc.
Sta&s— ' 1910 • 1900. S Pet
fontinenta! V. 5...91,972,268 75.9M.8T1 21.0
Cantlnental TJ. 5....91.972.?*! 76,994,57R 81.0
Alabama 2,158,09S 1,828,397 1«.»
Arizona 204,334 132,931 66.2
Arknnsa 1,675,449 1,311. - 20.0
California a,377,549 1.455.053 60.1
Colorado 799,024 539.700 45.0
Connecticut 1,114.758 905,420 22.7
Delaware 202.323 - 184,73 a, 9.5
District of Columbia 331. • . 278.718 IS.B
Florida 762,615 628.542 42.4
Georgia 2,609,121 2,218,331 17.7
Idaho ...'. 386.594 161,722 101.
Illinois 6,638.69t 4.821,550 16.9
Indiana 2.700,878 2,616,4«3 7.3
lowa 2,224,771 2,231,853 "0.3
Kansas 1,690,949 1,470,495 15.0
Kentucky 2,L'89,!>05 2.147.174 6.6
Louisiana 1,65-1,388, 1,381,825 19.9
Maine 742., 694.466 6.9
Maryland J. 295,348 1,188,041 9.0
Massachusetts 3,366,416 2,805,348 20.0
Michigan 2,810,173 2,420,983 16.1
Minnesota 2,075,708 1.7(1,394 18.5
Mississippi 1.797,114 1.651,270 15.8
Missouri • 3,293,335 8,106,888 6.0
Montana 376.053 243,329 64.6
Nebraska 1,192,214 1,066,300 11.
Nevada 81,875 42.335 93.4
New Hampshire .... 430,572 411,688 4.6
New Jfrsey J,537.669 1,883,669 34.7
New Mexico 327,301 195,810 67.
New York 9,113,614 7,268,894 25.4
North Carolina .... 2.206,287 1,893,810 16.5
North Dakota 677,05* : 519.146 74.7
Ohio 4,767,121 4,157,645 ■ 14.7
Oklahoma 1,657,155 790,391 109.7
Oregon 672.765 413,536 62.7
Pennsylvania 7,665.111 6,302,116 21.6
Rhode Island 542,610 428,656 26.8
South Carolina 1.615,400 1,340,316 13.1
South Dakota ...... 688,888 401,570 45.4
Tonnrseee 3.154.753 2,020,616 8.1
Texas 3,896,642 8,048,710 27.8
Utah r.73,361 276.740 84.9
Vermont 365,956 343,641 3.6
Virginia 2,061,612 1.854,184 11.2
Washington 1,141.990 618.103 120.4
West Virginia 1,521,119 958,800 27.4
Wisconsin 2,333,860 8.069,042 12.7
Wyoming 145,965 92,531 67.7
Alaska 84,354 63.592 1.2
Hawaii ..., 191,909 164,001 24.6
Military and naval. 66,608 91,219 ....
Porto Rico 1,118.012 X 553.243
•Includes 952,243 persons in Porto Rico (1599
census).
•♦Decrease, .
xAccordhiE to the census of Porto Rico, tak
en In 1899 under the direction of the war de
partment.
MACVEAGH MUST DIRECT
EXPENDITURE, SAYS TAWNEY
Chairman of Committee on Ap
propriations Is Besieged
WASHINGTON, Doc. 10.—Chairman
Tawney of the house committee on
appropriations who has been stormed
by a host of his colleagues In an ef
fort to find out what he purposes to
do to provide appropriations for car
rying out the $26,000,000 of authoriza
tions made by congress last session
for public buildings, has announced
that his committee will not provide a
dollar for public building purposes
unless Secretary MacVeagti so rec
ommends. The authorizations were
made without appropriating a dollar
for putting them Into effect.
Representative Austin of Tennessee
and other members favored making 1 a
strong- protest to Secretary MacVeagh
within a few days because he did not
include these $26,000,000 of authorizai
tlong In hiH estimates which he sub
mitted to congress.
Congressmen who have talked with
Secretary MacVeagh say he will not
submit any estimates to provide for
the authorized structures and that the
treasury Is in no shape just now to
stand an additional drain of such di
mensions.
TO ABANDON ASSAY OFFICES
WASHINGTON, Dec. 10.—It Is the
intention of the treasury department, it
congress authorizes, to abandon the as
say office at St. Louis, which the mint
bureau considers no longer necessary.
Other assay offices, among them the
one at Charlotte, N. C, and even some
of the mints may fall under the ax of
economy, if present plans become laws.
JOINS MONETARY COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, Dec. 10.—Speaker
Cannon has announced the appoint
ment of Representative George W.
Prince of Illinois to the national mone
tary commission, to succeed the late
Jesse R. Overstreet.
PORTER CHARLTON GETS
HABEAS CORPUS WRIT
TRENTON. N. J., Dec. 10.—Judge
Rellstab in the United States circuit
court today granted a writ of habeas
corpus in the case of Porter Charlton,
who Is accused of having killed his
wife, Mary Scott Castle Charlton, in
Italy.
The court also granted a writ of
ceritorari for tho bringing of the case
before him on December 19.
10-DAY COCKING MAIN
BEGINS IN LOUISIANA
MONROE, La.,- Dec. 10.—The. first
event of a ten-day cocking main, said
to be the largest since the Civil War,
occurred hero today. The main was
between F. H. Crook of Valiant, Okla.,
and W. L. Allen of Morman, Miss., th»
latter winning. Several hundred per
sona are here, including large delega
tions from San Francisco and Chicago.
DR. W. WYLIE, CHIEF SURGEON
PHOENIX, Ariz., Dec. 10.—Dr. Win
Wylie of Phoenix has been appointed
chief surgeon of the Randolph lines,
succeeding Dr. George Goodfellow,
who died a few days ago. lhe head
quarters will be moved from Tucaon
to Phoenix,
AMUSEMENTS
QIMPSON AUDITORIUM «* s- Hos" 8t-
Christian Science Lecture
by Prcf. Hermann S. Herlng, C. S. 8.. of Concord. N. H., Sunday arternoon, Decem
ber tli 1910, at S o'clock. Admission free. This lorture will be repeated on Monday
and Tuesday evenings, December 12 and I 3. at same plara nt 8 o'clock.
PRINCESS THEATER wJS^^JS^ISI:
I HI-, KEK, the big eastern laugliinß hit. "TUB GAY I.OKI) ILiKBY," fea
turing Il'IJI) AItDATH, the unoxc elled versatile comedian, supported by a
stock c, impany second to none, and the favorite chorus of the city. Evenings, 7:46
and 8:16, Matinees 8 B- m. dally, except Tuesday and FTlday. Popular prices,
10c. iiOc. 2Sc. . ■ ■ ■ - '■'■
LUNA PARK Comer Washington and Main Sts.
NOW ol'I.N Royal Hungarian Ban d Concerts t\vi,-e daily; the Diving Venuaj
Carousal; Hyinau's Vaudeville Theater (with Ladles' Orchestra ot 1 —four
acts pf Vaudeville and two reels of Pictures).
ATTRACTIONS*—Miniature Hallway Aerial Swing. Op»n Air Skating nink, Figure
Eight, The 7,na. Hlinntlnir Collery. Temple of I'almlslry, Hi-freahments. NO LIQUORN
BOLD ON' TUG GItOUN'DS. ADMISSION lOc, ■ >
LOS ANGELES HERALD: SUNDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 11, 1010.
VOLCANIC FLAMES
ILLUMINE ISLANDS
Skipper of Schooner off Alaskan
Coast Tells of Marvelous
Night Eruption
FIRE RISES THOUSAND FEET
Trapper Brings News That Dis
turbance Did Much Damage
on the Unamak Shore
BEATTLE, Dec. 10— Volcanic dis
turbances la the Aleutian islands and
the earthquakes In Bering sea continue.
Captain B. E. Hofman of the power
schooner P. J. Abler, the last \ctesel to
leave Bering sea, reports that Mounts
Pavloff and Shiahaldin, in the Aleutian
islands, are still in eruption. On Octo
ber 17, when the Abler was forty milea
out at sea, he saw flames issuing from
the crater at Pavloff. The night was
clear and mountain, sea, sky and land
wire brilliantly illuminated by walls
and tongues of fire that shot suo to 1000
feel Into the air. The flames rose and
,n id again at brief intervals, volumes
of escaping steam and smoke ascending
to the heavens. Dark columns, judged
to be huge masses of rock, were belched
forth far above the 10,000-foot peak.
SHOCKS AKK I'KLT AT NOME
II Benson, a Swedish trapper whose
camp is on a sandspit on the east side
of Unamajt island, near the outlet of
False bay, told Captain Hofman of
much damase on Umimak island by
recent volcanic disturbances around
Mount Shishaldin.
Slight earthquake shocks have been
felt recently at Nome, but the disturb
ance was too far out at sea to do any
damage except the tremor of the first
week of November, which sent ashore
a tidal wave that swept the beach.
In the winter Bering sea Is frozen
solid for a distance of forty miles from
land, the pack ice from the Arctic solid
ifying. An earthquake wave would
meet this ice bulwark, and Its force
would be lost.
GEORGETOWN UNiVERSiTY
GIVES RECORD OF SHOCKS
WASHINGTON, Dec. 10.—A merles of
severe earth shocks were recorded by
the seismograph at Georgetown univer
sity this morning. The tremors began
at 4:04 and lasted until 7 o'clock. The
maximum vibration occurred between
5-23 and 5:34 oVlock. The direction of
the vibrations was east and west. Both
the horizontal and vertical instruments
recorded.
The distance of the earthquakes from
this place is not estimtaed.
REPORT FROM SANTA CLARA
SAN JOSE, Dec. 10.—Two earthquake
shocks were recorded by the seismo
graph at Santa Clara college observa
tory this morning, the first at 2:35
o'clock, which -was very slight, and the
second at 3:05. The latter was from
the northyest, forming a sinusoid rec
ord, and the center of disturbance is
bolieved to be over the ocean, west of
Alaska.
MAURETANIA CROSSES
WITH CHRISTMAS THRONG
LONDON, Dec 10.—With 1135 pas
sengers and 5000 bags of Christmas
mail, the steamer Mauretania left the
Mersey promptly on time this evening
in a dash to the United States and
back to England before Christmas,
Nobody connected with the company
doubts she will accomplish her record
task and land her American passen
gers on this side of the Atlantic with
in the allotted twelve days.
Wagers have been laid at 5 to 2 that
the Mauretania will be In her berth at
Liverpool before Christmas eve. When
the ship pulled out into the stream she
was given a great sendoff.
Among her passengers are Richard
C. Kerens, American ambassador to
Austria-Hungary, and Mrs. Kerens;
the Prince and Princess Albert Radal
will and the Baron and Baroness de
Bode.
YOUTHS START LONG TRIP
IN HOME-MADE CANOE
DELTA, Colo., Dec. 10.—Three young
men whoso homes are in this city to
day startetd on -a trip to the Grand
Canyon of the Colorado river in Ari
zona in a home-built canoe. Their
names are C. P. Wheoler, E. P. Muir
and H. M. Kirby.
Launching their craft In the Gunni
gon river at this point, the youths will,
if successful, continue their Journey
down to the Junction of the Grand
river at Grand Junction and on
through Utah to where the Grand and
Green rivers form the Colorado.
Although approximately 400 miles as
the crow files, the distance to be cov
ered by water before reaching the
destination selected is perhaps five or
six times that.
A MEDICAL COMPROMISE
"You had two doctors in consultation
last night, didn't you?"
"Yes."
"What did they say?"
"Well, one recommended one thing
and the other recommended something
else."
"A deadlock, eh?"
"No, they finally told me to mix 'em."
SUSPICIOUS SOUND
Bacon —I see a man named Greene
Tuttle is running for office in a western
town.
Egbert—The name suggests the pos
sibility of getting in the soup.—Yon
kerti Statesman.
,; \ \ . AMUSEMENTS -"r;: - -
HAMBURGER'S MAJESTIC THEATER - nklm^mnth
Lo§ Angeles', Leading Playhouse—Oliver, Morosco, Manager.
. ;■: ■■•;; BEGINNING TONIGHT
POPULAR PRICE MATINEE WEDNESDAY r '
-/■- ■ ■ . •;■ fi%V;'-?>fi'? ;i ■■ '
■ ipßywiSm jj^^mH s^ct^^j
Nights and Sat. Matinee, 50c to $2. Popular Price Mat. Wednesday
BEGINNING SUNDAY NIGHT, DECEMBER 18 .'
• SEATS ON SAl.fi NEXT THCRSDAY. l,i , '
i" Jolin P Slocum presents the New Viennese Comic Opera,
KISSING GIRL
With MISS TEXAS OUINAN and the OSCULATORY ■ BEAUTY CHORUS.
TRICES: 50c to $1.50. MaTINEES WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY.
MMfSt?f Ft SULLIVAN*CONSIDinE
f^Wl^l WSJSJ^iJ VAUDEVILLE
BIG MATINEE TODAY AT 2:30 %
3 Shows Tonight
COMMENCING 6:30, 7:45 AND 9 O'CLOCK
I,AST TIMES TODAY OF HARRY VAN FOSSEN, T. NELSON DOWNS, TItBEE
ESCARDOS, CAMPBELL & XATEB, "^ELEST," TUKEE IMPERIALS, MAKII.
CIIEVITXE. A%"COBSING GOOD" BVLU. .. . „ , i . . { ,
ENTIRELY NEW BILL TOMORROW AFTERNOON
STALEY & BIRBECK ORLETTA TAYLOR
The Musical Blacksmiths In the rfablold Operetta /
Offering the Greatest THE BUTTERFLY AND '*
Transformation Scene ever . „, „ \ THE PRINCE -; ;
Seen on any Stage. A Gorgeous Scenic Singing Novelty
TOGETHER WITH SIX OTHER FINE ACTS
-„ i ■ • " • - — '
COMING—THE SECOND BIG S. & C. ROAD SHOW WITH BILLY
VAN, "The Assassin of Sorrow;" THE 5 COLUMBIANS and a big array
of vaudeville celebrities. ; ,
. 10, 20 and 30 CENTS—COME EARLY
ElCfl A*Zf*f\™ 1 FOREMOST STOCK
DEL LAd V# %J COMPANY OF AMERICA
THE FOREMOST STOCK COMPANY IN AMERICA
LAST TWO TIMES TbDAY of the «r*at detectlre play, "SHKRLOCK HOLMES."
■;:-; ■■■/.->■■ :, A.i, ;■;•, -: s ;':V.'. ;;'.::;:: vv:-; -:
i
, Commencing tomorrow night, Lewis S. Stone and ,
. the Belasco theater company will present OLD
HEIDELBERG. This means that the ' Belasco
offering for this week will be the most popular ■
play that has ever been given by any stock company I
anywhere in the world. Over a quarter of a million
people have seen this remarkable play at the Be
lasco, and the demand for seats for this week's per
formances is so great that the Belasco theater is sure
to be crowded to the doors every night, and at
Thursday, Saturday and Sunday matinees
'■■'..-'■ ■>"■. '•' '• ' ■'■■ " - ' ' ■ L ■■' '.
'■"*"'"' " Vv ' ' . ■ ' ' - ■-■'■?
TTJI? ATTrMTOOTTTM THEATER ,L. E. BEHYMBR.
HE AUDirOKIUM heautifui,." manager.
WEEK 'BEGINNING MONDAY, DECEMBER 19, MATINKKS WEDNESDAY
• AND SATURDAY, SAMUEL, H. KORK'S SENSATIONAL, MUSICAL PRODUC
TION, direct froiji ONE THAR at the CI RC'LK THEATER. N. Y.
Distinct Novelty in Amusements
\ Queen ®L
: MoulM JRouge
NIGHT LIFE IN PARIS correctly portrayed in 160 minutes, without waste of time
or money. .",-., ■'
NOTE— Owing to the congested booking situation and the enormous capacity ot the
Auditorium, patrons are. offered a $2.00 attraction at $1.60. Special prices for this
city only. PRICES: 26c. 800. 75c. $1.00 and »1.50. SEAT SALE OPENB AT BOX
OFTICBI NEXT THURSDAY MORNINO A T 9 O'CLOCK. - '
M' QROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER m»i» St.. N««r sixth,
_„. l.os ANGELKS* LEADING STOCK COMPANT.
BEGINNING M ATINEB TODAY, , - '
FIRST TIME BY ANY STOCK COMPANY r
cA c^VIESSAGE FROM c^VIARS
' NIGHTS; 36c, 500, 7»c. MATINEKS SATURDAY AND SUNDAY. 10c, 2Co,»0o.
'Uj^l ' li]|lH|ll U lUipfpTMlinirPll New, Cozy, Absolutely Fireproof
f l«WMl I fk\A ] 3 Shows Tonight— to 10:45
I \Y*' ynJbJjL^^4**P4 Twice Nightly, 7 and 9
k Jo. iBJ HalW t v H I"J prices loi', «oc, soc.
■iljtSS^MßnAStflMml«3wMi Haa«l*r-LaVelle Troupe, Bignlow's Merry
rarkiyßni||EUHlißjß»Hßiwisa niiiigßtrrs. Hamilton Hroß.. Finn H. Ford.
PfiJViM JkJliS Mf.l.^lm'/?»%V^^ tiuldo Qlaldlnl. riomanclli. N«w Photo *'lavs.
AMUSEMENTS
f~* RAND OPERA. HOUSE /
MATINFISS TODAT, TOB9OAI AND SATURDAY. PHONKB MAIN 1987, A 1987.
' First Time by a Stock Company This Afternoon
Ferris Hartman
And hli big oompa«y : present Eddie Foy'« gr«»t ihuslcal oom«dy iuocew,
77/r LIVELY, MZl?l?r^> '
Mi/jfCAL mm JljL
(S? T*k ktiYWHERE ATF*-ssML — -*£k\
«^_ *C*3 POPULAR PRICES^^- -^* - n
•Rij- ason opera HOUSE , W< T- mS«":
; WEEK STARTING TOMORROW — MATINEE SATURDAY
1 Popular Ladies' Matinee Wednesday—Special Prices, 50c, 75c, $1.
BLANCHE s-
Success
WALSH Zr
Woman"
FREDERIC ARNOLD KUMMERj
REGULAR PRICES 50c TO $1.50. SEATS NOW ON SALE.
Coming—Lillian Russell— Search of a Sinner"
-^ • '■^_-,_ | , -L, ' ;"'■ Bprias St., Between t« and Sd.
*< THE STANDARD OF VAUDEVILLE
Imperial OF VAUDEVILLE
Imperial Rj>ussian
Dancers From the Czar'B co^,
J_y dll LCI w> Own Ballet Corps
■*!'"' '■ Together with eight other «uperl> «ou, tncludlnc , ■
LIONEL BARRYMORE, McKEE RANKIN & CO., ;
, r : •. and OBPHEUM MOTION PICTUHES.
EVERY NIGHT. 100, SBo, 60c, 76c. MATINKB 2:15 PAII.T. 100. 2Bn, 80a.
OT VMDTP THfATOP Main, Between Fifth and Sixth
LllVlrll. 1 tIXLA I HiK. Cool—Commodlou* —Comfortable
Week of Dec. 6, ' THTE rENING S-T-A-B With Jule» Mendel
The Gr«at Big Show. '. • Spelled Backwards. ' '■ and the Olympic Co.
8 SHOWB TONIGHT. 1-AS and 9:18. Mat. Mon.. Wed,, Sat., Bnn.. 10c. 80c. 88c •
CAUFORMA THEATER, 2SB So. Spring «t. Wm. C. Rolfe*. l*»"e« and Manager.
The late.t BIOCiKAriI, SELIO and other FIRST RUN PICTURES— ADMISSION. |
, New plcture» Monday, Thuriday. Saturday. CLEAN—OOOI* • , . , '
# There Is Worship
in Rest
And Your Doctor Will Tell You That
Change Is Rest
Take a Sunday Trolley
Ride for Real Rest
THERE IS THE TRIP TO MT. LOWE—Takes you up
among the Giant Pines and OakH a mile above the Sea.
, .. THERE IS THE RIDE TO LONG BEACH with its myriad
'of soacoast attractions (clean). Flrst-clasa amusements.;.:'
There is the JAUNT TO POINT FIRMIN, Government
'' Breakwater and Lighthouse. ; -.■..:. *,- ,-
THERE IS THE SURF LINE RIDE TO NEWPORT AND
BALBOA. Fish dinners, Still Water Boating, Bathing, etc.
GENUINE SPANISH DINNER at CAS A VERDUGO, amid «
its beautiful surroundings. * Out Glendale way. .
, OTHER POINTS OF INTJBREST WORTH YOUR WHILE: • ' :
BEAUTIFUL RUBIO CANYON 7 ■ • ; ..- " '
' : SAN GABRIEL MISSION, established 1771. \
, SIERRA MADRE, at the foot of Mt. Wilson Trail. , .
Through the Orange Groves to Covina, Gle,ndora and Azusa. , ,',» "
GO SOMEWHERE—GO BY TROLLEY v ■' , .*, .
Pacific Electric Railway
OLDFIELD at Ascot
Saturday and Sunday
Take the Big Red Cars on Main Street
' Flyer Service Direct to Park Entrance -
PACIFIC 1; ELECTRIC RAILWAY

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