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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, December 12, 1910, Image 10

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NEWS FROM NEARBY CITIES
QUEEN OF TOURNAMENT
CONTEST ENDS TONIGHT
Expect to Announce Name of
Winner of Carnival Honor
at 10:30 P. M.
PASADENA, Dec. 12.— Tonight at 10
O'clock In the board of trade rooms the
tournament queen voting contest "ill
after having been on for six
s. The committee of news]
men, together with tournament offi
cials, 'I the vote to date last
night ;m>l locked the ballots in a safe.
Additional ballots which are cast up
to 6 o'clock today at the local news
together with those
at board of trade headquarters between
7 and 10 o'clock tonight, will be count
ed and added to the official totals al
ready ascertained. It is thought the
result of the contest will bo known by
10:3 D o'clock tonight.
POSTPONE MEETING OF
KNIGHTS OF KARNIVAL
PASADENA, Dec. 12.—The proposed
meeting of the Komlcal Knights of tho
Karnival for tonight has been post
poned to Wednesday night at 8 o'clock
in the board of trade rooms in order
to give committees more time to render
definite reports.. The parade commit
tee, composed or thirty-two members,
will meet at the same time in the new
directors' chamber adjoining the main
hall.
Charter membership in the organiza
tion last evening totaled 435. Member-
Fhip will be received at board of trade
headquarters until the required 600 are
secured.
COTTAGE GARDEN CONTEST
ENTRIES TO CLOSE DEC. 15
PASADENA, Dec. 12.—Entries in. the
cottage garden contest In the renters'
division are scheduled to close Thurs
day of this week, according to the com
mittee of gardeners and real estate
dealers in charge of the affair. Appli
. cation blanks are to bo Had at 148 West
Colorado street.
Three cash prizes of $50, $30 and $20
are to be awarded for the best kept
lawns, parkings and gardens by any
renter in Pasadena or South Pasadena
who is not a gardener by occupation
and does not employ outside heltf in
caring for his grounds. Judges will
visit the premises of contestants
periodically and announce their de
cision at the spring flower show.
WEDDED SIXTY-FIVE YEARS
PASADENA, Dec. 12.—Mr. and Mrs.
Carver Thompson, 472 Herkimer
street, observed their sixty-fifth wed
ding anniversary at their home yester
day by receiving relatives and friends
who came and went throughout the
day. Mr. \Thompson Is 86 years of age
and appears on the streets almost
daily. His helpmeet is 84 years of age
and, although not enjoying- as good
health as her husband, is far from
being an invalid. Th« couple received
numerous presents and scores of post
cards. They came to Pasadena from
and have lived here ten years.
BUSCH TO BRING RETINUE
PASADENA, Dec. 12.—Adolphus
Busch, liiH family and a few friends
are expected to arrive at 8 o'clock this
morning in a special car from St.
Louis to make their winter home at
Ivy Wall, the Buach estate in this city.
It is said his household this winter, in
cluding servants and gardeners, will
number nearly one hundred. Two nu
tomobileg have preceded the party and
two more ara expected. Mr. and Mrs.
Busch expect to celebrate their golden
wedding anniversary here next spring.
WILLIAM H. REEVES, SR., DEAD
PASADENA, Dec. 12.—William TT.
Reeves sr., father of City Electrician
W. 11. Reeves, died yesterday at his
home, 241 Galena avenue, aged 76
years. He came to Pasadena from
Seattle eight yean ago. His wife,
Fon and two daughters, Airs. J. M.
Boyd of Seattle and Miss Minnie
Reeves of this city, survive him. Fu
neral services will bo held at the home
Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock. The
Rev. Dr. Fox will offlciato.
PASADENA LIBRARIAN REPORTS
PASADENA, Deo. 12— The Pasadnna
library last month had a total circu
lation of 13,1196 hooks, nccording to re
ports just made public. There are
:u,477 books available. The average
Sunday attendance was 486. The east
branch lins 1 rrj7 books and its cir
culation for the month was 1l;7(.
GAIN IN SCHOOL ATTENDANCE
PASADENA, nee. 12.—Statistics
from ihe board of education show a
gain of 320 in attendance at the high
school, grammar icbooli and kinder
gartens over that of lost year. Tha
total this year to date is 5073. divided
ps follows: High school, 838; gram
mar schools, C 908; kindergarten,
FIRE DAMAGES EAGLE HALL
PASADENA, Deo. 12.—Fire of mys
terious origin in the "goat" room at
Ea*l< •-' hall, 131 West Colorado street, |
yesterday noon damaged the building j
and paraphernalia to the extent of
probably ¥251). Tho blaze was confined
principally to tin; celling and attic.
CLUB OWNERS TO ELECT
OFFICERS OF LEAGUES
NEW YORK, Dec. ll.—This will hi
in New York. Within
lext few days club owners of three
ies, two of them major, will mccl
In annual convention, elect of
discuss amendments to tho rules
:, id make plang for 1911.
T\ " . Ilio National and the
Bastern, will elect presidents. In the
American fcsan Johnuon still has nine
teen years to serve of a twenty-year
term, I a year. Thus far there
talk of opposition to
••Tom" i ; >• president of the Na
tional. The National will meet Tues
ill" American Wednesday.
PASADENA CLASSIFIED
LEATHER AND PONPON CLEANER
FEATHERS. HATBANPB, HOAS, ON
pona remade, wlllowed, cleaned, dyed,
curled. Low rales, expert work. MRS.
' IX3UISE ItILLIEL'X, 331.1 Morton aye.
Mall 7H JB-»-tt
PASADENA SHOE HOSPITAL
JEN'S BKWED Borjta ANp iinisu 111
laun.1 1 liO, lit ti. JAU; OAKS AVIS.
m-i-t:
SANITAS BATHS SECURED
BY NEW CORPORATION
California College of Electro-
Mechano Therapy Reports
75 Students Enrolled
LONG BEACH, Dec. 11.—Tho' Cali
fornia College of Klectro-Mcchano
Therapy, which Recently was incor
porated, has taken over the Sanitas
Baths establishment on East Second
street and will teach the practice of
drugless healing. Seventy-live stu
dents are already enrolled. Other quar
ters will be secured in a short time by
thf college, to be retained permnnntly.
The officers and board of directors
are: President, Prof. R. \V. Reading;
vice president, Dr. E. F. Gray; treas
urer, Miss Ida M. Gregg; secretary,
Mrs, Ellen D. Cain; Dr. C. D. Greenall,
]>r. .1. T. Lovell and Dr. C. Travis
Windsor.
The faculty includes Dr. Thomas
Powell and Dr. B. W. Child, Pasa
dena; Dr. C. D. Greenall, Dr. A. Greeth
nnd Dr. H. 8. Tanner, Los Angeles.
The tuition fee for the three-year gen
eral course, It is said, will be $500.
STREET WORK ON AMERICAN
AVENUE NEARS COMPLETION
LONG BEACH, Dec. 11— Slreet work
on American avenue, between Sixth
and Anaheim streets is now being
completed. This will provide a con
nerting link between the city's pnved
streets and the Los Angeles-Long
Beaoh boulevard.
Work is also in progress now be
tween Alamitos and Linden avenues,
along the ocean front, where a $20,000
concrete retaining wall is to be built
along the bluff. Contractor J. C. Beer,
who is to build the wall, has a number
of men engaged in making the neces
sary excavations.
CHURCH MEMBERSHIP GROWS
LONG BEACH, Dec. 11.—During the
year closed September 30, 1910, the
First Christian church of this city do
nated $3569.40 to missions, as against
.$1760 in 1909 and $835 in 1908. New
church officers and new officers for the
brotherhood were chosen at the recent
annual meeting. G. L. Hoodenpyle was
elected president of the brotherhood.
The membership of the church now
is 754. IS7 having been added during
the last year. It was the Christian
church that on Labor day, with the aid
of local carpenters and friends, built
a house of worship for the new East
Side Christian mission.
MINISTERS TO PLAY BALL
LONG *BEACH, Dec. 11.—Tho minis
ters of the city will participate in a
baseball game at the auditorium the
night of December .10, when they will
play against a business men's team.
This has been arranged as a feature of
an "aviation meet" to be held in the
big- hall that night by the boys of the
Y. M. (.'. A. A number of the clergy
men are already practicing for the
event. Some of them claim to have
shown class in "one old cat" and "town
ball" when they were youngsters and
are confident they can "come back.'
WOMAN'S HURT NOT SERIOUS
LONG BEACH, Dec. 11.—It is be
lieved that Mrs. E. W. Hoag was not
seriously Injured last night when she
was thrown from hi r buggy in a col
lision with Ellsworth Hatch's touring
car at Fifteenth street and American
avenue. While still suffering from se
vere bruises and the shaking up she
received, no internal injuries were sus
tained, so far as can be told at this
time. Mrs. Hoag was removed this
morning to the Long Beach sanitarium.
Tenth street and Linden avenue.
CANADIAN COUPLE WED
LONG BEACH, Dec. 11.—Two guests
at Hotel Virginia who came here re
i ently from Vancouver, B. C, were
! quietly married in Los Angeles a few
I days ago, thus consummating an in
ling romance. The groom wns C
I A. Macnelll, who arrived at the hotel
last Sunday, and the bride was for
merly Miss Beulah Dawson, who came
to the beach two weeks ago, accom
panied by her aunt.
LONG BEACH ITEMS
I,(ING BEACH, Dec. 11.—The next
interßcholaatlo debate in which the
local high school will participate will
be held at Hollywood and with Holly
wood high school on the other side of
tii. questioin. The debate will be held
at some time before January 28. Hol
lyhood high will submit the question
and the local school will choose sides.
11. L. Knloe, a local real estate man,
has bought the Wall grocery store
at Beaumont and his sons will man
age it.
The Long Beach lodge of Elks will
give a benefit ball at the Majestic
pavilion December 16. Dr. W. Harri
man Jones will be floor manager and
will be a large floor committee.
REDLANDS BRIEFS
REDLANDS, Dec. 11.—The holiday
shipment of oranges tor this season
breaks ail records for Christmas (ship
ping-, more than 300 cars of oranges
being sent out the past week. The
packing houses occupied some nights
of the week finishing up the oranges
that were in the house and tomorrow
and Tuesday the remaining fruit will be
sent out which may bring ilie total
up to 850 cars. One hundred anU thirty
boxes of lemons were sent out the
flrit shipment for this season.
To save oranges from bruising
against the dividing board in the boxei
,i machine has been devised so that the
is rounded off and the fruit
stands the packing without bruise. This
is lHin L - used at tho Hedlands Orange
Growers' packing house.
A t a meetinff of the Fruit Protective
association held last night, a perma
ii. Nt organisation was affected and thfl
first regular meeting will bo held Mon
day night in the Masonic tomple.
A PEACEFUL SECTION
Missouri Traveler—This Is a famous
on (or feuds, I understand.
Nutive—N'o move peaceful pfltf t3 any
v here than right here. No feTlds hero.
Everything's as pleasant as a pie.
It how about the Uillington-Wel
lington feud?"
"Over long ;itro. I'm BilHnfjton."
i led! I haven't mot uny of the
Wellingtons."
"No, nor you won't. The feud is
over, '
A MERE DETAIL
"Vo- I was at the opera last even
ing."
. "And what opera did they sinff?"
"Wall, 111 declare I didn't think to
uoUfio.i — --< ■—"" >
LOS ANGELES HERALD: MONDAY MORNING, JDECEMBER 12. 1910.
FRIENDS SEARCH DESERT
FOR TWO MISSING MEN
Former Railroad Employe, Car
rying $300. Disappears When
Returning to Home
SAN BERNARDINO, Dec. 11.—The
mysterious disappearance of two men
from different camps on the Mojave
desert and the fear that they have
either met with foul play or perished
on the barrern waste has caused a
united search- by friends and officers.
Tom Shaw, aged 85 years, a miner
living at Summit, near Randsburg,
disappeared Thanksgiving day. He
visited friends at Randsburg and In
the evening started to walk to his
cabin, seven miles distant. A rural
grocer who had left supplies the day !
before he disappeared first discovered
that the old man was missing, noting ]
several days after that the packages
had not been touched.
Samuel Paulsen of Otis, for a num
ber of years employed by the Salt Lake
Railway company, disappeared Decem- j
ber 5. On his person was $300. It is
feared that he has met with foul play.
Paulsen had passed the evening with
friends and left to return to his room,
and has not been seen since.
• ■ •
AWARD CONTRACT FOR CHURCH]
SAN BERNARDINO, Deo. 11.—The ,
building of the new Catholic church,
the corner stone of which was laid by
Bishop Conaty during the San Ber
nardino valley centennial on the 100 th
anniversary of the founding of the
Catholic church in this city, is to be
gin at once. The contract has been
awarded to S. L. Gowell for $21,416.
The total cost of the structure will be
about $30,000.
♦» » ■
LAWYER BATES TO BE DEPUTY!
SAN BERNARDINO, Dec. 11.—At
torney Frank T. Bates is to become
deputy district attorney under R. B.
GoodceU. R. E. Hodge, the present i
second assistant, will become chief !
deputy and Bootes will take his place, j
The change becomes effective January
1. when Goodcell, now chief deputy,
moves to take charge of the office.
DISASTERS CROWD
FAMILY'S HISTORY
Remarkable List of Fatalities
Mars Lives of Residents
in New York
NEW YORK, Dec. I.—Another Is
likely to be added to the remarkable
list of fatalities in the family of Mies
Adelaide Cummlng, 173 West Forty
fifth street. She was summoned from
Boston Friday night 'on account of the
critical illness of her sister.
Last week Miss Jane Gumming, who
is 32 years of age, put on a new dress
of the hobble skirt variety, and as
she was going- downstairs she slipped
and fell. Her hip bone was broken
and various complications have set in,
which determined friends to send for
the sister.
Here is the list of misfortunes which
have happened to members of Miss
Cumming's family:
Grandfather wrecked and drowned at
sea.
Father killed in a boiler explosion.
Sister killed by a snowball.
Another eister kiled by poison from
wounds. »
Third sister killed by a trunk lid
falling on her head.
Nephew went down in the Maine.
Nephew lost in the San Francisco
earthquake.
Sister loses her mind from shock and
is in insane hospital.
Last sister dangerously hurt by a
fall.
Miss Cumming is still a young wo
man, but her first bereavement hap
pened while she was a small child.
Her grandfather, John G. dimming, a
sailor of Salem, Mass., was ship
wrecked, and although the crew took
to the boats, the sen waa so rough that
the boats were swamped, and Cum
mins was not among the few survivors.
His son, James C. Cumming, was a
merchant of Salem, and the boiler ex
plosion In which he and fifteen others
were blown to pieces Is still historic
in that town.
Only two weeks after her father's
death a younger sister of Miss Cum
mlng was breaking a stick of wood
over her knee, when Bhe fractured her
kneecap and had to have her leg ampu
tated. Gangrene developed, from
which she died.
Another sister was killed at the age
of ten, being struck on the forehead by
a snowball in which a stone was Im
bedded, and a still more unusual fate
overtook another sister, Mary, several
years agV>. She VU packing a trunk,
when the lid fell and crushed her skull.
She died instantly.
The unhappy fnte of the family
seemed to descend to tho branches, for
one of Mias Cummlng's nephews was
lost In the San Francisco earthquake
In one of the collapsed buildings which
took lire. A brother of this lad, En
sign Matthews, had perished on the
Maine in Havana harbor. These trage
dies so preyed upon the mind of the
mother, Miss Cummlng's sister, that
she became violently insane, and Is
now In a Massachusetts asylum. Now'
the last near relative of Miss Cum
ming is in a hospital, and it Is im
possible to say whether she will escape
the family fate or not.
A friend of Miss Cummlng naw the
reporter who called at her boarding
house and said:
"When we heard of this last misfor
tune we could hardly believe it was
true. Poor Adelaide has had so much
misfortune that it peems it must end
sometime. You would think she would
be the most superstitious and nervous
person In the world, and I have often
asked her if she did not expect from
day to day that something terrible
would happen to her. she says, though,
that she doesn't; that she has learned
to be philosophical about It. She
la as merry and bright as can be, and
If she lives with the thought that
there is a sword hanging over her head
and that It might .fall at any moment
you would never guess It from her
manner."
VERY SUSPICIOUB
Magistrate— aid you arrest tills
man?
Officer—On suspicion. -I think he's &
Philadelphia boodlw.
WagletraJe Do you know him?
Officer—No, y'r honor; but he said be
wta from rhiladnlpUWi and he eoemed
to be ia, a hurry, --„- ... ~
WILEY IS PIONEER
IN CONSERVATION
Clerk Discovers Early Address On
Plant Growth by Noted
Food Expert
PLEA FOR CARE OF FORESTS
Consideration of Resources and
Their Preservation Dates
Back Fifteen Years
(Special to Th« Herald)
WASHINGTON, Dec. 11.—As guardian
of the public's health, Dr. Harvey W.
Wiley, the pure food expert, Is called
by his friends one of the greatest con
servationists of them all. It is a fact
known to but few, however, that he
was perhaps the first man now In pub
lic life to declare publicly for a broad
system of conservation of natural re
j sources, the movement which is Just
| beginning to make history. This was
i in his retiring address us president of
I the American Chemical society at its
annual meeting In Baltimore in pe
eember, 1893, fifteen years before the
famous White House conference of
governors was called in 1908.
A clerk rummaging through some old
papers in the bureau of chemistry has
> just unearthed this information. A
printed copy of the address, dusty and
i yellow with age, was shown the doc
tor, and he smiled when he saw that
the title was "The Waste and Conser
j ration of Plant Pood." In his address
Ihe covered practically all phases of
Shipping News
SAN PEDRO, Dee. 11.—Arrived: Steam
ship Santa Rosa from fan Francisco via Re
i dondo Beach; United States armored cruiser
j Maryland from San Dlcgo; steamer llanalel
j from San Francisco direct; steam schooner
j Bowdoln from Eureka; steam tchoner Kx
celslor from Eureka via Port San Luis;
steam schooner Mandalay from Crescent City
via San Francisco; steam schooner Tahoe
from South Bend via Redondo Beach.
Balled: Schooner Ruby for Coquille river
In ballast; steam schooner Yosemite for Col
umbia river via San Francisco; schooner
6. E. Home for Port Townsend for orders
in ballnst; steam schooner James S. Hlg-
Ems for Fort Bragg via San Francisco;
barkentine Arraco for Coos Bay In ballast;
steam schooner Daisy Mitchell for Grays
Harbor via San Francisco; United States
armored cruiser Maryland for San Diego;
steam schooner Grays Harbor for Grays
Harbor via Santa Barbara and San Fran
cisco; steamer Yellowstone for San Fran
cisco with steamer Hermosa in tow; steamer
Hanalei for San Francisco direct; big pas
senger steamers Harvard and Yale are
expected tomorrow from Atlantic coast. Cap
tain Harry Goodall. who will act as local
agent, left down the coast today In his
private yacht Lucero to meet the steamers.
MISCEIXAKEOC9 NOTES
The schooner Sehome, Captain Danevlg.
sailed today for Port Townsend for orders.
The steamer Daisy Mitchell, Captain De
vltt, worked overtime today to complete
discharge, of lumber cargo loaded at Grays
Harbor and sailed for Gavlota to load oil
drums for San Francisco.
The steamer Grays Harbor. Captain An
flndsen, sailed for Santa Barbara today
with partial cargo of lumber loaded at
Willapa.
The steamer Yosemtte, Captain Ranler,
sailed for Ban Francisco today with pas
sengers and will proceed to Columbia river
to reload lumber.
The steamers Bowdoln, Captain Tlbbetts,
and Excelsior, Captain Buckard, arrlveil
today from Eureka with lumber cargoes.
The steamer Mandalay. Captain Lofstrom.
arrived from Crescent City via San Fran
cisco with passengers and 400,000 feet of
lumber.
The steamer Yellowstone, Captain Lua
low, called for Ban Francisco this morn-
Ing with the Banning excursion steamer In
tow for repairs. The Hermosa has been
In service between here and Catallna since
last spring until a few weeks ago.
The private yacht Lucero sailed down
the coast today with her owner, Captain
Harry Qoodall, and a party of friends to
meet the steamers Tale and Harvard, which
are expected dally from New York. Upon
arrival here the steamers will be recon
verted Into oil burners before going Into
service between this port and San Fran
cisco.
The steamer Norwood, Captain Martin,
will sail tomorrow with passengers for
Aberdeen via San Francisco to reload lum
ber for this port. The steamer Fair Oaks
will also sail for Grays Harbor tomorrow.
The steamer James S. Higgins, Captain
Blalsen, put in for passengers today bound
from San Diego to Fort Kragjr via San
Francisco to reload lumber for this part.
With passengers and freight for the In
dependent Steamship company the steamer
Hanalei arrived today from San Francisco
and sailed for return. Since the Alaska
raclflo company discontinued service to
this port the Hanalei is operating under a
new schedule, with sailings on alternate
fifth and sixth days. She has been alter
nating with the Alaska-Pacific steamers on
a. six-day schedule.
The steamer Santa Rosa, Captain Alex
ander, arrived tonight from San Francisco
via Banta Barbara and Redondo Beach
with passengers and freight and wIH p»o
--ceed to San Diego tomorrow.
The United States cruiser Maryland ar
rived today from Ban Diego for anchorage
behind the breakwater to bore-sl«ht her
Kuns She will sail for return tonight. Tho
Colorado will sail for return tonight. The
South Dakota sailed last night.
MOVEMENT OF STEAMERS
ARRIVE
Santa Rosa, San Diego Dec 1!
George W. Elder, Portland Deo. 1!
George W. Elder. San Diego .Dec. 13
Buckman. Seattle Deo. 18
Queen. Seattle Dec. lo
Queen. Sari Diego Dec. 17
Rose City, Portland i Dec. 14
Hanalel. San Francisco Deo. 16
Beaver, Portland Dec. 19
Roanoke. Portland Dec. 19
City of PueMa. Seattle Dec. 20
Hanalel. Ban Francisco Dae. .-
City of Puebla, San Diego Deo. I.
Santa Rosa. San Francisco Dec. .4
Bear. Portland Dec. 24
Santa Rosa, San Diego Dec. II
George W. Elder. Portland Dec. 28
George W. Elder, San Diego Dec. 27
Hanalol. San Franclaco Deo. 27
Rosa City, Portland Den. .9
Umatllla, Seattle Dec. _J
Umatllla, San .Diego Dec. 31
. DEPART
Santa Rosa, San Diego Dec. I-
Santa Rosa. San Francisco Dec. 18
George W. Elder, San Diego Deo. II
Hurkman. Seattle Deo. i-
Rose City. Portland Dee. 15
Queen. San Diego Doc. 10
Queen! Seattle Doc. 17
Hanalel. Pan Francisco Dec. IT
Roanoke, San Diego Deo. 19
Beaver, Portland *>»<>• *°
City of Puebla. San Diego *"- Pjo. 21
Hanalel. San Francisco I'Oo. II
City of Puebla, Seattle Deo. 22
Panta Rosa, San Diego Dec. *»
Bear, Portland Dec. .5
Santa Rosa, San Francisco JJei- !»
fieorge W. Elder. San Diego Dec. 26
Ilnnalel, San Francisco Deo. 28
Rose City. Portland Dec. SO
Umatllla, Pan Diego »*e. 30
Umatllla, Seattle Uec- "
TIDE TABU!
High. . Low. High. Low.
Deo. 12.... 6:50 am 12:27 pm 6:60 pm
Deo. 13.... 6:28 am 1:04 pm 7:20 pm 1:17 pm
Deo. 14.... 7:08 am 1:47 pro »:tl p;n 1:05 pm
ARBIVAIiS A>T> DEPABTCTIES
BAN FRANCISCO, Deo. It-Arrived: Alca
tra«, Han Pcjro; Coo*t«>r, Ban Pedro.
Sailed: George W. Elder, Sun Tedro; bark
It. 1". nichel, Honolulu.
. I/SNDON»£aI!««U F»aapto» t -<
conservation, excepting water, power
and coal, which at that time did not
flßur* so prominently in the Industrial
progress of the country as today. Of
laic years Wiley has been too busy
chasing adulterators of food and the
dopers of drugs given to babies and
the sick, to even think of any phase of
conservation excepting public health,
and this makes his remarks of eighteen
years ago all the more wlgnlflcant to
day. A few paragraphs of what he
said will give an Idea of the doctor's
conception of conservation at that time.
He said:
VAST WASTE OF TI.ANT FOOB
"In this country, owing to the great
stores of wealth which the past had
accumulated in the soil, it is only
within recent years that the question
of the supply of plant food has as
sumed any practical importance.
"As long as there were virgin fields
at the disposal of the agricultural
rapist, the conservation and restora
tion of exhausted fields was of little
consequence. Not only have these
stores of plant food been utilized, but,
much to the discredit of the American
farmer, they have been wasted. The
mark of good agriculture Is to see field*
yielding annually good returns and in
creasing, or at least not lessening in
fertility. This being true, the history
of American agriculture to within a
few years must be the history of bad
farming, for everywhere we have seen
fertile fields losing their fertility and
farms once productive abandoned.
"The waste to which I desire to call
your attention is not that which nor
mally takes place In the production of
■a crop, but that which is incidental to
the cultivation of the soil and to a
certain extent unavoidable. I refer to
the denudation of fields by water and
to the removal of soluble plant food by
the percolation of water through the
soil. The losses due to the denudation
of fields are purely of a mechanical
character.
GREAT VALUE OF FORESTS
"The natural forest, or the natural
covering of grass over an area of soil,
prevents, to a large extent, the denu
dation due to heavy downpours of rain.
The removal of the forest and the de
struction of the grass by cultivation,
leave the soil in a condition in which
it is unable to resist the action of flow
ing surface water. A more striking
lesson may be seen in the hill regions
bordering both banks of the Ohio river.
'•Hundreds of fields once covered
with sturdy forests of oak, maple and
walnut, and afterward bearing large
crops of maize, tobacco and wheat
may now be seen furrowed with gullies',
as with the wrinkles of age, and aban
doned to brush and briers. The same
is doubtless true of other hill regions,
but I speak the more advisedly of
those which have come under my per
sonal observation. Great, however, as
the mechanical loss of plant food is.
it is by no means as dangerous as the
loss of the soluble materials caused by
the percolation of water through the
soil.
"From the foregoing summary of the
methods of waste of plant food, it has
been seen that in spite of all precau
tions of the farmer and the chemist,
and in spite of the selective absorp
tion of the soil, immense quantities or
valuable plant food are carried into the
sea, where apparently they are lost to
agriculture forever."
WASHINGTONS 17, BRICKS 5
The Washington Street Merchants
walked over the Brick team at Seven
teenth and Mallard, tho score being 17
to 5. Merrill secured a home run ore
the delivery of Williams. Duncan, the
former Compton high school twirler,
ptruck out eighteen ot hie opponents.
THE WEATHER
LOB ANGELES, Dec. 11,_191»._
Time. . |Thlr.|Hum|"svind|Vlo l |Weather.
r^TagTsTsrarl'.iaar.
sp. mj 80.13 |,68 | M [SW \* ) Cloudy.
Highest temperature, 64.
Lowest temperature, 66. •
Rainfall last 24 hours, .04 Inch.
Rainfall for season, 1.06 Inches.
Rainfall last season to date, 6.40 Inches.
FORECAST
SAN FRANCISCO. Dec. 11.—For Southern
California-Fair Monday; light north wind.
For San Francisco and vicinity—Fair Mon
day; light northwest wind.
For Santa Clara valley-Fair Monday; light
northwest wind.
For Sacramento and Ban Joaquln valleys—
Fair Monday: light north wind.
(JEMEIERIES—
INGLEWOOD PARK
CEMETERY
Two miles outside th» city limits, on the
Los Angeles & Reiondo railway; 300 acres
of perfect land with Improvements outclass
ing any cemetery on the coast.
207 S. BROADWAY, ROOM 20*.
Phones F3303. Male 4669.
Superintendent's pbone 105-11.
8-2S-12mo
ROSEDALE~CEMETERY
An endowed memorial park, noted for Its
natural beauty; endowment fund for per
peiual care, over $200,000; modern receiving
vault, chapel, crematory and columbarium;
accessible. City office, suite 302-306 EX
CHANGE BLDG., northeast corner Third
and Hill sts. Phones—Main 909; A 3620. Cem.
etery office, 1831 W. Wahhington st. Phones
52858: West 80. ' S-2-l!mo
HOLLYWOOD CEMETERY
Rolling lawns, trees, shrubbery and beautiful
lakes. *
MODERN IN EVERY RESPECT
Sltuatod In the moat beautiful section of
Southern California, the Ideal location, Just
insiOß Lob Angeles city limits.
Mclrose and Colegrove car lines to grounds.
A CEMETERY THAT IB SELECT
All3l. 208 Laughlln Bldg. Main 39L
Cemetery phones 6i>066; Hollywood 542.
EVERGREEN CEMETERY
The Los Angeles Cemetery association, Boyle
Heights, near city limits. Operated under
perpetual charter from Los Angeles city.
Modern chapel and crematory.
Office, 339 Bradbury Building.
Phones—Main 652; A 5466.
Cemetery- Home D 1083; Boyle 9.
6-E-12mo
• INSERTIONS OF A HERALD WANT AD
for tbe price of 2, or 7 Insertions for the
price ot 6. Ask The Herald counter man
PATENTS AND PATENT^AGENTS
MARTELL & CO.. ' PATENT SOLICITORS,
632-533 Germain bldg. F4761.
Protect your ideas. Big money In It.
••Our Special Letter on Patents."
What to Invent.. Free.
Send model or sketch. Opinion tree.
12-11-7
PIONEER PATENT AGENCY, HAZARD *
BTHAUSE. ESTABLISHED i«2 YEARS.
American and foreign patents secured and
trademarks registered. PATENT LITIGA
TION. 039 Citizens National Bank Building,
Third and Main. Horn- AI4M; Main 2528.
PATENT BOOK FREE. - . J-S-tC
1. E ZERHE. SOLICITOR. UNITED STATES
and foreign patents; 40 years' , experience.
122-3 STIMSON 81.D0., Third and Main.
Plione A 5344. . 10-4-tf
PATENTS AND TRADEMARKS, ALL COUN
tries. A. H. LIDDERS. patent Irwyer and
solicitor. 112 Am. Bank bids.. 2d and Spring.
10-16-tf
WELLS & WILLIAMS, THE LEADING
Paunt Solloitors. (21 Higglns Building, Seo
ond and Main sts. Phone FB6lB. 12-7-tr-do
/ i>SAYERS— /
JOHN A. HUNTER. M. E., {
Metallurgist, chemist and assayer. FJ7»I.
i »ii w, jama ex.. uwi<a
Classified Business Directory
Ready reference list of responsible business firms. Consult it
frequently for profit. Live business firms advertise, and _tne>f ad
vertisements are simply invitations direct to you. Patronize
Herald advertisers.
" s > ASSAYING
JOHN HERMAN. 2E2H 8. MAIn/nOT SAT
■ Isfacllon, but accuracy guaranteed. 12-22^tt
V ATTORNEYS
SPECIAL INVESTIGATIONS — PERSONAL
Injury claims specialty; estates setttled. J.
W. MACY, 638 Douglas bldg. Phones: A 8633.
■ Main 8628. > ___!=_
AUTOMOBILES
AUTOMOBILES REPAIRED AND REBUILT
PROMPTLY at too par hour. Home ABSBI.
■ »31',» South Hill Street, In rear. •
' ' ' ! ' " * 11-19-tI
AUTO GARAGE ~
PICO HEIGHTS GARAGE—
I Storage—Repair*— Air free.
. ' Home Phone 72282. . '
2783 WEST PICO STREET. 12-8-lmo
MAMMOTH GARAGE— CENTER PLACE.
4th, bet. Main and Spring. Open day ana
night. 11-13-tl
.; , ■>:;,, BATHS -:. ?? i
L. _-_-_•-.' _<..■■! ■'-. --, 'I. -II ~i -■■ -n '-- ~ " "
CHIROPODY, VAPOR MASSAGE BATHS;
now attendant; experienced. Suite Zl-2Z
HOTEL LOUISE, i 620 S. Broadway.
Phones Bdwy. 414». FBSS3. 12-9-tt
SCALP TREATMENT AND ALCOHOL
rubs, room 16, Gladstone hotel, 118 West
Fifth and 606* South Main. Hour*. » a. m.
to »:30 p. m. 11-H-tt
MAGNETIC TREATMENT FOR RHEUMAT
ISM, NERVOUSNESS AND STOMACH
TROUBLES. 666 S. Olive St. Rooms »-7.
U-lt-U
ANITA FELDMAN, 814 SANTEE ST., TWO
blocks east of Main. Salt bath* and eleo
trlo treatment*. _*■ 10-l»-tf
ELECTRIC BATHS,""" VIBRATORY TREAT
ment. NEW YORK OPERATOR, 621 »•
Main, suite 18. U-3-ln>o
MISS LOLA HILL, 708 CROCKER ST.,
tub bath* and alcohol rubs. Hours 10 a.
m. to » p. m. 10-20- tf
11914 S. SPRING ST, SUITE 8-CHIROPODY,
electricity, massage, vapor and shower
baths., __; «-»-«
LOTUS BATHS, 264 a BROADWAY; SClEN
tlflo massage, manicuring, chiropody. . A till.
> ■ 11-16-lmo
BICYCLES
BICYCLES—BICYCLES, TIRES AND SUP
plies at cash prices. KNIGHT'S, 134 North
jpjjng^_ 9-23-tf
BIRD DOCTOR
SICK PARROTS AND SMALL BIRDS
treated. Pets boarded. 11l S. FIGUEROA.
~* CABINET SHOP
REFRIGERATORS FOR BUTCHERS. RES
TAURANTS
and saloon*. Show case* and fixture*.
821-26 E. SECOND ST. Home A 4221,
Main ,1148. 11-23-lmo
CESSPOOLS
,_._, , -_„_. -.I---,-. / ■-.-...
IMPERIAL CESSPOOL - CO.—
We take out largest load. West 6396: 22040.
_„ 1-10-tf
CHIMNEY CLEANING
EXPERT CHIMNEY. FURNACE CLEAN
ing and repairing. A. H. MONNERT CO..
613 W. Pico. West 6886; Home 62467.
11-Z7-*f
" CLOTHING
WANTED-MEN'S SECOND-HAND CLOTH-
Ing: highest price, paid. F3758, Main 8476.
809 E. SEVENTH ST. 12-3-tf
- FURNITURE
Furniture Bot, Sold, Exchanged.
KANTOR. 723 W. SIXTH. F2628. 11-17-tt
FENCES: wire, IRON, WOOD
LOS ANGELES WIRE WO3KB, MANUFAC
turer. of and dealer* In all kind* of wire
goods. Floral designs a specialty. 129
K. SEVENTH ST. Phone F5090.
I 11-18-lmo
CITY AND COUNTY WIRE WORKS. 629
WALL BT. 11-16-lmo
LADIES' TAILORING ~
n.~——,-, ~~—->————»
8 zinko, THE ladies' TAILOR. OPERA
coats, rldlnj; habits, etc 465 S. Bdwy. R. 1-2
I g-l-'imo
MOTORCYCLES
TIRES PUT ON BABY CARRIAGES.
OSTERLOH'S MOTORCYCLE REP.'2R ,
SHOP. Twelfth and San Pedro St*
Home Phone 22974. 11-26-lmo
PERSONALS, BUSINESS— /
MORPHINE
j OPIUM, COCAINE
* and all drug habit* cured at home by the
Most remarkable remedy ever discovered.
No hypodermic Injections; no pain. A cur*
or n» pay. Call or write SO/ CAL. CHEM
ICAL CO.. 2021, 8. Broadway, room. 206-208,
Los Angeles. ' »-Vt-tt
FOR SALE—AT CMS HILL CREST DRIVE,
a number of choice water color picture*;
prices $1 to $26; the art buyer and the ama
teur artist will find these an Inspiration.
:, _ 12-11-3
PERSONAL—DR. H. Y. McNAUGHT HAS
REMOVED HIS OFFICES TO SUITE 603
BOMILLER BLDG. 430 S. BROADWAY.
HOURS. 10-12 AND 3-6. 11-30-lmo
■6 INSERTIONS OF A HERALD WANT AD
for the price of 2. or 7 Insertions for the i
price of 6. Ask The Herald counter man. I
FULL INFORMATION OF THE DIVORCB
laws of Nevada. Arizona and other state*
free. Address BOX 677, Goldneld. Nev.
11-16-lmo
CONFIDENTIAL. PRIVATE INSTRUC
tIons In hypnotism, $50. Results guar
anteed. BOX 209. HERALD. 12-2-lmo
MRS. MASS^N. the noted LONDON
palmist. 822. S. SPRING, over Owl drug
store. ii-z»-ti
CHURCH NOTICES—
Socialist^ Propaganda
and protest meeting against the execu
tion of Japanese Socialists. Union Labor
Temple. Sunday, Dec. 11. 8 p. m. Speak
ers' J. E. ■ Snyder, Austin Lewi* and
other.. Free »eats. All Invited.,
IJ-11-31
I INSERTIONS OF A HERALD .WANT AD
for the price of 2. or 7 insertions for th*
price of D. Ask The Herald counter man.
PENIEL HALL, 227 S. MAIN-NOON PRAY
er meeting dally; gospel meeting . every
night ' *-*•"
AUTOMOBILES— 3
HAVE YOU AN AUTOMOBILE FOR BALE,
for exchange or otherwise? Then use THB
HERALD'S classified automobile columns.
LOST AND FOUND—
8 INSERTIONS OF A HERALD WANT AD
for the prlc* of 2. or 7 Insertions for the
price of 6. Ask The Herald counter man.
LOST-SCOTCH COLLIE, 1501 B. »6TH ST.;
reward. Phone SOUTH BoBT^^ IMO-.I
PHYSICIANS— :
OR. C. C. LOGAN, Oculist, 111 Grant *"*«;
' MANICURING , - *;v
CUSP^NGT^ItI°-^l^S
MOVING AND STORAGE
J. F. Harvey Van * Storage, 201 B. Bill .t.
Fll5B, A 1837. Can .aye you money i"
• packing. shipping. .toring »ong«bga
_£°^»- ■■ — -' ••
MUSICAL INSTRUCTION
PADEREWSKI "ANO METHOD,
improvement on the L«sohetlsky method.
Taught ONLY at the Colonial <=«"•'*-,
- tory* 1239 S. Hope St. »■»"">• »' 8» l
OPTICIANS
J. P. DELANY. 809 S. SPRING. BSTAB
llshed 15 yr^ Glasses «u»r» d. l 2 s . l y m^
PAINTING, PAPER HANGING
PAINTING. PAPER HANGING. ANTING.
decorating. Estimates; wall paper, paint..
>J. A. LINNEY & CO.. 81 W. Third.
Bdwy. 1768. F8260. 11-13'"
-NEALB & BONNELL
PAINTING AND PAPER AQIN(* 1
Eunset SS97. . HOn>u-19-«
PRINTING
<r)L|< _ ) _^ > _^_ tji _^ j _ ( _ a >J - | ii-ilji-t,!!— i_ ~_ —u_. i iiijii,! ■-" ->- ■">- »-|nr^
THE GERMAIN PRESS, COMMERCIAL
printer., 84« SANTBB ST. Maln^ 6990.
ROOFING
ROOFING AND BUILDING PAPER, BEST
grade. Closing out. half price. SMI OIUF
FITH AVB. South 4163. "-*•"
Roof Repairing, Main 2426;
F6646. CAL. ROOHNQ & SUPPLY CO..
411 E. Seventh. 11-si-tt
BTANi^AtID ROOFING AND REPAIR CO.,
repair, any kind of leaky roof., city or
country. Bdwy 874«. 626 S. FLOWER ST.
SANITARIUMS
VILLA SANITARIUM-ONE OF THE MOST
beautiful spot* In Southern California for re
gaining health and strength. Special atten
tion given to nervous and mental diseases.
For Information inquire of B. 8. WBI
MOUTH, Lainanda Park, Cal. Phone Pasa
dena. Main 6371. Ta_» Sierra Madre car to
Villa Station. U-7-lmJ
THB WOMAN'S HOSPITAL
Exclusively for women and children. Best
equipped and homelike hospital in the city
for confinement cases. Terms to suit. -1245-
BOUTH FLOWER. F4134. 6-U-tt
SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES
SUCCESS shorthand INSTITUTE -
World's Record System. 827-37 H. W. Hell
man Bldg. ' U-Utt
STATUARY
INTERNATIONAL STATUARY COMPANY-
Garden Interior, statues, vases, fountains.
1322 WEST SEVENTH STREET. 11-H-lm»
STORAGE
n _,_^ '--'-.T.-L. -,_ -,_ —^
LARGE PRIVATE. LOCKED IRON ROOMS
for furniture, etc; 81.60 and $8 per month.
Trunks, boxes, eta., $260 to 60c; open vans,
$6 per day or 760 per hour. We pack and
ship household goods everywhere at re
duced rate*. ' ■
COLYEAR'3 VAN AND STORAGE CO.,
Offices 609-11 S. Main st. Warehouse 416-17
Ban Pedro st. Phone* F3171; Main 1117.
*2 ■ t»l6-tf
TAILORING
,i I, ,_,-.. i~i I—i .ii-i.ii—(_ni-i_ -i..i— ~ii. . —i. ir-_T~Eii~in ~~ii j~ J
WANTED—MEN TO HAVE THBIR OWN
clothes made for $12 a suit during No
vember. 132'A'W. FIFTH ST. 11-lijvlmo
" \ TYPEWRITERS
p. „i, v i in „„ ,, — f— i_ii-|_ii -^_n —i_n—^_ ii—) —\ i—> r~^i—ini—>s»~»iisr-|irJ^iiJ^ J
POSITIVELY BRAND NEW BALL-BBAR
ing back .pacer, 2-color L. C Smith vis
ible. Big bargain for .pot cash. Apply '
ROOM 11. 244 Vi 8. BROADWAY.
*^ 11-11-1 mo
INSURANCE
FIRE, AUTOMOBILE, ACCIDENT, LIFE,
burglary, liability, plate glass, surety bond».
RULE & SONS, Inc., 829-31 Htgglns bldg.
12-4-tt
DENTISTS ~
DR BACHMANN. 205-208 MAJESTIC THBA
ter bldg., 845 B. Broadway. FO6SI, Main 3815.
T-l-tf
jyONEY_TO LOAN- ;
' MONEY TO LOAM
$80,000 to loan on real estate, city or country.
6 to 7 per cent, amount to suit. MOVER
A GILBERT, 303 H. W. Hellman bldg.
Home phone A 8827; Main 6474. . < 10-t-tg
MONEY TO SALARIED MEN AND
women accommodated without delay or pub
licity. SOUTHERN CREDIT CO.. 411 O. T.
. Johnson Bldg. - - ■ > . »-14-t<
R. W. POINDEXTER, 409 WILCQX BLDG.,
will loan you what you need on real es
tate, stock* and bonds. Building loan* a,
specialty. ,- »-»-tf
I HAVE $200 TO $80,000 FOR REAL E3
tate loan*, city or country. Money wait- _
Ing. ; R. W. MOVER. 604 . Frost bldg.
y6107. • 12-1-tf
MONEY TO loan—full VALUE ON
diamonds, watches, piano., furniture, stor
age receipts. G. F. THOMAS, 711 8. Broaa-
I -ay. 10-BU-tt
TO LOAN SALARIED PEOPLE; NO RED
tape: without security; confidential. WEST
COAST EXCHANGE. 419 Henne bldg. 10-4-tt
DON'T BORROW MONEY ON SALARY UN
tll you see me. IT. A. NEWTON, 70S O. T.
Johnsom bldg. '< ■•.•'.•. 11-6-tf
$500 TO $10,000 TO LOAN AT 7 PER CENT.
T. L. O'BRIEN & CO., Jefferson and Main.
■ ■ - ■ ■ - ■- ■ - 6-9-tt
MUSICAL INSTRUCTION— f
MUSIC MUSIC »MUSIC
A thoroughly competent music teacher want,
a few more pupils for piano lessons; charges
moderate. Apply BESSIE CARLYON, 1344
Kellam aye.. L. A. . ■ 12-11-7
BAVE v MONEY. fOUR ADVT. THRES
times tot th* price of two, or seven time.
for the plica of five. If prepaid. U-l-tf
ATTORNEYS AT LAW- ,
LAWYER'S ADVICE FREE
Suite «36 H. W. Hellman Bldg., Fourth and
•-. ■ Spring. ■.-.■• t -.. :
General practice of law In all It. branches. "■
Civil and criminal cases conducted In all
. courts. Charge* moderate. Confidential.
' , 11-H-tf
——— ' ■ ' t
MACHINERY— - V '
BAVE MONEYI ' YOUR ADVT. THREB .
time, fci the price of two, or seven time*
■ for th* price of five. If prepaid. 11-1-tf
JOINING—
SAVE MONEY I YOUR ADVT. THREB
times for the price of two, or .even tlmea!
for th* price of five. If prepaid. U-l-tt
£)RESSMAKINQ—
3 INSERTIONS OF A HERALD WANT AD
for th* pilce of 1. or 7 Insertion, for the
uric* ni k Aat Th« UeoUd «.unt«r fuigt.

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