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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, December 12, 1910, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-12-12/ed-1/seq-2/

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POSTAL DEFICIT
CUT $11,500,000
Postmaster General's Annual
Report Shows Service Is
Being Extended
WAGES OF MEN INCREASED
Federal Banks Being Established
and Parcels Post Is Rec
ommended
WASHINGTON, Pec. 11.—In the
space of twelve mouths a reduction
had been made In the deficit of the
postoftico department of $11,500,000, ac
cording to the annual report of Post
master General Frank H. Hitchcock,
made public today.
While a year ago the fiscal records
of the postal service disclosed a deficit
of $17,500,000, the largest in the history
of the country, the excess of expendi
tures over receipts for the year ended
June 30 last amounted to only $5,848,566.
In commenting upon this reduction.
Postmaster General Hitchcock says in
his report:
"It is most gratifying to report that
this unprecedented reduction has been
made without any curtailment of post
al facilities. On the contrary, the serv
ice has been largely extended.
"The policy of the present adminis
tration has been to wipe out losses by
increasing the postal business along
profitable lines, and while thus enlarg
ing the department's income to reduce
as far as possible the rate of expendi
ture by cutting out wasteful processes,
by simplifying and rendering more ef
fective the methods of handling postal
business, and by raising to the highest
possible standard the efficiency of of
ficers and employes.
SrKKI) SAVE.* MONEY
"The more quickly mall matter can
be handled tht>. less expnslve is the
process. The department accordingly
has devoted Itself with great earnest
ness to the work of Increasing: the ef
ficiency of fho mall service, considering
this the surest method of making the
postal establishment self-supporting."
The department's policy is to extend
the service as rapidly as Is warranted
by Increasing population. In further
ance of this policy, 1500 new postoffiees
were established during the last year,
and 615 new rural delivery routes, trav
ersing altogether 12,235 miles, were in
stituted. Nearly 3600 new employes of
various classes were placed upon the.
rolls of the department, whose aggre
gate salaries were more than $2,000,000
annually. In addition to this sum.
$1,750,000 was added to the salaries of
postofflce clerks, $1,22G,000 to the salar
ies of letter carriers and $250,000 to the
salaries of railway mail clerks. All in
creases in salary were based upon ef
ficiency ratings.
In the discussion of second-class mall
Postmaster General Hitchcock points
out the constant growth of this class
of matter. It is carried at a loss, and
he urges that a remedy should be
promptly applied by charging more
postage.
RAISE RATES FOR APS
"in levying the higher rate," the re
port suggests. "It is believed that a
distinction should be made between ad
vertising matter and what is termed
legitimate reading matter.
"Under present conditions an in
cr«SVM in the postage on reading- mat
ter is not recommended. Puch an In
n-ease would place a. special burden
on a largo number of second-class
publications, Including educational
and religious periodicals, that derive
little or no profit from advertising,
li In the circulation of this type of
publications, which nid so effective
ly in the educational and moral ad
vancement of the people, that the
government can best afford to en
courage. For these publications, and
also for any other legitimate reading
matter in periodical form, the depart
ment favors a continuation of the
present low postage rate of one cent
a pound, and recommends that the
proposed increase in rate be applied
only to .magazine advertising mat
ter.
"In view of the vanishing postal
deficit it is believed that if the maga
llnes could be required to pay what
it costs the government to carry their
advertising pages the department's
revenues would soon grow large
enough to warrant one cent postage
on flrat-class mail.
"Newspapers are not Included in the
plan for a higher rate on advertis
ing matter because, being chiefly of
local distribution, they do not em
ploy the mails to any such extent as
the widely circulating magazines."
kciui. SHBTICE costly
While the loss resulting from the
low postage rate on second-class mail
is the greatest in the postal service
the loss on rural delivery service is
very considerable. The appropriations
annually granted to maintain the
rural delivery system, however, as
pointed out in the report, are ex
pended in the interest of a vast pop
ulation. Mr. Hitchcock urges the
wisdom of further extension of this
system even at a considerable loss to
the government. He points out, also,
the business wisdom of the consolida
tion during the last year of the star
route and rural delivery system, the
consolidation having been the means
of effecting a large saving and of In
creasing the efficiency of the ser
vice.
Mr. Hitchcock reviews the work al
ready accomplished looking to the es
tablishment of postal savings banks.
A trial of the new system will be
made, beginning January 1, 1911, at
one postofflca in each state and ter
ritory of tlio Union. The amount ap
propriated by congress for this trial
was $100,000. All of the offices se
lected for the trial are of the second
class, wage earners being particular
ly benefited. It is expected that the
new postal savings system will be
extended to many other offices before
the end of the current fiscal year.
RECOMMENDS PABCHI4 POST
A renewal of the previous recom •
mendation for a limited parcels post
service on rural routes is made. Mr.
Hitchcock expresses he hope that con
gress will authorize the delivery on
rural routes of parcels weighing as
high as eleven pounds. This scheme
can be put Into operation with little if
any expense to the government.
A recommendation is m ide that con
gressional authority he riven the de
partment for the issuance of postal
notes in amounts not exceeding $10, at
a, lower fee. than is charsjrd for many
orders.
Mr. Hltehrnrk believes thai many
abuses ol the franking system could
11< ■ ;,:.■■•. .1 inurki •! i oonomy,
by Bupplyin ipwial off.li li ' . nvelnpas
;iiid stamp* f"r free mail irf the gov
ernment, In the present circumstance!
i, |i tmpoi Ibli to detei tnlnu the c>Ht
*n the government of the franlunj;
U. S. ELECTRICIAN ON
SUBMARINE DIES OF
INJURIES RECEIVED
SAN DIEGO. Dee. 11. Henry W. Ley,
(he iwecontl etas* electrician on hoard the
submarine Grampus, who was injure,! by
the blowing out of an Intake valve
erdar. died curly thl* morning. I
Ley »a« it years old and had been In
the nary about tiro year* and In the
submarine branch but a few week*. The
body "ill be -nil 'to Boulder, Colo.,
where hi* parent* live.
privilege, but if it were hedged about
by sucli a plan as Mr. Hitchcock sug
gests it would be possible to determine
definitely the cost of carrying free
mail for all executive departments and
for the congress.
It is indicated in the report that the
Crusade by the postoftlce department
against the fraudulent use of the mails
has been pushed with great vigor.
During the last few months the prin
cipal officers of thirty-four corpora
tions and flrmß have been placed under
arrest for swindling the public by this
method.
FRAI'DS tm $100,000,000
"It is estimated." the report says,
"that the eighty important eases re
cent lv brought to a head represent
swindling operations that have filched
from the American people In less than
a decade fully JIOO.000,000."
Mr. Hitchcock stmngly urges that
the entire postal service he taken out
of politics. He says:
"The recent order of the president
classifying, on the recommendation or
the department! a" aesistant post
masters, was an Important step in the
right direction. As a still more im
portant reform, presidential postmas
ters of all grades from the first class
to the third, should be placed in the
classified service. This action, which
is earnestly recommended, would un
questionably result in B still bettor
standard Of service."
A general extension of the civil ser
vice rules to fourth class postmasters
is recommended, although some disad
vantages have developed in the appli
cation of the civil service rules to
postmasters of that dan,
In conclusion, Postmaster General
Hitchcock expresses the hope that con
gress will see Its. way clear to grant
an annual leave of absence of thirty
days to portoffice clerks, city letter
carriers and to railway postal clerks
who are required to work six days or
moro a week throughout the year.
CONGRESS DELAYS
TARIFF TINKERING
Promised Efforts at Schedule
Revision May Not Materialize
at Present Session
(Afsoclated Prose)
WASHINGTON, Dec. 11.—A week of
congress, has not cleared the atmos
phere as to whether them there will
be any serious effort at tariff tinkering.
While many bills have been Intro
duced for the repeal of the duties on
lumber, food products, coal and many
raw materials, they have come ffoni
the Democratic minority and are. re
garded as indicating the opinion of
the individuals at the next session,
when the Democrats will be in the ma
jority.
In the senate the only tariff activity
is in regard to the proposed change In
the rules by Senator Cummins. The
change is designed to permit revision
by schedules and prevent considera
tion of amendments to schedules other
than those specifically under discus
sion.
The opposition to the proposed
change in the rules insists that it in
volves cloture in a form that has been
repugnant for a hundred years.
Friends of the Cummins scheme point
to President Taft's Indorsement of
tariff revision by schedules and de
clare such a rule is necessary if the
president's plan is to carry.
PENSION BILL NOW EXPECTED
The passage through the house of
two of the large appropriation bills
was an unheard of thing in the his
tory of congress, especially when it
was considered they were the Indian
and rivers and harbors bills, both of
which have precipitated controversies
and long debates before. It is expect
ed that the pension bill will be re
ported from committee on Tuesday,
and that the legislative, executive and
Indicia! bill will be reported on Thurs
day.
Chairman Tawney of the appropria
tion committee has promised Speaker
Cannon and Republican Whip Dwight
that he can report others of the big
supply bills as rapidly as tlfo house
can handle them. The rush of these
measures through the house at the
Instigation of the administration to
open the field for the president's legis
lative program promises to break all
records.
At the same time there seems to be
an impression among members that
the session will prove barren of re
sults BO far as general legislation is
concerned.
Much opposition Is developing
against the passage of a bill to pro
vide for a reapportlonment based on
the thirteenth census, If this should
go over until next session some Inter
n-tin .- debates would result, Reap
portio'nment legislation, as a rule, of
fers advantages to the party in power,
but next session the bouse will be
Democratic and the senate Repub
lican, and many members think it
would be Impossible to pass a law
under such conditions unless it con
tained a large element of fairness to
both parties.
MANY SPANIARDS KILLED
IN SECOND GREAT STORM
Seville Menaced by Flood. Trains
Derailed, Ships Wrecked
MADRID, Dec. 11.—Spain has been
visited by a second cyclone, more
severe than thai which swept the west
ern portion of the country a tew days
ago. Many persons have been killed
or injured, and the low lying districts
are flooded.
Lower Seville is submerged and it It
feared the entire city will be under
water shortly. A railroad bridge at
Alealu has been destroyed and numer
ous villages are In a critical situation.
Railroads have been washed away at
Caceren, Aranjuez, Castillo, Caatelleja,
Vlllasec-a and Malaga. Two trains
were derailed today at Palenciu and
several bodies have been observed float
ing down the river at Valadollld, Tel
egraph communication with the pro
vinces is , imosi entirely suspended
Reports have reached here of ship
recks along the coast.
LOS ANGELES HERALD: MONDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 12, 1910.
MEXICAN REBELS
MUSTER 8000 MEN
Government of Sister Republic
Prepares for Active Campaign
Against Insurgents
REVOLUTIONISTS LACK GUNS
Fighting Promises to Be Confined
to Mountainous Districts of
Country
(Associated Press]
DOUGLAS. Ariz.. Dec. —After
having permitted the rebels to take
possession practically without opposi
tion of all the territory between Chi
huahua and Torreon to the borders of
Sonora and Sahuaripa, it is now evi
dent that the government of Mexico
is preparing to enter on an active
campaign against them.
It is believed by those who have
knowledge of his previous campaigns
that President Diaz has purposedly
deferred active steps in order to per
mit the enemy to gather in one place
where they may be surrounded and de
stroyed. In the impending hostilities,
while the Insurgents have, according
to reliable Information, a mounted
cavalry force of more than 8000 men,
they will be sadly handicapped by the
lack of machine guns, while, the gov
ernment forces will labor under the
disadvantage of operating In a moun
tainous country as difficult as that
which protracted the campaigns
against a far smaller number of Ya
quls for many years. In the encoun
ters up to date the federal troops have
permitted themselves to bo surprised
three times by the rebels, which indi
cates that the latter have been care
less in throwing out their pickets.
The general indications are that the
rebellion will only be in evidence In a
long campaign in the Coahuila and
Chihuahua mountains, with the rest of
the country free from disturbance.
PLAYWRIGHT ASSERTS DIAZ
ROLE APPROVED BY PEOPLE
John Wesley de Kay Claims Rev
olutionists Have No Grievance
NEW YORK, Pec. 11.—John Wes
ley de Kay. author, playwright and
organizer of the United States Pack
ing company and the Mexican Na
tional Packing company, both of which
operate under concessions from the
Mexican government, inquired eagerly
foi- the news from Mexico when he
landed here today from the steamer
Coronia, from Liverpool.
"If Mexico had a population to deal
with like our own," he said, "then the
trouble might be grave, for in the
United States the masses Of the people
have money, their own houses, rifles
and some knowledge of how to shoot.
But in Mexico 83 or 90 per cent of the
people Hre without money, arms or
resources "T any kind.
"They are entirely incapable of or
ganizing any effective or strong move
ment against the government, and all
disturbances which have not a ma
jority of the men of influence and
wealth behind them must he compara
tively local and petty until the char
acter of the citizenry is materially
altered.
"As a student of Mexico for ten
years, I am able conscientiously to
say that there is no class of Mexicans
who have a real or legitimate griev
ance against the government. The
property and money interests of the
country are protected and hut lightly
taxed. The laboring man has a better
wage than ever before and with more
demand for labor than can he sup
plied.
"The burden of supporting the gov
ernment falls in great part on the
Industries and the foreign population,
and the industries Hie practically all
owned by foreigners. They consume
a great portion of imported goods, the
duties on which supply a large part
of the government revenues.
"Throughout the country there is a
profound love for President Diaz and
universal belief in his integrity."
DIAZ TROOPS ANTICIPATE
VICTORY OVER INSURGENTS
Federal Forces to Attack Rebels
Near Texas Border
CHIHUAHUA (Via El Paso, Texas),
Dec. 11.—Troops, including 120 cavalry
men and ten artillerymen with rapid
tire «luis, left here tonight over the
Orient road, destined for Ojinaga, on
the Texas border, where revolutionists
are reported In the ascendant.
General Hernandez Btated tonight
that Genera] Navarro expects to attack
the Insurgents at Rancho Santiago,
about 1011 miles west of here, tomorrow.
Although the Insurrectos equal them
in numbers. Hernandez declared the
discipline and organisation of tin
federal troops, together with their
artillery, would give them victory.
Rancho Santiago is situated on a
: and offers cover behind a Btone
fence a mile long. There are also 100
adobe houses that can be utilized by
the troops if they are hard pressed.
There are many barbed-wire tenc< a
In this vicinity which will be a serious
1 obstacle to advancing detachments.
Pour hundred reinforcements, with
two field pieces, arrived here today on
a special train.
Tomorrow they will be sent to Join
i;. neral Navarre, who is within twenty
mile- of the Insurrectos. Both sides
are maneuvering to bring about an
engagement on advantageous ground.
General Navarro is said to have
gained the first important point, as he
is now In the .open country.
r . in mrrectos had hoped to catch
htm In tin mountains, where their
knowledge of the country would be an
I Invaluable asset.
The reinforcements which arrived to
day occupied a special train of seven
;<*. The ' contingent Included
i ■• nty artillerymen, whose horses fol
peclal freight.
AMBASSADOR SAYS PEACE
REIGNS THROUGH MEXICO
Senor De La Barra at Washing
ton Receives Official News
WASHINGTON, !)'■<■• It Declaring
thai exaggerated accounts *>( the rev
olutionary movement In .Mexico had
magnified its Importance In the minds
of innny Americans, Ben or ds la Barra.
Mexican ambassador to the United]
PREACHERS CONDEMN
MOB THAT DROVE OUT
INDUSTRIAL WORKERS
FRESNO, Deo. ll.— Strong rondemna
tlon of the mob which drove out the
Industrial Workers of the World Friday
and burned their ramp MM spoken from
the pulpit* of *-re«no today. The pas
lorn urged that the authorities should
art stringently.
Dr. Thomas lloyd of the Mrst Vres
h.vterutn rliun *nid the primary cause
of the trouble was the unequal distribu
tion of wealth mill <ln>.»ril Ihe fight of
the Industrialists with lite rampalicn be
in* waged by the Insurgents at Wash
to (ft on.
No attempts to sneak tin the streets
were made today.
States, said today the trouble had at
no time approached any significance.
He said normal conditions reigned
throughout the republic, except In a
portion Of Chihuahua, where the gov
ernment forces arc pursuing 400 revo
lutionists.
His statement, he added, «ns based
on official reports from his government,
which had kept him advised of the pro
gress of events, wherefore he could
authoritatively say the lives and in
terests of natives and foreigners alike
were secure.
The ambassador said several revolu
tionary successes had ben reported and
later denied, "which untrue statements,
he said, "have not only reflected upon
the reputation of Mexico as a peace
loving country, but also have had their
effect on Americans with Interests In
Mexico and given rise to unrest and a
spirit of suspicion as to fie security of.
such Interests."
lie said the government of General
Diaz is absolutely secure, and that for
eign interests are in no danger.
Continuing, the ambassador said:
"The ledltlonarlp* are being- dealt
with in a lawful and orderly manner.
The cases of all who are taken Into
custody because of their participation
in the rebellion arc in the hands of the
Mexican courts.
"The revolt has demonstrated three
things: The strength of the govern
ment and the spirit of justice that
guides the people, the loyalty of the
army and the support by the people
generally of a course of peace and or
der, showing their satisfaction with
present conditions."
The ambassador snid that not a sol
dier had proven disloyal.
THE ITALIAN RIVIERA
IS BATTERED BY STORM
ROME. Dec. 11.—The Italian Riviera
has suffered greatly from recent
storms and the weather threatens more
loss. Miles [if cultivated flowers have
been devastated.
San Remo is flooded and many resi
dents were compelled to escape from
windows on rope ladders in the night,
their houses being surrounded with
water. Several persons have been
drowned.
Railway traffic between Rordi^hera
and the French frontier has been in
terrupted because of washouts. All
rivers in the north are at flood stage.
The Tiber also Is rising fast.
The hill on which the village of
Pentenuovo stands is being rapidly
undermined.
_ . ._ AMUSEMENTS
mAMELES sULuvArtBrConsiDinE
&Sf& J&M ULLLtJ VAU DE VI LLE
THIS AFTERNOON—A BIG NEW BILL
<^wwi S'^^lM^ RLETTA
/j&ZsJ%febr /^ '/•^ uw\m\v TT-TP RTJTTERFLY
Iff STALEY & BIRBECK
jUh "The Musical Blacksmiths"
\\\ W IVith their great Transformation
\\W scene
The HawananTeno, JOSEPH KETLER & CO.
PRINCE & GALGANO thY " rural comeily ilraina.
PRII The Italian harpist. THE TOWN FIDDLER
SCOTT & WILSON ZORODO BROTHERS
Acrobatic humorists. A sensational athletic exhibition.
THE LAUGH-O-SCOPE
MATINEE EVERY DAY—lOc, Me AND 80c—TWO SHOWS EVERY NIGHT.
NEXT WEEK—THE SECOND BIG "S. • C." ROAD SHOW. WITH BILLY VAN.
•■THE ASSASSIN OP BORROW." THE FIVE COLUMBIANS AND SIX OTHBR
' ' " VAUDEVILLE CELEBRITIES.
HAMBURGER'S MAJESTIC THEATER N Kk'mnth
LOS ANGELES' LEADING I'l \VIU>> -I'- OLIVER MOROCCO. MANAGER.
DANIEL \. ARTHUR prr»rntn fr'Jy^y'j^M *1 —^Bta Am^ M *"« S?iWSeßh|
In liln MinK comedy success, M^HgjfSq Bi a B* lj "°wj PJ
A Matinee Idol | m aPtl ml.mb**m tidi
With LOOSE DRESSER and THAT DANDY CHOBIIS.
"On« Thousand laughs and not a single blush."—New York Herald.
PRICES: 50c TO 12.00. POPULAR PRICE MATINEE WEDNESDAY.
BEGINNING NEXT SUNDAY NIGHT, seats on Ml* Thursday, John I',
■locum presents tile New Viennese comic opera,
1 KISSING GIRL
With MISS TEXAS GUINAN and the' OSCULATORY BEAUTY CHORUS.
PRICKS! S0« to *1.50. MATINEES WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY.
COMING—MARY MANNERINU IN "A MANS WORLD."
G DAXin r\TDI7T?A unTTsff MATINKKS TOMORROW. SAT., SUN.
RAND OPkKA HUUalt Phone. Main J9OT, AIO6T.
A LIVELY, MERRY MUSICAL HIIIHI..
Tfl'-LSm anil his hIK company present Eddie I fu. 'Rflrl «nd
rerns ko.v» treat music and fun hit, inecwunu
T^«.«.~. M « NEXT WEEK—A ma«niflcent revival of I The Girl
Jriartman •TUB TOYMAKER." Seat, this morning. | *■ "V vj«*
PEACEMAKERS TO
PLAN WORLD LAWS
American Society for Judicial
Settlement of International
Disputes to Meet
NOTED MEN WILL CONFER
President Taft. Carnegie and
Others to Further Movement
for Permanent Court
WASHINGTON, Pec. U.—The merits
of a permanent court of arbitral jus
tice, as advocated by Secretary Knox
in his note to the, powers, -will bo
promulgated In the international con
ference Of the American .Society for
Judicial Settlement of International
Disputes, ti> i" held hers this week.
President Tuft, honorary president of
the society; Andrew ('iirnoirio, Senator
Root and several diplomats and stu
dents of International law win attend.
A program has been arranged, cal
culated to cover every phase, favorable
and unfavorable. In the question."
The central Idea is to launch a move
ment which, together with the favor
able answers already received from
several powers, will aid in promulgat
ing the tribunal at tlie next Hague
conference. Its importance, it is said,
will be in the recording of legal prece
dents to make international laws for a
body as Judicial rules rather than by
diplomats,
(■resident Tuft Will speak at tjie ban
quet closing the conference. Other
speakers will be fiFn. Stewart L. Wood
ford. Gen. X D. Grant, Thomas Nelson
Page, MartMi \V. Littleton, W. Hourkc
GOCkran, Senator Theodore W. Burton
and M. Jus«erand, French ambassador.
The program includes addresses by
Benor de la Barra, Mexican ambassa
dor; Senator Hoot, Justice Riddley
of the high court of Canada, Hon. John
W. Foster, former secretary of state;
Dr. Bcnujmin Ide Wheeler, Andrew
Carnegie, Justice Brown. Joseph
Choate, Governor-elect Simeon E. Bald
win of Connecticut, David Starr Jor
dan. Dr. Charles W. Eliot, Harry Pratt
Judson and Edward Glnn of Boston,
who recently gave $1.000,000 to found n
school for teaching- of peace doctrines.
AVIATORS FEAR WEATHER
CONDITIONS AT MEMPHIS
MEMPHIS, Term., Deo. 11.—Short
flights across country and spectacular
low altitude maneuvers made up to
days aviation program. The plan was
to have the aircraft ascend to the
higher lev.'ls and make attempts for
duration records. but unfavorable
weather conditions prevented.
Moisant and Barrier in monoplanes
and Frisbie in his biplane participated.
Qarrofl tried out his Demoiselle, but a
disarrangement of a steering gear madn
necessary a hasty coming to earth
after a minute in the air.
AMUSEMENTS ' -.0
Bo«h .'..one. U47.
\ VVI%^^I»V%% natlnee Kverj »»r at 2:15.
i; THE STANDARD OF VAUDEVILLE
I New Bill Starting Matinee Today-
George Beban CSi> Co.
|! ,*- rr«»ntln« an Italian ClaMlo, "THE SIGX OP THE KOBE." ,
' V i^« V Xothlrig Jn the regular d«. I. finer <h«nthU one-act gem
«S i>e.plle anything .you may have seen, you will acclaim this the
jl|ja^,..- supremo height of' Acting Art.
i||l|i§§H '% Jewell's Manikins Grant & Hoag \
*^^^^^^^L' Cleverly manipulated figures Air and Ethel return with new ;
£|9 L that arc almost HfelllM In laurels after some years In th«
B W their action, m.iKln a delight- east, In their particular line ,
H [ ftil surprise. they have no peers. I
M The Asahi Troupe Camille Obcr
'' *^wWS^^ never maKl° '" Blwos" ln '"• Dainty and '-hlnK' not only t
} :-*^| B> expected from the Nipponese, most happy In her work, but
\ - wKrm bllt tnis m"tßr> wit"hls "■ on "* art"llc Bldo np eldc'lly )
i 1 I^WW (ngt ' slstants, Is surpassing wonderful iis well. |
'' Iwi mi Felice Morris & Co. Three White Kuhns <
i 1 ill I^S The only '■Call for Help" you Mirth and '""° are the, key
) 'Wm M need with mi" M°" is first notes °c these hoys' hi* hit,
1 f| ' » ld to ">• la|lht<'r-"tl'' ■""'' tliey have found "10 way (
' '*^B^ 1 lsn ' " f"n"y" '" "''"'
'' $&T Last Week of the Czar's Especially Engaged \
Imperial Russian Dancers
Alexander Vollnlnt ot Mosrow. I.yditt LapakDWß and Tl.eodnr LapoKOW of St. retors
bufg. Not to hiive fleen them is t.i mlsi 'the (l«n.-liig trent of tllo .ealOO. f
ORPHEUM MOTION PICTURES
I I Mn.v. the Latest. Alwa.vß the Most Novel. Always the Best.
I 1 E^?y Night, 10c 25c. 10c, 75c. Matinee 3:15 DAILY, 10c, 25c, SOC.
"R^OROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER Maln 8I •Ne sl«th
lYjL" LOS ANGELES' LEADING STOCK COMPANY
is your mP^k
c HUSBAND ) «?*^A
? WIFE flfc^'A
( SWEETHEART ) /jjFr^Wk.
SELFISH? Mj|ift3 lm
Here's the remedy. m Ife^^y
THE ORIGINAL, STARTLING p
DRAMATIC NOVELTY, WJ
ml * % v A UTC < K^^Rli
\\ U 1/ I y I 9
YOU,
Ma tiv (O Come and I U
AS FULL OF SURPRISES AS A
CHRISTMAS TREE AND h J|| i> hcott
__ ' _ —.-.-»»•. •• . A» the Messenger
JUST AS TIMELY. A' tha (Photo by Marks)
NIGHTS— IISc. sue, HO. MATINEES SATURDAY AND SUNDAY. 10c, 25c. 60c.
NEXT WEEK—FIRST TIME ANYWHERE "TUB GRINGO'
API AC^^ THt FOREMOST STOCK
DLLAdWUCOMPANY OF AMERICA
COMMENCING TONIGHT—THIS WEEK ONLY
LETWIS S STONE and the Belasco theater company will present an elaborate
revival of the most popular of all plays, .
OLD HEIDELBERG
The nresent revival of tins grand old play of German student life will positively
he ~lven for one. week t witness this fine play should secure seats of very
and hose who want to witness this fine play should .ecure their seats the very
ana muoo firßt tl))ng thlg morning.
Regular Belasco Prices—Matinees Thursday, Saturday & Sunday
NEXT WEEK-Hoyfs famous laughing success. "A STRANGER IN NOT YORK.-
Seats today.
TTTT-i AUDITORIUM -THEATER L. E. BEHYMER,
HE AUDITORIUM beautiful." manager.
"*■ NEXT WEEK, BEGINNING MONDAY
QUEEN Effi MOULIN ROUGE
Immense Company* —Augumented
— Orchestra ======
SEATS READY THURSDAY
MASON OPERA HOUSE ' . w< T<»!£££:
COMMBNCTWQ TONIGHT A»P ALL WEEK. »«TINEE SATURDAY. Sr£ClAt
IAIJIKS 1 MATINEE WEDNESDAY. Special prices, 50c, 15c, *1.00.
• ' _ ■■■■■ In ncr reateßt success,
niAMAnA 111 AlAn TIIE OTHEB WOMAN,"
KlOnPiiQ IM^JIXI By Frederic Arnold Kuramer.
Ifl! I all ■■ ItjS Regular prices, r.Oc to *I.RO. Seat sale now
UEUIIUHV lI.MIVII *'„* Com | _r,llllan Russell "IN SEARCH
——i——^—— OF A SINNER." * "
SHRINE AUDITORIUM Dec. 12-13-14-15-16-17
- , „, OU^N«r GIVEN BY THE IXM ANGELES
/\UtOmOUlle OnOW motor oak deausrs* association
npn-vs nFPFMBKR 13 at 8 p. m.. and from 10 a. m. to 10:30 p. m. thereafter. So-
B^B. SSa V f^nSerJlirju
and electrical effects. Admission 50c. including society night.
QIMPSON AUDITORIUM m 8. Hop. *
Christian Science Lecture
By Prof. Hermann S. H.rlng. C. ■■ *.. of Concord. » H.. Monday svsnlng. December
12, 1910. at 8 o'clock. Admission free. This lecture will be repeated on Tuesday «v«n-
Ing, December 13, at the same place. ____^ _
__, _ — I
LUNA PARK Con" Washington and Mala Sts.
VOW (H'lN- noyal Hungarian Band Concerts twice daily; the Diving Venus;
*rar WusalH»man's Vaudeville Theater (with Ladle.' Orche.tra of 7 plece.-four
MU4™*OTlOlf^lnirw» eMw!°iKHlu Swing. Open Air Skating nlnk. Flr.r«
Elght. The Zoo Slating Callory. Temple of Palmistry. Refreshment,. NO LIQUOKb
SOLD ON TUB GROUNDS. ADMISSION 10c.
O-r „,,T>Tn t<ur<tTt?T} •'. ' ■ Main, Between Fifth and SUtb.
LYMPIC THEATER Cool—tommodlom—CumfurtabK
"^rarea?'Big'' Show. ' TIIK T.VKNING S-T-A-B With Jules Mendel
Th Great Hlk Show Bpaltod Backward.. and the Olympic Co.
2 SHOWS TOMGH?.7:«Si»d 8:15. M.I M 0.., Wed., Sat.. Sun., 10c, 20c, 25«.

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