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Los Angeles herald. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, December 16, 1910, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-12-16/ed-1/seq-2/

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MRS. TURNBULL CHARGES FORGERY
KEEPS COUNT OF
BREAKFAST KISSES
Mother of Baldwin Claimant Tells
of Courtship and Con
tract Marriage
DECLARES SHE WAS DUPED
Asserts Letters Which Contra
dict One Portion of Her
Story Are Bogus
(Conlinuftl from I'm* One)
apparently, a simple instrument, hems
merely a mutual agn i take
each other for husband and Wife,
"The next morning," she resumed, I
counted die kisses he gave me during
breakfast They numbered twenty-two.
Then lie said he wanted my photo
graph to wear in his watch ease. We
went to a photograprer and ordered
11. a< Ii "ted one finished in blue
for himself and ordered one for my
locket that was finished in red.
DHM AUK « OUNTBD
"Mr Baldwin was a very demon
tive man and knowing that l had
counted ins kiases at breakfast, and
that they were twenty-two, he BUg
g( st. ,i thai i place the number '22
upon the back of the picture."
At this KtuKe of her recital the pho
tograph was Introduced, as was one of
Baldwin himself, showing him to lie.
about 66 yearn old. Mrs. Turnbull
declared that the horseman gave it
to her, saying that he wanted her to
have it
"Mr, Baldwin found it necessary to
go to Bakersflsld on business," con
tinued Mrs. Turnbull. "Before he went
he asked for the marriage contract.
i said i had locked it up In my purse.
Ha told me to si\e it to him say
injj; that girls arc careless and 1 might
lose it.
"I came to the Hotel Westminster,
registering under the name of Lillian
.\. Ashley, and a fi'w days later was
joined thore by Mr. Baldwin and we
took a trip tv -San Diego and Coro
nadu.
"Mr. Baldwin was a most fascinating
man—the kind to win a woman He
was a. dancer of ability and a most
winning talker. While in San Diego
1 asked for a wedding ring- and ho
promised to give me one. He later
Save me a plain gold one which 1 wore
upon the customary finger until 1 mar
ried my second husband, when X trans
ferred it to the right hand.'"
Mrs. Turnbull removed her glove and
showed a plain gold band ring.
PRODUCBfI FADBO 80888
Continuing her story she told of
Hoing to Santa Anita. Where she lived
,ii the Hotel Oakwood, where Bald
win, she declared, "showed her every
attention that a husband would to a
yom;,. wife." There were mutual din
ners—the one he gave her partaking
of the nature of a bridal banquet. She
kept as mementoes the roses she wore
that night as well as his buttonhole
bouquet. Both were Introduced as
. \ id.-nee.
"Of course," said Cavin MeNab,
one of the attorneys for the defense,
when the withered posies were placed
before his eyes, "wo understand these
are 'flowers which bloom In the spring
liit-la,' and believe 'they have nothing
to do with the case.' "
i ither dinner favors, relics of the
name festivity, were shown. They were
red paper bonnets for the women and
paper caps for the men. Other pic
tures of the days of 1893 were shown,
one being that of Mr.-. Turnbull seat
ed upon a white horse given her by
Baldwin. iVJiother was of herself,
upon which Bhi said she once had
written. "Lillian A. Baldwin,'' later
removing the word:- when she learned
Bho u.i nol Baldwin's wife.
"Why did you remove tho wordi
; In- in .is asked.
" l:. . .in. 1. I wanted m thing to do
with sin h H name," answered Mrs.
Turnbull with a Bob, "when J learned
l ivBS not hii real wife. 1 removed
them when I went east under the name
of Aline Belmont, which I ai sum".l
.so that Beatrice might not know who
she is."
.Mr-. Turnbull quieted herself and
continued telling of Baldwin's kind
nesses to her at Santa Anita. Upon
one of the boats on the lake there tha
horseman planned to paint her. name.
lie was Instrumental In taking her
in-other. Everett P. Ashley, there to
bear her company no tsho should not
be lonusomo in his absence.
LIFE AT WANT* ANITA
"He showed me every social atten
tion," said Mrs. rurnbull. "Ho. went
about with me in public nil the while.
We s»a.t at tin table with each other
at meal times. Wo drove and rode i
horseback. Sometimes wo would lean :
over and kiss each otln r vi our horses
galloped along."
"That Mas thr old form of 'Joyrid
in;j'," said Mr MeNab, .-.a 1■ ■ voce,
"which hss been succeeded by spurts
in automobiles."
"Our', day," resumed Mrs, Turnbull,
"we look a ride into his Santa Anita,
canyon. It v.as on that i rip that 1
told him I ' xpec ■'! In become a;
mother. He was very glad, lie kissed
me a.nd said that it the child were a
boy ... would name, it. after him and
if it wen a girl we. would rnako one
of her name Anita In honor ol tho
place in which i had told him of the
happiness In store for us in thu posses
sum of a child."
relati d more of th. Ir life toi
nUi. Anita, ; ■■ v ing that thoy often
played croqui t. a ;.,inu- at which Bald
win excelled, she told of his tendemesH
upon rip they made uni c t-> a
I'm nti i ■ I in o .':ion when
Bhe wu 11.on ill
Finally ho li ft for San l'ian< Ibl-o,
paying both '■'< anil her hills at the
i total Oakwood, ana giving her instruc
tions to folio ■ htm in v, tew days. She
left April 15 and In dance with
Baldwin"; oiriers drove to the Powell I
i treel entrance ■■• th« HaUlwln hotel
in the northern city. Tin Hho was
taken in charge by a servant, who con
ducted her to a. Mocping room in Bald
win's suite. ; in tsaid it was beautifully
furnished.
MOiii: kismjos
"It avhs not lontf after my urrlval,"
said Mr*. Turnbull, "betore Mr. Bald
win oame up to the apartments. He
/jrnete'l me with kisscß.
"We orfiipied bla apartment* to
gether. We ate our dinner then to
sether nearly ■ very nighl and nearly
11Iways broakfastrvl thorf, though we
lunched downstairs. Servants frequent
ly me to the ap irtmenU at his or
tiers to see if there were anything I
i
wanted, and lie eulied me his wife be
fore Hum.
"Life was very pleasant. Wo drove
and rode together, attended the theater
'and enjoyed ourselves. He was as kind
and Rttcnttva a: anybody could wish.
"Finally I heard a woman talking
about Mr. Baldwin's wife. I asked her
If ho were not divorced. She gave me
.i cutting laugh and said not that any
body had ever heard of, I sought Mr.
Baldwin and told him 1 wanted to see
his divorce papers. He admitted that
ha hud no divorce.
"Oh, the horror of that moment. To
think that 1 should have been living
with him in shame.
"He admitted that he had no right
to have tricked me Into what I thought
was marriage. Ho said he wanted a
divorce, but declared that his wife,
Lilly, would not divorce him and he
could not divorce her, because she had
not done anything.
BALDWIN ADMITS D*X>BH
"I asked him why he hud not tom
me the truth the night of March 3 and
.saved me from my shame. He said
that I was too much of -a Puritan,
while hi was a Mohammedan and be
lieved in a man's having more than
one wife. He said we could bo happy
together anyway and he would be kind
to ma and care for me and the child.
At that point in her story a recess
was taken until afternoon, when there
was a noticeable increase In the num
ber of women In the crowd. Many of
them stood patiently all through th*
remainder of the day's session.
When the court was called to or
der Mr. Grant reverted for a few
moments to the pictures of Mrs. Turn
bull that had been finished In red and
blue. In response to his questions Mrs.
Turnbull said that Baldwin had or
dered a third one to be finished in pink
tor the child. She declared that he
kept it.
She also recalled an Instance, when
In San Francisco, she had asked him
tor money with which to buy shoes.
He told her, she said, to go to a stor*
in Market strict, say she was his wife,
and have them charged to him. She
did bo, purchasing a pair of gray suede
shoes for evening wear.
Mrs. Turnbull resumed her story at
the point where she had learned that
she was not Baldwin"^ legal wife.
"He said it was my duty," she as
serted, "to live with him, because of
the child. Ho brought as much pres
sure as he could, but I still refused.
Ho told me It was right for me to live
with him and that he would care well
for me and make mo happy if only I
would forget my foolish scruples.
WOMAN'S WAX OVER
"I became ill. I wanted to die. Mr.
Baldwin assisted me to retire. I don't
remember much more of that time. I
was sick a day or two and Mr. Bald
win nursed me. When I recovered he
was about to go east. He gave me
$120 and left, telling me to join him
when I had come to my senses. He
said for me to stay as long as I liked
at the Baldwin hotel and be kissed me
goodby and left.
"I continued to occupy the apart
ments at the hotel until one day H.
A.i Unruh, Mr. Baldwin's confidential
business adviser and manager, sent me
a note in which he asked me to leave,
as my rooms were wanted. I tele
graphed to Mr. Baldwin, who answered
to the effect that any person annoying
me in that manner again would be dis
charged.
"Nevertheless, bellboys continually
brought me more, notes with the same.
request, and finally I left the hotel
May "6 1893. I decided to go east to
and Baldwin, i went to st. Louis,
where I was told he whs in Cincinnati.
I went there and was told he had gone
to St. Louis. l was Informed that he
probably would return in a few days
and I could wait for him if I liked. I
finally found him in St. Louis. I met
him at the race track and had a talk,
with him in the grand stand.
CHILD IS BORN
"] told him of the treatment I bad
received at the Baldwin hotel. He said
I should have stayed there Instead of
following him east. He said he was
glad to set- me, however, and asked me
to live with him there. Ho said ha
never would do anything more for mo
unless .1 did. 1 told him such a thing
would be shameful and disgraceful.
He gave me $40 and left me.
•i v, nt to Cincinnati. I fell ill, and
when I next felt aware of who I was."
Mi TurnhuH'M voice broke as she told
her troubles, "all of my hair had been
cut off bind 1 was informed 1 had had
brain fever.
"I went to Boston for a few days
and later returned to California, going
fust to San Francisco and then coming
to Los Angeles, I went to 129 Olive
street—] don't know- whether it was
north I"' south—and obtained one room.
1 was in great poverty. I had no money
and my child was about to he born.
My brother supported me as well as ho
could, by any kind of work ho could
get Finally, in my one-room estab
lishment, which was unheated ana
bare of all the things a woman needs
tor Bin ii an ordeal, my daughter was
born December 7, 1893." .',.-•„
■Who was the father of that child?
asked Mr. Grant.
■■Ellas Jackson Ualdwin," was tho
quick ami firm answer.
She told of the. child's being baptized
in panadena, v. here Mrs. Turnbull lived
several years, supporting herself by
conducting a manicure establishment.
She wrote to Baldwin of th« birth of
the child and In 1897 went to San Fran
cisco to see him. She .ailed with the
child and her sister, but. saw only a
Col. Kowalsky, Baldwin's attorney.
A «I"K.STION OF JOKES
\ question arising as to the truth of
Kowalsky*' heinz Baldwins attorney,
Mr. McNab asked if It could he proved
by Col. Kowalsky.
'•'1 can prove II by him," asserted Mr.
Grant. , , , i
••Oh you can prove anything by < nl.
Kowalsky." declared Mr. Mi Nab.
Mr. liraut responded that he wan.
glad his opponent* wen- llling to
make such an admission.
Mr. m. Nab let Mi. Mclnerny step
into the bri-.u h.
"(if course," said the latter, "It Is i
understood that Mr. McNah's remark
was only airy perslflago."
••A sort of Joke?" suggested Mr. Grant
sarcastically.
That was it," ■ aid Mr. Mclncrny, "ii f
sort, of juke."
■I hope tie- jury understand jokes,"
said Mr. Grant.
Mr. Hutton, Mr. Grunt's associate, tit
(.■lured sijeli remarks were highly im
proper and might Influence the Jury if
Col. Kowalsky were (ailed as a wit
ness.
Mrs. TurnbuH told of going east and
teaching manicuring. she started to
tell of the education of the child, but
the court sustained an objection of the
defense. The plaintiff's attorneys then
surrendered the witness for cross-ex
amination.
WOMAN CBOSB-K.XAMINED
"The first time you met Baldwin
whs October 4, 1891, you testified,"
said Mr. McNab.
•It was," said Mrs. Turnbull.
"You met him ut the Thompsons'
home, showed him about the grounds
and lunched with him, I belleva?"
"I did."
'•He wanted to adopt you'"'
"Yes."
T.OS ANGELES HEBALD: FRIDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 16, 1010.
•And the nevt time you met him
was March -'. I*-W?"
"Vi
"And the next night occurred Inc.
marriage, you stated?"
"V.
"Did you not testify you h illoved
Baldwin' to 1"' a married man no 10
the time he wanted to marry you.""
"I knew he must be married to have
a daughter, as he had told me he had.
' 1 supposed him to bo married In a
gen ral way."
"Is there any difference between br
ing niarii'''] in a general way an.l in
a special way?" Inquired Mr. MeNab
with sarcasm.
The witness was silent.
■•Mill you fall In love with Baldwin
in the short time that elapsed between
the period when you thought htm a
married man and that when lie told
you ho had been divorced?"
"I had loved him as a father before."
■aid Mrs. Turnbull. "He was very!
kind to me."
"But you began to love him differ
ently when he said he was divorced."
"Well, that made a groat deal of
difference."
"And it was in May. TW. that you
learned Balwin was married and had
not h'-en divorced?"
"Yes."
"And then you Immediately ceas .1 to
| love him as suddenly as you had be
gan loving him before?"
ANOTHKK MAN NAMF.I)
Without waiting for a reply, Mr. Mc-
Xah thundered. "Isn't it a fact that,
I you, who pretended to moral qualms
When you learned of Baldwin's al
leged dupingr of you, really had been
the mistress of Colonel Albert Tope
Of Boston, your relations with him be-
RinninK August 4. 18»1'."'
Mr. Dockweller, for the plaintiff, In
stantly objected.
The court overruled his objection.
Mr. Dockweiler officially made an
exception.
Much of the remainder of the ses
sion was punctuated with the three i
words. "Objection," "overruled." and
"exception."
Mr. MeNab continued to ply ques
tions relating to J]rs. Turiibull's inti
mate associations with Baldwin, ask
ing her of ber "coming to Los An
ffeles from San Francisco, taking; her
honeymoon alone," and registering un- ,
der the name of Lillian A. Ashley at |
the Hotel Westminster, although she |
had said she thought she was married j
to Baldwin and therefore entitled to
be known 8P his wife.
"Mr. Baldwin told mo to register]
under that name," declared Mrs. Turn
bull.
TRIP TO CORON'ADO
Then Mr. MeNab asked about their }
trip to Coronado.
"How did you register there " he
asked.
"Mr BaJdwin attended to that,"
said Mrs. Turnbull, "while I waited In
the ladies' room."
"Did you not look at the register?"
"I did not."
"How did he introduce you?"
"As his wife."'
"Did he not Introduce as his daught
er?"
"Well, when the words 'Mrs." and
•Miss' are spoken repldly it sometimes
is hard to tell the difference between
them. I may have misunderstood."
Mrs. Turnbull then testified that it
was not until August, 1895, that she
learned she had not been registered
at- the hotel in Coronado as Mr«. Bald
win but as Miss Asnley.
In an attempt, it was understood, to
prove that she had known that fact
before Utters alleged to be In her hand
j writing were introduced She was asked
' to Identify the writing. She could not
say for sure that it was hers. She
was shown the marks a clerk of the
court in San Francisco had placed up
on it during the trial of a seduction
case, she brought thore against Bald
win years ago when it was alleged
she had admitted she wrote the letter.
I>EI'LAJ<KS I.KTTKR FUR4JKRV
She examined the letter more closely
and declared it a forgery.
The clerk who had the letter in his
ear.: at the time the case was tried
in the. morth, who was subpoenaed as
a witnesses, a Mr. McElroy, whs asked
to rise, to "refresh Mrs. Turnbull's
memory," it was stated. She did not
recognise him, she said. Neither did
she remember a Mr. Smith, the court |
stenographer, nor a Mr. Martin, the
bailiff, who also were exhibited.
Then followed queries as to her
knowing a James H. Wood, to whom
the utter was addressed. Bhe knew
him. said he was a detective and that
she had met him in Boston,
"He came to mo thore," she said.
"For what puspo.se?"
•I can't rememoer."
"Did he not call upon you as the
ajront of Colonel Albert Pope?"
•N.i."
"Did he ever give you any money?"
"Not himself.
"What do you mean by 'himself"."
"He handed me money when J start
ed hack to California where he Hd
-1 vised me to go, saying it might not
be too late for Mr. Baldwin to obtain
a divorce and marry me. He gave, tne
STB and apologized for being unkind
to me in 1894."
"Whore did you get the money with
which you bought your Pasadena cot
tage?"
Alter many questions and the court's
Insisting that they be answered, she
paid she had been told it had come
ti did i !olonel Pope.
Another letter wan shown her with
1 th. nguest that she say \vh«ther tho
handwriting was hers. She declared It
also h. forgery. "I think it was done
by b Mr. O'Keefe, who is iiy cleverest
pernon in that way I know."
"Where did you get acquainted with
him "
"He used to bo an office boy for a
Wesley Boss, with whom my father
had associations."
■DM v"11 not have extensive associa
tions with Boss, yourself?"
r did not "
"Did you "n* write a l*tter 'n him
1 addressing him as 'my *ai tern
prince' ?"
"I did not."
Considerable time was consumed by
ntlAPtlon* regarding Mrs. Turnbull's
actions wh«n she sued Baldwin on the!
. tion charge and when her sister
was on trial 111 San Francisco on the
accusation of attempting to kill Bald
win.
Then the court adjourned until W
i o'clock Tuesday morning. Meantime,
the San [<"ranci»eo attorneys In the
case will take a flying trip to their
homes, returning In time for continued
iToxs-examinlng of Mrs. Turnbull
i when the ease la resumed,
PROTESTS HIS INNOCENCE
IN FARM MURDER MYSTERYi
John Feagle Denies Knowledge of
Crime in Kansas
KA.NS.vs CITY. Dec. 13. ■ "1 give my
word before God that T am not guilty,
r gave you gontletnen credit for better
Thin was the statement Of John
FVtaglc, alleged slayer of Mrs. Emetine
Bornhurdt. ( one of the four -persons
Killed on the Bcrnhardt farm .-until of
here last week, when asked if he had
anything to .-ay about the charge
TELLS CONGRESS
TO TAKE A REST
Lafe Young of lowa Doffs Toga,
Calls Colleagues Boys and
Gives Them a Lecture
I Astsclstod PrtM]
WASHINGTON, Dee. 15- Senator
Lafayette Young of lowa today gave
tho legislative body of which he has
been a member exactly ten days, tho
surprise of its existence.
lie had prepared to make an attack
on his coll.'ague. Senator Cummins,
who seeks the adoption of a concur
rent resolution to change the rules of
the senate and house, so as to permit
piecemeal revision of the tariff law.
This he did, and mine.
Doffing his toga when he arose, ho
lectured the grave and dignified sena
tors from the standpoint Of an editor,
which he is in private life.
The senate gaaped and then laughed
when Mr. Young told it the country
would feel relieved were congress to
adjourn altogether for two "solid"
years.
It gasped again when lie alluded to
its members ill breezy fashion as
' boys," and when ho declared tho
editors of the country and not con
gress, rule" the country, the galleries
.joined with the senators In general
hilarity.
Senator Young's speech, which oc
cupied less than aji hour, commanded
the Strictest attention. The senator
had prepared an address which was
before him on his desk, but he sel
dom consulted the manuscript. He
warmed as he proceeded, and. ap
parently realising that it might be at
once his salutatory and his swan song,
he spoke his real thoughts on legisla
tion and on the national legislature.
OI'I'OSKS TARIFF <'HAXUKS
His reference to editors and printers'
Ink as the real directors of tho des
tinies of the nation was followed by
disavowal of any intent to offend.
When he called his colleagues "boys,"
ho accompanied it with a wave of his
[ hand. This incident followed a story
| of how, JtiMt us he was about to take
■ the train for Washington, and a con
stituent buttonholed him.
"Go down there, senator," said the
I constituent, "and for heaven's sake put
up a fight for the consumer."
"1 will not." Mr. Young said he re
plied. "Those boys there are doing
I that. I am going to fight for the pro-
I ducer."
Mr. Young opposed all efforts at re
vision of the existing tariff because,
as he contended, the law protects the
farmer. He had great fear, he said,
that ultimately the adoption of the
Cummins resolution would prove in
jurious to the great agricultural inter
ests.
»lr. Young spoke of the recent elec
tions and plainly referring to the pro
gressive Republicans, said that argu
ments made by men within tho Re
publican party had produced Demo
cratic votes.
In discussing attacks by Insurgents on I
the principle of protection, Mr. Young
told Of meeting Col. W. ■<■ Bryan re
cently, and of saying to him that just
as the latter had progressed in fitness
for the presidency, his chances had
diminished and that as he had now be
come a conservative, his party would
not prefer him for that high office.
.LAND DIRECTOR SUGGESTS
NEW PHILIPPINE POLICY
Captain Sleeper Urges Adoption
of More Liberal System
WASHINGTON, Pec. 15.—Transac
tion in friar lands in the Philippines
were again under discussion before
the house committee on insular af
fairs today. Ctptain E. H. Sleeper, di
rector of the lands of tho Philippines
government, resuming his testimony.
The witness said he believed th->
present limitations on the amount of
land a corporation could acquire In
the Philippines was contrary to public
policy. He contended that corpora
tions should be bound by fewer restric
tions than at present, and that a lib
eral policy was the only one that could
build up business in the archipelago.
SHARKS PURSUE SAILOR
AS HE SWIMS TO SHORE
Shipwrecked Marine^ Tells of a
Disaster Off Australia
VICTOKIAi B. C, I 15.—After
drifting six days without food on a
derelict. Theodore Andeiseu swam to
shore on the west coast of Australia.
He told Q thrilling story Of the dis
aster that had brought death to every
other member of the crew. News of
the tragedy was brought here last
night by the steamer Moan a iron
bane.
The derelict was a pearling lugger ot
L'uO tons, the Hugh Norman. Sin- was
.-ailing down the coast frdM! Broome to
I'r.inantle when she struck a reef. The
dingy was launched and all of the crew
excepl Andersen and the captain
boarded her. The little boat drifted
away and was swamped. All her ■"•
. upantH w err- drowned.
The captain ordered Andersen to
jump in after the dingy, but seeing
three sharks cruising In the vicinity, he
refused Later the, lugger drifted off
, the reef an.i the captain leaped over
hoard and tried to swim ashore, but
ho wa« attacked and devoured by
.■harks N'"'\t day Andersen decided to
risk all in an effort to reach land. [f.
took him an hour to BWim ashore, and
he was pursued by sharks, but escaped
them.
THOUSANDS SIGN PETITION
FOR PARDON OF C. W. MORSE
WASHINGTON, Dee. IB.—Charles
W. Morne'K petition for pardon ha:;
been formally presented to till di
p.irtin.nl ot ju-i >.o. One section of the
plea of tho convicted .New Vori-: bank
er came in a large express, package
.iii<i w.-is signed with the imtnei ol
thousands of persons Of prominence.
Mrs. Morse has made another pel i
', tion for her husband and this has
been presented to ('resident Taft by
Senator Hale, The president sent It at
once to Attorney General Wlckersham
who turned it over to the attorney m
Charge Of pardons.
AMUSEMENTS
jffW/?J?/J?CSULLIVAM*C0n5IDinE
[email protected]!NOLL&d VAUDEVILLE
llrl.lla .« Tallin- I I -'""'l'll KH I"" * <'«.
SuSS; I staley <* Birbeck I SHrT
HARVARD AND YALE
ARRIVE HERE SAFE
New Ships for Los Angeles to
San Francisco Trade in Port
After Rounding the Horn
SAN PSDRO, I'ee. IS, A new era of
passenger transportation between Los
Angeles and Sail Krani iseo will follow
the nrrival of the palatial steamers
Yalo and Harvard. The Yale unehored
in the outer harbor last night and will
be followed by the Harvard about 5
o'clock tomorrow morning. Wireless
reports received this afternoon stated
that the steamers were about eleven j
hours apart.
The steamers are seventy-seven i
days from New York, having started !
on their long swing around the South |
American continent nearly three j
month! ago. November 28 they
touched at Tocopilla, their last port
of call. The voyage was uneventful,
excepting a delay of two days at Labi
tos, where the steamers took fuel.
Tomorrow the steamers will come
into port for a general cleaning up
before going into service between hero
and San Francisco under the manage
ment of the Pacific Navigation com
pany. The steamers used oil for fuel
when they • wen In service < between
New York and Boston on the Metro
politan line.
HOI II SHU'S TO HI KN Oil.
Before starting 1 on their long 1 voyage
they were equipped to burn coal and I
will bo reconverted into oil burners
hero.
The new service will be started next i
Tuesday with the departure of tho I
Vale for San Fraucisoo from this port.
Tito service provides for a nineteen*
hour service with four sailings a week.
The steamers will leave San Pedro on
Sundays. Tuesdays and Wednesdays in
the afternoon. They will leave San
Francisco Mondays, Wednesdays,
Thursdays and Saturdays at 4 p. m.,
arriving here at 10 a. m. the following
days.
The new steamers will be the first on
the Pacific coast to sell tickets at a
flat rate price with berths and meals
extra. The fare between Los Angeles
and Ban Francisco .will be $8.35. Meals
will be served a la carte and berths
will cost from 50 cents to $2, with
private staterooms costing from $3 to
$8, including baths.
COMMANDERS OF NEW SHU'S
The Yale is under command of
Captain Gove and the .Harvard is com
manded by Captain Shea, formerly
port pilot at San Francisco. When tho
steamers go into service on this coast
it la reported that the Yale will bo
under command of Captain McFar
land, who made the voyage around the
Horn as her first officer. Captain Me-
Farland formerly commanded the
steamer Hanalel. Captain Jebsen, for
merly master of the Pacific Coast
company's steamer Governor, will
have comamnd of the Harvard.
There are many rumors that the
new steamers will start a rate war
that may Involve the railroads as well
as the other steamship lines. So far,
however, agents of competing lines say
there is no intention to meet the rates
of the new steamers.
PRIMARY LAW SUPREME
ISSUE, SAYS SPALDING
Candidate for U. S. Senatorship
Declares Patriotism Prompts
Offer of Service
San DIEGO, Dec. X -Candidate
Bpalding. who has been prominent in
the United States senatorial tight, is
sued a statement toduy in which he
explained his position on political issues
and announced that hi.s candidacy
rests principally <m the primary law.
lie said:
".Some papers are trying to befog the
I issue by stating thai because Judge
i Works received a small majority of the
popular vote he should be the choice
for the senate. The primary law saya
nothing regarding the popular vote.
; The latter cuts no figure one way or
I the other in the choice for a. United
! States senator.
"1 ulalm to ho a 'progressive,' as T
understand tho meaning" of that word.
I believe a man may be both regular
and progressive, but I intend to be
right first.
"All political machines look alike to
me. 1 am not the candidate of any
club or organization. I own no Stock
in the Southern Pacific railroad, nor if
elected will I be affiliated with its so
called political bureau.
• I have offered my services to tho
nation for tho next six yearn. I did so
from purely patriotic motives. Thin is
one of tho eases where tho office has
sought the man, not the man the office.
■.My candidacy must stand or fall
with the primary law. That law is on
trial, not 1. Tt Is now up to the legis
lature. My work of campaigning is
euli il."
'WE ARE IN CRAZY ZONE,'
DECLARES EX-GOV. ADAMS
Tells Colorado Apple Growers
Conservation Is Excessive
OKNVKR. Dec, IB.—The (Irst Ameri
can apple congress wan called to or
der this afternoon 8,1 the Albany ho
tel, with 200 'd*l?g>t«l In attendance.
Former Governor Alva Adams madn
the opening address and criticised con
uion in the west, saying:
"There is a line nf excess where
conservation becomes lunacy, and I'm
not sure we are not now in the crazy
zone, in Colorado one-third or the
state is now a reserve on which it la
trespass for a citizen to Hct foot."
M. X. Barteja of Pueblo was elected
president ot the congress for the en
suing year.
JEWELER'S WIFE ROBBED
sax FRANCISCO, Deo. 16.—After
torturlnn a woman for an hour, prick-
Ing her throat with a dagger and
threatening immediate death, a robber
last night gained possession of $:;.->
and a diamond broo* and escaped.
His victim is Mrs. Kene Fabulet, wlfo
of a jeweler.
nan umi non — TOWS** K. WB| ■""■ MU>
r^ciJT' 1 **M £5331-83&33&& South Broadwag
iKHnmniio wwr btbbt pat."
„ 125 Dozen of Women's Finest - All
jSn^*1 *""^ Wool Sweater Coats i Off
jS&£ W Offered at ; —4 vrll
i^&r&^€*L Practical Xmii Gifts That Ntat Woman's
**^^-ft ,+?&■& • . ApproTal
l!v! •£ JB' «« VKHY i;'"'"'l stylo included in this maichle»« rol
jfuL/'' Kj iccilun strictly all-wool garments in every weave.
, - rfj^a lenjttll «nd nlzc. Single and <lonhl«-nreame<l <•"«"•
/ JrtffflHHsW^ '"I «'VIB eollai-8; full rnnjo of colon". A «r»«t pi"
//SJII|JHHjP™fckN chus'l "d ale at '""•-'°" off- >truiH j'l-0011
-7^BB^BBsV\ lIIT' """"»N | Off »<*■;:"
nn\ s s^v& t Off ««v-;H? Xii
/uEomMiM 'MV *''"5 . »3.85, »4.30. i ie» $10. SIS.BO *15.
(l^^(fi¥ XI sol M'°°p *"'so' *750 ""•*"' «"•''•" ,f "■.
'///'•'■ Mwh* IfW/ Men's Sample Sweater Coats
''''wMIMIu Wi Heavily Reduced
"IIMYiK" wll, / A MOST complete stock of Men 1* Knit Coats—
;/1W» isiiU 1/7 ™ five elegant sample lines, emhraclnir every
i«BßSa};"'akffB l 1/; klml of ft good Sweater Coat for every posslljlo
I^WrmmiiWru*' occasion. MAIN FF.OOIi.
*iW 'frill ill "7 »-•■«« Sweater* ... 51..-.0 I *:l.«o Sweater. ... *1.!I3
H irW li I'\ ( *< .Ml -».■■■■!.. ■ B.li I »4.«0 Sweaters >■■ "•
P ffflfffl^ What $1.50 Buys in Ideal
Gift Merchandise
llnnd-.nl <!ln«N ( l«ar J»r», with genuine <ierman Sliver Silk I.lnrd •• en
(irrniain silver tops, «| gQ Jewel Canes at «r..vv
"import^" Shavin, flMs'.' wilh" Porcelain gS?*.^ ?!" U.!7 . -%- $1-50
a BrU "nd ' .. $'-50 lland-pain.rd ' Impon,,! Sh.vln,
irisiVsr-Ss Mlrror" gss i^c^rsr. "; <lr $i-«o
. AMUSEMENTS J
% Spri St., Between 2d and Ad.
THE STANDARD OF VAUDEVILLE
Geo. Beban £&> Co.
Presenting
The Sign gf the Rose
Together with an «tra fine bill of eight acC», Including the IMPERIAL RISKIAN
D\XCERS. Orplirum Motion Pictures showing Columbia million fl«herlc».
KVKRY XIGHT. 10c. =sc. BOr. 76c. MATINEB 2:K. DAILY, 1».-. ; „-. Mr.
HAMBURGER'S MAJESTIC THEATER * nkTr Aninth
" I-OS ANGELES 1 I.KAOINO 1-t.AYHOISK. OIJVER -MUROM O. MANAGER.
HAMi:i. V. AHTIHR promts B Itlj 3f**tk TiT^^ll Nl S^fes^
In lilk Mint comedy |'" i" Miß«^W^^^^H^^Ti^«i^rMßi HB^^ißftl
cA MATINEE IDOL |, X*J Si ill -1 *A
With I.OIISK PRKSSER and THAT J)ANI>Y » HOHL.x
"One Thousand laughs anil not a i-iiiKle bin**."- York Herald.
PRICES: 60c TO »2.00. ■ MATINEE SATURDAY.
BEGINNINO NEXT SUNDAT M<illT. SKATS ON SALE NOW.
.John P. Slorum presents Hie New Viennese comic opera, •
I KISSING GIRL
With MISS TEXAS OITINAN and the OSfII.ATORY BEAUTY CifOlum.
PRICES' 50,- to $1.50. MATINEES WEDNESIJAY AND SATURDAY.
J*" COMING—MARY MANNERIXO IN "A MANS WORLD."
Tttt- AUDITORIUM ••THEATBH I* E. BBHTMKI:.
HE AUDITORIUM miSmrvw manageu.
NEXT WEEK, BEGINNING MONDAY
QUEEN EH MOULIN ROUGE
Immense Company Augmented
Orchestra
SEATS NOW ON SALE
PRICKS—EVKMNGS. BSc. ftOo. 75. . >l. 00. $1-30. MATINEES.' 2.h- TO «1.00. <
CIIT I ™A Ct/f^^ THL FOREMOST STOCK
yLLA^^V COMPANY OF AMERICA
« ! OLD HEIDELBERG | f*gggs
NEXT WEEK -Ilnyi'« Laughing BUOOM*, "A STHANiiKIt IN NEJW YORK."
MOROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER M»'° st- *«• *■""•
' ~ 1/36 ANGKLES 1 LBAUINa STOCK COMPANY.
*- IS YOUR HUSBAND .SKI.KISII? HERB'S THK CURB: -
A MESSAGE FROM MARS
* .tartllne dramatic nov'lty alone in Its claw. First time In stock.
„,,,,. .--,-,■„ 7ie MATINEES SATURDAY AND SUNDAY. 10c. 23c AND :•«■■.
NIQHTB—>!KXT WBBK—Tba beautiful love comedy. "THE PRINCE CHAP."
Gr.AMr» nPPRA HOUSE MATINEES TOMORROW AND *lIIN.
RAND UP&KA nuuan J'honrn Main ID«7, AISBI.
~ " A LIVELY, MERRY MUSICAL WHIRL. •
. I and hi* big company present Biddla I TV,-, t?o«l m.~A
Ferns Koj'b great muslo nn.i fun hit. me £-80 »nd
__ I NRXT WKK.K A munnlflrent revival or I Th* OtVI
Hartman | -THE TOTHAKKR." Seats this morning. I xhc vjin
MASON OPERA HOUSE w *iS2iS
TONKiHT AM) TOMORROW NKiHT. MATIN SATinDAT.
__ _ g |. • ■ a In her greatest success,
iIIAMAnA Wakh R "THE OTHER WOMAN,"
pKEQnniIP Hi Hi Nil By Kred.rlo Arnold Kummer.
Uiailullu If UlUll H'g'ilar prices. Me to J1.50. s^s&» nSS
llflMllUalW lIUIVII n « Com | ng ._ I/ uilan Kuwell "IN SEARCH
———————————— OF A SINNER."
-«^m—^— w*™.,-r*—M.^tll)/ll ■pf*su».-iJiu,T.^JHmiM New, < ■•/.». AliHolutel.v Fireproof.
W^T^O^^ffv^BiffvSS^K^ Matinees Dally, 2:3o—Twice Nightly, 7:00
I ijW'l k1 W *\f|s^J «nrt n:l1n- rrlces, Kir, SOc, 30e.
I ff I^^ BgTilnifmßrS'mmßl HARDEEN, King «•' IlHndcuffs.
|L H. J'Pl HRIIW*■ Pi IS 11 I'eYINK ft wn.T.IAMS. "Mil •' EMMT.TT,
„/y ll^Ji^Sw^^Bl^J It) I'Onil. bennett. iuiord, i|\Ritv
H^WWWWWttSF|BeCiW|!Iu HOTTER 4 <<>■ Ml SICVI, KING, MOVINti
Q^^*^J*MwUBHiJUBaMMsIV 1-ICTIiHKS.
SHRINE AUDITORIUM Dec 12-13-14-15-16-17
V>-J A a l-'i PU«,« (iIVEN BY THE I.OS ANGELES
/\U[tOrn.ODllG OIIOW MOTOR CAR DEALERS' association
OPENS DECEMBER 13 at I Ik m.. and from 10 a. m. to 10:80 p. m. thereaftur. Ho
elatvnia-ht Thursday. Fifty leading makes of cars. Ohlmeyer's Grand Concert Bind.
I ad?e? Vl.nne« Orche *tra D« Koven Male chorus on society nltrht. Oldflcld's Bena. tn,
Pholnlx winner? Kiat raoer. Ale. oii and the Vanderb.lt cup. Magnificent decoration,
and electrical effects. Admission .'.o'-. Including soclaty night. \
PRINCESS THEATER Hmm* auuh'h. Main khi.
THiiTWEEKrthe big eastern laughing hit. "THE (JAY LORD HARRY," feu
turlns FRED 4HDATII. the unexcelled veraatlle comedian, supported by a,
stock company second to none, and the favorite chorus of the city. Evenings, 7:15
and 9:15. Matlness 3 p. in. dally, except Tuesday and Friday. I'opular prices,
10c. 20c. 850. —————— ——■——^>
V UNA PARK Corner Washington and Main Mis.
•*-' ®c Royal Hungarian Band
TWICE DAILY. "Miss Emma Newklrk." the Diving Venua. and 20 first class at
tractions, all for one admission. 10c. DECEMBER H. 15. 18, 17, 18.
"SI'KCIAX" MOBON SHOW DHIIMBKIt H. 15, It). 17, 18.
Of VTV/r'DTr' TTJTU 1 ATPP Main, lletwcen Fifth and Mlxth
LlMril I nii<A I XUtf. Ccramodlouj —Comfortalila
, V ,,. K uf Dec. 13. HOT A7P A WAV* With Jules Mend"
Tin Oreat Big Show. DLtl\ 6 E* AW/VI and the Olymplo C*
1 SHOWS TONIGHT, 7:fft and 0:18. Mat. Mon.. Wed.. Sat., Sun., 10c. 30c, Ms.

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