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Los Angeles herald. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, December 21, 1910, Image 1

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WEATHER FORECAST:
Cloudy, cooler; light north wind
NIiMIIKIt 81. X itlOlli . OU V-Jiill JL ill', month
SHIPS FOUNDER IN
WILD HURRICANE
ON EASTERN COAST
Storm Grips Newfoundland
Waters, and Loss of Ship
ping Will Be Heavy
TWO BIG STEAMERS MISSING
Crew of Schooner Preference
Saved After 60 Hours'
Work at the Pumps
[Associated Fres»l
BOSTON, Dec. 20.—Newfoundland 1%
reported in tho grip of a hurricane
said to bo the worst In many years.
The storm lias been raging i$ hours
and shows no signs of cessation. Fears
are expressed that many shipping dis
asters will bo recorded before the
storm blows Itself out.
Tho Norwegian bark I'ctra, 110S tons,
KIo Janeiro for Halifax, is reported a
total wreck at I'enhaut point, noar
Cape Sabro, N. S. llor crew of six
teen men wero saved with great dif
tlculty.
The schooner Preference of Windsor,
N. S., bound from Kllzabethport, N. J..
for St. John, was abandoned In a sink-
Ing condition of? Georges bank,. Sun
day. Capt. Sole and his crew were
rescued by fishermen. The Preference
was caught with soveral other, coast
era off Cape Cod last Thursday night
when the wind suddenly shifted off the
northward. The Preference was blown
off shore, had nearly all her *ills car
ried away, both top masts cut oft and
bowsprit broken. In addition she
sprang a leak. All hands took a turn
at th') pumps for the next 60 hours,
the schooner drifting steadily off shore,
without sighting a sail. The Hulling
schooner Fannio Bell Atwood of this
port hove In sight Sunday and tlio
fishermen took off tho ciew In dories.
Captain Galo said today there was lit
tle chance of the schooner keeping
afloat after her pumps stopped, as she
was deeply laden with coal.
ir'irao anxiety Is felt hero over re
ports concerning the safety of. tho
Woormann steamships lngorbcrt and
lima Woormann. Tho latter vessel
started from Las Palmas, Canary
islands, yesterday 1n tho teeth of a
terrific Kalo to succor her sister ship,
whtch bad been sighted 72 miles off
tho coast displaying signals of dis
tress, and Indicating that her engines
had been broken down.
Since then no word has coma to I>aa
Palmas from either of the ships, and
they have not been sighted by Incom
ing vessels. It is believed they were
driven northward by the storm. The
German consul at Las Palmas is
aboard tho Irma, Both of the steamers
ply between Hamburg, Rotterdam and
West African ports.
LIFE SAVERS DIE IN
BATTLE WITH BIG WAVES
Two Men Drown When Boat Is
Upset by Surf
NRW YORK, Dec. 20. —Two members
of the volunteer life saving crew at
Kockaway Beach, L. I.—Bruce Bond
and David Jamison —are missing and
are believed to have perished today
when tho new boat they were trying
out with three other members of the
crew, upset In the surf. William Cas
sidy was taken from the water ex
hausted, while Fred Voltmer and Wil
liam Philipps made their way to shore.
Despite the heavy sea, the five men
insisted upon setting out to try the
new boat, an eighieen-foot slx-oared
craft. They wore 200 yards off tho
beach when a heavy squall struck them
und tho boat turned turtle. Tho water
was Icy cold and It Is believed tho
missing men wero seized with cramps
and went down almost at once.
STORM CRIPPLED VESSEL
IS PICKED UP AT SEA
MOBILE, Ala., Dec. 20.—Pounded by
terrific seas and In a sinking, condition,
tho American schooner Dorris was
picked up In tha Caribbean sea by tho
cruiser Tacoma December 13th and
towed to Puerto Cortes, according to
information rocoived hore today. Her
i-aptaiu, Gustave Axelson, was knocked
overboard and drowned.
KING GEORGE SUDDENLY
SUMMONS PRIME MINISTER
Asquith Hurriedly Called to Lon-
don to Discuss Politics
LONDON, Dec, 20.—The king tonight
unexpectedly summoned the primo
minister to London from Edinburgh.
The nature of the conference, Which
his majesty Is to have with Mr. Ab
quith is not known, but it is likely
tho general political aspect will bo
gone into thoroughly.
King George has taken a marked
interest in the general election which
haa just ended, and it is certain he has
no wish to Boe another dissolution of
parliament for a long time. Aa the
now parliament now stands, tho lib
oral government in coalition with the
Nationalists, regular and independent,
and the labor members, hold 398 seats,
as against 272 held by tho Unionists,
a majority of 126.
STEEL FLAKE IN EYE 9
YEARS; OPTIC REMOVED
LONG BEACH, Dec. 20.—Charles S.
Stevens, 1610 Locust avenue, who was
struck in the right eye nine years ago
by a steel fragment, has Just had the
eye removed. Although the sight had
gradually grown weaker Stevens did
not suffer much pain from the injury
until a few days ago. When the eye
wan removed to save tho other eye
from being affoetod the bit of steel
was found imbedded in it.
LOS ANGELES HERALD
FOUR MEN PERISH AND
TWO MILLIONS LOSS IN
BLAZE AT CINCINNATI
CINCINNATI, Doc. 21.— flr«
which caused a loss of two million
dollars broke out in tba manufac
turing district of thin city at 2:20
o'clock .this morning and* at 3
o'clock whs spreading,
o'clock this morning and at 3 o'clock
Was spreading.
Four firemen Ware burled tinder
walls. Only ono was rescued alive.
Tho body of Robert Greor was re
covered, but twe other bodies were
In the ruins at 3:30 o'clock.
The firo originated in tho build
ing of tho Krlppendorf-O'Noll itfcoe
company, and quickly gained such
headway that tho entire eight-story
pstabllßlimont was soon in ruins.
Tlio loss on tho building 13 roughly
estimated at $2,000,000.
INDEX OF
HERALD'S NEWS
TODAY
LOS ANGELES
Story of Mrs. Tumbull's past life comes
put under trying cro.su examination la
Baldwin, case. < PAGE) 1
Steamer Tale Inaugurates now service on
\v<--t coast. Balls from San Pedro to San
Francisco with 200 passengers. PAGE) 2
Money raised by Teachers' Building asso
elation will defray expense of Incorpo
ration and Insure club house. PAGE] 2
Engraver makes statement regarding walk
out of union men at Thorpo plant. PAGE] 2
Four hundred men rush work at Do
mlnguez field for opening of aviation
meet next Saturday. PAGE! 3
Council Instructs officials to devise plan
to safeguard checks deposited with pub-
Ho officials. PAGE} 6
Phi Delta Phi fraternity of province
6 arrange* bright program fdr bi
ennial conviction. PAGE! C
Action Involving 1.000.000. aores of land
in lower California and 1450.000 Uo
g-un in superior court. PAGE! 0
Censors tame naughty "Queen of Moulin
Rouge" and threatened raid does not
tnku place. PAOEJ 12
Victor Henry, real estate operator,
charged with several offenses, files
affidavit that he Is Insane. PAGI3 13
Coolness of Ferris Hartman prevents
panic at Grand opera bouse. PAGE 13
Paclflo Light and Power company com
pletes 65,000-horsepower electrlo plant
at Long Beach at cost of 11,000.000.
PAGE 12
Three-year-old bicyclist takes four mile
rids In specially constructed machine,
> PAGE) 12
Eight members of council vote against
changes in ordinance for Merrltt build
ing; Initiative may bo Invoked. PAGEI 12
Brother of Jules Busobalk prefers
spending money on mother's Christ
mas to paying brother's fine. PAGE 12
Three hundred poor children will be
guests of Mrs. Robert Marsh and
daughters at novel Christmas celebra
tion. PAGE 12
Amendments to eleetlon laws occupy
Joint conference of council .and charter i
revision commission. PAGH 2
Autopsy surgeon declares Martin Cahen,
reported victim of highwaymen, died
from pulmonary apoplexy. PAGE! 10
Editorial and Letter Uox. PAGE 4
Society an I clubs. PAGIB 5
Hotel personals. PAGE) 6
Theaters. PAGE 7
Mining and oil fields. PAGE) 1
Sports. PAGE 8
Markets ami financial. PAGE) 9
■Weather report. PAGE 10
Marriage licenses, births, death*. PAGE) 10
Classified advertising. PAGES 10-11
SOUTH CALIFORNIA
Pasadenans engage in (Ist fight over
water questions. PAGE 10
Santa Monica board of education calls
125,000 bond election. __ , PAGE 10
Long Beach woman dislocates neck; phy
sician replaces vertebra. ' PAGE 10
Auction sale of box seats for Tournament
of Roses chariot races to be held today
at Pasadena. PAGE! 10
EASTERN
Protest by Honduras "that Hornet Is a
filibuster causes United States to
carefully watch vessel. PAGE! 1
'Wild hurricane rages In Atlantlo and
many lives are lost. PAGE! 1
John D. Rockefeller makes final gift of
110,000,000 to University of Chicago.
PAGE! X
Formidable opposition expected to de
velop In senate against L.orlmer ver
dict «» PAGE) 2
FOREIGN
Count and Countess do Oallgny deny
1200,000 swindle and Involve promi
nent people In their defense. PAGEI 1
Mexican government sends reinforce
ments to attack revolutionists on two
.ides. FAUEJ 1
MINING AND OIL
Los Angeles mAi will operate in placer
fields of Yavapal county. PAGB 7
New strike in porphry Interests people of
Eldorado canyon. PAGB 8
WHAT'S GOING ON TODAY IN
- LOS ANGELES
AMUSEMENTS
Auditorium—"The Queen of th» Moulin
Rouge," 8:15 p. m.
Btlssoo— "A Stranger In Now York," 8:15
P. m. , .
Burbank—"The Prince Chap," 8:15 p. m.
Grand—"The Toymaker," 8:15 p. m.
Levy's. Cafe C'hantant—Continuous vaude
ville, '2:30 P. m. to 12:30 a. m.
Los Angeles—Vaudeville, - 2:80, 7:45 and 8
p. m. • • - .
J.una park—Outdoor amusements, band con
cert and vaudeville, 10 a. m. to midnight.
Majestic—"The Kissing Girl," 2:15 and 8:15
p. m.
Mason—Dark.
Olympic— "The Halfback," 3, 7:43 and 9:15
p. m. •
Vaudeville, 2:15 and 8:15 p. m. ,
Pantages—Vaudeville, 2:30, 7:45 and 9 p. m.
Princess—"Ac the Beach,"* 3, 7:45 anil 9:15
p. in. ' i
OF INTEREST TO WOMEN
Wednesday Morning club, 10 a. m. and 2
p. m.
Hollywood Woman" club, 2:30 p. m.
MISCELLANEOUS
Council meets with charter revision com
mission at 9 o'clock a. m.
Board ot public works meets at 2 o'clock
p. m.
City council meeting, 0 a. m.
Dr. Corey gives seventh lecture nt course
at 8 p. m. la Burbanlc hall an "Tho Chem
istry of Life; What Is Disease? the Philoso
pher's Stone." ,
Excursion to Newhall tunnel, km cham
ber of commerce 8:30 a. m.
Special Christmas song service under au
spices of Toachers' Oracled union, Bcrean hall.
Tempi* auditorium, 0:45 a., m. •
-. . - . . --„-.. . '. t,*-■ ' a.. , .*■•/* *'.^ "*-■*.' ~. -'
WEDNESDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 2t 1010.
OIL KING MAKES
UNIVERSITY FINAL
GIFT, $10,000,000
Rockefeller Completes Plan He
Announced at Founding of
Institution in Chicago
URGES SUPPORT BY FRIENDS
Total Amount of Donations for
Educational Purposes Ap
proximates $35,000,000
■ [Associated Press]
CHICAGO, Dec. 20.—John D. Rocke
feller has completed the task he set for
himself In founding the University of
Chicago.
Today public announcement was
mado of a "single and final" gift of
$10,000,000, which includes all tho contri
butions Mr. Rockefeller had planned.
This sum, to be paid In ten annual In
stallments beginning January 1, will
make approximately $35,000,000 he has
donated to the university.
Mr. Rockefeller says ho now believes
tho school should be supported and en
larged by the gifts of many rather than
those of a single donor. This, he be
lieves, will be better accomplished If
tho public understands the limit of Ms
contemplated assistance.
Tho founding of new departments he
leaves to tha trustees, as he says funds
may be furnished by other friends.
Nearly $7,000,000 has been donated to
the university in addition to Mr, Rock
efeller's gifts. •
ROCKEFEIXER'S SOX RESIGNS
With the announcement of Mr. Rock
efeller's final donation came the resig
nation of John D. Rockefeller, jr., and
Fred T. Gatesrf Mr. Rockefeller's per
sonal representatives, from the univer
sity board of trustees. In enclosing
these resignations Mr. Rockefeller ex»
plained bo was carrying out a convic
tion that the Institution should be
"controlled, conducted • and supported
by the people," which whom up to now
he had simpiy been co-operating.
Mr. Rockefeller's Idea, as It is un
derstood, is that he Is turning over the
institution and Its endowment to Chi
cago and the west, and in so doing
withdraws from any further represen
tation in Its control.
Announcement of the gift was made
at the quarterly convocation at the uni
versity this afternoon In the following
letter to the president and trustees:
OIFT APPROXIMATES 110,000,000
"I have this day caused to be set
aside for the University of Chicago
from the funds of the general education
board which are subject to my disposal
income bearing securities of the present
market value of approximately $10,000,
--000, the same to be delivered to the unU
versity In ten equal installments be
ginning January 1, 1911, each Install
ment to bear income to the university
from the date of such delivery only.
"A list of these securities is appended
herewith. In a separate letter of even
date my wishes regarding the invest
ment and use of the fund are more
specifically expressed. It is far better
that the university be supported and
enlarged by the gifts of many than by
those of a single donor.
"Most heartily do I recongnize and
rejoice In the generous response of citi
zens of Chicago and tho west. Their
contributions to the resources of the
university have been, I believe, mors
than $7,000,000. It might perhaps be
difficult to find a parallel to generosity
so large and so widely distributed as
this, exercised in behalf of an institu
tion so recently founded.
FINAL AID FOB UNIVERSITY
"In making an end of my gifts to the
university, as I now do, and in with
drawing from the board of trustees my
personal representatives, whose resig
nations I enclose you, I am acting on
an early and permanent conviction that
this Institution, being the property of
the people, should bo controlled, con
ducted and supported by<the people, in
whoso generous efforts for Us upbuild
ing I have been permitted simply to co
operate; and I could wish to conse
crate anewto the great cause of edu
ctaion yie funds which I have given if
that were possible; to presont tho instU
tution a second time, in so far as I
have aided in founding it, to the people
of Chicago and the west, and express
my hope that, under their management
and generous support, the university
may be an increasing blessing to them,
to their children and future genera
tions. Very truly yours,
"JOHN D. ROCKEFELLER."
NAVY ASKS $1,190,000 TO
PATCH UP WAR VESSELS
Georgia and Virginia Need Mod
ernizing of Turrets
WASHINGTON, Doc. 20.—Repairs ag
gregaing $1,190,000 on naval vessels ara
provided for In estimtaes submitted to
congress today for uso in tho next fiscal
year. Secretary Meyer asked for au
thority to expend $500,000 each on the
Georgia and Virginia for modernizing
thoir turrets, $120,000 on tho Arethusa,
$25,000 on the Iroquols and $45,000 on tho
Nero.
Tho Georgia and Virginia have been
in continuous service on the Atlantlo
for four years. Tho Arethusa is the
only tank vessel in tho navy. Tho Iro
(luois is a large steel tug, formerly tho
Fearless and now in service on the
Pacific coast. Tho Nero's repairs aro
necessary becauso of that vessel's hay»
ing grounded July 1.
MANY BUFFALO BUILDINGS
SHAKEN BY EXPLOSION
BUFFALO, Dec. 20.—An explosion
similar in many respects to the one
that occurred In New York on Monday
shattered the windows of several cars
and startled passengers on board trains
In the New York Central station and
occupants of buildings for blocks
around shortly before 12 o'clock tonight.
The explosion occurred at a point
where pipes which supply gas to cars
branch in two direction! and where a
valve is located. The cause lias not
bcon ascertained.
Detective Called "Wickedest Man in the World" by
Mother of Claimant to Share in the Baldwin Millions
JIBS LIU-IAN ASHLEY TURNBULX (AT RIGHT) YESTERDAY DENOUNCED JAM I'M K. WOOD AND TESTIFIED MANY
BETTERS PURPORTING, TO HAVE BEEN WRITTEN BY HER AND SENT TO HIM ARE FORGERIES. DETEC
.■-»»*.; TIVK WOOD IS A WITNESS FOR THE DEFENSE _^
TRAP IS SET FOR
MEXICAN REBELS
Government Sends Reinforce-
ments to Attack Insur
gents on Two Sides
MEXICO CITY, Dec. 20.—The Tenth
battalion of infantry, a battery of light
artillery and one rapid flre gun left
hero today in two special trains for
the zone of insurrecto activities in
Chihuahua.
The force from this city is in com
mand of Gen. Sanchez Rivera and Col.
Rafael Lis. The Tenth battalion con
tains 603 enlisted men and _twenty-two
officers.
These troops were said to be In
tended to reinforce Guzman at Peder
nales, where the government forces are
preparing to deliver a crushing blow to
the revolutionists. The situation is
said to be as follows:
On one side of the valley of Mai
Pazo (Bad pass) Is the force of Gen.
Navarro of 1000 men. Col. Guzman is
on the other side with a force of 340
troops.
Troops are being hurried forward to
raise the force of Col. Guzman to 1000
men and then tho attack will be made
from the two sides.
In high official circles it is believed
that the rebels are now trapped and
that they ca#iot possibly escape.
The destruction of this force. It Is
said, will mean that there will remain
no rebels in the field, with the excep
tion of a few marauding band 3of out
laws.
Francisco I. Madero, the head of tho
insurrectionary movement, Is again re
ported to be in Mexican territory, ac
cording to a story in El Heraldo Mex
lcano thia afternoon.
MILWAUKEE SOCIALISTS
STRIVE FOR HOME RULE
Congressman-Eleot Berger Op
poses Washerwomen's Law
MILWAUKEE, "Wi3., Dec. 20.—Vic
tor L. Berger, alderman at large and
Socialist-Democratic congressman-elect
was defeated by the Socialist contin
gent in the city council when he op
posed, the measure which the city at
torney has declared unconstitutional.
The measure was one to allow washer
women to use city water freo ot chargo.
The Socialist city attorney had de
clared the measure, unconstitutional,
but the Socialists wanted to pass It
any way and did so dospito tho ob
jections of Berger.
The council adopted seventeen reso
lutions asking for tha passage by tho
legislature of that number of special
Milwaukee bills allowing tho city to
engage in various enterprises at pres-,
ent barred by the law. The Socialists
among other requests want the au
thorities to erect municipal hospitals,
ico plants, packing houses, to conduct
any public, utility, and in general to
have complete homo rule granted Mll
waukeo Instead of the. city being forced
to ask legislative approval for every
Innovation proposed.
STEEL TRUST ANNOUNCES
PLANS FOR ANNUAL BONUS
$2-700,000 to Be Distributed
Among Corporation Employes
NEW YORK, Dec. 20.—The United
States Steel corporation announced to
day its plan for distributing a bonus to
the officers and employes of the corpor
ation and subsidiary corporations, in
accordance with its annual practice.
The sum to be distributed for 1910
amounts approximately to $2,700,000.
The amount is determined by the an
nual earnings. The bonus will be paid
60 per cent in common stock at $70 a
share, and 40 per cent in cash. Last
year the bonus was paid 60 per cent in
cash and 40 per cent in preferred Htoek
at $124 a share, or combination stock
at $90 a share
FATHER AND CHILDREN
VICTIMS OF MURDERER
DURHAM. N. C, Doc 20.—Tho
charred bodies of J. L. Sanders, his
22-year-old daughter, Mary, and his
four-year-old granddaughter, Irene
Norton, in the ruins of their home at
Hestor, near here, gave startling evi
dence today to ono of the most atro
cious crimes committed in this section.
Nathan Montague, a young negro, is
accused by a coroner's }ury of assault,
murder and arson. The negro 13 safe
tonight in tho state penitentiary at
Raleigh, but mobs are reported gath
ering.
UNCLE SAM'S MEN AND
SHIPS WATCH HORNET
WASHINGTON, Dec. 20.—The Hon
duran ministry today protested to the
state- department against permitting
tha departure of the steamer Hornet
from New Orleans, on the ground that
tho vessel contemplates leading a revo
lution expedition against President Da
vlla.
The state department officials feel all
the usual precautions have' been adopt
ed to prevent the embarkation of the
Hornet on a hostile expedition directed
against the government of President
Uavila of Honduras.
It is realized, however, that the Hor»
net might meet another vessel at sea
and embark men and arms. Or they
might be taken aboard at some little
frequented Central American port, as
was done in the case of the Venus,
purchased by the Madriz faction in
Nicaragua to operate against Estrada.
To prevent a repetition of that affair,
orders have been sent to the command
er of the United States steamshp Ta
coma, now at Puerto Cortes, to endeav
or to prevent landing on the Honduran
coast of an expedition that appears to
have originated in the United States.
Meanwhile there have been some in
ternal troubles in Honduras to distress
President Davila, according to a report
to tho department from United States
Minister McCreary at Tegucigalpa.
SOCIALISTS WILL FIGURE
IN CAMPAIGN AT OAKLAND
(Special to The Herald)
OAKLAND, Dec. 20.:—The elimination
of party politics in municipal affairs as
provided by the new city charter has
not prevented the Socialists as a politi
cal organization from preparingl active
ly for the Oakland spring campaign.
Whilo the name "Socialist" will not
appear on the municipal ballot, follow
ers of Karl Marx and his economic
philosophy intend to hold a convention
January 8 and indorse candidates fop
tha mayoralty and commissioners. Tlie
Socialists, apparently, think that by
opening the campaign early in tho year
they can familiarize the public with
k tho names of their candidates, so that
any one wishing to vote his Socialistic
convictions at the April election will
not bo confused by the absence of the
party column on the ballot.
Mayor Scidel of Milwaukee has been
leoured to aid in the campaign this
spring, and tho former candidate for
president, Eugene V. Debs, is also ex
pected here soon. Charles Edward
Russell, a magazine writer and Social
ist, will also come to the coast on a
lecturing tour.
MRS. EDDY'S HEIRS TO
COMBAT BURIAL PLANS
WASHINGTON, Dec. 20.—Heirs of
the lute Mrs. Mary Baker G. Eddy are
expectud to oppose the burial of Mrs.
Kddy in Mount Auburn cemetery. Boa
ton, according to former Senator WiN
Ham E. Chandler, who was counsel for
them and who today received a copy of
tlio will.
Her sons, George W. Glover and Dr.
E. J. Foster-Eddy, are determined to
have her burled In the family burial
plot in Tllton, N. H. The only deter
rent to having the body transferred to
Tllton will bo the finding' of a personal
request on hor part to lie buried else
where. No mention of her resting place
ia made in tho will.
cs r v/(T IT 1 /- im>TTT'C! • iMir.r ««. on trains Be.
OliN VxIAU \j\Ji. J-LiO . BUMDAI'3 sc. ON TRAINS 10«
TITLED PAIR DENY
$200,000 SWINDLE
'Count and Countess' de Galigny
Involve Prominent People
in Their Defense
TOURS, France, Doc. 20.—The trial of
the self-styled Count and Countes3 de
Gallgny, who are, charged with having
swindled tho Duchess de Choiseul out
of $200,000 la the sale of spurious paint
ings, was begun before Judge Roberts
In the correctional court today.
The complainant was the widow of
Charles Hamilton Paine of Boston, and
recently married the Duke de Choiseul,
whose mother was Mary, daughter of
Malcolm Forbes of Boston.
A number of letters, which the de
fendant claimed to have received from
the complainant, involved Alexandro
Tscherniedieff, who recently was ar
rested in London, charged with conspir
acy to blackmail the duchess. Tscher
niedieff was named as corespondent in
a suit for divorce brought by the late
John W. Hunt.
BLAMK.H THE WOMAN
D'Aulby, or Gallgny, was subjected
to a severo cross-examination by the
judge concerning his various titles and
an alleged newspaper campaign carried
on by him in America in connection
with the ownership of old pictures. The
judge also sought to ascertain under
what circumstances D'Aulby nrst met
his wife.
The defendant declared the object of
his life was to build up a reputation as
a musical composer. He said he was
the close frirend of Prince Philip of
Bourbon, who wanted to adopt him.
He maintained that ho had sold pic
tures, furniture and wine to Mrs. Paine
at her insistence, and had never guar
anteed the authenticity of the pictures.
She invaded his house, he added, and
eventually their relations became very
friendly.
They were broken off. however, for
personal reasons. D'Aulby was handi
capped in his battle with the Judge be
cause of his feeble command of French.
The defense scored a point in Its at
tempt to prove that D'Aulby was a
reputable artist, pointing out that a
Paris newspaper gave a musicals con
sisting of D'Aulby'a works.
Neither the duko nor the duchess do
Choiseul was In court today, although
they are in the city.
MRS. ADRIANCE SETTLES
FOR SMUGGLED NECKLACE
Government Gets $12,063.35
from Wife of Reaper Maker
(Special t« Tlio TI-raM)
NEW .YORK. Dec. 20.—Mrs. Ada F.
O. Adrlance, wife of I. Reynolds
Adrlance. the Poughkoepsle reaper
manufacturer, who omitted to declare
a pearl necklace on her arrival here
from Europe on August 28th last, has
effected a settlement with the govern*
ment by paying $12.0fi3.35 to William
Loeb, jr., collector of the port.
This sum represents the homo value
of tho necklace, which is Inclusive of
the purchase price and duty, and as
Mrs. Adriance had been fined $5000 by
Judge Hand on October intli, on the
charge of smuggling, sha has paid tho
government $17,063 on a necklace which
originally cost about $7f>oo. This makes
the total cost of tho necklace to her
$24,503.
DIAZ FEARS ASSASSINS;
GUARDS WATCH AT PALACE
MEXICO CITY. Dec. 20.—That Presi
dent Diaz fears assassination and has
taken the precaution of having his
food tasted and hist sleeping apart
ments effectually guarded, was learned
today. The president, it Is said, changes
his sleeping room nightly. Streets load-
Ing to the presidential palace are
closed to traffic and all messengers ar
riving from the provinces are searched
before they are admitted to Ilia execu
tive building. „ ' .- >
THE HOME PAPER OF
GREATER LOS ANGELES
GHOSTS OF PAST
CONFRONT WOMAN
IN BALDWIN CASE
Mrs. Tumbull Describes Her
. 'Wickedest Man-He Rises
Up in Courtroom
CROSS-QUESTIONS BARE LIFE
Torrid Letters, Detectives, Old
Affairs Troop Forth in Rec
ord of Days Gone By
Hundreds nf curious persona crowded
Judge Rives' department of tho su
perior court nnd had the gratification
of seeing Mrs. Lillian Ashley Turnbull
prodded with questions relating to al
leged improprieties before sin met
Elias Jack3on Baldwin, with whom she
says she entered into a marriage con
tract.
Mrs. Turnbull, to upo a phraso whu-h
doubtless slipped easily from tho
horseman who, sho alleges, Is tho father
of her child, Beatrice Anita Baldwin-
Turnbull, who wants a daughter's
share of tho turfman's estate, was "in
better form" than when her cross-ex
amination waa begun last Thursday.
Hardly for a moment was her com
posure shaken, no matter with what
severity she was cross-qucstioneel re
garding Incidents In her life which
concerned her alleged relations with
Col. Albert A, Pope, tho Boston manu
facturer of bicycles and automobiles.
"When tho court was opened yester
day morning Gavin McNab, for tho
defense, resumed the cross-examina
tion of Mrs. Turnbull without the aid
and abetting of tho oratorical splendor
of Garrett Mclnerny, whose train was
delayed but who reached LO3 Angeles
from San Francisco in time to serve as
a reinforcement in tho afternoon.
Mr. McNab was handicapped by hav
ing broken his glasses. A pair which
he had borrowed did not cling persis
tently to his no.se nor fit hia eyes, and
during the reading of letters ho often
had to stop several minutes to adjust
them. Ho began with a letter which
was brought forth last Thursday .and
which was written by Mrs. Turnbiill
in 1889 from Boston, Mass., to Lewis
Leach, president of the Farmers bank
of Fresno, Cal.
WRITES TO FRESNO BANRKK
In the eplstlo, Mrs. Turnbull wrote of
herself as being 20 years old and very
fond of horses.
"My eastern prince," sho wrote,, "13
Wesley P. Balch, but as I want to go
to California I shall need a count upon
tho Pacific coast. Now If you are a
wbolesouled youth with the ducats,
good figure and fair looking faco write,
me and inclose photo and on receipt
of same will tell you more about yours
truly, MISS L. A. ASHLEY,
"or 'Tho Blonde.' "
Mrs. Turnbull admitted that she had
written the letter, but denied that she
had advertised for employment as an
assistant in the breeding of horses, ac
cording to tho terms of a printed ad
vertisement which was attached to it.
"How do you account for tho fact
that this, the only letter you sworn
was a forgery when your seduction
case was heard in San Francisco you
now admit is genuine?"
"There was so much forgery ard
treachery then in connection with
James R. Wood that it waa hard to
tell what was truo and what waa
false."
In response to questions, Mrs. Turn
bull declared that when she met Bald
win in St. Louis shortly alter she
learned that her alleged marriago waa
only a mockery, he had taunted her
with having registered her as his
daughter and not as his wife at tho
Hotel Coronado and hal told her to suo
as "about the best advertisement a
man could have was a good lawsuit."
TEU/9 Ol' "WICKEDEST MAN"
"During the seduction trial did you
not say that you surrendered to him
because he promised to make you hla
daughter?"
"I don't remember."
"Under the laws of California, you
knew, did you not, that a married
woman cannot bring a suit on a seduc
tion chargo?"
"But I knew at the, time tlin suit
was brought that tho marriage waa
fictitious."
"Did not your attorneys try to provo
that you had been registered at Coron
ado as Baldwin's daughter?"
"Very likely—l did not tell them how
to handle my case."
Mr. McNab then roverted to lettor.i
alleged to have been written by Sirs.
Turnbull to Jamea R. Wood, a deteo
tive employed by William Redding,
Colonel Pope's New York attorney, to
look up tho woman's record.
"Wood forged tho letters or caused
them to be forged," asserted Mrs.
Turnbull. "He's about the wickedest
man that over lived. It's tho Ood'S
truth I am telling and if Wood wer<»
hero I should tell him what I have said
about him."
Asked why she could rcmomber the
words of tiia nlleged marriage con
tract more clearly than she could her
letters, sho responded that the paper
meant to her her marriage certificate.
"I think a woman remembers her
marriago much bettor than lengthy
matters Which occur before or aitor,"
she said.
"Havo you ever mentioned the con
tract in any letter?"
"Yes." f=hc responded, "to ex-Gover
nor John I>. Long of Massachusetts,
nnd secretary of tho navy under Mc-
Ktnley."
Mrs. Turnbiill'M le^al representatives
said that Loner had retired and de
stroyed all of his correspondence, but
remembered that Mrs. Turnbull had
written to him ;ibout her alleged mar
riage. They promised to product! mortj
evidence from Long.
"Did you ever write to Wood about
ItT" asked Mr. McNab of Mrs. Turn
bull.
"T told him about It."
"I asked you if you had written it
to him."
"I don't remember."
"WICKKI>E9T MAN" APPEARS
"Wr/ll refresh your memory, 1' 'in
clared Mr. McNab, and turning
around, said, "Mr. Wood, will you
please stand up?"
An elderly gray-haired, gray-moua-
I (Cuutliiu«4 oc r»c«» Ilue«* *

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