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Bismarck weekly tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1884-1943, July 25, 1884, Image 3

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042588/1884-07-25/ed-1/seq-3/

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®be Piamowfetlri&utte.
Foabd His Horses.
W. S. OasEelman found bis hones near
Fainted Woods Thursday evening. The hor­
ses were straying about the prairie and al­
though no thieves ,*ere found .with them, jthe
fact that they had been stolen, were strong.
Gates, the fellow who was recently arrested on
suspicion in thiB city, is evidently the chief of
the guilty ones. Gates and another man
called at the boose of Mr. Fickle Thursday
morning and described the horses, stating that
they had lost them and were in search. Gates
said he was a son of the man who owned the
animals and that they were brought from
Canada, in the evening the thieves returned
and while in conversation, Mr. Pickle asked
which was the son of the owner of the horses.
This time the other man, whose name is not
known, said he was the heir. This aroused
Mr. Pickle's suspicion, and as his strangejguests
made themselves, dissgretably at home he began
to think he bad a couple of very undesirable
visitors. After taking dinner with Mr. Pickle,
Oates and his companions went in search of
the horses. There were several others in the
gang, among whom Billy Adams, the cowboy,
wcs recognised Vy the son of Mr. Wilcox, who
lives fonr miles north of the Fickle farm. In
the evening Mr. Gasselman with a number of
farmers who turned out with rifles to hunt for
the horses and the thieves, oame upon the ani
mals just south of Fainted Woods. Mr. Cas
selman remained at Mr. Pickle's Thursday
night, and yesterday morning all the neighbors
came to the house with rifles and offered to
pursue, and if possible find the thieves. They
left it with Mr. Gasselman to decide, and as he
had not fonnd the horses in anybody's pos­
session, and could make no direct case on any
of the supposed thieves, he decided not to en­
danger the lives of his friends and returned to
report the circumstances to Deputy Sheriff
Griffin. Gates is a bad man and should be
capt&red.
Crack Shots.
The Bismarck Gun club already has some of
the best marksmen in the country. Last even­
ing's glass ball shoot was the most satisfactory
of all. The shooting was better than ever be"
fore, as will be seen by the score. A large
crowd of spectators were in attendance and en­
joyed the contest for the medals. Joe Little is
now the posaesser of the leather medal, while
Mr. M. Kinney holds the gold. H. H. Day "and
W. Watson shot for the challenge badge, and
Watson was once more victorious. The boys
evidently ^ill have a lively task on their hands
in getting the challenge badge from its present
holder. The following are
THE SCORES
made from a possible fifteen
Wright 13 Bigelow 9
Baker 8 Peterson 13
Watson, Geo 12 Wetherby 8
O'Shea 13 Day 11
Moorbouse 11 Bragg 11
Little, Joe 2 Bain, Geo 8
McGlung 9 Watson 14
YanEpps. 12 Faulkner 4
Calef. 10 Ward 11
Bell 12 Miller.... 14
Kinney, 14 Hager. 13
Joseph Little walked proudly away with the
the leather medal. Watson, Kinney and Mil­
ler tied tor the goid medal and the shoot off
was as follows, in a five-ball contest:
FIBST:
Wateon,W 2 Miller 3
Kinney. 3
SECOND:
Kinney 5 Miller 5
THIRD:
K'nney 5 Miller 3
Mr. Kinney won the gold medal after a hard
contest and splendid shouting.
In the sweepstakes Mi Clung won the fiit
prize, Bell eesond and Wright third. In the
second sweepstakes Miller and Bell divided first
prize. Day took second and Hager third. In
the third sweepstakes Hager won first, Bell
second, and Miller third.
FOB CHALLENGE BADGE.
In the contest for the challenge badge held by
W. Watson, the number of balls osed-was twen­
ty, and the-following score was made
Wateon 18 Day 15
Mcintosh Development.
The development of Mcintosh county, since
the establishment of the Ellendale and Bis­
marck mail route, is beyond all expectation.
Hardly a day passes that a party of gentlemen
do not go to the county to locate. This morn
Messrs. A. Hilliard, M. Hayes, A. McDonald,
L. D. Clock, F. T. Peiry, and H. J.Whitley leave
for Mcintosh county, and wili remain several
days. Two new towns have been located in
the county and have been christened "Haskins
Lake," for friends of Colonel G. A. Loans
berry, prominent in Michigan and New York,
and "Jewell," for M. H.Jewell, of the TBIBUNE.
Base Ball Tonr.
The Mandan base ball club has arranged for
scries of games and the following from the
Mandan Pioneer gives their route and dates:
C. W. Van Slyck has made all preliminary ar­
rangements for the Mandan base ball nine to
leave Mandan on its tour of match games on
Tuesday, July 22. It is expected to procure re­
duced rates to St Paul and return. The fol­
lowing programme of games with the different
|jnwi along the road has been arranged, and will
be followed so far as practicable. Some changes
may be necessitated to oblige the different
nines Jamestown, July 22 Valley City, Jnly
23 Fargo, July 24 Morehead, July 25 Grand
Forks, July 26 St. Paul, Jnly 28 Minneapolis,
July 29 St. Paul, July 30 Minneapolis, Jnly
31. The foregoing programme will allow the
club to spend Sunday, June 27th, in St. Paul,
and give them a day's rest preparatory to play­
ing Minneapolis and St. Paul. C. L. Gurley
will accompany the clubs as business manager.
The Penitentiary Board.
The board of directors of the Bismarck peni­
tentiary met Saturday afternoon in the presi­
dent's office of the Merchants National bank.
Present—A. W. Edwards, of Fargo J. H.
Miller, of Wahpeton John A. McLean, J. P.
Dnnn and G. A. Lounsberry, of Bismarck. The
board visited the penitentiary building and
found
the structure in the best possible condi­
tion. The center building is entirely enclosed,
roof painted, and cupolo on, while the south
wing is nearly to its full height The cells
will soon be completed and plastering is in
pragma. When completed the penitentiary
will be a very handsome structure. It is of
beautiful design and the artifical trimmings
appear to splendid advantage. At yesterday's
mirPtiwg
«n estimate of *5,000 was allowed
Messrs. Megan A Kelly, and the action of the
building committee in making certain neces­
sary ohanges in the work: waa approved.^
Hi
The Brewery.
The contract for excavating and laying the
foundations for the residence of Mr. Eckhardt,
Who will remain in Bismarck as manager of the
brewery, has been awarded to Mr. B. B. MaBon,
and work is now progressing on both the resi­
dence and the brewery. Both buldings are to be
solid brick with stone foundation, and will cost
in the aggregate,at least $60,000. Mr.Miller and
Mr. Eckhardt are in^the- city and will lose no
time in the erection of the buildings, which
will'be an ornament and valuable addition to.
the city. The machinery and equipments have
beenjpurchased, and before winter the beverage
which has made Milwaukee famous the world
over, will be flowing from a Bismarck brewery.
The plans for the superstructure may be seen at
the office of Heinze Bros., who are the archi­
tects. The brewery and residence are located
in the same block and are on the river bank at
the foot of Main street, near the steamboat
landing.
Eastward Ho!
A special.car of the Oregon Railway and Nav
gation company was attached to last's evening's
train. The occupants of the car were Gen­
eral Land Agent Lamborn, of the Northern Pac­
ific road and family, and D. B. Tattle, chief
clerk of the Eighth division of the railway mail
service, the lattes gentleman beicg en route to
Minneapolis to attend the national encamp­
ment of the Grand Army of the Republic. The
car was a beauty.
Death by *as.
The Steele Herald contains the following ac­
count of the death of Mr. Wallace T. Farring
ton, a homesteader, yesterday from well gas
"One of the saddest events that we have ever
been called upon to chronicle, occurred this
morning about six o'clock in the death of Mr.
Wallace T. Farrington by suffocation from gas.
Mr. Farrington was living on his homestead,
the southwest quarter of section 4,139, 73, had
been, for the past week engaged in digging a
well, and in the process struck a vein of gas, at
a depth of about thirty feet, but it not being of
such strong character work was kept going until
a depth of fifty feet was reached. Last even­
ing it was noticed that the volume of gas was
tnnch Btronger, and an effort was made to drive
it out by fire, but every attempt to produoe fire
in the bottom of the well proved to be a failure.
This morning, about six o'clock, Mr. Farrington
insisted upon going down in the well amid the
protestations of his wife and his farm hands.
On reaching the bottom ef the well he called to
those at the top to draw him up, which was at
once proceeded with, and the unfortunate man
reached within twenty feet of the top when he
was overcome and fell from the bucket to the
bottom of the well—a distance of thirty feet—
and all attempts to rescue him proved futile.
Dr. John Harcourt was .at onoe sent for, and on
arriving at the scene of disaster, found, by ex­
periments, that it .would be certain death to
attempt a rescue by person. Grappling irons
were then procured, and the. body of the unfor­
tunate victim brought to the surface."
The Herald says the deceased leaves a family
in indigent circumstances, and that the people
of Steele will do all in their power to "tempet
the wind to the shorn lambs" he has left behind.
An Enjoyable Day,
By invitation of Mr. and Mrs. Horace Thur­
ston of Bismer Mr. and Mrs. Deckard ac­
companied them into the country on last Thurs­
day for the purpose ot noting the changes and
progress of the past year and see the prospect
for the promised harvest on the Missouri slope.
We went south about eight miles viewing the
crops on our way and noticed wheat and oats,
corn and potatoes, beans and peas, pumpkins
and watermelons, muskmelons and cucumbers
turnips and rutabegas, and other garden pro­
ducts in splendid condition.
We bad the good fortune of partaking of a
splendid dinner of fried chicken and nice fres'i
vegetables at Mr. and Mrs. T. G. McDonald's—
living on section 6,range 79, township 137, after
which we wended our way north of the capital
city, pulling up at the homestead of onr old
friend, J. T. Wallace, Efq. We found the
farmer in all of his glory—cordially receiving
as and making us feel glad that we lived "in
this our day," We were inviied to ascend the
stairway leading to the observatory, located on
the roof of the barn, where we had a splendid
view of the growing crops. Then we visited the
milkhonse and enjoyed the nice cool beverage—
not the proverbial "blue John"—but good,sweet
cream, giving delicious flavor to the refreshing
draft, so generously bestowed, of which our
North Dakota people are so fortunate who keep
good milch cows.
Then our genial friend started out for a walk
over the premises. Fruit trees, goosberriee,
raspberries, currants, strawberries and, a beauti­
fully laid out garden were seen in fine condi­
tion. Ten acres of potatoes, very promising, 15
or 20 acres of oats on sod broken last spring,
likewise five acres of rutabegas and tarnip9, and
15 acres of millet in the best of condition, with
two miles of squashes and two miles of pump­
kins.
On Mellon Bros.' section of land, south Of Mr.
Wallace's, wheat and oats were in number one
order, and certainly difficult to excell. Mr. Joy
and Mr. Thompson,on the north, show fine crops
of grain.
Surrounded with 300 chickens and fine crops,
and possessed with such enthusiasm as oar
friend Wallace, based on facts, indisputable
facts, we parted with our friend, feeling that he
had good reasons for what be has advocated
pertaining to the growing value of Nortn
Dakota.
Oar next objective point was John Millet's
farm and garden.
Here we were delighted to see currants, goose­
berries, raspberries, loaded with the precious
fruit. Apple trees and plums in Ant-class
condition and large according to age. In short
everything in field and garden seemed to be in
the hands of one who knew/ at what he aimed,
and knew the best way of obtaining the most
successful malts.
We parsed over apart of Mr Sherwood's claim,
but the lateness of the evening wonld not per­
mit an expression as to the nature of the crop?.
Mr. Sherwood informed us that everything was
lovely, and his manner carried conviction with
the company.
If our "eastern friends" and some of our
"eastern journalists" could but see our new and
rapidly growing country as it is at present, both
conviction and conversion would take place,and
such a rush to this country "eye.
hath not seen"
aa would be developed in the near future. The
writer lived in the "Miami valley" in the state
of Ohio, the value of whieh for fanning and
gardening has not been questioned, and can*
testify that bo finer grain or garden products
were ever seen by him in seven years than is
now on exhibition over the thousands of aores
on the Missouri slope. J. R. DECKARD.
.Another Excursion.
The excursion reason is now in full bloom
and the people of Bismarck may thank the
Lord for their daily visit from seme party or
other of tourists who come to seek pleasure and
see the country. 'Yesterday morning a special,
car was attached to the west bound passenger
train, bearing seven capitalists from Columbus,
Ohio, among whom was Mr. J. McCune,
father of Attorney McCune, of McLean county.
The members at the psrty were Messrs.
W. G. Deshler, Isaac Eberly, Lorenzo 'English,
Thomas J. Price, A. H. Gling, Ebenrzer Barcus
and J. M. McGnne, all of Columbus, Ohio. They
are en ronte to the National Park and Portland
and will return over the Union Pacifio, Mr. Mc­
Cune returning .to Bismarck to visit bis son and
family. Mr. Edw. McCune, wife and children
were in the city yesterday to meet the party.
Governor Pierce Coming Soon,
The following special telegram was Bent
from Washington to the Pione Press of
Friday: "Governor Pierce, of Dakota, arrived
here this forenoon, and paid his respects to the
president and secretary of the interior. He
cannot take the oath ot office until he reaches
the territory, and expects now to be in Yankton
about the first of AngUBt. He will remain
here several days to consult with the president
and secretary of the interior before returning
to Chicago. Governor Pierce does not propose
to take any part in the capital squabble, but
will leave the judicial authorities to decide it.
He finds that the law does not require him to
live at the capital, and that fact will release
him from much embarassment and permit him
to choose a residence wherever he finds it most
agreeable but as soon as the capital dispute is
desided he will locate in the place- selected
He sayB a great many people called upon him
at Chicago, but he did not commit himself to
them on any question.
The Peoria Excursion.
The excursion which has for some time been
announced by the Northern Pacifio, reached
Minneapolis Thursday, the 17th inst, in a body.
The Minneapolis Tribune said of them: "The
party which is composed of leading and in­
fluential men, numbered 110. During the
time they remained here they visited Minne­
apolis and the lakes on a flying trip, and then
went out on their western journey. A large
nnmber contemplate purchasing new homeR in
Dakota and Montana. Others will extend
their trip to the National Park, special ar­
rangements having been made to convey them
from Bismarck."
As will be seen by the personal column of
the TBIBUNE, several several of the party have
already reached Bismarck. The majority of
the party are scattered along the line east as far
as Fargo, but all must come to Bismarck to
secure their return tickets, and many of them
will secure property before returning. They
are representative men from Iowa and Illinois
and have come for business as well as pleas­
ure. Many of them will go as far as the
National Park before returning to their homes.
Service ot Song.
A service of song was held in the Presbyte
rian church Sunday pvpning, which was partici­
pated in and ci joyed by large congregation,
The choir furnished some excellent music and
the solo by Mrs. O. W. Bennett was particularly
fine. A short bat pointed discourse was preach
ed by Bev C. B. Austin, in which he took Col
Bob Ingersoll to task In refutation of a rep­
uted statement of Ingeisoll's, that the chnrch
membership of the country is decreasing, Mr,
Austin produced (ffioial statistics showing that
the membership of the chnrcb has been on a
rapid increase ever since the beginning of the
Christian era, and that the progress has not
halted or decreased, but gone forward with
greater and better results within the last half
century. Mr. Austin's arguments were highly ap
predated by the congregation.
Ansiey's Release.
Geo. Gibbp, having recovered sufficiently to
be considered out of danger from the effects of
the bullet wound inflicted by Ansley, the latter
was released Monday on $1,000 bail. The bail
at one time was fixed at $5,000, but owing to
the circumstances surrounding the case, and
the apparently complete recovery of Mr. Gibbs
the bail was reduced to $1,000.
The Telephone.
The BiBmarck and Mandan telephone exchange
is a most satisfactory success, and Bince the
seventh of the month Manager Davis has receiv­
ed ten new subscribers. Yesterday Mr. Davis
issued a list of his Bismarck and Mandan sub­
scribers, which gives a very good showing.
Hereafter the central office will be open at all
hours, night and day, which news will be receiv­
ed with pleasure. The instruments are now all
in working order and the subscribers are well
pleased.
The Crros Ventres.
Fonr boj and two girls of the ^Gros Ventres
tribe of Indians arrived from Santee yesterday
morning, where they had been attending school
under the charge of the American Missionary
Society. The girls were named respectively
Otter and Mary Wolfe, and are daughters of
Poor'Wolfe, a chief of the Gros Ventres. They
left for Berthold last evening on the steamer
Undine.
^mm&
Erroneous Beport.
It now appears that the report recently re­
ceived from Washburn to the effect that Johnny
Hackett and a companion named Hart had
joined the horse thieves at Villard is erroneous.
The report that they were hung is also false.
Johnny Hackett's brother, who lives in the city,
informed the TBIBBNK that the accused are in
search of the thieves who stole two animals from
Mr. Hackett. their father.
Home Production.
Mr. Geo. McCullongh has a fine sample of
cauliflower grown in Bismarck this sesson at
the Bismarck grocery and frait store. It
is large, rich and healthy in appearance, and is
another proof of the wonderful possibilities of
Dakota soil.
The rapid improvements in the many ills to
which the human race is heir, says the Daily
World, Nashville, Tennessee, can be attributed
to bat onoe source, and that is St Jacobs Oil,
the world renowned pain cure.
1
Robert
'V: ••fTQREAT.: 'MENS5S S
Money Cannot Corrupt
Will Testify under the State Oath that
Dr. Price's Cream Baking Powder
Does not containAmmonia, Lime, Potash. That it is a PURE, GLEAN
and WHOLESOME Powder for raising light and digestible bread
That it is superior to the Royal IN EVERY RESPECT.
That the Royal contains Ammonia. That Ammonia is retained in
the food. That Ammonia is injurious. The Royal Company dare not
deny it.
National Board of Health, Washington, D. C.
National Board of Health Bulletin, Supplement No 6, page 33.
Dr. Price's Cream Baking Powder heads the entiae list for purity and
strength.
Prof. R. Og-den Dcremus, M. D., LL. D., College of the City of New
York.
Prof. R. C. Kedzie, Michigac State College, Lansing, Michigan.
Prof. H# M. Scheffer, St. Louis, Mo.
Prof Charles C. Boynton, Brandon. Yt.
Prof. James P. Babcock, State Assayer, Bostou, Mass.
Dr. EliasH. Bartley,B. S.,Board of Health, Brooklyn,N, Y.
Prof. Curtis C'Howard, M. Sc. Starling Medical College, Colum­
bus, Ohio.
Prof M. Delafontaine, Chicago, 111.
Prof. G. A. Mariner, Chicago, 111.
Prof John Or away, Mass Inst of Technology, Boston.
Prof A Witthaus, A M, D., University of Buffalo, N. Y.
A million families that have used it for a quarter of a century.
It is an old trick of the Royal Co to throw dirt, crying lime and
pctash, transposing dates, parading black lines, and alleged Govern­
ment Chemists, in order to detract public notice from the disgusting
drug ammonia in their powder They know that Dr Price's ^oes not
contain ammonia, lime or potash
Do not take our Word for it. Let every Housekeeper Prove it.
PLACE A CAN OF THE ROYAL, TOP DOWN, ON A HOT STOVE UNTIL
HEATED, THEN KEMOVE THE COVER AND SMELL.
PRICE BAKING POWDER CO
REAL ESTATE!!
For Bargains in Lots or Acre
BISMARCK PROPERTY,
Address, JOHN W. FISHER,
No. 194 Front street, New York City.
Or, WM. M. PYE, Sr., Bismarck, D. T.
Dan Eisenberg's Dry Goods Store!
Everything will be sold Cheap.
Carp its, Oil Cloths, Mattings, Curtains, Window Shades, Fringe
and a full line of Wiudow Hangings Also a full line of Dress Goods
consisting of Cashmeres. Silks in black and fchades, Flannels, Ladies'
Cloth, Alpacas, Buntings, Nuns' Veilings, and in fact everything per­
taining to the Dry Goods line, will be sold at
ftflj^Next door to Postoffice, Main Street.
W. D. SMITH,
Dealer in Furniture
ELEGANT BED-ROOM SETS, DINING ROOM
AND OFFICE CHAIRS, FEATHERS, PILLOWS, CORNICES,
CURTAIN POLES, PICTURES AND FRAMES. UNDERTAKING WITH
HEARSE, METALLIC CASKETS. COFFINS, ETC. LATEST
IMPROVED SEWING MACHINES A SPECIALTY.
Main St, Nearly Opposite Sheridan House
&
GROCERS,
McCORMICK MOWERS, REAPERS
AND TWINE BINDERS.
54 Main Street, Bismarck, D. T.
TO AND FROM
DAKOTA
VIA THE'
CHICAGO* HORTH-VESTEBH
This great Railroad now offers travel­
ers their choice between Two First-class
Routes to and from the Famous Grain's
Regions of Central and Southeastern*'
Dakota.. One via Madison, Wia.Winona,
Minn., and
Tracy
Minn., andthe other
via Clinton. Cedar Rajnds, Tama, and
.aawarden, Iowa. The following
BOOMING DAKOTA TOWNS
are among the Stations beet reached toy:
this road:
Crandon^
Ja Smtt, '5
tBoland.
Elkton.
Esmond,
Estaline,
Fairbanks,
Frankfort,
Aberdeen,
Aloes ter,
/ttamont.
Athoi,
Aurora,
Bereaford,
Blunt,
Broadlandi
Brookings,
Brace,
Canning
Bti
Caniatota,
CanoYa,
Carthage,
Castlewood,
Oavoor,
Centemlle,
Miller,
'Horbert,
I Vordlaad,
Horthville,
.Ordway,
Parker,'
,• Pierre, «i
Preston,
Raymond
'Bedfleld,'
-Goodwin,
Harrold,
Henry,
Highmore,
Hitc"
Roe Height*
Rudolph,
Salem,
St. tawreaMk
Vilas,
Volga,
Watertown,
Wellington,
Wolaey.
cchcock,
Hurley,
Huron,
Iroquoia,
Clark Center, Xranibnrg,
Columbia, Manchester,
If destined for or from any point In
Central or Southeastern Dakota, buy
your Tickets via the Chicago & North
western Ballwiay. Its train and trade
equipments are the best in the world,
and by its various branches it reaches
nearly every point of interest in this
wonderful section of counter.
If you wish the Beat Traveling Accom-1
modations you will buy your Tickets
by this route AND WILL TAKE NON1
irrmcit:
For-- rates for single or round trip
tickets and for ftiU Information not ob
regard
1 Norl
orthwest, write to the General
tssenger Agent. Chicago & North
estern Railway, at Chicago, 111.
All Coupon Ticket Agents sell Tickets
by this Line.
MARVIN HUGHITT,
2d Vice-Fred,
sad Gen. Manager.
THE Rom ROUTE
CHICAGO, ST. PAUL,
MINNEAPOLIS & OMAHA
-ANJ—
Chicago A Northwestern
RAILWAYS.
The Shortest and Best Route
East to Chicago, with]Dining Cars,
Elegant Day Coaches, and Palace
Smoking Room Sleepers on all
trains from Minneapolis and St*
Paul, through Eau Claire and
Madison, with choice of route via
Milwaukee. The Chicago, St.
Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Rail­
way also runs through train3
southwest from St. ,Paul and Min:
reapolis to Sioux City and Coun­
cil Bluffs, with Sleeping Cars
through without change to St. Jo­
seph and Kansas City, and is the
short, quick ronte from St. Paul
to Des Moines. Northeast from
St. Paul, through trains are run to
Ashland, Washburn and Bayfield,
Lake Superior: and from Eau
Claire to Superior City, where con­
nection is made for Duluth. But
this route to Chicago is what th6
Managers take pride in, and be­
cause of the smooth steel rail
track, well ballasted road bed, the
best Day Coaches, Sleeping and
Dining Cars that money can pro­
cure, courteous and attentive em­
ployes, and with trains always on
time, it is rightly named
"THE ROYAL ROUTE."
Try This Route When You Travel
F. B. CLARKE, T. W. TEASDALB,
Gen'l Traffic Manager. Gea'l Passenger Ag't.
ST. PAUL
GOING EAST
-OK—
GOING WEST
No mat ter.
which, the
NORTHERN PACIFIC R. R.
IS YOUR LINE,
As it will take you in either direction between
ST. PAUL MINNEAPOLIS,
DULUTH, MOORHEAD, FARGO, GLYNDON,
CASSELTON, VALLEY CITY, JAMES­
TOWN, MINNEWAUKAN, (Devil's
Lake,) MILNOR, LAMOURE,
BISMARCK,
MANDAN, GLENDIVE, BILLINGS,
HELENA, M. T..
YELLOWSTONE
MTIOIiL PAM,
DEER LODGE, BUTTE CITY, MISSOULA
SPOKANE FALLS, WALLA WALLA,
THE DALLES,!
PORTLAND, OREGON,
OLYMPIA, TACOMA, SEATTLE, VIC­
TORIA, B. C., all points in BRITISH
COLUMBIA, and ALASKA. SALEM,
iALBANY, and ROSEBURG, ORE.
REHEXBEK That the Northern Pacite
Railroad runs
The only Emigrant sleepers!
The oily Day CoacJtee!
The only PullMian Sleepefrs!
The ealjr Dining Cars!
BETWEEN
ST. PAUL AND PORTLAND, ORE.,
Full information in regard to the Northern
Pacific lines can be obtained Free by addressing:
CHAS.S.FEE.
General Pass. Agent, St. Paul,

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