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Bismarck weekly tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1884-1943, May 18, 1900, Image 1

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TWENTY-EIGHTH YEAR.
NORTH DAKOTA NEWS.
Osnabrock—Daniel Livinggood, a
farmer, living five miles north of the
city, was instantly killed this morning
by falling from a load of hay. He
waB GO years of age.
Mayville—While playing, little Har­
old Ames was drilling at a block—
which had been used last fourth of
July,for a firecracker stand. It ex­
ploded, blowing off the first joint bone
of the thumb and lacerating it and the
next finger.
Minot—Ames McKay, convicted of
defacing cattle brands, has been fined
$500, or 250 days in jail. He will pay
the fine.
Wahpeton—Major Pease has re­
ceived permission from Adjutant Gen­
eral Miller to organize a hospital corps
(or the Norta Dakota militia and is
recruiting his corps. The corps will
consist of eight privates and three
hospital stewards besides the major,
who will commence weekly drill and
instruction lectures as soon as he gets
his company recruited.
Jamestown—In the burning of the
Soo trestle near Valley City, the North­
western telephone wires were broken
down and communication interfered
with for a short time. New poles iare
being put in by the company to re­
place those burned. The trestle was
not the one whicu is built across the
Northern Pacific tracks. It was lo­
cated some distance northwest of the
crossing.
Oakes—Gnarles Norander, a section
hand, was found lying dead in bed.
There was no marks of violence and
tne coroner's jury returned a verdict
of death from natural causes.
Fargo—Ingri Olson, a domestic,
claimed that R. Gallup of Casselton
had traded a farm belonging to her for
one in Otter Tail county, Minnesota,
receiving the sum of a thousand dol­
lars to boot, and failing to give her
the! money. Mr. Gallup denied that
he had received that or any other
amount in exchange in the trade, and
when the case was called in the dis­
trict court before Judge Pollock he re­
iterated the claim. The attorneys for
Miss Olson had the draft which Mr.
Gallup signed, drawn on a Hillsboro
bank and no evidence was introduced
by the defendant. The jury was out
but a short, time when a verdict for
Miss Olson was returned, awarding her
a thousand dollars with interest on the
amount from December 10, 1894, at 7
per cent.
Jamestown—Mrs, Mary Eseltine of
St. Paul has made complaint to the po­
lice that she was robbed of $31 in her
room at the Capital hotel Friday night.
Mrs. Eseltine is deaf and dumb and
has been canvassing in this city for an
eastern firm. She states that she kept
the money in her trunk.
Jamestown—Five families of movers
from Gentry county, Missouri, were
bound north today to McLean county
to take up land. hey had good out­
fits.
Valley City—Ingebret Aas came
within an aas of losing his life and
much else when crossing the railroad
track at Valley City. The neckyoke
of his wagon dropped down just as a
freight slid down the hill. Mr. Aas
"passed," quickly unhitched his team
and hiked for a secluded spot to watch
where his wagon, lime, and nails
struck. The lumber was all he ever
found.
Grand Forks—The annual conven­
tion of the North Dakota Medical as­
sociation will be held in Grand Forks
on the 23rd and 24th of May. The
sessions will be held in the K. P. halj
and it is expected the attendance will
be very large from all over the state,
to say nothing of those who will at­
tend from adjoining states. One of
the pleasant features will be a grand
banquet at the Hotel Dakotah on the
evening of the 23rd.
Fatgo—Several cases of flagrant vio­
lation of the law in regard to selling
intoxicating liquors to Indians in Moor
head have been brought to official no­
tice, and immediate steps will be taken
to arrest and convict the guilty parties.
The proper authorities in the state of
Minnesota, where the offenses were
committed, have been officially in­
formed, and the matter will be taken
up and thoroughly investigated.. It
has been known that ever since the In­
dians arrived in Fargo, a few days ago,
vehicles known as "jag wagons" have
boldly waited at the government build­
ing for loads of Indians, and have con­
veyed them over the river to the booze
emporiums. Several Indians have
been arrested for drunkenness, and
even now one is serving a two day's
sentence in the city jail.
The Sheldon Progress assures us that
McKinley carried the recent village
election.
A FATAL FIRE.
Fire in the Hotel Helena at Chicago
Burns to Death Two Women
and Injures Others.
Fiames Gain Headway so Rapidly that
it Was Impossible to Summon As­
sistance in Time.
Guests Jumped from Windows and Ten
of Them Are Badly Injured—Some
Will Die.
Chicago, May 10.—Fire at the Hotel
Helena this morning burned to death
two unidentified women and seriously
injured ten others.
The building was totally destroyed.
Those dead are:
TWO UNIDENTIF xED WOMEN.
Those seriously injured are:
S. G. McHATTON, bank clerk.
MRS. T. D. ALLEN, back broken,
dying in hospital.
FLORENCE FLORENCE.
STELLA NIEWOLKI.
aARAH HUTCHINSON.
WM. F. HORNE.
E. E. TARBOX.
MRS. W. F. TAYLOR.
T. D. ALLEN.
Missing:
J. H. COLLINS, salesman from New
York.
The fire occurred at 3 o'clock in the
morning. The first discovery of the
flames was maue by a passing police­
man, but they gained headway so rap­
idly that help could not be summoned
in time to save all the guests. Those
who were injured received their injur­
ies in jumping from windows.
ALIEN CLAIMS.
HOUSE REINSERTS THE HANS
BROUGH AMENDMENTS TO THE
ALASKAN CIVIL CODE BILL AND
THEY WILL PROBABLY BE SENT
TO CONFERENCE.
Washington, May 1G.—The house
committee on revision of the laws has
inserted in the Alaskan civil bill,
which has been before it a couple of
weeks, the Hansbrougn amendment
barring aliens from locating mining
claims in the territory. Those amend­
ments were debated in the senate for
three weeks, and finally withdrawn by
Hansbrough, who realized the bin
would be defeated if they went in.
This action by the house committee
means that the Hansbrough amend­
ments will probably be adopted by the
house and sent to conference. This
question of citizenship in Alaska is one
of the utmost importance, and many
of the richest claims in Cape Nome will
be affected should Hansbrough's prop­
osition to bar all alien claims be
adopted.
FOR OtD MUDDY.
Washington, May 1G.—The senate
committee on commerce has ordered
favorable reports on amendments to
the sundry civil bill appropriating
$250,000 for an emergency expenditure
on the Missouri river.
CROWDS SAW THE LIMITED.
St. Paul, May 1G.—General Passen­
ger Agent C. S. Fee of the Northern
Pacific has returned to St. Paul from
a two weeks' trip to the Pacific coast.
He went west in charge of the first
North Coast Limited sent out April
20. Mr. Fee states that the new train
received an ovation at every point
along the line. He estimates that
fully 125,000 people visited it at the
various depots. Every little town
along the line as well as every city
turned out en masse. In Seattle the
crowd was tremendous.
FREE HOMES.
SENATE PASSES THE FREE HOME­
STEAD BILL—ONE OF THE MOST
'IMPORTANT PIECES OF LEGIS­
LATION TO THE NORTHWEST.
Washington, May 1G.—The senate
has passed the free homes bill and it
is generally conceded among north­
western senators and members in the
states most affected by the legislation
that the free homestead bill is the
most important legislation for the
people of that section that has passed
in recent years. It is calculated by
the friends of the bill that it will afford
relief to more than 75,000 entrym :i,
who have been unable to pay for the
lands upon which they have settled.
There is a mucn smaller class of un
trymen whc will be saved a part of the
total post of the lands Mch they Lave
entered Jr. view of the propo3*.i law
making it unncessary to make further
payments. Great difference of opin­
ion exists as to the possible ultimate
cost to the government as a result of
the passage of the bill. It has been
estimated at from $15,000,000 to $35,
000,000. The question turns upon the
amount of lands that were to be taken
by settlers. Most of the reservations
that have been opened haw been paid
for by the government and the funds
are held in trust for the Indians. The
Chippewa lands in Minnesota are
opened upon the condition that such
as are sold to settlers shall be paid for
by the payments being turned over to
the Indians. The estimate is that
about a million acres of Indian lands
in Minnesota will be opened to free
homestead entry by the bill, which
will now go to the president for his
signature.
M. E. RESOLUTIONS.
COMMITTEE SCOLDS PRESIDENT
MCKINLEY FOR NOT ENFORCING
ANTI-CANTEEN LAW—EX-CON­
GRESSMAN JOHNSON OBJECTS.
Chicago, May 1G.—The Methodist
Episcopal general conference commit­
tee on temperance, of which Samuel
Dickie of Michigan is chairman, and
of which ex-Congressman Johnson of
North Dakota, a c-ampion for the an­
ti-canteen law, is a member,, adopted
resolutions today, which, in the minds
of a number of the convention, at least,
is a direct slap at President McKinley,
because of his acquiescence in the de­
cision of Attorney General Griggs de­
claring the law ineffective.
Delegate Johnson took exception to
the portion of the report which reads
as follows:
"We deplore the fact that our gen­
eral government by its internal rev­
enue system continues to give legal
recognition to so corrupt a business,
especially do we condemn the course
of the government in accepting and
collecting revenue from persons in
prohibition towns or state which are
known to the officers of the treasury
department to be engaged in the vio­
lation of prohibitory laws." His ob­
jections were opposed and the section
of the report was adopted.
DEATH OF DR. LAW.
Dickinson, May 10.—Word has been
received here of. the death of Dr. V.
Marshall Law, lately rector of the
Episcopal church of Dickinson, who
was compelled to resign his pulpit on
account of ill-health. He proceeded
direct to Texas on his way to his home
in California. At Clarendon, Tex.,
where he stayed over en route to his
home, he was stricken with paralysis
and died on the morning of the 28th
of April. His wife had been tele­
graphed for and reached him two days
before his death. He recognized her
but was unable to speak to her. His
remains were buried in San Francisco
on May 2.
SURPRISED.
JAMESTOWN PEOPLE SURPRISED
AT THE WALKOVER OF JUDGE
GLASPELL—STUTSMAN S DELE­
GATION NOT HAPPY.
Jamestown, May 1G.—While not al­
together unexpected, the overwhelm­
ing victory of Judge Glaspell came as
a surprise to the people here who had
looked for a close vote. The fight has
been one of the hottest in -the state on
both sides, but the judge's combina­
tion with Major White enabled him to
carry the outside, counties, regardless
of his defeat in his home county, and
secure the nomination. It is claimed
that this combination gives Major
White 79 votes to the state convention
from this district.
In the convention speeches were
piade by S. E. Ellsworth, Harry Corn­
wall, O. J. Seiler and L. B. Hardy of
this city, after which the roll was
ordered. The vote stood by counties
as follows:
For Glaspell—LaMoure, 14 votes,
Logan 5, Barnes 25, Wells 17, Foster
8, Eddy 10. Total 79.
For Bartlett—Stutsman 19, Griggs
10. Total 29.
Editor McKean of the Sanborn En­
terprise was elected chairman and
Hon. Geo. W. Solliday of Carrington
secretary of the convention. Judge
Glaspell was nominated by Attorney
Blackwell of LaMoure.
REPULSED AT JuAFEKING.
London, May 10.—A dispatch from
Lourenzo Marquez says it is reported
the Boers have been repulsed at Mafe
king with heavy loss. No dates are
mentioned. The dispatch* is not cer­
tain whether the report is a version of
Sunday's battle at Mafeking or relates
to subsequent fighting. However, the
report strengthens the belief that
Mafeking is passing through the crisis
of the sedge.
BISMARCK, NORTH DAKOTA, FRIDAY, MAY 18, 1900.
iDLLER'S REPORT.
General Buller Makes Another Report
from Dundee of the Occupation of
of Glencoe by British.
Boers Are Trekking Rapidly and Trains
Running Half Way Between Lady
smyth and Dundee.
Foraging Party of British Fired Upon
by Boers and Several Men Killed
and Captured.
London, May 10.—General Buller
makes the following report from Dun­
dee of the occupation of Glencoe:
We occupied Glencoe yesterday. The
Transvaalers have now quitted Big
arsberg positions and the Free Staters
on Drekensburg are much reduced in
numbers. Carolena LydenDurg, with
the Pretoria commandos, trekked with
eleven guns and we entered Glencoe.
The last train and ambulances left yes­
terday morning. The result is largely
due to the excellent work of the Fifth
division in the last few days. Trains
are now running as far as Wesselsnek
station, half way between Ladysmith
and Dundee.
General Roberts reports from Kroon
stadt that two officers and six men of
the Prince Alfred Guards while forag­
ing were fired upon by a party of Boers
hiding in a farm house with a flag of
truce dying. Two men were killed
and one officer wounded and the other
officer and two men were captured.
CLARK REAPPOINTED.
Washington, May 10.—Senator Clark
has received notice of his reappoint­
ment to the senate from Acting Gov­
ernor Spriggs of Montana. He has
accepted the appointment.
WILL HOLD OUT.
London, May 10.—Baden Powell
sends word from Mafeking that food
will hold out until June 10. The Brit­
ish relief column is due there now and
word is hourly expected of the relief
of the city.
A NEW COMBINE.
Iflcchlij (Ertlmne.
Jamestown, May 10.—The deal which
resulted in the renomination of Judge
Glaspell at Valley City, had for its
backing, no doubt, the ambition of a
number of candidates for state offices.
The combine appears to be headed by
Frank White of Valley City for gover­
nor, with E. F. Porter of Foster county
for secretary of state, and probably
others for various offices. The coun­
ties of LaMoure, Barnes, Wells, Foster,
Logan and Eddy seem to make the
neuclus of this deal which, as natur­
ally opposed to the present administra­
tion, united to name the candidate for
judge opposed by Governor Fancher,
as the first move on the board. How
this new combine wih be received in
other parts of the state and whether
it has a support not now showing on
the surface, remains to be seen.
INDIAN DELEGATES.
TWO OF THEM IN TODAY'S CON­
VENTION AT x-ARGO—THE AD­
VENT OF THE REDMAN IN POL­
ITICS.
Fargo, May 10.—In the state con­
vention which convened here today
were two interesting figures in the per­
sons of two full blood Indians from
the Elbowoods district, near the Fort
Berthold Agency. In the district are
300 Indian voters who have taken
lands in severalty and who have at­
tained citizenship under a federal
statute which went into effect a year
or two ago. Under the call, and en­
tirely of their own volition, these vot­
ers held a convention to nominate del­
egates to Fargo. With the assistance
of two bright young members of the
tribe, who are college graduates, the
convention was regularly held accord­
ing to "white man's parliamentary
rules" and the two young graduates
were selected to go to Fargo and as­
sist in the preliminaries for the renom­
ination of the "Great Father"—McKin­
ley.
Some of the Indians said-that "white
man's delegates told what to do," so
the delegates to Fargo were told what
to do and in addition the hat was
passed around, so that they would not
be "in debt to white man" and suffi­
cient money was collected to pay their
expenses.
The action of the Indians is partic­
ularly pleasing to Agent Richards of
the Fort Berthold Agency, as it illus'
trates plainly the good effect, and the
influence associating civilized meth­
ods, business and political, has had
upon the red man, also his amenabil­
ity to education and his desire to take
an interest in the public affairs of the
nation of which he has become an ac­
tive part.
BONDSMEN PLEASED.
Grand Forks, May 10.—The decision
of the supreme court in the Wording
case is pleasing to the bondsmen here.
Catherine L. Wording died at Ra­
cine, Wis., in 1890, leaving a will in
which S. W. McLaughlin was named
as executor, and he received letters
from the probate courts both at Ra­
cine and Grand Forks, the will having
been probated at both places. The
terms of the will provided that Mc­
Laughlin accumulate the estate until
there were sufficient funds on hand to
pay all legacies.
Whfen McLaughlin failed in this city
in '97, the probate court here required
him to render an accounting of the es­
tate, which he did, and Judge Carothers
found him short to the extent of over
$8,000. McLaughlin at this time ten­
dered his resignation as executor
which was accepted and Willis A. Joy
was appointed in his stead and at once
brought an action to recover the
amount of the shortage against Mc­
Laughlin's bondsmen, among whom
are such prominent men as County
Treasurer Elton, Investment Banker
John Birkholz, George B. Winship and
others.
The case was tried in this city last
December, before Judge Fisl: of the
First judicial district, who granted a
motion for a directed verdict for the
defense. Defendant made the motion
on the grounds that the Racine county
court had exclusive jurisdiction that
the will created a trust and that Mc­
Laughlin was acting in the dual capa­
city of executor and trustee and that
the defaults were as trustee and not Us
executor, and various other grounds.
Joy appealed to the supreme court
and that body by its decision sustained
Judge Fisk in giving a directed verdict
in favor of the defendant bondsmen.
Bosard & Bosard represented the plain­
tiff and though the decision was
against their client they are credited
with putting up a very strong case.
Templeton & Rex and Burke Corbet
represented the bondsmen, Scott Rex
preparing the brief and making the ar­
gument before the supreme court.
KANSAS REPUBLICANS.
Topeka, May 10.—The republican
state convention met at noon, commit­
tees were appointed and speeches
made.
SERIOUS LOSS.
Washington, May 10.—General Mc
Arthur in a cablegram to the war de­
partment confirms the report of an
engagement with the insurgents at
Cantubig on April 14, in which a de­
tachment of the Fifty-third infantry
garrisoning that place took part. Of
thirty-one men in the detachment Mc
Arthur reports nineteen killed, five
wounded. Over two hundred of the
attacking party were killed, the streets
being covered with dead insurgents.
The Iloilo-Paney cable was broken by
an earthquake.
CLEW'S FINANCIAL REVIEW.
New York, May 12.—The reaction­
ary movement in the stock market de­
veloped strength last week, and the
tendency has been much less bullish
than two weeks ago. Good reasons
exist for a strictly moderate reaction.
Values of good properties were often
pretty high and more or less liquida­
tion of speculative accounts was inevi­
table in the absence of fresh stimulus
to outside buying. General trade shows
some signs of less activity but not
more than could be reasonably ex­
pected after the rush of 'the past six
months. As a whole, however, the
business situation is sound and prom­
ising. The approach of a presidential
election acts as a detriment in some
quarters, much more than it really
should, but there is every prospect of
a renewed revival of business when
the elections have been discounted and
values brought down to a more normal
level. The immediate future of the
stock market is somewhat problem­
atical. There is no reason for any im­
portant declines. The industrials
have already dropped considerably be­
low top figures, while the railroads
are making such excellent returns that
no anxiety need be manifested should
they cease overtopping the big gains of
1899.
At present Senator Wolcott is the
only public man in Washington who
is an expert operator of an automobile.
Congress wil adjouA about June 10.
Thus more prosperity is being forced
on the country.
FIVE CENTS
THE DELEGATES.
Harmonious Republican Convention at
Fargo Selects Delegates to
Philadelphia
Both Senators Named Members of the
Delegation, with Holms, Plum
ley, Collins and Stephens.
The anti-Murphy Delegation Wins out
in Its Fight and is Seated by
The Convention.
Fargo, May 10.—The delegates se­
lected to the republican national con­
vention are as follows:
SENATOR H. C. HANSBROUGH.
SENATOR P. J. McCUMBER.
H. C. PLUMLEY, of Cass county.
STEVEN COLLINS, of Grand Forks
county.
H. L. HOLMES, of Pembina county.
R. N. STE JNS, of Burleigh county.
The alternates are as follows: Leutz
of Morton county, Blackwell of La­
Moure county, Brown of Wells county,
Steele of Rolette county, White of
Traill county and Swiggum.
The convention was harmonious, the
slate having been made last night and
gives satisfaction.
1 ue anti-Murphy delegation was
seated from Ward county on the re­
port of the state committee.
Most of the delegates returned to
their homes on the afternoon trains.
Congressman Spalu.ng was chair­
man of the convention and Shea of
Richland chairman of the committee
on resolutions. Little of Burleigh
was chairman of the committee on cre­
dentials. Ringing resolutions indors­
ing the administration were adopted.
APPOINTMENT LEGAL.
Washington, May 10.—Senators are
practically unanimous in the opinion
that the appointment of Senator Clark
to the vacancy from Montana is legal
as the state constitution is quite clear
on that point.
PRISONERS.
Havana, May 10.—It is said Cabanas
fortress is being prepared for the re­
ception of the prisoners in the postal
scandal. It is reported the shortage
in the Havana postofflce is $8,000,
which, if true, means another fraud to
be dealt with.
BIG FIRE LOSS.
St. Catherines, Ont., May 10.—The
plant of Well and Vale Cycle Motor Co.
burned this morning. The loss is
half a million.
CONSIDERING CLARK.
Washington, May 10.—In the senate
Senator Bucon's remarks were inter­
rupted to permit Senator Chandler to
move a postponement of the resolution
in the Clark case till Saturday. Sen­
ator Chandler said the privileges and
election committee desired to have a
meeting to consider what action to
take in the matter.
CUBAN SCANDALS.
Washington, May 10.—Senator Ba­
con called up the resolution authoriz­
ing an investigation of the Cuban pos­
tal affair and spoke thereto. He said
the country wanted to know how
money being collected was expended.
Levying taxes in the island should be
explained. The expenditure of money
by our officials was the most extrava­
gant ever heard of. He read from
the report of the secretary of war to
show the last year's round number re­
ceipts in Cuba were sixteen millions,
and the expenditures fourteen millions.
He said the press had exposed the
worst extravagance ever heard of.
SETTLERS IN WARD.
Minot, May 1G.—Eight hundred and
eighty-six homesteads, were taken by
settlers in this land district during the
month of April. This is the largest
business ever done in any one month
in this office and will probably not be
reached again this year. This repre­
sents 141,700 acres of land which will
be cultivated more or less In the near
future. It represents that S8G heads
of families have or will in a short time
take up their abode in the northwest­
ern part of the state. It means new
business enterprises, new towns and
new people. It nfeans that ere long
this will be a thickly settled country
and an important factor In all affairs.
MISSOURI CONVENTION.
Kansas City, May 1G.—The republi­
can convention met this morning but
got into a jangle over committees and
further business was blocked till
straightened out.
'$84
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