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Crossville chronicle. [volume] (Crossville, Tenn.) 1894-current, September 13, 1922, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042757/1922-09-13/ed-1/seq-5/

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CROSSVILLE CHRONICLE
CAPT. PECK TALKS ABOUT
Profit in Farming
Talks to Farmer by T. F. Peck, Commissioner of Agriculture,
"I am going to get away from the
farm; there is no money to be made
in farming." Occasionally you will
hear this expression from some farm
er. But on investigation, it will be
found that the trouble is with the
farmer and not with farming. To set
off against such pessimists as the one
quoted, you will find farmers who
have made net profits of more than
$200 an acre on strawberries, of more
than $ 1,000 an acre on tobacco; some
who have produced more than 400
bushels of potatoes to the acre; still
Others , who have made profits of as
much as ?5po per acre inorchards. And
othes who have found fine profits in
the production of poultry and hogs
where they have had the proper at
tention. The trouble with a great many
farmers is that they are land poor.
They try to cover too much ground.
.They try to farm on too extensive a
plan, land that is deficient in plant
food and which cannot, therefore pro
duce good crops. Much of the land
farmed does not return the cost of
production.
Whether the land is rich or poor,
it must be broken and pulverized it
musr be planted and cultivated, and
.the crops, good or bad, must be har
vested. The difference in the labor on
poor land and good land, in a good
crop or a poor one, is. not very marked
hut the difference in net profit is very
great.
If we could make up our minds to
cultivate only the number of acres
we could get in the proper condition,
fertilize it as it should be, and use
only the best seed, and leave nothing
undone that should be done during the
season for cultivation, we would har
vest more from a few acres than we
have been harvesting from a large
acreage, and the cost in labor would
be materially reduced. The land not
in cultivation could be pastured until j
it could be given the right preparation
for crop production, or sold to some
one who would see what we were To
'ng with a few acres.
Land cannot produce crops profit
ably if it is run down, is deficient in
plant food and is not cultivated prop
erly. We have been mining the most
of our soils so long that it is deficient
in plant food, and then we half pre
pare the land, do not use the care we
should in the selection of seed, and
are not as thorough as we should be
in the cultivation and harvesting of
the crops.
With such methods, profit in farm
ing cannot be expected.
We can restore the fertility of our
soils and grow money crops each year
while we are doing it. I have taken
land which I was told was worn out
j and in three years have on it as good
'crops as could be grown on any soils
jany where. I would get some green
j crop on it to turn under; I would sub
! soil it ; I would lime it ; I would grow
soy beans or peas during the summer
to turn under, and rye and crimson
clover ni the wintert o turn under; I
would use acid phosphate. Of course
1 1 would not treat a very large acre
I age in this way at one time, but each
jyear I would add a few acres.
' If we will treat the soil fairly it
I will do its part. Tennessee could prof-
itably employ ten men on the farming
i land of the state where one is now em
jpioyed, if we could cultivate the soil
jas it should be. Many farmersr arc
land poor, and are slaves to their
land. They try to farm too large an
acreage, and cannot give it the prop
er attention, either in the preparation
of the ground for the seed or in the
or in cultivation of the growing crops.
Another thing that will help to
make farming a profitable instead of
a losing proposition is community co
operation, and a greater variety of
product's. The farmer could have
something ready for the market at
practically all seasons of the year, and
with cooperation among the farmers
Railroad Fares I
I RefundedinCash !
To Nashville and Return by the Associated Retailers
of Nashville, Tennessee, during
State Fair
Week
While visiting the Fair you can buy your fall merchan- .
dise andjjet your Railroad Fare Refunded, traveling
by auto. or railroad, from the following merchants:
TAILORS AND
CLOTHIERS
L. A. Bauman Co.
Burke & Co.
Carney & Johnson
Chas. Davitt & Co.
T. J. Gross & Co.
Hampton-Harrison
Co.
Hirshberg Bros.
Jack & Jake
King's
R. Z. Levy & Son
MILLINERY
Golden Millirery
-Shop.
Tinsley Millinery Co.
SHOES
Economy Shoe Co.
AII-American Shoe
Store.
Ellis Shoe Co.
G. R. Kinney Co. Inc.
Kuhn, Cooper &
Geary.
Loventhal, Frank & Maxwell House Shoe
Co.
S. Lowenstein & Bro.
Joe Morse & Co.
Porter Clothing Co.
DEPARTMENT
STORES
Cain-Sloan Co,
H. J. Grimes & Co.
Lebeck Bros.
D. Loveman, Berger Jensen & Jeck
Co.
John A. Meadors &
Son
Scott-Mayes Co.
Shines Walk Over
Shoe Co.
Endicott-Johnson.
JEWELERS
Calhoun Jewelry Co.
& Tietlebauni.
Thompson & Co.
Timothy Dry Goods
Co.
HARDWARE
Union Hardware Co.
Fish Bros.
MUSIC
M. F. Shea
O. K. Houck Piano
Co.
OPTICAN
E. S. Getiman.
D. Lowenheim & Co.
M. I. Lusky Jewelry
Co.
B. H. Steif Jewelry
Co.
Arthur Scrivner.
Weinstein Coi.
PRINTERS
Cullom & Ghertner
Co.
McQuiddy Printing
Co.
Williams Printing Co
SPECIALTY SHOP
Frances Vanity Box.
The Linen Store.
DRUGS
Buchi-Sand Drug Co.
Jennings Pharmacy
FLORISTS
Geny Bros:
Joy Floral Co.
PAINTS
Allen Whitfield Paint
. .& Glass Co.
Eason Paint & Glass
Co.
CANDY
Chas. S: Mitchell.
GROCERS
Crone & Jackson
SOFT DRINKS AND
LUNCHES
Kornman's.
Mocker's
AUTO ACCESSO
RIES AND SPORT
ING GOODS
Universal Accesso
ries Co.
SEEDS
Hudmon Seed Co.
LADIES READY
, TO-WEAR
Armstrong's
The Fashion.
Sol Frankland & Son
Rich', Schwartz &
Joseph
B. B. Smith & Co.
The Associated Retailers of NasMlle
r 302 Chamber of Commerce Bldg.
309 FOURTH AVE., N.
oi a community in marketing the prod
ucts, the best prices could be ob
tained. Farming, conducted as it should be
and as it can be, will make our various
communities prosperous, and in such
farming communities the children will
be content to stay on the farm and
carry on the work so necessary to the
prosperity of the country. Let us do
thoroughly what we undertake to do,
GRASSY COVE
Rev. P. E. Radford filled his regular
appointment here Sunday morning
and evening.
Mrs. Lizzie Miller is having her
house painted. E. R. Swan, of Crab
Orchard is doing the work.
Pant AnHrev wilt lav fnr Wn
and not undertake more than we can .Springs, N. C, where he will be in'
properly look after.
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
To W. H. ROCKWELL:
FRANK LI EB ROCK,
W. H. ROCKWELL.
In the Chancery Court at Cross
ville Tennessee.
school again
I Harry and Georgia Hartman have i
entered the Cumberland Mountain
j school at - Crossville for this year, j
j Dr. jRussell and wife vere over 1
i from Crab Orchard Monday to see i
j the infant of Spencer Kemmer, which I
nun l jr ion. j
There will be a pie supper at thei
school house Saturday evening, Sep-
In this cause, it appearing from the ' tcm.b.c.r l6.for the benefit of the school;
bill, which is sworn to, that the de- at ,nis P ; everybody is invited j
fendant, W. H. Rockwell, is a non-ito cme ?nd helP.out with it. We
resident of the State of Tennessee, helcerta!nlv do appreciate the good work
is, therefore, hereby required to ap-!,hat IS be,n done ln our scho1 here
pear, on or before the Third Monday Sept. 11. Coveite.
of October next, before the Clerk and!
Master -of said Court, at his office inj iiir?fM 1 t
Crossville, and make defense to thei lli7Pf III A M
bill filed against him in said Court, by a-t
Frank Liebrock, or otherwise the bill;
will be taken for confessed, and thei Mrs.. Jews Tollett died at her home
case set for hearing ex parte. here Friday after an illness of onlv a
It is further ordered that this notice , few rfavs
, iti t f e . ' ;
De puousnea ior iour consecutive
weeks in the Crossville Chronicle, be
ginning with the publication of Sep
tember 6, 1922.
This 4th day of September, 1922.
C. G. BLACK,
9-6-4t. Clerk and Master.
ing in Crab Orchard and Crossville
for the past few days.
H. L. Spencer, of Crossville, spent
part of last week here having some
timber work done.
There was a box supper here SaT
urday, August 26. The proceeds went
toward a singing school.
John Warner, of Crossville, has been
teaching a singing school here for
the past week.
Miss Mae Brown visited her sister,
Mrs. Laura Hedgecoth here Sunday.
Several boys from Grassy Cove have
been coming to our singing school.
Mr. and Mrs. Amos Angel visited
Mrs, Angel's niece, Mrs. Chester
Hedgecoth here recently.
Misses Ruby and Pearle Hedgecoth
entered high school at Crossville Mon
day. Mrs. Mae Rector, of Nashville and
little daughter, Elizabeth, visited Mrs.
Chester Hedgecoth here recently.
Ab Cox was in this vicinity last week
Sept. 9- Vernis.
Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Brown have
moved to Crossville recently. They
will be greatly missed here.
Several boys of Grassy Cove at
tended the box supper here.
Mrs. Grace Flynn has been visit-
DR. F.J.UPHAM
DENTIST
OROSSVtLUK .
F. H. Washburn
Real Estate
Farm Lands a Specialty
CROSSVILLE. TENNESSEE
Your Railroad Fare Refunded
L
52Hi !W$aSSR8SSaEEl
DURING
STATE FAIR WEEK ONLY
'BY
The Associated Retailers of Nashville
' I MrM fesr RS WHT IJVJ - j--, "S. - I
16-17-18-19-20-21-22-23
The South's Greatest
Educational Event
Music Fun- Recreation
THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS GIVEN AS CASH PRIZES
$200,000.00 Spent on New Amusemen Features
Dazzling Water Circus
Daily Radio Concert
Death Defying Auto Races
Dare-Devil Stunt Flying
Fireworks Every Night
Band Concert All Day
Spellman Spectacular With
500 People in Cast (0nVrUhAoc!:any)
JOHNNY J. JONES SHOWS
and the Great White Way
firing the Whole Family Reduced Railroad Rates
r fi
tv
Svatr
f SAME OLD
ADMISSION 5V
it

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