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Birmingham state herald. (Birmingham, Ala.) 1895-1897, October 27, 1895, Image 7

Image and text provided by University of Alabama Libraries, Tuscaloosa, AL

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85044812/1895-10-27/ed-1/seq-7/

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GROSS SURPLUS DEC. 31, 1S94.
Equitable.. .$37
Mutual.
New York.
Northwestern.
Mutual Benefit.
Connecticut Mutual.
Ktna.
Penn Mutual.
Prov. Life and Trust.
New England Mutual
,481,069
22.729,570
21,576.751
14,100.870
3,862,742
7.763,270
6,859,919
2,334,600
3,305,334
2,049,607
RATIO OF ASSETS TO LIABILITIES
DECEMBER 31, 1894.
Per cent.
Equitable.125.40
Mutual.
New York.'..
Northwestern.
Mutual Benefit.
Connecticut Mutual_
Etna.
Penn Mutual.
Prov. Life and Trust...
New England Mutual..
112.55
115.30
123.83
107.46
114.25
119.55
110.34
113.93
109.23
Hh
RATIO OF SURPiU LIABILITIES
DECEMBER L31r 1894.
Per cent.
Equitable...25.40
Mutual. 12.55
Ne\£ Yuriev.--.... .V. 15.30
Northwestern*. ...\. 23.83
Mutual JOeiintit.... 7.46
Conjpectlfcut Sjutual.M. 14.25
Etna;.T..i... 19.55
Penn Mutual. 10.34
Prov. Life and Tr|»«L.. 13.93
New England SgjiMiaL;- 9.23
—i
ASSURANCE IN FORCE DECEMBER
3i,° lm
H vit n< qol »’'.i
Equitable.,$913,556,733
Mutual. .-854,710,761
New York.
Northwestern . 340,627,569
Mutual Benefit-..1.: • -209,369,528
Connecticut Mtlttfal 156!SSS,871
Etna . hia*. .135„90J,79C
Penn Mutual ... 136,S57,»7:>
ProvTfeffe and Trust 103.671.934
Now England Mutual 93,8(JS,'38?
•wst
INCOME SAVED FOR INVESTMENT
IN 1894.
Equitable.. .$16,243,243
Mutual . 14,877.638
New York . 12,343,884
Northwestern . 8,785,132
Mutual Benefit . 2,192,565
Connecticut Mutual.. 020,199
Etna . 1,689,380
Penn Mutual . 2,098,393
Prov. Life and Trust. -2,191.993
New England Mutual 769.743
INCREASE IN ASSETS IN 10 \ EARS,
1885-’94.
Equitable. .$127,173,189
100.194.322
103,551,792
50,750.484
17,049,069
8,801.432
12,219.441
15,251,383
17,891,778
7,172,342
Mutual
New York.
Northwestern.
Mutual Benefit.
Connecticut Mutual.
Etna.
Penn Mutual.
Prov.Life and Trust
Hew EnglandMutual
SURPLUS EARNED IN 1891
Equitable-$8,181,068
Mutual. 8,010,801
New York. 5,209,629
Northwestern. 4,003,715
Mutual Ilorlcfit........ 1,933,613
Connecticut Mutual.. 1,816,234
Etna...1.165,078
Penn Mutual. 1,008.160
Prov. L/tfe and Trust. 1.142.104
New England Mutual 863,662
— --—--~“
CASH DIVIDENDS PAID IN I SO I
Equitable_$2,139,735
Mutual. 1,308,345
New York. 1.681,755
North wesem. 1.261,325
Mutual Benefit. 1,674,251
Connecticut Mutual.. 1,263.415
Ktna. 806,8.Y.i
Penn Mutual. 760.2X1
Prov. Life and Trust. 644.6X2
New England Mutual 863,662
i
V nil IMt lITtf
’+J L.
is
JL
In All Things at All Times.
^ H fcj riA-.V Xkilfl - Uii .
There are rilaJi*f»GOOU life insurance companies, but among
them all there rHisChe one BEST. THE BEST; is;THE EQUIT
ABLE!' If you tvishto know why, send fdT:v t? the report of the
Superintendent of Insurance for the State oL-New York on the ex
amination of The Eqtiitablq, 2, for actual results of maturing poli
cies; 3, for statement of death claims paid in 1S94. Then you will,
know the three great; reasons of The Equitable’s supremacy: 1st,
its financial stability; 2d, its great profits arid advantages to living
policy-holders; 3d, the promptness of its payments and liberality
of its settlements.
The Equitable Life Assurance Society
m. IV. ALEXANDER, Yicc-I’miTni
I i >
OF THE UNITED STATES.
. : H- HYDE, President.
Alabama Department—-Clark & Jackson, Managers; Louis V. Clark,
J. Kirk Jackson. L. D. Burdette, Cashier. ---
OEMCES—2021 First Avenue, Southern Club Building, Birmingham, Ala.
Assets, $185*044,310. /■< Surplus, $37,481,009.
lvpifni’vT ivravfE
1 f
*: # 1
i * »
. 1
1
IvnilLifl.' IVi TlflT 1 I IV
ivvi’c’rmifVT
INCH EASE IX SURPLUS IX 10
YEARS, 1885-’!) 4.
Equitable.. .$27,017,995
Mutual. 16,652,664
New York..-,.... 1-1,883,707
Northwestern. 10,593,993
Mutual Benefit....;. 722.365
Connecticut Mutual. 3,553.853
Etna. 1,890,053
Pent! Mutual. 1,052,549
Prow Life and Trust.. 1,761,370
Now England Mutual —453,790
(Decrease.)
INCREASE IN ASSURANCE IN FORCE
IN 10 YEARS, 1885-’D5.
Equitable. .$604,147,562
Mutual. 502,921.476
Now York. 58.2,911,574
Northwestern. 241,903,587
Mutual Benefit. 73,525,985
Connecticut Mutual 4,456,186
Etna. 51,244,205
Penn Mutual. 82,557,215
Prow Life and Trust 61,980,155
'Jew England Mutual 31,239,591
t (.nniuiTc lMiivun iv Trv vimis I
lillf liljiluLj 111 I HljiHIlJ iH JlUrUlHU
IN TEN YEARS, 18S5-94..
Equitable.. .$24,C07,601
Mutual. 22,272.905
New York. 18.452.023
Northwestern. 9,381,890
Mutual Benefit. 3.278,187
Connecticut Mutual. —29,465
(Decrease.)
Etna. 2.145,024
Penn Mutual. 3.5G4.967
Prov. Life and Trust 2,509,757
New England Mutual 1,075,849
imjimiou in liiiniii.-i
IX TEN YEARS, 1885-94.
Equitable_$4,658,645
Mutual. I'®.1™
Northwestern.
Mutual Benefit...- 991,8flt>
Connecticut Mutual... 431,179
Kina. 534.453
Penn Mutual. (192,891
Prov. Life anil Trust.. 851.761
New England Mutual 281,648
TEN YEARS, 1885-94.
Equitable . .$28,666,246
Mutual.
New York.
Northwestern..
Mutual Benefit.
Connecticut * Mutual-.)
Etna.... * .* J. .1.. JL
Penn Mutual.
Prov. Lilic and .Trust
New Eilglarfd MJituqJl.
, :
26.661,211
22,650,562
11,610,159
4,266,385
404,565
2,578,971
4,239.841
3,390,758
1,336,994
Holders in Too fyars, 1-885-"9i.
Mutual....
no t ,
Equitable.. . $12,278,566
7,166,195
2,665.19a
2,619,123
687,506
1.14&»'lj
,,664,35*
New York.
t Northwestern
Mutual Benefit.
Connecticut Mutual.
Etna.
'Penn Mutual..-*,_
Prov. Life and Jfrust
New England Mutual
1*28,51*
55:1,042
-**■
-Sr-fe
I IJUI ULliil &
IN TEN YEARS, 1885-’94.
Equitable. $126,000,761
91,621,748
97.643,828
48,421,138
16,775,122
8.633,528
11,838,533
15.001.7S4
17,515,428
7,644,951
Mutual.
New York.
Northwestern.
Mutual Benefit.
Connecticut Mutual..
Etna.
Penn Mutual....
Prov. Life and Trust
New England Mutual
1885-’94.
Equitable . .$46,259,509
41,384,129
33,993,408
21,098,950
14,798,901
15,502,406
8,266,010
6,843,544
5,527,517
4,904,633
Mutual.
New York.
Northwesern.
Mutual Benefit.
Connecticut Mutual.
Etna.
Penn Mutual.
Prov.Life ami Trust
Now England Mutual
- . . _
THE MARKETS
Bank Clearings.
Clearings.5
Balances.
68,387 34
8,012 57
•Chicago ’Change.
Chicago, Oct. 26.—Wheat had plenty of
hull news to work on today, but the ulti
mate outcome of trading was a loss, though
not a serious one, to prices. There was an
all-round complaint or the dullness of trade,
and longs, finding but an indifferent local
demand and absolutely none from the out
filde* were constrained to sell out, not wish
ing to carry their load over Sundav. Much
attention was accorded the New York mar
ket, as tho understanding was that the Sea
hoard contingent was bullislily inclined.
Slightly higher prices ruled at the opening
and for quite a while afterwards, advances
at Liverpool and dry weather and the fact
that tho exports for the week more than
exceeded 2.658,000 bushels affording a mod
erate amount of encouragement. The Kusso
Chlna treaty, with its probable effect on
England, and whether war would result,
was also used as on encouraging strength.
The estimate of Monday's receipts, 807 care,
changed the tone from steady to weak, and
a raid being made on tho noar future in
corn about the same time added to the de
pression. The St. Louis Modern Miller em
phasized its reference to the drought condi
tions. It is that the visible supply will
show an increase for the week of about
2,000,000 bushels. December wheat opened
at 61Uft6H«c, doc lined to GO*@GO%c, where
It closed, being Me under yesterday. Cash
wheat was steady, closing easy.
Corn—Under determined pounding by two
commission houses the near future in corn
was forced a full cent lower, the May sym
pathizing with them, but not declining as
much. The estimate® for Monday’s receipts
—470 cars—was the basis for the raid, shorts
also evolving some encouragement from
them. Previous to tho activity uccompuny
lng tho break referred to there was but a
dull market, with no interesting features
to record. May corn opened at 29*>ic, de
clined to 293/sc, closing at 293stP20l2C. M to %c
under yesterday. Cash corn docllned %c
per bushel.
Oats—The trade in oats presented no In
terest at all. The early trading was fair,
and so was that around the time wheat
and corn were breaking, but on an average
the dav was a very duD one. Prices moved
up and down correspondingly to the action
of wheat. May oats closed 14c lower. Cash
oaLs were *c lower.
Provisions—No class of trade In provisions
appeared to be interested in that market.
The feeling was steady, but it was con
ceded that any extra demand or preemir©
to sell would l>e felt in prices. The hog
market was weaker, but exerted no influ
ence on the product. The close was 2*c
higher than yesterday. January pork is a
shade higher; January lard a shade higher
and a shade lawer for January ribs. Do
mestic markets were quiet and easy. Lead
ing futures ranged as follows:
The loading lutures ranged as follows:
Closing. •
59*
6
tilth
30*
297*
28
2 b Vi
1814
18*
20*
8 05
9 12 Vi
9 42V4
5 55
5 67V*
5 b5
4 5 2 Vi
4 60
4 8Q
Cash quotations: Flour was quiet, but
steady. Wheat—No 2 spring wheat, [email protected]
60Vic; No. 2 red. Corn—No. 2,
307^?32c. Oats—No. 2 oats, 28*4c. Mess pork,
$8.12*^8.15. Lard, $5.57*@5.60; short rib
sides, $4.52V2<&4.55; dry salted shoulders. $5.25
<&5.37y»; short clear sides. $4.87**4.DO. Whis
ky, $1.22.
In Wall Street.
New York, Oct. 26.—Stocks opened firm on
covering of short contracts. The Grangers
were especially Arm at this time, and moved
up about per cent on the belief that the
September statement ot the St. Paul road
Articles
Wheat
Oct.
Dec.
Mav.
Corn—
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
May.
Oats—
Oct.
Dec.
May.
PorK—
Oct.
Jan .
May —
Lard—
Oct.
Jan.
Mav
Ribs—
Oct.
Jnn.
May.
Opening Highest
60*
61*
05*
31
297*
2844
29*
1914
18*
20*
8 05
9 42Vi
9 43
55
07*
85
55
57V*
80
60*
61*
31*
30 *
28*
29*
18*
18*
20*
8 05
9 15
9 45
5 55
5 67Vi
5 85
4 571-2
4 60
4 80
50*
G0-*
04*
30*
29*
27%
29*
18*
18*
20*
8 05
9 10
9 42*
4 52*
4 57*
4 77*
will make an excellent showing. The South
western and International shares also
moved up fractionally. The strength or
the market was short-lived, however, and
In the last hour of trading speculation was
positively weak. There were liquidating
sales In the Industrials, and the bears re
sumed aggressive tactics. Leather was the
special feature, and dropped from 12Vi to
11%<211%, and preferred from 74Vi to 70%fy
71%, considerable long stock coming out on
the way down. Sugar was also heavy in the
closing dealings, and fell from 105% to 10.1%
<Q108%. Lead sold down 1 to 32%, General
Electric % to 35% and Tennessee Coal and
Iron 1 to 38%. Western Union Beef rose
% to 13 on the declaration of a dividend of
1% per cent, and later declined to 12. After
tho payment of the dividend the company
will have a balance of $68,000. Chicago Gas
declined 1% to GS. The deposits of 1« idellty
receipts for Central Trust receipts now ag
gregate $16,533,200. The slump In Lead and
Sugar led t.o realizations in the railway list,
and a decline of % to 1% per cent took place.
The market closed heavy. Net changes
show losses of >4 to 1% per cent outside of
Leother preferred, which declined 3% per
cent on the day. Pacific Mail was easier,
and declined 30(^30%, the reports current
yesterday about a settlement with the Pan
ama no.t having been confirmed.
Bonds were firmer.
Sales footed up 527,000.
The sales of listed stocks today aggre
gated 61.806 shares, and of unlisted stocks
54,357 shares.
Now York. Oct. 26.—Money on call was
easy at 2®2% per cent; last loan at — per
cent, and closing offered at — per cent.
Prime mercantile paper, 5%«G per cent, bar
silver. «7Vac. Mexican dollars.- . .
Sterling exchange was steady, with actual
business in hankers’ hills at S4.87MP94.67Vl
fer sixty duys and $4 8SV4®4.88V8 lor demand;
posted rates, $4.8894.89: commercial
bills. $4.8o% dl »7.
Treasury balances—Coin. 389,8.58.430; cur«
rency, $90.7u5.o?7.
Government bondsweresteady.
State bonds were •lull.
Railroad bonds were nigher.
Silver bullion at the board was 6 ift'dbbVB.
Closing bids—
American Cotton Oil... **
American Colton Oil preferred..
American Sugar Refining.....
American Sugar Refining preferred. loovj
American Tobacco.....
American'lobacco preferred. -19b
Atchison.
Baltimore and Ohio.
Canada Pacific..
Chesapcako and Ohio.. ...
Chicago and Alton.
Chic ago, Burlington and Quincy.
Chicago Gas..
Deluware, Lackawanna and Western
Distillers and Cattle Feeders.
Erie.
Erie preferred.
General Electric.
Illinois Central.
Lake Erie and Western.
Lake Erie and Western preferred. 77
.. 3
Louisville and Nashville. *
Louisville. New Albany and Chicago... **
Manhattan Consolidated.
Memphis and Charleston. J®
Michigan Central. 97ji
Missouri Pacific./.
Mobile and Ohio.
Nashville. Chattanooga and St. Louis... 73
United States Cordace .
Uuited States Cordage1 proferred. 14j'2
New Jersey Central. 11 Hi
New York Central. luuvi
New York and New England.
Norfolk and Western preferred. 18
Northern Pacific . . £
Northern Pacific preferred. 18%
Northwestern. 106%
Northwestern preferred... 147Vi
Pacific Mail. 8oV4
Reading. 18%
Rock Island... 76%
St. Paul. 76%
St. Paul preferred. 126
Silver certificates .. 67%
Tennessee Coal and Iron. 39Vs
Tennessee Coal and Iron preferred. 98
Texas Pacific.. 0%
Union Pacific . 12%
Wabash. 8%
Wabash preferred. 21%
Western Union. 91
Wheeling and Lake Erie. 14%
Wheeling and Lake Erie preferred. 44%
BONDS.
Alabama, class A. 109%
Alabama, class B,*. 109%
Alabama, class G.-.r.... ...100
Louisiana stomped 4’s. 100 -
North Carolina 4’s...... 104%
North Carolina 6’s. 123
Tennessee new settlement 3’s. . 84
Virginia 6’s deferred. 6
Virginia Trust Receipt 4’s. ..... 6
Virginia funded debt. 62
United Statee 4’s, registered. 111%
United Stules 4’s, coupon. illVa
20%
60
69
16%
163
85%
68
167
23%
13%
United States 2’s.
Southern Hallway 5’s..;-i
Southern Railway common....,,
Southern Hallway preferred —
South Carolina. 4 Vfc's...
•Ex-dividend'. tBid. TArtfud
Chicago Board of Trade.
As many' complaints coming to the
Chicago Board of Trade showing that per
sons intending to deal in grain and pro
visions through niehiberi^of 'the Board and
subject to its. rules amfroghjations. are mis
led into dealing with persons or firms who
have no connection with ill is Board, the
public is cautioned against dealing with
such persons or firms, and Is notified that
GEORGE F. STONE, Secretary, will an
swer any inqtiiriesas to whether any partic
ular person or firm is a member of such
Board.
GEORGE F. STONE, Secretary.
8-24-su n-Gm
P7i/i
Wttty
111*
3d
106
What Do You
Want to Know
About Speculation?
Grain, Provisions, and Stocks bought and sold
on limited margins. Hulse’s Manual for Specu
lators sent free on receipt of two-cent stamp.
Correspondence solicited"
JAMES G. HULSE &Co.
ROOMS 483-458 TUB ROOKERY. CHICAGO. ILL
10-l3-sun-12t
Sun's Cotton Review.
Newr York, Oct. 26.—The Sun’s cotton re
view- says:
Cotton fell from 10 to II points and then
recovered part of tho loss, closing barely
steady, with sales of 1*11,300 bales. Liverpool
advanced 4 points, and. then, lout half of this,
closing quiot with hjkH. sales of 8000 bales
at unaltered quotations. New Orleans Is
easier. The New' Orleans receipts on Mon
day are estimated at 14,000 to 15,000 bales,
against 21.113 bales test Monday, 32,123 bales
last year and 15,105 bales'in 1893. Spot cot
ton here was quiet at 1-Hk* advance, wdth
sales of 336 bales for' spinning. Middling
uplands, 8%c. Memphis received 5810 bales,
against 6390 bales tnle day lost week and
5355 bales the same day lqM year; Houston,
6797 hales, against 9000 bales last week and
13,370 Imles tho same week last year; Au
gusta, 1286 bales, against 2170 bales last week
and 1999 bales the same week last year.
The exports from the ports were 33,957 bales,
10,164 bales to Great Britain, 9748 bales to
Franco and 14,045 bales to the continent.
The ports received 47.327 bait*, against 44,111
bales last Saturday and '13,899 bales last
year. The s<>tftlicrn ei>ot markets were
generally unchanged. Mobile advanced *4c;
New Orleans soltT 2650 bales, Savannah 1750
bales, Galveston 1400 bales* Memphis 1350
bales, and Mobile. 900 bAles. The Chronicle
states that northern spinners have taken
thus for this season 297,397 bales, a gut ns t
397,691 bales last season. The w'orld’a visi
ble supply is now: 3;£28,455 hales, including
2.955,313 bales, of whidh 2,606.113 w'ere Amer
ican. The exports frbm the ports thus far
this season aggregate 580,878 bales, against
972,0S8 bales at this time la*H season.
Today's features: The Liverpool news
was disappointing,, and it w'as decided that
Neill Brothers were to issue a crop estimate
of 0,250,006 to G.uOOtOOO bales. Consequently
prices declined, not only American, but on
European selling orders. Later on, how
ever, there were signs of a rally, duo to a
report that after all Neill Brothers will is
sue a bullish circular. Furthermore, quite
prominent Interests In Wall street nave
taken the bull side, and strong people in
the cottpn trade itself are very friendly
to the staple, while the bears, on the other
hand, are disposed to be quite cautious.
Ne'w York Cotton Market.
Now York, Oct. 26.—Cotton was quiet.
Bales, 336 bales.
Middling gulf s.... 8%
Middling..... .
Now York, Oct. 26.—Cotton futures closed
barely steady. -Bales, 141,300 bales,
October deli very. . .6. 38
November delivery. 8.38
December delivery... * ..'—v.,.... .8.43
January delivery..v*.*.... .9.50
February delivery. 8.56
March delivery;... .8.61
April delivery .. .*-«..<.*. $ 06
May del 1 very..,..>t..A... .9.7 2
Juno delivery .. ^.8.77
July delivery. 82
The World's Visible Supply.
New York, Oct. 26,^-Thp total visible sup
ply of cottpn for the. world is 3.128,455 bolt*,
of which 2,846,255 bales are American,
agai^t 2.955.,*13* 2.606. ri*
spofctjvoly last yenn*,,/ Receipts u/ cotton
this wot'k at all interior towns, l\'57,?1!) halos.
Roreipts from tho plantations, 352,821 bales.
Crop in sight, 1,946,485 Ixiles.
General Cotton.Markots.
Galveston...
Norfolk.
Baltimore.
Boston..
Wilmington
Philadelphia.
8nvannnh —
New Orleans
Mobile.
Memphis_
Augusta.
Charleston ..
Cincinnati. .
Louisville
Bt. Louis.
Houston.
S
£
:<«■
-
•o
i*5»
8 f "7v| 4 3'
8«A; 2739
8^; >705
8 9-18'
81*
8741
8I*|
6bt»
1142
•211
55t$
8 5-16 11058
8% ,117-1
8 5-16
644 •
6>*
8V$
8 V| 1
■fnw2
16.94
1727
9264
7ii&“
2739
3016
- 9CTJ9
65
431
>35991
33019
5535
J 2774
3183
4449
1694
6444
9261
304
3350
ouo
2500,
913
18959
6276
95548
314622
62799
30092
6S61
820
18811
509*16
New Orleans Cotton Market.
Now Orleans, Or* ’0 .—Cotton futures closed
steady. Bales, 3 ,0 <0 bales.
October delivery......
November delivery_'. 8.34
December deliver —. 8.39
January oellvery..^.7.. 8.40
February deilvery..8.45
March delivery .. 8.49
April delivery...8.53
May delivery.... ....^ ..8.57
June delivery. .6.60
Liverpool Cotton Market.
Liverpool, Oct. 23.-12:30 p. in.—Cotton
was quiet; prices firm; American middling,
4fcn. Sales, .
__ 8000 bales, of which 7*.0ii
were American; speculation Abd export, 500
bales. Receipts, loop bal^s, Of which 7oo
wore American.
Futures opened steady; demand moderate.
American middling and low middling clauso
Quotations: ,• .......
November and December
delivery.4 3C-64d©4 36-64d
December and January de
livery..-’4 36*64(1
January and February de
livery. 1 35-64 ©4 37-6 Id
February and March deliv- %
ery. ..4 [email protected] 38-61d
March and April delivery..4 37-64d&>4 39-64d
April and May delivery.... 4 4o-64d
May and June delivery... .4 73-64d
Futures oiosed steady.
Liverpool. Oct. 26.-1 p. m, — Futures closed
quiet.
October delivery .4 34-64d®4 3,V64d*
October and November dp- *" ,
livery.4 :»4-64d*
iVNofcmber and Deceiplutr^
delivery. 4 34-64d*
'December and January oe»- , . o
X liVcrv.4 34-64 J©4 35-64(1*
.. ‘January and February de- -
Oellvery.4 35-64 If
JfFcbruary and March dclfr
d city.i'.7.t.'.4 36-04dt
‘aZof
IiWafchand April dofivory.4 37-64d w f' 36«64d*
-Arujil and May delivery.... ! 38-6 id©4 Idt
Mat and June delivery■••'4 *4lJt-'04d*^3
Jure and July delivery. . 1 _4l-o4dJL „
—July and August delivery.4 4:{*^4d^J 43-6 4 d
O-'•Hellers, (Buyers. lvalue. ‘
>0 I —
19 l NewOttennfc.
■k nIpw Or
^hrilcc white. 5%cj Off while, ilJrlfip^clTolce
Orleans, Oct. a).--Open Kettle suRar—
2 7-16c: good fair, 2%c; centrifugals,
St ... - ..
/yellow, 3%(ciil 11-lCc; new pelmd yellow, 3 7-16
d&;3B-16c ^ ,'~4 'I -*
Molasses—Open kettle, strictly
vJiritnc, 37c; prime, 35t?3Bc; common, 31c; cen
ytrlroigaJ molasses, strictly prime, 21c; fair.
>U7c: syrup, none offered. Re lined meur
Kg’dwu' ' * ’ - '* ’
,. un’dorod and cutlonf, 5 l-16r; standard
granulated, 4%c; confectioners’ A, 4tye. Rica
was dull; prime. 3&®3%c; fair;,, V4ii3'4c;
common, 2(if‘A%c.
St.JjOUlS.
81, Louis, Oct. 36.—Flour was firm and un
changed. Wheat was lower; October, 61*40;
December, 6141c; May, 66V4e. Corn was low
er; October, 2714c; December, 2464c; Mtty,
26V4c. Oats—December was hlRher. and May
lower; October, 18c; December, lS>4e; May,
2014c. Pork—Standard mess, !WjS.C?4.
Lard—Frlme steam, 86.45; choice, 35.65. Ua
COI1—Shoulders, , Ioiirs, 85.%c; clear ribs,
6c; sliort clears, CVic; dry salted shoulders,
68sc; ribs, 84.80; clears, 34.96. High wines
were steady at 31.22.
New York Cotton Seed Oil and Sugar.
New York, Oct. 26.—Cotton seed oil was
quiet; crude, 2414c; yellow prime, old and
new, 27%c; yellow prime, off grade, [email protected]
27‘4c. Coffee was quiet, but steady, at r» to
10 points up; December delivery, $11.70; Jan
uary delivery, $J1.45#14.65; March delivery,
$14.25(5714.35; May delivery, $13.80. Snot rio
was dull, but steady; No. 7, 15%c. Sugar—
Raw was dull, but steady; fair refining.
3%a; refined was dull, but steady; off A.
4 3-16#4%c; standard A, 4Aic; cut loaf and
crushed, G*4c; granulated, 4%#4%c.
Chicago Cattle Market.
Union Stock Yards, 111., Oct. 2f».—Cattle
Receipts. 700, with the market steady; com
mon fo extea steers, $3.20#5.30; stockers and
feeders, $2.3('02.85; cows and bulls, $1.25#
3.50; calves, $2.50#f>.00; Texans, $2.60#3.25;
western rangers. $2.25#4.00.
Hogs—Receipts, 22,000, with the market
fairly active, but 5c lower; heavy packing
and shipping lots, $3.50#3.85; common to
choice mixed, $3.40(53.85; choice assorted,
$3.75^)3.90; light. $3.10#3.90; pigs. $2.00#3.70.
Sheep—Receipts, 2000, with the market
steady; inferior to choice, $1.50#3.50; lambs,
$3.00^)4.75.
Ladies
Defenders.
This week we will sell you a pair of
these beautiful DEFENDERS for 19
cents; worth 75 cents.
Jliggest bargain ever offered in Gai
ters. Similar bargains in all grades
of Shoes.
UVUessex*,
The Feet Fitter,
2010 2d Avenue.
WU.cGX COMPOUND
mANSY9PH^
SAFE AND Sl'Bfi.
. U uscrupuJoiis persoua are coun
terflUingfViIcok CvmMnud
Toaiy Tllla, the genuine are nut up In
metal boxes with registered trade mailt of
Shield, accopfno worthless nostrum. luUhtoa
thegcnulnc, at all Druggists. Send 4 cents for
_ Woman*! Male Ouferd ana receive them
"by mail. WMeox Npsciiflt Eo.ft'lida.Ea
nov7-eod-ly
Wo eornl tho mnfvelon* French
Remedy CALTHOS free, ami a
legal gnarauloo that Calthos will
WTO I* IHoclutr*** A ...
(THE Snrnnutorrhen.Verlcoecle
uud RESTORE Lost Vigor.
Use it and pay if satisfied.
Addrcu, VON MOHL CO.,
Holo American Agent*, Clnrtanatl, Ohio.
•W
UMi-su-tue-thurs-eow-wky-lyr
and WUlskey Habits
cured at home with,
outpaiu. book of rar
UouWa sent FliEK.
—_U. a. WOOLLEY, M.D.
bltuhall SL. AllluUt, (la.
EDUCATIONAL.
Collegiate Institute for Hoarders,
The Cedars,” . . . Selma, Ala.
Every branch of polite education taught.
Special attention to music. Children from
3 to 7 received in Kindergarten Depart
ment. Primary, Intermediate and higher
course—Latin optional. School year from
first Monday In September till last week of
June. Toons, $150 per school year, half
yearly, In advance. Mu ale extra. The In
stitute is under the care of the Sister's of
Mercy, who tie vote themselves to the well
being and literary improvement of the
young ladles. Pupils received any time,
charged from date of entrance. The great
est care heat owed on their health, comfort,
manners and deportment.
CONVENT OF MERCY,
Broad Street, Selma, Ala.
10-25-3m-frl-su-wed _
GEORGETOWN * UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL OF LAW.
FOUNDED.1780
FACULTY.
REV. J. HAVENS RICHARDS, S. J., Pres
ident of the University.
HON. HENRY 15. BROWN, LL.D., Justice
Supreme Court of the United States.
HON. MARTIN F. MORRIS. LL.D., Asso
ciate Justice Court of Appeals of the Dis
trict of Columbia.
HON. SETIl SHEPARD. Associate Justice
Court of Appeuls of the District of Colum
bia.
I ION. JEREMIAH M. WILSON, LL.D.
JOSEPH J. DARLINGTON. LL.D.
GEORGE E. HAMILTON, LL.D.
R. ROSS PERRY, A. M., LL.D.
REV. RENE HOLAIND, 8. J.
TALLMADGE A. LAMBERT, LL.D.
CHARLES A. DOUGLASS, Esq.
Circuit Court—MICHAEL J. COLBERT,
A. M.
Court of Appeals—Messrs. TALLMADGE
A. LAMBERT, JOB BARNARD and
HENRY WISE GARNETT.
For information or circulars, address
SAMUEL M. YE ATM AN,
Secretary and Treasurer,
Washington, D. C.
School year opens October 2, 1895.
0-29-1 mo__
BIRMINGHAM
CONSERVATORY
Academic Year 1895-6 Begins
Monday, Sept. 2.
—•—
AH aspirants for Certificates or Diplomas
should be enrolled on that day.
Catalogues describing the courses to be
pursued mailed free to any address or
may be had upon application to the Con
servatory.
-♦
Musical Director.
8-30-tf
J# Birmingham business College
^v>> .->• BIRMINGHAM ALA *
\Yt,' shohthXno bookkeeping s
I *> Yufb WET PAY YOUR R R TARE
- \*> ' SHORTHAND BY MAIL LESSON FREE
Potter Building, First Avenue.
Sessions Day and Night.
A modern, progressive, practical school of
business. Tuition rates reasonable. Posi
tions for graduates. Call or write for cat
alogue.

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