OCR Interpretation


Birmingham state herald. (Birmingham, Ala.) 1895-1897, November 08, 1895, Image 3

Image and text provided by University of Alabama Libraries, Tuscaloosa, AL

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85044812/1895-11-08/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 3

Black
Thibet
Silk Lined All Through
$12
as OVERCOAT!
Only at the PANT-ERY,
oi course.
Al. Wilson,
1903,'^ Second Avenue.
THORNTON.
£
0
b
z
&
0
X
b
I sell everything in the
line of
Fancy Groceries.
T. F. THORNTON,
No. 2003 Second Avenue.
Rock Bottom Prices
On Flour, Meat, Coffee,
Lird, Vegetables, Fruits
and Canned Goods of all
kinds.
H
X
0
X
X
H
0
2
THORNTON.
i
THE WEATHER.
Washington, Nov. 7.—Weather forecast
—For Alabama: Partly cloudy and local
showers, with east to south winds.
For Mississippi: Generally cloudy
weather; local rains; easterly winds,
shifting to northerly; cooler in northern
portions.
DAILY BULLETIN.
U. S. Department of Agriculture,
Weather Bureau,
Office of Station Agent,
Birmingham, Ala., Nov. 7, 1895.
Local observations during twenty-four
hours ending at 7 p. m., central time:
Time.
8 a. m.
12m.
7 p, m.
Temp.
Direct’n Raia
of wind. iWeather fall.
70
71
70
SB Cloudy
N Cloudy
BE ICloudy
.00
.00
.00
Highest temperaiure, 72; lowest, 63; aver
age, 68.
BEN M. JACOBS,
Local Observer.
Reports received at Birmingham, Ala.,
on November 7, 1895.
Observations taken at all stations at 8
a. m., 75th meridian time.
*51
Place of
Observa
tion.
Montg’ry
Memphis..
Knoxville
Atlahtn...
Vlckeburg
N.Orleans
Nashville.
*-SLE
ocB«B
sb?|1b
: £ & EB
: "Bi?
: *o75 3
TWTnd.
62 NE
E
NE
NE
E
N’E
E
v 2.
® §
Lt.
Lt.
Lt.
12
Lt.
10
Lt.
50
* 2
I!
CD
»»
I
.00 Cloudy
.00 Cloudy
.00,Clear
.00,C ouay
.00i Cloudy
.22ICloudy
.oOiCloar
T indirates trace of rain or snow; t indicates
rise and - fall.
BEN M. JACOBS,
Local Observer, Weather Bureau.
AN IMPENETRABLE FOG.
New York Weather Becomes Quite English,
Don’t You Know.
New York, Nov. 7.—For forty consecu
tive hours a fog has had uninterrupted
and impenetrable reign over the city,
bays and rivers for fifty miles around.
Navigation on the water is fraught with
great danger and navigation on rail is
delayed anywhere from one-half to two
hours._
General freight and passen
ger office of Southern Railway
removed to No. 7 North 20th
Btre9t. Telephone 846.
ll-5-tf _
Cigarette Tax Is Constitutional.
Wheeling, W. Va., Nov. 7.—In the crim
inal court today Judge Hughes decided
the state tax law taxing cigarette dealers
was constitutional. He overruled de
murrers to indictments against dealers
In this ci'ty and practically favored the
law as it stands. Trial was set for the
18th Instant. United States Judge Goff
recently declared the law unconstitution
al under the Interstate commerce act.
Don’t Want the Cable.
London, Nov. 7.—The governments of
South Australia, West Australia and Tas
mania have declined to co-operate with
the other interested governments In push
ing the project for a Pacific submarine
cable.
DUKE
Cigarettes
High Grade Tobacco
m
ABSOLUTELY PURE
l*-30-«u-wed-frl-wkr*ljp
AT THE CAPITAL
Supreme Court Decisions—Negro Charged
With Manslaughter—Marriages.
Local Matters.
Montgomery, Nov. 7.—(Special.)—The
following matters were disposed of- and
orders granted by the supreme court to
day: »
Elijah Vick vs. the state of Alabama,
from Mobile city court; appeal dismissed.
No question reserved.
Kittenhouse Moore vs. Barber Asphalt
Paving company, from Mobile circuit
court; motion to dismiss appeal over
ruled; motion to strike counter abstract
from file granted and no costs allowed
for same; case continued with leave to
tile new counter abstract.
Western Railway of Alabama vs. 8.
L. Burney, administrator, from Cham
bers circuit court; appeal dismissed by
appellant.
Valentine Reich, administrator, etc. vs.
Sloss Iron and Steel company, from Bir
mingham city court; dismissed by agree
ment on file.
Alabama Mineral Railroad company vs.
Anderson Irwin, from Etowah circuit
court; appeal dismissed by appellant.
Western Union Telegraph company vs.
E. Holzborn & Co., from Mobile circuit
court; motion to set aside judgment of
affirmance overruled.
Ex parte Fitz Wiley et al„ petition for
habeas corpus, from Pike county; sub
mitted on briefs.
Ex parte Major Brooks, petition for ha
beas corpus, from Jefferson county; sub
mitted on briefs.
Charles Broom vs. the state of Ala
bama, from Mobile city court; submitted
on briefs
Alex Simon vs. the state of Alabama,
from Mobile city court; submitted on
briefs.
John Murphy vs. the state of Alabama,
from Baldwin circuit court; subndtted on
briefs.
Robert F. Espalla vs. the state of Ala
bama. from Mobile city court; submitted
on briefs.
Ex parte Robert F. Espalla, petition for
habeas corpus, from Mobile county; sub
mitted on briefs.
Francis A. Howard vs. the state of Ala
bama, from Washington circuit court;
submitted on briefs.
E^ parte James Gazles, petition for ha
beas corpus, from Mobile county; sub
mitted on briefs.
William H. Martin vs. Amos W. Butler,
from Mobile circuit cqurt; submitted on
briefs.
Edgar P. Daughdrlll. administrator,
etc. vs, Claude H. Daughdrlll et als., from
Mobile probate court; argued and sub
mitted.
J. T. Dockland vs. W. R. Rogers, from
Clarke chancery 'court; submitted on
briefs.
J. A. Goodson et al. vs. D. P. Lumuels,
from Anniston city court; death of ap
pellee suggested and leave to revive In
name of administrator and heirs.
Court adjourned until Monday, the 11th
Instant, When the cases from the Fifth
division, composed of the counties of
Chambers, Chilton, Coosa, Elmore, Lee,
Macon. Russell and Tallapoosa, will be
called.
J!'or Manslaughter.
Coroner Campbell today swore out a
warrant before a magistrate charging
George DeVall, the negro driver of Mr.
Martin's delivery wagon, with man
slaughter. The negro is charged with
having caused the death of Mrs. Mitchell
yesterday evening by letting his runa
way home run into the buggy of Mrs.
Mitchell and her children, who were out
driving at the time of the accident. Mrs.
Mitchell was instantly killed. Those who
knowf the inegro say he is not a vicious or
bad boy, and has never before been in
any trouble that they knew of. He has
been driving Mr. Martin’s delivery wag
on for years and Mr. Martin says he nev
er knew a better negro than he, and re
grets the accident and greatly deplores it.
Happy Marriages.
Miss Susie Brown wars married yester
day evening to Mr. Erwin. Jones at the
First Baptist church, Rev. Dr. Eager of
ficiating. The bride is the daughter of
Mr. John L. Brown, who is claim agent
of the Western railroad. Mr. and Mrs.
Jones left Immediately for New York and
other points in the east on a bridal tour.
At the home of the bride’s mother in
this city Miss Alita Barnett was married
to Mr. Samuel T. Surratt, Rev. Dr. Pow
ell officiating. Miss Barnett is a charm
ing young lady and Is quite popular In
social circles. Mr. Surratt is one of the
most popular railroad men in the city,
having occupied a prominent and trust
worthy position for years in the union
ticket office in this city, and has not only
the confidence and esteem of the railroad
officials, but the business community.
Their many friends join in wishing Mr.
and Mrs. Surratt a long and prosperous
life—a smooth and pleasant voyage down
the sea of life. They left immediately
after the ceremony on a bridal tour.
Cards have been Issued to the marriage
cf Miss Eugenia Rebecca Dillard to Mr.
William Dlngley Peck on November 19.
Miss Dillard Is the daughter of Col. and
Mrs. J. W Dillard and is a very popular
and charming young lady, having hosts
of admirers, and Mr. Peck is a well
known young business man, who has
been peculiarly fortunate In winning the
heart and hand of one so vivacious in
manner an intellect. The marriage will
take place at 6 o'clock In the morning at
the residence of Colonel and Mrs. Dillard,
419 South Hull street.
The Journal’s views.
"Treachery and perfidy Inside the party
accounts for the party’s defeat In many
states In Tuesday’s elections. The Wash
ington Post tells the story, anticipating
the result, on the eve of the election. Ac
cording to the Advertiser New Jersey
was lost because Senator Smith of that
state was not In accord with Mr. Cleve
land on all occasions. Silver was not an
Issue In New Jersey. Senator Smith was
not an Issue. But the result and effects
of- Mr. Cleveland’s policy was an Issue.
The depression brougt about by the Wall
street gamblers and some misguided
bankers outside of Wall street to secure
such legislation as would destroy silver
as a money of final redemption, and
brought about the revolution In such
states os New Jersey: but In Kentucky
the administration forces determined that
no silver man should win and through
treachery and perfidy have perhaps ac
complished their purpose In that state."
Personal.
Miss Jeanette Loeh will leave Friday
morning for an extensive trip to Atlanta
and New York.
Miss Mamie Grlel will leave for At
lanta next week to be gone for a fort
night.
The many friends of Mr. Lambert Sol
omon are pleased • to see him In their
midst.
Eugene Fies of Birmingham Is ex
pected here on a few days' visit.
Quite a bevy of society debutantes are
expected here before the winter festlvi
tis.
A Cowboy Suicides.
San Antonio, Tex., Nov. 7.—Charles
McKay, one of "Buffalo Bill's” Wild West
Texas cowboys, Just returned from At
lanta. committed suicide today by shoot
ing himself twice at his home, seven
miles from this city. Family troubles
are said to be the cause.
The Campaign Deferred.
Paris, Nov. 7.—The chamber of depu
ties reassembled today and voted to de
fer consideration of the Investigation re
garding tire French campaign in Mad
agascar until the house should be in pos
session of the complete reports of General
Duchesne. . . _ i <, j s u ..* u.. i
TERSELY TOLD.
"Paint! Look out!" is the comma®
sign.
“Did you bet on Kentucky?” is a com
mon street query.
The State Herald continues to receive
flattering compliments.
The city employes were paid off yester
day. and many old scores were blue pen
ciled.
Elections may come and elections may
go. but Birmingham moves on forever;
paddling right up the stream!
Mr. T. A. Shipman, traveling passen
ger agent of the Southern, has gone over
to Jackson. Miss., on official business.
General Passenger Agent Aim ore of
the Louisville and Nashville passed
through the city yesterday en route to
New Orleans.
A coat and hat has been found l>y the
police near Williamson furnace. The
owner can recover his property by iden-,
tifylng the articles at police headquar*
ters.
An Alabama Great Southern switch en
gine struck and demolished a vehicle yes
terday afternoon at the Twentieth street
crossing. The wagon contained three oc
cupants, but no one was hurt.
When your name and business appears
in the State Herald1 it is seen and read by
citizens of half a dozen states, and lib
erally read by patrons of Birmingham.
Moral: Don’t hide your light under a
bushel.
A gentleman yesterday told a State
Herald reporter that several local cap
italists could be induced to embark mon
ey in the furniture factory which was
recently locally suggested in the State
Herald.
The remains of David Langdon, the
Whiteman who died yesterday a week ago
at Waverly, Ala., were shipped yesterday
to Denmark Station, Carchester county,
Novia Scotia, by the Birmingham Under
taking company.
Two thousand nve nunareo pans ui
ladies’, misses' and gentlemen's fall and
winter shoes, bought at all prices, re
ceived Ladles’ and gentlemen's summer
shoes will be sold for the next few days
regardless of cost or price. T. C. King,
2026 First avenue.
Dr. Morris leaves this morning with
his family for Nashville, pr. Morris Is
highly pleased with Nashville, and ac
cording to the Nashville papers his
church and the people are highly pleased
with him. His two first sermons were
considered the best ever heard In that
city.
Mayor VanHoose is devising a plan to
procure United States flags to float over
the public buildings, and especially the
school buildings in the city. He is trying
to procure the flags without spending any
money from the treasury and at present
he has favorable prospects for carrying
out his project.
The latest and most popular dish is
Italian "Spaghetti,” prepared by Cara
vella, at Frank’s. It is prepared in regu
lar Italian style, with imported Italian
cheese. If yon want a relish that teases
the palate almost to death try it. It 13
served only twice a week, Tuesdays and
Saturdays.
A letter has been received by a prom^
inent gentleman from Mr. C. \V. Bullen,
president of the National Dank of the
Republic of St. Louis, which gives out
the information that the St. Louis board
of trade will visit .Birmingham about the
25th of the present month. They will first
visit the Atlanta exposition in a body.
Jefferson county candidates are as cool
as cucumbers in a refrigerator. They are
nil first-class men, big-hearted and liber
al. and don’t want to get in the way of
each other. Hence the delay in coming
to the front. They are brave and chiv
alrous to a man, and when they do decide
to enter the race they will let the people
know It. Watch the papers.
The lovers of the opera and theatrical
performances in general will regret that
the possibilities are that the O'Brien op
era house and the Seals' hall will possibly
have to close business. Cause, for fussing
among the city officials, and when thor
oughly on the stage the lamented Booth
couldn’t draw the crowd from Birming
ham's city hall. Watch this paper for the
dates and be on hand at each perform
ance.
The holding back of the cotton In the
rural districts one would not think effects
the trade in a manufacturing city like
Birmingham, nevertheless it's true. Yes
terday and the day before were the dull
est days noted1 in Birmingham within the
past six weeks. Birmingham receives
a handsome trade, both wholesale and re
tail, throughout Alabama and parts of
Georgia, Tennessee and Mississippi, hence
feels the least turn in the trade.
Call 951.
Southside Plumbing Co.,
Avenue B and 20th Street. .
All orders promptly attended
to.
10- 13-lm_
EARLY CARS.
For the benefit of our patrons who wish
to take the early trains at union depot
we have electric cars leaving South,High
lands 5:30 a. m., daily except Sundays.
Commencing Saturday, November 9th,
cars will leave Avondale 5:30 a. m., and
Fountain Heights 5:30 a. m., daily except
Sunday.
All cars start from terminus one hour
later on Sundays.
BIRMINGHAM RAILWAY AND ELEC
TRIC COMPANY,
J. B. McClary,Superintendent.
11- 8—t? ■_
General freight and passen
ger office of Southern Railway
removed to No. 7 North 20th
street. Telephone 846.
11-5-tf ___
Old papers ior sale oheap at
this office.
NEGRO ASSASSINATED.
Amos Thomas Killed by an Unknown Person
Wednesday Night.
Greensboro, Nov. 7.—(Special Corre
spondence.)—News was brought to town
this momingr by Ben Harris of a hiyrible
assassination in beat No. S last night at
8 o’clock.
Amos Thomas was the victim and his
assailant was unknown. Amos' wife was
an eye witness to the killing, but it was
too dark for her to recognize her hus
band’s murderer.
Thomas, it seems, walked out Into the
yard, followed by his wife, and seeing
a man on his premises hailed to him.
The person, whoever it was, ran, pursued
by Thomas. When about ten yards off
the man wheeled and fired his gun at
Thomas, the entire load taking effect in
his face and neck, producing immediate
death. No. 4 shot were used, and the gun
was wadded with portions of a Greens
boro Watchman.
There is no clue whatever to the guilty
party.
For Whom?
Harried, busy, nervous women ere the
ones for whom Paine’s Celery Compound
was especially prepared. These men and
women with nerves all gone and feebly
nourished need Just the invigorating,
strength-giving effect of Paine’s Celery
C9mpoMlA?a^g)Vrfc^uiGH.
Pioneers of Low Prices,
Fall Hats
In New and
Stylish Shapes.
A hat is one of the most profitable
articles sold by furnishing: goods dealers.
A profit is made on the style and tone of
it, as well as the quality.
Our trade policy in the selling of Hats,
as in everything else we handle, is just
the reverse of this. Buying as we do in
immense quantities, we secure prices not
obtainable by other dealers. Selling as
we do at a small margin of profit enables
us to name lower prices than anyone
else in the business.
Men’s STIFF HATS in all the
newest Fall shapes,
75c, $1.00, $150 and Upwards
S ft Hats, 35c and Upwards.
Children’s F.ncy Cais, 19c ar.d
Upwards.
Our assertion that our prices are lower
than those of other dealers is a positive
fact. We ll gladly prove it if you’ll give
us a chance. The fact is there is no
house in the country that gives the value
we do In hats, and our large and grow
ing trade is the best thing we can submit
In evidence of this fact.
J. L. CHAL1F0DX <fc C0„
Birmingham, Ala.
Branch of J. L. Chalifoux, Lowell, Mass.
COAL!
J/^orona
Ijoal Co
Office and Yard:
Cor. Avenue A and 22(1 Street.
—•—
We sell more lump coal than any
yard in the city.
Joe R. Cook,
„ .Manager.
TELEPHONE 1020.
O’BRIEN’S OPERA HOUSE.
BEN S. THIESS, Manaser.
Monday Night, Nov. 11.
1 i
The Distinguished Young Actor,
«niiiin»iiiH|.ia<iNiiiaiiir«« I'Miniii n wing
I B|r Willianj Morris, \
ImShuK •«•••'■» Miili*lnli liilitl1 l>.Mll.r:|ii|'l|»li'|!i|i:|iiri»|i:|i.|i:|i,|i I I ,MM!i|ll£
-IN
I The Logt paradise, I
By HENRY C. DeMILLE,
Under the direction of GUSTAVE FROH
MAN.
Strong Cast I
Handsome Dresses,
Original Scenery!
Seats &a sale Monday morning at D
o’clock.
And MATINEE,
.12
First Grand Produc
tion of
'TRILBY,"
—WITH—
A. M. PALMER’S
UNRIVALED
COMPANY
Pnder the direction of
WM. A. BRADY.
I
•ZOII-ZOU'
Positively only visit
of the sensation of the
age.
»Dramatized by PAUL. M. POTTER from Du
Maurter’s Celebrated Novel.
'THE PLAY BETTER THAN THE BOOK.
AN IMMENSE POPULAR TRIUMPH!
BEAUTIFULLY STAGED!
ADMIRABLY ACTED!
THE SUCCESS OF THE YEAR
-IN
ffJEW YORK, BOSTON and CHICAGO.
The sale of seats will begin Tuesday morn
ing at 9 o'clock.
PRICES—25c, 50c, 75c and *1.00.
MATINEE PRtCES—25c and 50c.
In Our New House. Next to the Old Stand
xiHIRSCHlx
DRY GOODS & MILLINERY
COMPANY
2022 First Avenue.
WILL DRAW THE BUYING PUBLIC.
In our larger store we carry a larger stock to select from and we are better
prepared to serve you. Our business has been rushing aud we had to tele
graph for new millinery and capes, which will be open this week.
Millinery and Cloak Department Down Stairs.
Tam O’Shanters
AT HIRSCH’S in all shades, plain and
plaid; prices 35, 50 and 75 cents.
Bob Roy Hats
For children at HIRSCH’S; 35, 50 and
75 cents.
15 Cents.
Black straw Sailors at HIHSCH’S.
$1.00 a Fair
Buys a splendid Kid Glove; every pair
warranted.
For Baby Caps and Cloaks
Go to HIRSCH’S.
$4.75.
Your choice of 50 separate Skirts In
lustre and serge at HIRSCH’S.
$4.49
Buys a ready made all wool suit in
navy and black at HIRSCH’S.
Dress Trimmings
At sacrifice prices at HIUSCH’B.
Winter Underwear
For children, misses and ladles. Qo to
. HIRSCU'S and get prices before buy
ing elsewhere.
New Pattern Hats
At HIRSCH’S millinery parlors; down
stairs.
New Jackets
At HIRSCH’S at *3.98. Your choice of
all wool Jackets, ltghe weight, black,
blue and tan.
New Capes
At HIRSCH’S In cloth, velour, velvet,
plush and astragan. Come early and
get your choice.
Fire Store
H. A. KLINE & CO.,
Two Large Stores in One:
1903 Second Avenue and 117 19th Street.
The Cynical Saying of the Old- Time Sulky Salesman that—
“A Iooking-around-customer never comes back to buy, but
keeps ‘looking around’ until tired out, then falls an easy prey to
the last store she visits, whatever stuff they show her—”
All that is changed here, especially in our Dress Goods,
Cloaks and Capes, and Underwear Departments.
- Our best customers are those who have “looked around”
at other stocks.
They almost invariably come back and tell us by their
words—and their purchases—that we give
The Best Values for the Least Price.
Illustrations of the above are noticeable just now in our
CLOAK DEPARTMENT; also Woolen Underwear and Dress
Goods.
Call and see us at 117 Nineteenth Street or 1903 Second
Avenue.
Fire Store #f H. A. Kline & Co.
"2"ovi Can’t Imnrove Some TVh-iELers.
That's exactly the case with our Old La
dles’ Comfort Shoes, which are so easy and
comfortable that they couldn't be more so.
All shoes should be that way, whatever the
age or sex of the wearer. The elderly,
though, need such shoes more than those
less advanced In years, and for their benefit
we corrv a line of the easiest of easy foot
wear. Every pair Is a genuine value at
from 11.25 to *8.50 a pair. The same is true
of everv shoe in our stock. It’s a case of
high va'lue and low price every time.
We carry the finest line of ladles' up-to
date Lace and Button Shoes.
If you want fine shoes for children we
can show you first-class shoes.
We have 2000 pairs of Ladles' hand-turned
Button Shoes, sizes 1 to 4, C and D last.
Plain toe button ShoeB, two many of the
sSInc slzo, real value 23.00 to 25.00, will close
out at 21.50.
All mall orders shipped the same day re
ceived.
All kinds of repairing done.
ST. PIERRE, Wholesale and Retail Shoer, 1910 First Avenue.
The Metropolitan Hotel and Restaurant
Nos. 8 and 10 North 20th Street, Corner Morris Avenue.
NEXT TO THE UNION DEPOT.
REGULAR MEALS, 25 CENTS.
Birmingham Paint and Glass Company
LARGEST STOCK. LOWEST PRICES.
Taints, Oils, Varnish, Glass, Sash, Doors and Blinds.
• 1916 Third Avenue.Birmingham, Ala.

xml | txt