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The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, May 07, 1885, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1885-05-07/ed-1/seq-4/

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THE DA1LV PACIFIC COMMERCIAL ADVERTISER.
c&&vtrti$emenis
Sydmlisemenls
OLD NEWSPAPERS.
THE VARIOUS USES TO WHICH THEY
MAY BE PUT.
The Many Excellent Purposes Which the
Dally Paper May Be Made to Serve
In ITousehold Economics
Health Hints.
Harper's Bazar.
Old newspapers are of more use than
would appear at a first glance. "We sub
scribe to the dally newspaper because we
must be Informed on all the affairs of the
day. Then many think the next thing' la
to relegate them to the kitchen in order to
provide kindling for the household fires,
and it must be confessed that Bridget
makes very free use of them in that way.
But they serve so many excellent pur
poses besides that it seems a pity to let
Bridget have full sway, though she may
try to convince you that it is impossible
to get the breakfast without even using
those of the very latest date.
It has been several times suggested by
economists that newspapers can be made
to take the place of blankets in guarding
from cold, and it is a fact well worthy of
notice that they have been proved very
satisfactory in making light, convenient,
and warm bed coverings when others can
not be had. Travelers would do well to
bear this in mind when far from the re
gion of hotels, and not throw their paper
out of the car window, or leave it on their
seat in changing cars, for there is no tell
ing how useful it may prove in some
emergency to ward off cold. As a pre
ventive of that fatal disease, pneumonia,
a folded newspaper laid beneath the outer
clothing across the chest is said to be in
fallible. ,
This has been confirmed to the writer
by the testimony of an individual whose
avocations kept him constantly "exposed
to all weathers, night and day. lie was.a
resident of a country village, a perfect
type of a hearty, strong, vigorous man,
and he accounted for his robust health,
notwithstanding his exposures, by saying
that, although inheriting consumptive
tendencies, he had been able to resist
them through the simple precaution of al
ways wearing a newspaper over hia chest
under his coat.
Aj a preventive of cold feet, a piece
of newspaper folded in the sole is quite
equal, if not so elegant or expensive as
cork or lambskin soles, being light, soft,
and easily renewed. If you wish to test
the power of a newspaper in excluding
cold, try tacking one, doubly folded, be
tween your window and your stand of
plants, and see how nicely they will be
protected, and how frosty the window
will consequently be. Newspapers will
in the autumn, before severe black frosts
come on, effectually protect green-house
plants, before you take them up, from
cold and wind.
The writer remembers once driving up
about dusk to a country place and being
startled at seeing what looked like a pla
toon of ghosts drawn up in white array
before the house, which turned out to be,
on closer inspection, rows of tender plants
all tied up in newspapers to protect them
from the sudden frosts incident to the
season, that in one night might cut them
all down. We have known tomato plant
, protected in the same way, and made
to ripen in the open garden much longer
by this inexpensive, easy precaution
within everyone's reach.
Old newspapers are admirable as floor
coverings under carpets, or even spread
under ivensington squares, retaining all
the dust, which neither remains in the
carpet nor sifts through to the floor; then
then they can be so easily removed that it
is a great saving to use them in this way,
especially as, the dust well shaken out,
the papers are equally serviceable for
kindling purposes afterward, so can do
double duty besides the legitimate one of
heralding the news of the day.
Weather strips are now almost uni
versal, as well as double windows, for se
curing warm rooms; but where, as is the
case in some old-fashioned country houses,
they are not procurable, newspapers can
supply the deficiency very well by being
cut In long strips, neatly folded over, and
stuffed in the interstices, and so most ef
fectually exclude the cold winter air.
Old newspapers are excellent to clean
windows with. Slightly damped, then
rubbed till clear, they serve .the purpose
much better than even linen cloth, for
their is no lint to rub off. Newspapers
wrapped around the feet under the stock
ings are an effectual protection against
musquitoes, as, with all their virulence.
they can not Due tnrougn paper.
Old newspapers are faithful mirror3 of
the past. As they increase in age the very
advertisements become curious. There
fore, those who have no use for the mod
ern newspaper in all the various ways w
have pointed out must find intellectual
profit in storing them away till the time
when some circumstance may drag them
forth from their long-forgotten hiding
places to claim an interest in human eyes
which perhaps they never had to such an
extent before.
Illustrated papers are very useful in
adorning the walls of rooms, .overing up
unsightly wall-paper or obnoxious holes,
the delight of children as well as their in
structors, affording gleams of cheerfulness
and pleasure in else gloomy apartments.
They are of such infinite variety, too,
with their lovely illustrations of poems, of
natural history, and comic sketches, as
well as portraits of beauties and notabili
ties, that they continually educate the
public taste and give the impecunious a
f limpse of real art they cannot else af
ord. A Critical Journalist.
Texas Sittings.
A menial bearing a largo package en
tered the office of a great Houston daily.
"What's that?" asked the editor.
"Mrs. Smith has written a five act play
and she wants you to look over it, and
give her a criticism. She will call for it
next week; good morning," and lifting
the package down from his shoulder, the
menial placed it on the table, and started
for the door.
"Come back here. Just you wait five
minutes, and then you can take it along
with you, " exclaimed the editor.
Origin of Balloon.
Chicago Herald.
The story published respecting the
origin of balloons that Mine. Montgolfier
had washed her petticoat to wear to a
foetiirnl nn t.h next riav nnrt hnnf it
over a chafing-dish to dry. The hot air,
welling out the folds of the garment,
lifted it up and floated it. The lady was
astonished and called her husband s atten
tion to the sight It did not take Mont
golfier long to grasp the idea of the hot
air balloon.
Danger from Arnica.
In The Receuil de Medici ne Veterin
aire Ir. Cagny calls attention to the in
discriminate use of the tincture of arnica
for horses. He says that it is often em
ployed in considerable quantities for
petty strains and bruises, and is kept in
contact with the affected surfaces until
sihey are swollen, heated, and often blis
tered, thus greatly aggravating the orig
inal trouble. He also cites cases in which
erysipelas has been induced in men from
an overdose of this irritating remedy.
SALMON ! . SALMON !
Ex. W. II. DIMOND.
A Fine Lot of Red Fish.
FOE SALE BY
Castle & Cooke.
125-tt .
BRICKS ! BRICKS !
Ex. W. H. DIMOND.
39,000
California Hard Brick
FOIl SALE BY
Castle & Cooke.
124 -tf
ROYAL INSURANCE COMP'Y
OF LIVERPOOL.
CAPITAL. $10,000,000
UNLIMITED LIABILITY.
ill re Insurance of all description
1 will be effected at Moderate Kates ot Pre ml
urn, by the undersigned.
WM. O. IRWIN & CO.
129-dJfcwtf Managers lor Haw. Islands Q
TJIMIOKr
Fire and Marine Insurance Co.
Of New Zealand.
CAPITAL., : : 1 0,000,000
Having: Established an Agency at
Honolulu, for the Hawaiian Islands, the un
dersigned are prepared to accept risks against Fire
In dwellings, stores warehouses and merchandise,
on favorable terms. Marine risks on cargo,
freights, bottorffry, profits and commissions.
Losses promptly adjusted & payable.
128-dwtf WM. G. IRWIN A CQ.
JOHN COOK,
Carpenter, No. 31 Alakea St.
Will attend and contract for nil kinds of work In
bis line.
REMOVING, RAISING or REPAIRING old
or new buildings.
Work to be paid for when complete.
Satisfaction guaranteed, or no pay.
Charges as low as the lowest in the town.
Post Office box 135.
29-sept 30
"COEDON BOTJGE"
G. W. MACFARLANE & CO.,
Cor. Fort& Qyeen Sts.,
HONOLULU, H. I.
Sole Areiitsfbr this Favorite Brand ot
CHAMPAGNE.
469 tf A w
Pantheon Stables,
Cor. Fort &J Hotel Streets.
LIVERY, BOARDING,
AND SALE STABLES.
Carriages for hire at all hours of the- di-y or
night; also, conveyances of all kinds for parties
going around the Island.
Excellent Saddle Horses lor f.adies
and Gentlemen. Guaranteed Gentle.
Carriage os. 2. 21, 46, 47, 48, 49,
SO, 51, 52 and 53.
Double and single teams always to be hud on
livery at the most reasonable rates.
Large and small omnibus for picnics and excur
sion parties, carrying from 10 to 40 passengers, can
always be secured by special arrangements.
Omnibus time tables can be obtained oy apply
ing at the office.
The JjOiift Branch Bathing House
can always be secured for picnic or excursion
parties by applying at the office.
Corner Fort and Hotel Streets.
Telephone No. 3 1.
JAS. DODD, Proprietor.
39Stf
Steam Candy Factory
AND BAKERY.
F. HORN, Practical Confectioner,
Pastry Cook and Baker. 1
71 Hotel street. 117 tf Telephone 74
V EXTRA DR
POR?A1l0fl'Hl89
KAMEHAMEHA DAY.
Programme of the Races
TO BE HELD AT KAPIOLANI PARK OX
niI T 1t 1!H(,
UN'DKK THE ;AUSPICES OF THE
Hawaiian Jockey Club.
1 GKAZIER'S PLATE.
Running Race ; half-mile dash open to all r
weight for age.
2 QUEEN'S PLATE.
Trotting Race ; mile heats, to harness ; best 2 In
3 ; for Hawaiian bred horses only.
3 HAWAIIAN JOCKEY CLUB CUP.
A Sweepstake "of 50 added ; cup to be
won by the same person twice, the second win
nine to be at any future annual meeting ; one
mile dash ; open to all three-year-olds. Healed
nominations, inclosing a fee of 10, to he sent to
the Secretary of the Hawaiian Jockey Club, on or
before 2 P. M. on the 4th day ol June Jriual ae
ceptances as to the balance of sweepstakes on or
before 2 P. M. on the 10th ot June.
4 GOVERNOR DOMINIS' CUP.
A Sweepstake of $50 added. Running Race ;
&-mi!e dash ; open to all two-year old Hawaiian'
bred horses ; entries closed on August 1, 1884.
5 KING'S PLATE.
Trotting Race; mile heats, -best 3 In 5 ; open
to all.
6 KAHUKU CUP.
Running Race; mile dash; open to all Ha
waiian-bred horses ; weight for age.
7 RECIPROCITY CUP.
Running Race; 14 niile dash; free for all;
weight for age.
8 GENTLEMEN'S RACE.
Trolling or Pacing ; mile aad repeat ; open to
all horses that have never beaten three minutes ;
owners to drive, to road wagon.
9 PONY RACE.
Running Race ; mile dash ; open to all ponies of
14 hands or under.
10 KAMEHAMEHA PLATE.
Running Race; 2 mile dash; open to all;
weight for age.
Admission within the fence 60 Cents
Admission to the Grand Stand 50 Cents
Admission of horses to in enclosure, 60 cents
for each horse.
No charge made on the bridge for entrance to
the Park Grounds.
Applications for stalls to be made to the Secre
tary.
Amount of purses will be given on or before
June 1, 1885.
All running races to be under the rules of the
Hawaiian Jockey Club.
All trottiHg races to be according to the rules of
the National Trotting Association.
Entries close at 2 P. M. on Monday, June 8th,
at the ofliee of C. O BERGER, Secretary, with
the exception of races No.'s 3 and 4.
G8-apl3-tf C. O. BERGER, Secretary.
GRAHAM PAPER COMPANY,
St. Louis. Mo.
Manufacture and Supply all kinds of
Book. News,
Flat and Label F-apers.
Binders' Boards,
Twines, Ete.
V. G. RICHARDSON,
RESIDENT AGENT,
205 J,eidesdorr Street.
Telephone No. 47. SAN FRANCISCO.
X. B.-Speoial Attention gtveu to
tarjje Contracts. . 474 tf&w
NOTICE.
ON AND AFTER THIS DATE ALL OUR
accounts will be rendered monthly instead
of quarterly, as heretofore.
S. J. LKVEV fc CO.
Honolulu, Feb". 2nd, 1835. 497 tf
Benson, Smith & Co.,
-JOBBING AND RETAIL-
T3JRTJG-G-ISTS.
PROPRIETORS OF THE
jVXaile Cologne.
113 AND 115 FORT STREET.
mar27-VS-6m
Commercial
INSURANCE COMPANY,
OF CALIFORNIA.
FIRE AND MARINE.
Capital, paid in full $200,000 00
Assets, December 31, 184 443,3sl 05
Losses paid since Company was organ
ized... 1,133,534 80
C. O. BERGER, Resident Agent.
Ollioe No. 24 Merchant street, Honolulu, n. I.
107-jul-29-w
WANTED.
BENNETT'S DIRECTORY AND SKETCHES
of Hawaiian History, published in 1870, for
which a fair price will be given.
W. V. ALEXANDER,
Government Survey Office,
or at the office of this paper. 116 tuyiuwl
INTER-ISLAND
Steam Navigation Co.
(LIMITED.)
STEAMER w. Q. HALL,
(MALULANI,)
BATES Commander
Vt'ill run regularly to Maea, Maul, and Kona
and Kau, Hawaii.
STEAMER PLANTER,
(LILINOE.)
CAMERON Commander
Leaves every Tuesday at 5 p. m. for NawiliwUi,
Koloa, Eleele and Waimea. Returning, will leave
NawiliwUi every Saturday at 4 p. m., arriving at
Honolulu every Sunday at 5 a. m.
STEAMER IWALANI,
FREEMAN ...Commander
Will run regularly to Hamoa, Maul, and Kukui
haele, Honokaa and Paauhau. Hawaii.
STEAMER C. R. BISHOP,
M ACAULE V Commander
Leaves every Saturday at 3 a. m. for Waianae,
Oabu, and Hanalei and Kilauea. Kauai, Return
ng, leaves Hanalei every Tuesday at 4 p. m.f and
touching at Waialua and Waianae Wednesdays,
and arriving.at Honolulu same day at 4 p. m.
STEAMER JAMES, MAKEE,
WEIR , Commander
Will run regularly to Xapaa, Kauai.
T. R. FOSTER, PresidenU
J. Kma, Secretary. 53-ap7-ly
OCEANIC STEAMSHIP CO.
St?
THE NEW AND ELBiANT STEAMSHIPS
'MARIPOSA' & 'ALAMEDA
"Will leave Honolulu anil -.n Francisco on the
FIRST and FIFTEENTH of each month.
PASSENGERS may have their namesbooked
In advance by applying at the office of the Agents
PASSENGERS by this line are hereby notified
that they will be allowed 250 pounds of baggage
FREE by the Overland Railway when traveling
East. f
EXCURSION TICKETS for round trip, 125
Good to return by any of the Company's steamers
within ninety days.
MERCHANDISE intended for shipment by this
line will be received free of charge, In the Com
pany's new warehouse, and receipts Issued for
lame. Insurance on merchandise in the ware-
bouse will be at owners' risk.
WILLIAM C IBWI.V fc CO..
334-tf
PACIFIC MIL STEAMSHIP CO
TIM K TABLK.
PACIFIC MAIL S.S. CO.
For Sail Francisco
Zeaiandia On or about May 10th
For Auckland and Sydney :
Australia On or about May 17th
$83-tfwti
WILDEirS STEAMSHIP CO,
(L.imit4Ml.i.
I
STEAMER KINAU,
(King, Commander),
Will leave Honolulu each Tuesday at 4 p. u. for
Lahaina. Maalaea, Makena, Mahukona, Kawaihae,
Laupahoehoe and Hilo. Leaves HUo Thursdays at
noon, touching at the same ports on return, arriv
ing back Saturdays.
PASSENGER TRAIN from :xiulli will leave
each Friday at 1 p. m., to connect with the Kinau
at Mahukona.
The Kinau WILL TOUCH at Honokala and
Paauhau on down trips for Passengers if a signal Is
made from the shore.
STEAMER LIKELIKE,
(Loreuzen, Commander),
Leaves Honolulu every Monday at 4 p. m. for
Kaunakakai,Kahului, Kcanae. every other week;
Huelo, liana, Kipahulu and Nun. Returning, will
stop at the above ports, arriving back Saturday
mornings.
For maila and passengers only.
STEAMER LEHUA,
(Davies, Commander)
Will leave regularly for Paauhau, Kohola.lt le,
Ookala, Kukaiau, Houohina, Laupahoehoe, Haka-
lau and Onomea.
STEAMER KILAUEA HOU,
(Weisbarth, Commander),
Will leave regularly for same ports as the S. S.
Lehua.
steameiTmokolii,
(McGregor, Commander),
Leaves Honolulu each Wednesday for Kaunaka
kai, Kanialo, Pukoo, Moanui, Halawa, Wailau,
Pelekunu and Kalaupapa ; returning, leaves Pukoo
Friday a. m. for LahaJua ; leaves Lahaina Saturday
for Pukoo, remaiainiug Sunday, and arriving at
Honolulu Monday eveuing.
B-.B The Company will not be responsible for
any freight or pifekages unless receipted for, nor
for personal baggage unless plainly marked. Not
responsible for money or jewelry unless placed in
charge of the Purser.
All possible care will be taken of Live Stock, but
the Company will not assume any risk of accident.
SAM'L O. WILDER, President,
s. B. ROSE, Secretary.
OFFICE Corner Fort and Queen streets.
23-ly Mar 30
Drifted Snow Flour.
(ROLLER PROCESS.)
HAVING LEASED THE SALINAS MILLS,
I am now prepared to supply, in quantities
suit, all orders, with the celebrated family
Flour, DRIFTED SNOW, and also the A No. 1
bakers brand, RISING SUN. Please address all
orders to C. L. DINGLEY,
mha4-7-3m No 13 Stcuart St., San Francisco.
Notice to the Public.
The Elite
ICE CREAM PARLORS !
Ice Cream will be served at the SARATOGA
HOUSE, on Hotel Street, until Further notice.
saropen aily until 10 P.M.
Orders received and carefully attended to.
Weddings and Parties supplied.
Telephone 181.
Our cart with Celebrated Ice Cream will make
Its usual route in the evening. 395tf
Win. G. Irwin & Co.
OFFER FOR SALE
Sugar! Sugar! Sugar!
II I LEA PLANTATION "Washed!" SS
iu kegs.
CALIFORNIA SUGAR REFINERY
Cube Sugar in 25 lb. boxes.
Dry Granulated, in barrels'and kegs.
"A" Crushed Sugar, in barrels.
"D" Coffee Sugar, in kegs.
Gold-u Syrup, in gallon tins.
Coils Manila Rope, all bizo-.
Coils Sisal Rope, 6 thread to 2H inch.
Coils Bale Rope and Ranana Twine.
Reed's Patent Pipe and Boiler
Covering All Sizes.
MANILA CIGARS.
Salmon, Beef and Port in barrels.
9
One 4 1-2 foot Smoke Stack, 85 feet
lliKb. will be Sold Cheap.
574-JU6
BEAVER SALOON.
NO. 7 PORT STREET.
v Opposite Wilder t Co.'st
H. J. Kolte, Propr.
OPKX FOM 3 A. U. TILL 10 P. M
FIRST-CLASS LIXCHES, COFFEE,
TEA, SODA WATER, GINGER ALE,
Cigars and Tobaccos
OF BEST BRANDS
Plain and Fancy 1IIF.S personally selected from
the Manufacturers, and a Large Variety
of BKST QUALITY
SMOKERS' ARTICLES.
Lovers of BILLIARDS will find an Klegaut
BRUNSWICK I CO. BILLIARD TABLE
on the Premises.
The Pioprietor would be pleased to receive a cal
om his Friends and the Public generally
who may desire a
I.UNCII. A SMOKE. OB A GAME OF
BILLIARDS.
THE CASINO
AT THE PARK
IS OPEN EYEItY DAY.
a-Tbe only Sea-Side Resort in tke
li tngrdom.
M. J. XOLTE,
;6-tf
AVERY & PALMER,
General Business and
Real Estate Agents.
Prompt Attention given to Collections.
Office, Xo. 6 Fort Street, Honolulu.
539 tf
S250 REWARD.
A REWARD OF 250 WILL BE PAID FOR
information that will lead to the arrest and
conviction of the party or parties who, on the
evening of the 2Sth Instant, tampered with the
calling wires of the Hawaiian Bell Telephone.
GODFREY BROWN,
President Hawaiian Bell Telephone Company.
March 30. 1S85. 27 mar 30-tf
P. P. OKAY, M.D.,
PHYSICIAN AND SI lUiF.ON,
Office next door to the HONOLULU LIBRARY,
9 to 10 A.M.
Ovfiok Hours: 2 to 4 P.M.
7 to 8 P.M.
Sundays 9 to 11 A.M.
RF.SIDKNCE Cor. Kinau and Fensacola Sts.
531 myl7
A Horse! a Ilorse! My Kingdom for ti Horse. King liichard.
The Fast Trottincr Stallion
VENTURE.
KECOIJD, L':27.
Having purchased this celebrated Stallion from Mil. JAMES CAMPBELL, I hereby
notify the public that he will stand the present season at my headquarters, corner of
Punchbowl and Queen streets (Captain Clunev'sK Terms for the season, $50 ; to insure,
$100.
Description.
Venture is a rich chestnut color, 16 hands high and weighs about 1,100 pouuds. In
structure he is the picture of great muscular power, and in appearance, temperament and
disposition, he is faultless. Full of tire and gentleness, he is without upeck or blemish.
As a stock horse he is having extraordinary success ; his numerous progeny, both in Cali
fornia and in this country, attest this fact, several of them being able to trot low down,
and one of his daughters (Venus) can trot in 2:25. Venus is also the dam of Trunt.it,
which is said to be the most promising two-year-old in California. He trotted a mile ltt
season, as a yearling, in 2:45.
IPedigree.
Venture, chestnut horse, foaled in 18G3, bred by Henry Villiamson, Enq., Oakland,
California ; by Belmont, he by American lioy, he by Seagull, ho by Import Expedition.
1st dam, Miss Mostyn, by American Boy, Jr.
2d dam, by Kenner's Gray Medoc.
3d dam, Imported Lady Mostyn, by Tenier.
4th dam, Invalid, by Whisker.
5th dam, Helen, by Hambletoniau.
6th dam, Susan, by Overton.
7th dam, Drowsy, by Drone.
8th dam, by Old England.
9th dam, by Cullen Arabian.
10th dam, Miss Cade, by Cade.
11th dam, Miss Makeless, by son of Greyhound.
Belmont, by American Boy.
1st dam, Imported Prunella, by Comus.
2d dam, by Partisan.
3d dam, Pawn, by Trunipator.
4th dam, Prunella, by Highflyer.
5th dam, Promise, by Snap.
Cth dam, Julia, by Blank.
7th dam, Spectator's dam, by Partner.
8th dam, Bonny Lass, by Bay Bolton.
9th dam, by Darley's Arabian.
10th dam, by Byerly Turk.
11th dam, by Taffolet Barb.
12th dam, by Place's White Turk.
13th dam, Natural Barb Mare. . ,:....
In offering the services of this horse to the pub'ic I make one claim for him, which
is that he is tho highest bred trotting stallion in the world, living or dead, and in support
of this claim I am willing to submit i to any authority that can bo obtained, and if he is
not, then I will forfeit all my claims to horse knowledge. It will bo seen that his pedigree
represents a union of the purest blood of the English and American thoroughbred racer,
one of his grand dams, as also one cf his great grand dam' being imported from Eng
land to the United States. When Venture was on the turf, auout tight years ago, ho was
at that time the sensational horse of the Pacific Coast, and the Fporting papers in the
East, that were always so much opposed to running blood in the trotter, commenced
picking away at his pedigree, trying to tind a cold cross in it, at the same time declaring
that it waa simply impossible for a strictly thoroughbred horse to trot us fast as he was
then trotting ; but at last they had to give it up, and admitted the fact that he was a
strictly thoroughbred horse,but declared him a phenomenon, and were unable to account
for his great speed at the trotting gait. But the fame of. his eire, old Belmont, is almost
world-wide, and it is a well-known fact his blood nicked better with the trotting families
than that of any other thoroughbred horse ever known, as, in addition to Venture, two
other thoroughbred sons of his, Capt. Webster and Owen Dale, were said to have pos
sessed great speed at the trot. Besides these, he sired the dams of Belle Echo, 2:20 ; Flora
Shepherd, 2:30 ; Monarch, 2:28 ; Nelly Patcheu, 2:27 U ; Bustic, 2:30 ; which is a showing
that a great many of the best trotting bred horses cannot equal. Mr. Patrick Farrell,
who is one of the most experienced drivers on tho Pacific Coast, told me the last time
that I saw him, that Venture was the fastest trotter that he ever pulled a line over, and
that if Lis temper had not been soured in his youth by bad handling, he believed that lie
would have equaled, it not surpassed, all the records ever made, and that he could show
a two-minute gait with him to a wagon, but in company ho would become wild, on ac
count of his hot blood, and was often beaten by horses that could hardly run as fast as
he could trot. His record of 2:274, which was no measuro of his speed, was made at the
Oakland track in 1877, in a race which he won, beating Alexander, Gus, General Ileno and
Billy Hayward, this being his last public performance.
It is thought by some people that an aged horse is not as good a producer as a young
one, but no greater mistake could possiblj bo made. Indeed, the opposite is claimed by
many large breeders, and instances are so numerous of horses siring their best foals at an
advanced age that the above theory has long ago been exploded. Imported Diomed was
twenty-seven years old when he sired Sir Arehy, his best son ; Bonnie Scotland, who died
only a few years ago, sired Luke Blackburn and George Kinney, by far the best of his get,
after he was twenty-five ; Imported Leamington sired Iroquois, his best son, the last year
that he lived, at twenty-five. Among trot fcrs may be mentioned Volunteer, the sire of
St. Julien, who is thirty-one years old this spring, and is said to be as lively and vigorous
as he ever was, and his youug foals as promising as any that he ever got. Old Hamble
tonian died in March, 187G, aged twenty-seven years, but sired two foals the last days of
his life, and one of them, called llambletouian's last, made a trotting record of 2:25 lg the
past season, and the other one is said to be equally as fant.
Withthesefact3beforeus.it is plain that theage-of a horse has nothing to do with
his success as a sire. I think myself that there is a gnat dial in the condition that a
horse is kept, for an animal that is well fed and cared for, with plenty of txercise, w ill
beget better foals than one that is turned loose and never stabled or fed grain.
Venture is twenty-two years old this spring, and with the care that I intend to giv?
him, I expect him to sire better foals than he ever has before. Ho is a remarkably anre
breeder. Mr. Campbell assures me that he has never bred a mare to him yet that did
not produce a foal, and his many beautiful colts, now on Mr. C.'s ranch, are worth a lr.n
journey to see ; and now as he is to be kept so
uwiug a koou uiic ououiu ue bu uunu iu uicir own interest as to neglect the opportunity
of obtaining his blood while they have the chance.
For any additional particulars apply at Punchbowl and Queen streets.
C. 13. MIL
Honolulu, April 10, 1885.
ANHEUSER-BUSCH
BEE WING ASSOCIATION.
EXTEA FAMILY
LOTJIS LAGEE I33SER
ST.
VWf ilkmrlutk Br. Aaa.t4 ,,S fi
Gold Medals and Premiums awarded 1'hiludelphia, lsTC; Paris, 1878; ajid Amfcterdam, 18S.1.
MACFARLANE & CO.,
-
Kaahumanu Street,
SOLE AGENTS FOR THIS
convenient to tho general public, no one
IS, Iroprietor-
C3-apl0-tf
Honolulu. H. I.
CELEBRATED BEER.
471 tf& w

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