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The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, July 30, 1887, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1887-07-30/ed-1/seq-2/

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PACIFIC COMMERCIAL ADVERTISER, .JULY 30. 188'
TEHJIX OK .IRS(B1JTI0S.
Per aoonoi....,
Six months...
Par month
."3 00
. 50c
-Ktibs4rlptIOD Payable Always) in
Advaacc.
Communications from all parts of tbe Kingdom
will always be very acceptable.
Persons residing In any part of the United States
can remit tbe amount of subscription due by Post
Office money order.
Matter Intended for publication In tue editorial
columns should be addressed to
KitiToa. Pcinc Commercial a iivkktiskr.'
Besides communications arid advertisement
snould be addressed simply
" P. C. ADTKRTmtK, I
And not to individuals.
T H E'
Pacific Commercial
In now for sale noi.v at the Knllawtiiic Places ;
J. H. SOPLR - Mercnant street
A. M. HEWKTT Merchant street
T. O. THRUM Fort street
WS4. 8TRAHLMANN Hawaiian Hotel
Flr Onf pr topj.
SATURDAY
Julv 30th.
THE SCHOOLS-
Tlie Government and private .-imols
throughout the Kingdom are now all
closed, and the pupils are enjoying a
well-earned vacation. The result of the
examinations which have been held
during the past month show that the
work of the school year has been very
encouraging. At the various schools in
this city the examinations were attended
by a very large number of persons, who
took much interest in the work of the
pupils. All were (satisfied that the
teachers had been painstaking with their
instruction.
Tue Court of Appeals of the State of
Kentucky recently decided that when an
insurance company, through its man
agers or chief officers, issues a pamphlet
or circular making representations as to
the plans upon which it insures, and
sends this literature out ty its soliciting
agents, it is to be regarded as part and
parcel of the contract of insurance en
tered into upon the faith of the repre
sentations contained therein, and it is to
be conbidered in connection with the
policy of determining the liabilities under
the contract.
The Chinese are to have a new coin
age, and ninety coining nre arid nil
m.- l " . .g jp a
mint in -Jh'tja v y next
April. The pi.s:- . w.'.v. are being
prepared in England, are m-.iseiess and
automatic, and are capable of producing
2,700,000 coins per day of ten hours.
The coins are to be dollar pieces and
three subdivisions, a half, a fifth and a
tenth in silver, as well as the "cash" or
"mils," equal to one-thousandth part of
a dollar in rolled brass. The silver dol
lar is equal to 5s English money. Of
the 2,700,000 coins which are to be
struck per day, 100,000 are to be (if re
quired) silver dollars. The extent of the
order may be estimated from the fact
that the Royal Mint in London is only
furnished with sixteen presses.
Supreme Court.
AT CHAMBERS CHIEF JUSTICE JL'DD PRE
SIDING. Friday, July 29th.
Henderson et al. vs. Allen et al., fore
closure and sale of liana Plantation. S.
B. Dole for plaintiff, W. A. Kinney and
C. Brown for defendant. The parties
agree to the foreclosure and sale. Wm.
Foster was appointed guardian ad litem
of Else Unna, minor, defendant.
In re guardianship of Arthur C. Tur
ton, minor. C. Brown, attorney for
guardian; F. 11. Hayselden, attorney in
fact. The accounts of James Campbell,
guardian, surcharged and referred to
Master for report, Tuesday, August 2d.
In re estate of Rosalie Gilliland, final
accounts. E. S. Cunha, guardian, in
person. Guardian's accounts referred
to Ma3ter for rojnrt, Tuesday, August 2d.
In re estate of Moanauli, final ac
counts. C. Brown, attorney for admin
istrators. Accounts of David Manaku
and Mohole Moanauli, administrators,
surcharged and referred to Master for
report, Tuesday, August 2d.
JULY TERM BEFORE FKE8TON, I.
. Dodd vs. James Dodd, divorce. F.
M. Hatch for plaintiff; V. Neumann and
V. O. Smith for defendant. The ground
of tlie application are those of cruelty
and drunkenness, and the plea consisted
of a general denial. Several witnesses,
among others the Marshal, were pro
duced for the prosecution, and the case
was continued until this rooming. The
Court issued an order prohibiting the
publication of evidence until the conclu
sion. For Kan Francisco.
The following passengers are booked
at the office of W. G. Irwin Sl Co., to
leave by the Royal Mail steamer Zea
landia to-day :
J. M. Monsarrat, C. H. Hartwood and
wife, Miss K. Beaver. E. A. Jones, Miss M.
F. Knerick, II. C. Meyers, J. A. Kennedy,
E. Austin, D. S. Austin. Jr.. il'na M.
Fairchild, R. M. Overend and wife, J. D.
Brown, Rudolf Spreckels, Chief Engineer
Ezra J. Whitaker, Miss Sarah Kine.W. W.
Hall, Mrs. Thos. Brown, Misses Marie and
Bertha von Holt, Mrs. S. A. von Primer.
Master -Eneas K. Mackintosh, Mrs. An-j
drtw Moore. j
i k;e
The Large' Hall Crowded In Every
Part An Interesting Pro-rramme-nintrlbutloa
of Prlaen. rv.
Tlie closing exercises at the St. Louis
College took place yesterday afternoon
in the large hall, and were attended by
an audience which filled the building in
every part. Many were unable to obtain
admission. The front of the stage was
decorated with Mowers and evergreens,
while the stage itself was provided with
all the conveniences to be found inside
of an ordinary theater. The members
of the orchestra occupied seats just be
low the stage.
SOME WHO WERE THERE.
Among those present were noticed II.
R. II. Princess Liliuokalani, II. R. II.
Princess Kaiulani, Hon. A. S. Cleghorn,
Hon. Chas. R. Bishop, President of the
Board of Education; Senhor A. de Souza
Canavarro, Consul and Commissioner
for Portugal ; Monsieur Laurent Coche
let, Consul and Commissioner for France ;
Right Rev. the Lord Bishop of Olba,
Hon. John A. Cummins, Hon. II. A.
Widemann, Professor W. D. Alexauder,
Rev. Alexander Mackintosh, A. T. At
kinson, Inspector General of Schools;
Mm. C. T. Gulick, Mr. and Mrs. W. S.
Luce, Very Rev. Father Leonore, Fathers
Sylvester, Clement, Pouzot and Mat
thias; Hon. J. L. Kaulukou, Mr.
and Mrs. M. Mclncrny, Mrs. Em
ma M. Beckley, Mrs. C. Bolte,
Mr. and Mrs. T. A. Lloyd, Mrs. Chas. B.
Wilson, Mrs. J. K. Wilder, Mrs. Henry
Davis, Mrs. W. R. Buchanan, Mrs. J.
M. Sass, Miss Jennie Tuck, Major H. F.
and Mrs. Bertelmann, Messrs. G. L.
Babcock, Henry Berger, S. B. Rose,
George Lucas, H. S. Townsend, Walter
Hill, editor of the "Daily Bulletin," and
Wray Taylor, of the P. C. Advertiser.
The Very Rev. Father Leonore was very
assiduous in his attention to the seating
of those invited.
THE PROGRAMME.
The programme, which was divided
Into two parts, was as follows
PART I.
Overture Popular Medley.. F. G. Rathbun
St. Louis College orchestra
Recitation "Welcome". .Seven Small Boys
Address t-Ai Crawtoni
Soner -'The Little Tradesmen"
Cohere Minim Choir
Dialogue "Poor Ueorg.e"
ueo. Cooper, .las. Crowder, ir r
Gurney, L. Reync ds, Aug. Viera.
'Le Vai d 'Amour"
College Junior Orchestra
Laughing Chorus College Choir
"THE GREAT ELIXIR."
Dr. Wiggins Eli Crawford
Doctor's Assistant Win. Crook
Doctor's Errand Boy Chas. Murray
Doctor's Patient Mr. Greenbax (deaf)
.V. Fernandez
Doctor's Patient Mr. Aspen (nervous)
Jno. Aiu
Doctor's Patient Mr. Kflpatrick (stut
tering) Win. Cuelho
Captain (undersized man) Chas. Rose
Charles (chemist dissatisfied heir)
Thos. Sylva
Charles' Friends ... Fr. and II. Bertelmann
PART II.
Overture "Poet and Peasant"
F. Von Suppe
St. Louis College Orchestra.
Chorus "Bird of the North Anon"..
College Choir
Medley "Anon"
College Junior Orchestra
"THE ENCHANTED VIOLIN."
Drama in two acts.
Tamorante Jas. Thompson
Ico, his servant Jas. Llovd
Dwarf, a good genius Wm. Cuelho
Solomon, a miser V. Fernandez
Judge Eli Crawford
Elders
Jos. Zablan, B. Peter. Thos. Sylva.
Fr. Bertelmann, P. Sylva, J. Ma-
kainai.
Guards S. Kaleiopu and Wm. Hoapili
Chorus "Come Where the Lilies Bloom"
College Choir
Distribution of Preiuiurus.
"America" College Orchestra
The opening selection, an overture of
popular medleys by Rathbun, was
played by the College orchestra. Their
playing was excellent, and was most en
thusiastically applauded. The curtain
then rose upon seven small pupils, who
had each a small white shield hanging
from his neck. The first one recited a
verse, and then turning his shield
around displayed the letter "W." Each
boy had his turn until the word "Wel
come" was formed. It was a capital
idea and met with the approval of the
audience.
ADDRESS OF WELCOME.
Before the seven little bovs left the
stago Eli Crawford stepped in front of
them and delivered the following ad
dress in a clear tone :
Dear Friends We, the pupils of St.
Louis College, who have entered this in
stitution to drink, as it were, at the foun
tain of science, and who have been striv
ing most earnestly throughout the past
year to store our minds and hearts with
what is most useful and good, have now
tome to the period in the college boy's
career when he joyously lays aide his
school bag. relinquishes his lessons and
tasks, and seems to forget his profession
altogether in the enjoyment of a well and
hard earned vacation. The bow that is
never slackened gradually loses its elas
ticity, and soon becomes an absolutely
worthless instrument even in the hands of
the most skillful archer. Our minds, also,
need relaxation, and a great deal of it too,
as this grand jury of almost 400 are over
willing to testily.
We will not boast of progress made in
the various branches of knowledge; let
the examinations, our specimens of draw
ing, painting and penmanship; our music,
vocal and instrumental, speak for them
selves. Suffice it to say we had great faith
in the power of effort, were not afraid of j
difficulties, and tried our utmost to give i
perfect satisfaction to our devoted teach
crs. Whether we have thereby merited
the crown of -uccess or not remains an
intere -ting matter for this select audience
f.. .1. i-Me. O 'rb 'loved teachers who have
h.
an
i!t i--ant an 1 often'imes
i! r n-tr.n and rr.unln
. ;. r uni'tigned love a
h we are indebted ft l i
...ii in our rtgard, and we shall
ever remember them through life as our
greatest friends and most generous bene
factors. We extend to them a hearty fare
well. In conclusion, dear friends, we thank
you for honoring ua with your presence on
this occasion, and we hope that the little
entertainment we have prepared for you
will not prove a failure, but a successful
contribution to your love of merriment
and pleasure, and a source of sweet satis
faction for ourselves. Loud applause.
The next number was a song, "The
Little Tradesmen," by the College
minim choir. When the curtain rose
the audience found a number of pupils
at work at different occupations. For
instance, one was repairing a barrel,
another sawing a piece of wood, another
working at an anvil, while others were
occupied saddle making, butchering,
shoemaking, tailoring, painting, etc.
They sang as they worked, and so cap
tivated the audience that an encore was
insisted upon and responded to. A dia
logue, "Poor Georgie," was given by five
boys in a manner which pleased the
audience very much. George Cooper,
who took the leading part, sang a song
from behind the scenes witti fine effect.
The Collece junior orchestra next
played a selection, "Le Val d'Amour."
Its members are: First violins, Thos.
Sylva, James Lloyd and Fr. Bertelmann ;
second violins, G. Long and Jas. Holt ;
third violins, P. Sylva and C. Long;
flute, H. Bertelmann; clarionet, "Wm.
Cuelho; cornet, James Thompson;
double bass, John Aiu. Their playing
was of a high order and quite a surprise,
and showed that great pains had been
taken in their instruction. The clarionet
playing of "Wm. Cuelho deserves special
mention. A laughing chorus by the
College choir, consisting of some fifty
pupils, was very well rendered.
In "The Great Elixir" the audience
enjoyed considerable fun. Eli Crawford
personated Dr. Wiggins, a quack, who
had a wonderful medicine to sell. It
cured in every instance 6ave one.
Charles, a chemist, taken by Thomas
Sylva, had analyzed it and found it was
worthless. The "Doctor," to save ex
posure, had to sign a paper to the effect
that it was so. The play was exceeding
ly well given and the stage settings were
very appropriate.
The second part opened with the over
ture, "Poet and Peasant," magnificently
played by the College orchestra. Its
difficulties were entirely overcome by
all the players. A chorus, "Bird of the
North," by the College choir, was nicely
sung. Particular attention must be
made of the singing of George Cooper.
The little fellow has a sweet voice and
knows how to use it. He sustained the
solo part in a very creditable manner.
Later on the choir gave another chorus,
"Come Where the Lilies Bloom," and in
this little Cooper gave fresh evidence of
his vocal powers.
The concluding number on the pro
gramme was a drama in two acts, en
titled "The Enchanted Violin." The
principal character was Ico, a servant,
personated by James Lloyd. He played
his part to perfection, and was several
times applauded for his efforts. Vincent
Fernandez as the Miser kept the audience
in good humor. His dancing was too
funny for anything. Wm. Cuelho as the
Dwarf and Jas. Thompson as Tamorante
both did their parts well. Throughout
the play the large audience was kept in
one continual roar of laughter.
The exhibition was of a very pleasing
nature throughout, and though the ex
ercises lasted about three hours they
were of so varied a character that the
large audience gave no signs of weari
ness. Brother Bertram and his able as
sistants are to be highly congratulated
upon the success of the afternoon's en-
tainment. They must have labored hard
to bring the pupils to such a state of per
fection.
CONGRATULATORY REMARKS.
The Hon. Charles R. Bishop was then
called upon to make a few remarks. He
said he had listened with much
pleasure to the charming music.
Whatever one undertakes it should
be done with thoroughness. It
was very evident that the teachers
had taken great pains with their pupils,
and that the latter had been very at
tentive. The exercises had been very
creditable to all concerned, and he con
gratulated them upon the exhibition. A
year ago he listened to the closing exer
cises, and then heard some of the boys
speak in English who had also spoken
again to-day. They had made good im
provement in their pronunciation of
English. He congratulated the teachers
and all connected with the school. He
hoped they would all enjoy their vaca
tion and return with fresh vigor to resume
their studies.
The Lord Bishop of Olba thanked the
large audience for their presence. It
was very gratifying to see that so many
took an interest in the work of the
school, and especially was it so to the
faithful and devoted teachers.
DISTRIBUTION OF PRIZES.
The prizes, which consisted of hand
some books and chromos, were then
distributed from the stage by II. R. H.
Princess Liliuokalani, Princess Kaiu
lani, the French Commissioner, Hon.
C. R. Bishop and the Bishop of Olba.
Tlie following is the list of prize winners :
BOARDERS.
Prizes for merit James Thompson,
V Cuelho, Z Kakina, K Kekehena, D
Hoapili, Wm Hoapili, Ah Pay, J Crowd-
er, S Kaleiopu, J Makainai, G Long, D !
Long, D Kaiawe, J Holt, J Legros, T i
Sylva, H Mahiai, W Kaae. Hilarion, O J
Messberg, G Cooper, W Spencer, F Re-
beiio, C Fern, C Lorg, H Mika, C Rose,
K Legros, P Vieira. H Cooper, J Lloyd,
J Lai e. L-leopu, II Makahi, F Bertel-m..-
" W t.ir m, r ani Ah Fook.
1.'. - ...,e 1, Z Kakina and W
Bertelmann
.i i m..
.iU;.t :.. . -i
Sylva.
Vocal Music G Cooper.
HIGH CLASS.
Prizes for Merit E Crawford, S Kaei
opu, J Aiu, W Cuelho, J Thompson, H
Cooper, J Lloyd and T Sylva.
Arithmetic J Aiu 1, II Cooper
S Kaleiopu.
Geometry E Crawford 1, S Kaleiopu
2, J Aiu.
Algebra J Aiu 1, S Kaleiopu 2, E
Crawford.
History and Geography H Cooper 1,
E Crawford 2.
Natural Philosophy J Aiu 1, S Kalei
opu 2.
Christian Doctrine W Cuelho 1,
Thompson 2.
Bookkeeping J Aiu 1, S Kaleiopu, 2.
Physiology II Cooper 1, E Craw
ford 2.
Composition II Cooper 1, E Craw
ford 2.
Orthography and Elocution E Craw
ford 1, J Lloyd 2.
Grammar V Fernandez 1, T Sylva 2.
Penmanship V Fernandez 1, J
Thompson 2.
Phonography J Aiu 1, S Kaleiopu 2.
Latin V Fernandez 1, B Peter 2.
German W Cuelho.
French J Aiu.
FIRST CLASS.
Prizes for Merit J Holt, J Zablan, B
Peter, E Kekehena, C Long, II Mahiai,
G Long, Z Kakina, G Cooper, F Rebello,
C Rose, D Hoapili, Ah Pay ami C
Fern.
Spelling, Reading and Grammar J
Zablan 1, G Jackson 2.
Algebra and Bookkeeping Ah Pay 1,
W Crook 2.
United States History and Geography
W Spencer 1, C Long 2.
Penmanship and Map-drawing W
Kaae 1.
Christian Doctrine C Fern 1, F Beck
ley 2.
SECOND CLASS.
Prizes for Merit F Beckley, J Crowd
er, P Haile, U Jones, G Sea, J Lane, J
Migel, A Viera, E Simmons, L Reynolds
and W Nott.
Spelling and Reading L Reynolds 1,
F Beckley 2.
Penmanship J Lane 1, J Kaahuna
lii 2.
Arithmetic A Viera 1, G Sea 2.
Geography and Grammar F Beckley
1,W Sumner 2.
THIRD CLASS.
Prizes for Merit F Gurney, C Kaa-
hanui, Poohina, J Halemano, Ah You,
C Murray, II Schwarz, P Travers, A
Sylva, Keliihanaela, G Cabral, T Lloyd,
C O'Sullivan, II Mika, C Viera, C Hop
kins, Peenahele, Alapai, W Lycett, L
Wood and R Duchalsky. ?
. The College orchestra then played
"America," and the large audience dis
persed.
Death of I'aul I'etrovliz.
Information was received bv last mail
from His Majesty's Consul General at
Rome, James Clinton Hooker, Esq., of
the death of Paul Petrovitz on the 14th
of June last. Mr. Hooker states that
Mr. Petrovitz arrived in Rome last
autumn with credentials authorizing
him to paint portraits of the King and
Queen of Italy for His Majesty King
Kalakaua. His credentials having been
presented, their Majesties sent their
photographs to Mr. Petrovitz and ar
ranged lor a sitting. His health was
failing, rheumatism being the cause.
On June 13th Mr. Hooker called upon
him and found him in a very low con
dition. He advised medical aid. which
Mr. Petrovitz declined. Mr. Hooker,
however, took with him Dr. Tideli, a
leading physician, who pronounced that
Mr. Petrovitz had trouble with his
heart and his blood was very weak, in
fact he was reduced to a state of anemia,
and that he might die at any moment.
Mr. Hooker remained in attendance
with a nurse, but on the follow ing morn
ing Mr. Petrovitz died. His remains
were placed by the Consul in a zinc
coffin and deposited in a temporary
vault in the Roman Catholic cemetery.
Mr. Petrovitz, in many conversations
with Mr. Hooker, regarded Honolulu as
his home, and spoke of the King of Ha
waii with deep affection. So far as his
papers were concerned he appeared to
be an American citizen.
When Mr. Petrovitz left these Islands
he had extensive commissions from His
Majesty, but his untimely death will
leave them unfilled. At the time of his
death Mr. Petrovitz was about 80 years
of age. Bulletin.
Rlfle Shoot I ns: Mrttcli. i
At 1 :30 o'clock this afternoon there
will be a shooting match, at the King
street range, between a team of ten
from H. B. M. S. Conquest and one of
a like number from the Hawaiian Rifle
Association. Kach man will fire ten
rounds at 200, 400 and 500 yards. Fol
lowing is the II. R. A. team: Dr. John
Brodie, C. B. Wilson, F. J. Iliggins, W.
Unger, C. Nicoll, J. W. Pratt, J. II.
Fisher, W. C. King, J. Roth well and E.
Hingley. Reserve, J. J. Williams and
F. Hustace.
rersoual.
Among the passengers leaving by the
steamship Australia on Tuesday will be
Mr. Thos. Rain Walker, Acting British
-'ice Consul, Mrs. Walker and their son
Master Clement. They will visit San
Francisco and suburbs, and expect to
i be absent about a month. We wish
them a very pleasant voyage and a safe
return. During Mr. Walker's absence
Mr. F. M. Swanzy will discharge the
functions of Acting British Vice Consul.
&&vtttl$mtnts.
Absolutely Pure.
This powder never urics. A marvel of purity.
rtreno-Ui and v holesomone3. More economical
thantheonUr-arv kinds, Mid cannot be sold in earn
petition with ii.a multitude of lo'.Vteat, short
weight, alum or vVxphate powders Sol'!?5f'!Ji!,
CANS. lkiVJL, iiAn.ltf l owest Co.. 100 ViUl-6W
V V
yi. T. COLEMAN A CO., Agent.
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. M U
nDE
51 HEMEDV i
uiuilf
I
BSaMfifrfrfN
a.
-mnilll Mt 1
DR. PARDEE'S
(The Only BllbU Blood Pnrlfler.)
A. SPECIFIC FOR
BHEIJMATISM,
Scrofula, Salt Rheum,
Neuralgia, Ring Worm
And all other Skin and Blood Diseases.
XT HEODXATZ3 TH3
LIVER AND KIDNEYS.
Cure Indgeatloa aid tl dlasea arlalna; rrons
a enfeebled oondlUon of tbe ajatcmu
Dr. Mabtine, of London, the cele
Srated specialist, says of PABDEE'f.
REMEDY : " I have used it for twent
years for Blood .Diseases, such a
Vrofula, Salt Rheum, Teter and Cancer
and I cannot recommend it too highly.'
The Rev. Dr. Thomas, ot Hong Kong
v hina, says: ' PARDEE'S REMEDY
is a wonderful medicine for the Blood.
I have prescribed it hundreds of times
for Leprosy, and when given in time
it always cured the patient. I can
safely say that Leprosy will never break
out on persons who take Pardee'
Kfvedv regularly, and I advise all per
suns xi ving in countries where Leprosy
is prevalent to take Pardee's Remedy
as a preventive."
FOR SALE BY ALL 0RUCCISTS IN HONOLULU.
tiBlueclatt
N. F. BURG ESS,
Expressman & Drayman,
S4 KING STREET,
HONOLULU.
ltesidence, l.r'2.
Telephone No. 202.
WaikikiBath House!
MR. W, CROOKS HAVING TAKEN CHARGE
of the Waikiki Hath Uuush, lies to inform
the public that he will run the plane as a first
class bathing resort.
MRS. CROOKS will attend to the lady patrons
of tbe place, and every effort will he made to
make it attractive. 716-jylS
OEDLNG S JSAUGAG EXPRESS
St. Si. SASttEUS, IKOI.,
Deliver Baggage and Freight of Every Descrip
tion with Promptness and Dispatch.
O flier, HI liliitr Mrnl. llolii Tele
phone. ;.
Residence, lis JViiuxnii Mreel. Koll
Telephone lor ICenitleiiee. it.
Tud-june I5tf
JOHN PHILLIPS,
Practical Plumber, Gastitter
AND
C oppersmi tli
71 King Street, Honolulu, H. I.
liorsi: Wm Miir
JOB WORK PROMPTLY ATTENDED
TO.
Bath Tul.s. Water Closet. Wash Bowl, Plumb
ing Goods of all kinds alavs on hand.
"iM-juiielotf
A. PALADINI,
Wholesale and Ketail Dealer in every kind of
F'renli, Salt, Simikl. I'lckled hikI
Iri'l I'lvli.
Removed to Clav-St. Marke,S15 .r17 Merchant St.
SAN Fit A N r lCO. UTTiii a 1 'b8
WEXNEK & CO.
3 Fort Slrict,
Have on haii'l New Foreign and Homeruade
Jewelry.
Watches, JSruccIcts, Necklets,
Pins, Lockets, Clocks,
And ornaments of all kinds.
Silver aril
Grold Plate,
Eletraut Soliil .Silver Tea Neth.
Suitable for Presentation.
ENGRAVING AND NATIVE JEWELRY
A Specialty.
Repairing in all It branrttes.
fiT" Sole Agents for King's Eye Presoi vers
4fi-inar9-lvfi
FRANK CFRT2.
' 1 lUUUlUliOtlil l'i
Of all Descriptions of
BOOTS & SHOES
tJ" Ordern from the other 1 Rlnr.ds solicited.
So. 11 1 Fort St., Honolulu.
AiwM El
ifp
IPl
X...... . n inH'-tf
69 diwtf
Look out for New Announcement in a Few Davs.
Popular Millinery House,
1G4 Fort St., Honolulu.
S. SVCTIS, ProDrietor.
w. s.
WINE VTSTD SPIRIT ALERCHANT,
CAMPBELL FIRE-PROOF BLOCK. MERCHANT ST., HONOLULU-
Has junt'rect ivt i! from Kuroj'p jt r "Hercules,"
200 Cases Guiiiess' Extra
Bottled by M. li. FOSTEK A SONS.
ALSO FINE ASSORTMENT OK
HOCK j.NT) CLARET.
These Wines wore especially nelecteii for Y. S. Luce, anil aro far superior to any e?er
before imported into this mat Ket.
THE FINEST ASSORTED STOCK ('
CHAMPAGNES, ALES, WIN ES, ETC.
ALWAYS OX II AND.
KTSpecial atteution drawn to the celebrated Wines
ana Medium) , WHITE TOUT, SHERRY, etc.
Rum Punch the
57Saprl.UfJw
S
Tlie Leading Uillinerv House
-OF-
Chas. J. Fishel.
COK. FORT & HOTEL STS.
For two Weeks Only
OurSemi-Annual
Benin ant Sale
will take place
NEXT MONDAY
All our remnants will oe placed on th
Counter, and marked way down.
In Ladies' Trimmed and Unfrhnmed
4 141- iti
ats, we are prepared to oiler liK J
II
BARGAINS.
Remnants in all departments.
Come and ee what we offer you next
MONDAY.
CI I AS. J. FISHEL,
Leading Millinery House.
Hawaiian Hote
CARRIAGE COMPANY.
FIRST-CLASS CARRIAGES
At all hours day and night, with competent
drivers and steady lioises.
TO H. TC T !
SADDLE HORSES, BUGGIES, WAG
ONETTES, VILLAGE CARTS
AND BRAKES,
With good, reliahle horcei.
IUving just received a fine lot of
Horses from California,
W are prepared to offer extra iridnrenients to
t arties wanting Family, P.oid, F.xpreHM or Dray
Horses. Guaranteed aa reprefiented or no Bale.
Prices to suit the times. RING UP 32, or apply to
MILES & IIAYLEY,
727J24tf Hawaiian Hotel St&blec.
jAjsmisnnrPiis.
LUCE,
Stout,
-MALMSEY, MADEIRA (Pry
Latest Novelty.
Clans Spreckels
Wm. CI. Irwin.
CLAUS Sl'K ECKELS & CO.,
BANKERS.
HONOLULU.
HAWAIIAN INLANDW,
Craw Exchange ou the principal parts of tbtj
world.
Will tecelve l-pos1tfl on opn account, wake
(ollectloiiH anil cor.iimt a Keti.-ral hanking acid
excliMi)f Inisiiit-ss.
IH-p..Hits bearing Interest received In their Sav
Iiirh Department HUl.Ject to pul,ll8he,l rules and
res-ulatiiMs.
1 Too St
MA0FARLANE & C0-,
! "1TIIOI-kkai.e F,Ai.r.iiN a.d jf..
; entl Jobbers iu WINK., and L1QUOK.
: w
Sie. 12 Kaaliuniaini Street.
HONor.nLi:. 28-tf
curs BPRsn.m.8. WH Q f(kWJ1
WM. G. IRWIN & Co.,
FACTORS
!. Honolulu
ami
H. I.
oiiimlsslou
:B-tfwtf
j M. PHILLIPS & Co.,
Importer and Wliolenle Oealern in
Clothing, l'.ootfl, Mines, Hats, Men'd FuniiHh-
Ing arid Kaiiry fjoodH. N O. 11 Hnu?illlftcitill Ulrui.1
Honolulu, H. I.
25tf-w tf
H. HACKFELD & CO.,
GKNEHAL COMMISSION ACJFXTK.
2f It Queeu fct., Honolulu, H.I.
ED. HOFFSCHLAEGER & CO.,
Importer A- Commlwtlon St errliantm.
Queen .Street, Honolulu, H. I. a7-tl
GKASS SEEDS.
COCKSFOOT, RYE GRASS, ENG
LISH RED CLOVER, COW
GRASS.
'"hf: attention of all interested in
J improving the raHture lands of the Inlands
In called to the above : valuable needs, which we
ofler for sale in lots to f;ult purchase.
Ve have also on band mirple lots of White
Clover, Knpllsh Al?yke. Timothy, Rib Grnt".
(res-ted I'og's Tall, Tall Fecne. Ifslinn rve
Grans and Lucerne seeds, which we offer in
small lots for trial, and will also receive order
for quantities of not less than half a ton wtlght,
and execute earn with dispatch.
717-Jut18tfdtw WM. O, lEWra CO,

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