OCR Interpretation


The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, November 05, 1888, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1888-11-05/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

I3n utljoritn.
Notice of Appointment of 1'ire Marsha!.
In accordance with the power vested in
me by law I have this day appointed
JOHN COliUHT WHITE to be Fire Mar
shal of the Fire Department of Honolulu.
CIIAS. F. WILSON,
Chief Engineer Honolulu Fire Dept.
Approved:
L. A. Thuhstox,
Minister of Interior.
Honolulu, Nov. 1, 1888. 1201 w 1213-L't
Sealed Tenders
"Will be received at the Interior Office until
Fill DAY, November 9, 1888, at 12 o'clock
noon, for the construction of an addition
to the Reservoirs at the Half-way House,
Nuuanu Valley.
Plans and specifications can be seen and
all required information obtained upon ap
plication to the Office of the Superintendent
of Public Works.
The Minister of the Interior does not
bind himself to accept the lowest or any
bid. LOIililN A. THURSTON,
Minister of Interior,
Interior Office, Nov. 1, 1S8S. 137-td
THE DAILY
Pacific Commercial Advertiser.
Be Just and fear not:
Let all the ends thou aim'st at be
TLy Country's, thy Uod's, and Truth's.
MONDAY,
NOVEMBER 5, 1SSS.
The choice of an executive and a legis
lature by the votes of the people to be
ruled, cast in an orderly and peaceable
manner,can never be,to anyone who looks
below the surface of things, other than
an interesting and suggestive spectacle.
But when the result of the election is to
. be the choice of the rulers of fifty mil
lions of the most intelligent and enter
prising people in the world, and the de
ciding for four years of the public policy
of one of the great powers of the eartb,
the occasion rises fairly into the region
of the sublime. When we reflect that on
the same day, at the same hour, through
out a region extending thousands of
miles from ocean to ocean, millions of
men are assembling at thousands an
even tens of thousands of places,
in
crowded cities and quiet country villages
far ui on mountain slopes and out on
wide and breezy prairies, beside th
rattle and whirl of busy factories and i
n
secluded mining camps, to decide sucli
vast and possibly far-reaching issues by
tbe quiet and simple process of dropping
little pieces of printed paper into a box,
we realize, in some measure, the vast
progress the world has really made in sub
stituting the peaceable processes of law
and reason for the reign of violence and
brute force. When we remember further
that the result of this election, whatever
it may be, will be accepted and sub
uiitted to, quietly, peaceably and as a
matter of course, we are inspired with a
new faith in the possibilities of human
nature, and feel that those who wrough
and suffered for the establishment of
popular government and liberty under
the restraints cf self-imposed law, were
not constructing an edifice of cardboard
and cobwebs, but erecting an enduring
temple upon a foundation of solid rock.
The election of President of the United
States; the fact that there is such an oc
casion, that it is so vast, that it is con
ducted as it is, and has such results, is
full of encouragement for all who desire
the enfranchisement and elevation of
their fellow men.
A peculiar and distinctive product of
American party politics is what is known
as " the boss." The presence and per
tinacious activity of the personage so
named is not confined to either of the
two great political parties, though it ap
pears to have been iu the fostering shelter
of the Democratic fold tiiat he first as
ii .ri.- r l at i r-
eumeu uenniie lorm ana proportion, ins
existence and functions once recognized
and acquiesced in, he rapidly blossomed
forth into that tropical exuberance of
power and pretension which characterize
him to-day. But wherever he origin
ated, he has at all events spread rapidly,
lie has fastened himself upon American
politics like the lantana on the slopes of
Kona, and seems quite as difficult to get
rid of. Now what is the " boss ?" He is
simply the chief manipulator or wire
puller, the man who, to a more or less
complete extent, controls and runs the
regular party machinery. He it is who
arranges caucuses, and makes up
41 slates," and selects the delegates to
be elected to conventions, and in all
party matters acts as the power behind
the throne generally. Great U the boss
and not to be despised, as no end of
people have found out to their cost.
Gentlemen of good intentions and lim
ited experience, who enter the field of
politics with large expectations of use
fulness to the public and honor and glory
to themselves, are very apt to ignore or
undervalue the importance of the indi
vidual in question, with the result of
being badly, and sometimes very unex
pectedly " left." Thus far in our politi
cal history, we in Hawaii can hardly be i
DAILY PACIFIC COMMERCIAL
said to have ever known what it was to
have a boss. Perhaps some cynical per
son may say that is because we never
had any politics or any parties. We are
not at all sure that such a criticism would
be altogether without force. lut how
ever that may be, and however the pre
sent may differ from the past, we don't
want any boss in Hawaiian politics, and
we don't intend to have any if we can
help it. Nevertheless we are quite well
aware that it has been determined in
certain quarters that a boss is what we
want and that, a boss we shall have.
The candidate or candidates are on hand
and are already in training. They took
a little preliminary spin over the track a
year ago, but with results, it is believed,
not altogether satisfactory to themselves.
We shall have more to say about bosses
hereafter.
I'e rsoiial.
Mr. Imlach, of London, has gone from
Ililo to visit Hon. Dr. Wight at Kohala.
Messrs. M. I). Monsarrat and W. C.
Sproull returned yesterday from a com
bined business and pleasure trip round
this island.
He v. J. A. Cruzan, formerly of this
city, is one of the " Visitors to Theologi
cal Seminaries" for the Congregational
Association of Central and Northern
California.
Mr. Chas. V. Housman, son-in-law of
Captain Wilfong, long a resident of these
Islands, died recently in California. Mr.
llousman was a civil engineer, and did
some of the railway work in this country.
Rev. Brooks 0. Raker, M. I)., once
connected with the Anglican Mission and
afterward Government physician at
Kona, Hawaii, has, the A. C. Chronicle
finds, obtained clerical work in the dio
cese of California.
Mr. Kluegel, the engineer laying out
the Oahu Railway, fourteen years ago
married Miss Mary Taylor (who was
born here (says the Friend), the daugh
ter of the first pastor of Fort-street
Church, and grand-daughter of the
Thurstons.
Alfred Evelyn Staley, R. C. S., who
was born in the Hawaiian Islands during
his father's incumbency of the Anglican
Bishopric here, was married in England
lately to Mary Henrietta Flora Mackin
non, youngest daughter of the late Mr.
Colin Macrae Mackinnon.
The Friend is hopeful that Rev. Oliver
P. Emerson, of Peacedale, R. I., will
accept the position of Corresponding
Secretary to the Hawaiian Board of Mis
sions. "Among not the least of his
qualifications for the work is a not per
iect, but quite idiomatic knowledge of
Hawaiian, which will enable him to en
gage at once in active visitation among
the churches."
California Fruit Farm of a Former
Hawaiian liesident.
The following description of the estate
of Mr. S. T. Alexander, brother of Hon.
W. D. Alexander of Honolulu, is con
tained in a published letter from Ander
son, ten miles south of Redding, Shasta
county, Northern California :
" S. T. Alexander, six miles from town,
has what is destined to be one of the
finest, if not the finest, fruit farms in the
valley. There are now planted to trees
and vines 160 acres, 100 of which were
set out this year. All told there were
planted DOO trees divided as follows:
Thirty-five acres to prunes, mostly
French, sixteen acrs to almonds, six
acres to olives, twenty acres to peaches,
five acres to oranges and one acre to Sicily
lemons. There are about thirty acres of
Muscat grapes and ten or twelve acres of
old orchard. Fifty acres more were
cleared this summer, which will be
planted during the season to olives and
prunes. A crop of blackberries yielded
over $200 per acre."
Storm ami Fatality at Sea.
Captain E. B. Cousins of the American
bark Alden Besse, which arrived at Ka
hului, Maui, last Monday from Nanaimo,
British Columbia, with -a cargo of coal,
reported a stormy experienco during his
last trip. A heavy gale from the south
west began on Thursday, October 11th,
and lasted for twenty-two hours, the ves
sel shipping heavy seas constantly. The
men on duty were kept in the after-house.
On rridav morning at o o clock, a sea
man named J. A. Loekwood, a native of
riew ork, who was in the after house,
was washed overboard by a high sea,
together with a small boat, davits, and
bulwarks, in latitude 44 deg. north and
longitude . 123 deg. west. The captain
was scarcely able even to attempt ren
dering assistance to the unfortunate man
on account of the severity of the weather.
and the poor fellow quickly disappeared
irom view lorevcr.
Fatal Accident on Hawaii.
Mr. Sam. Macy gives us the account
of a fatal accident at Wairnea, Hawaii
On Wednesday last a half-white boy
named Thomas Lindsay was chasing
cattle, when his horse fell with him. He
was thrown head foremost to the earth,
so badly fracturing his skull that the
brains oozed out. Dr. Greenfield, who
was called, did not believe the lad would
live till next morning. Nevertheless he
lingered until noon of Saturday, when he
died. Lindsay was twenty "years old,
and is described as having been the
smartest wild bullock catcher on the
island.
- The Anglican Chronicle.
The November Anglican Church
Chronicle deplores and rebukes the in
difference, said to have developed in this
community during the last twenty years,
toward churches and benevolent socie
ties. An extract is copied out of a letter
trom Mr. Harry von Holt, describing,
with a graphic touch that one who trav
eled to write might envy, the cities of
Hongkong, Yokohama and Tokio. ' The
news pages are well tilled, and "Our Pil
grimage" is continued, this time taking
the reader to France.
Clijijese Liberality at Home.
A Hongkong dispatch of October 3d
says: foreigners at Canton have ad
dressed the Consuls protesting against
arbitrary obstacles imposed by Chinese
omciais oi mat place in respect of the
landing and embarkation of goods. The
matters in dispute have been referred to
the Home authorities.
EDUCATION IN KOHALA.
A Teachers' Association Formed Flour
ishing Condition of the Schools.
The teachers in the English schools of
North Kohala, Hawaii, in order to assist
in raising the standard of education in
that district, have organized themselves
into an association for the exchange of
ideas, discussion of methods and the ap
plication of them to the work in hand.
For the present, their meetings will be
held monthly. As there are now nine
English teachers in the district, these
meetings will be both pleasant and pro
titable. At the last meeting, Miss Wing, of the
Foreign School, presided; Mr. Lord, of
the Makapala School, acted as recorder.
There were also present Mrs. Lord and
Mrs. Tamar Hussey, of the Makapala
School; Miss Ostrom, of the Chinese
Mission School, and Miss Emma Kenton,
Miss Turner, Mr. and Mrs. Thatcher, of
the Ainakea School. The following pro
gramme was carried out :
Quotations from educational authors
on educational topics, by each teacher.
Discussion by Mr. Lord of "Teachers'
meetings and what they accomplish."
After a ten minute talk on teaching read
ing by each teacher, and a general dis
cussion of the work in these schools, a
committee on programme was appointed
for the next meeting, to be held the 24th
inst. The feature of this meeting will
bo a discussion, to be introduced by Mr.
Lord,ot language-woik. These meetings
will further serve as a medium for the
exchange of educational books, papers,
etc. All persons interested in the work
of the English schools are invited to be
present.
In both the Government schools the
attendance has greatly increased ; so
much so in the Makapala school as to
retard the work. This school must have
a fourth teacher. In the Ainakea school
the teachers could not do justice to any
additional pupils.
Miss Wing speaks encouragingly of her
work in the Foreign school. The at
tendance remains about the same as at
the close of last year.
Mr. Frank Damon is very fortunate in
having secured the services of Miss
Ostrom, a recent arrival from Minnesota,
as teacher of English, in the Chinese
school at Makapala. A. T.
THE VALUE OF REPUTATION.
Keputation is the opinion of the world
about a man. Charactei is the fact it
self, but reputation is what we think
about that fact. Keputation thus be
comes a factor in the business world, and
has a money value which can be in
creased or lost.
Judicious advertising is a help. No
storekeeper who depends upon simple,
fair dealing alone can make a very great
or sudden success. He is an honest
man, but the people do not know it.
Hence, he must use all legitimate means
to acquaint them with that fact. If he
is a judge of the articles of his trade, so
that his customers can rely upon his
selections, he must convince customers
of his superior knowledge before it will
net him a return. But once his reputa
tion is established, built up by slow de
grees, so that his neighbors one by one
yield their judgment to the growing
opinion of our retailer's abilities, then his
neighborhood or state opinion becomes a
valuable property, as much so as a house
or lot. This is so true that a mere label
is often enough to secure for the goods it
covers a much higher price than for
other articles possibly of as good, or it
may be of even better quality. Grocers
and consumers can better afford the
higher price with the implied warrant of
its reputation, than accept another brand
at less price, but upon which a lack of
reputation casts a doubt.
Thus a reputation is worth striving
for, and when achieved, is the founda
tion for prosperity. It ione of the re
wards offered by the world for hard
work and continued fair dealing, which
even from a money point of view are
seen to pay. Let no retailer get dis
couraged because trade increases but
slowly. Everything valuable costs effort
and time, and the result is worth all it
cos:s. A fine reputation once estab
lished is honorable to a merchant and
brings, too, its pecuniary rewards.
The secret of success is two-fold first,
a foundation of good qualities upon
which a good reputation can be bi ilt,
.
ana second, the using of all legitimate
and persistent means to extend the
knowledge of such good qualities as far
as possible. Am. Grocer.
Oil on the Waters."
An improved method of distributing
oil on the waters has been patented in
Germany. It consists of a rocket, to
which is attached a cylinder filled with
oil. It is said that the rocket can be
tired with accuracy from a ship, and
that when it explodes the oil is scat
tered just where it is wanted. Several
interesting experiments have recently
been made between Bremen and New
York. In one the rocket was fired to a
distance of 1,500 feet and less distances.
By the explosion of five rockets, at a dis
tance of from 1,200 to 1,500 feet from the
ship, a space of 1,500 to 2,000 square feet
of water was covered with oil, and the
waves were at once smoothed. The
rocket was fired 900 feet against a gale.
The importance of the invention to deep
water sailors consists in the certainty of
the explosion of the rocket at a sufficient
distance to leave the vessel in carm
water during a gale. The invention is
said to have been purchased by the
North German Lloyd. Bradstreets.
Good Shooting.
Experimental firing with a new Brit
ish military rifle at ranges beyond 2,000
yards is startling. The targets were
small field fortifications ten yards lono-.
The firing, volleys by about thirty men
was almost wholly from direction, sight
ing being impossible, owing to the hazy
weather; yet the results were surprising'.
At 2,000 yards, out of G70 shots, there
were 159 hits; from 307 shots at 2,400
yards there were 96 hits, and from 029
shots at 2,800 yards there were 104 hits.
Penetration at the extreme ranges has
been doubted, but some bullets at 2,800
yards struck an iron target and were
broken to pieces. N. Y. Sun.
Do Figures Ever T.ie?
Two women had thirty chickens each.
which they took to market. Thev agreed
to divide equally the proceeds of their
sale. One sold her chickens two for a
dollar, getting for her chickens $15. The
other sold hers three for a dollar, getting
for her thirty chickens $10. This made
$25 realized for" the sixty chickens. The
ADVERTISER .JWVgMgBR,
merchant called on to divide the money
said: " You sold your thirty chicker.s
two i" r a dollar, and you sold your thirty
chickens three for a dollar. That makes
sixty chickens at the rate of five for $2.
Vell live into sixty goes twelve times
twice twelve is twenty-four. That makes
$24 your chickens have brought." But,
as shown above, the women actually bad
$25 in their pockets. And yet the'
merchant's figures were right ! Do figures
lie?
I'erils of the Jload.
A little after 9 o'clock last evening a
native named Puahi was brought to the
Police Station suffering from an ugly
looking lacerated wound on the left leg,
just above the knee, which was received
by coming into collision with a hack on
the Waikiki road. Dr. Kodgers was sum
moned, and removed the man to the
Queen's Hospital, where his wound was
attended to. The injured party is said
to have been on horseback at the time of
the accident, and the shock of the col
lision was such as to break the cross-bar
and one of the shafts of the carriage.
Hand Concert.
The Royal Hawaiian Band will
give a
concert this evening at Emma Square,
commencing at 7:3;). Following is the
programme :
i.
.
t
4.
5.
6.
Overture Italian Rossini
Finale Stradella (by request) . . . Flotow
Fantasia Mill in the Forest. .Eilenberg
Selection Attila Verdi
Mikioi, Malama, Nowelo.
Selection Patience (by request)
Sullivan
Waltz TheMikado(by request). Sullivan
Lancers The Mikado 44 .Sullivan
Hawaii Ponoi.
Typographical Union No, 37.
At the regular monthly meeting of
this branch of the International Typo
graphical Union of North America, held
on Saturday evening last, the following
otlicers were duly installed to serve for
six months: V. M. Pomroy, President;
J. J. Williams, Vice-President; J. J.
Greene, Secretary; W. S. Brash, Treas
urer. STRAYED !
OX OR ABOUT NOVEMBER SECOND,
from the Hawaiian Hotel Stables, one
Bay Filly. 1 years old, one foot white,
no visible brand, rope on neck. Ite-
to Hawaiian Uotel Stables. 13'J
Tax Collectors Notice!
TAX PAYERS OF THE DISTRICT OF WAI
luku. Island of Maui, will please take notice
that their aunual taxes for the current year are
now due and payable to the undersigned, at his
office, corner ot Main and High streets, town of
Wailuku, between the hours of 9 a. m. and 4 p.
in., except as hereinbelow stated, when he wiil
receive taxes at the following places, viz:
Spreckelsville, Nov. ; Kahului, Nov. 12; Wai
hee, Nov 19; Waikapu, Nov. 22; Ilonuaul.i, Nov.
26. W. A. McKAY,
Tax Collector District of Wailuku.
139-lw 12i3-2t
TO LET.
VT NO 7 CHAPLAIN STREET, ONE LARGE
furnished front ro;m; also, a small suite of
rooms suitable for a small family. lJ2-lm
DJtESSMAKliNG.
MRS. M. B. CAMPBELL HAS COMMENCED
the business of Dressmaking, Cutting and
Fitting, at her residence, No. 73 Beretauia street,
opposite the Hotel. The patronage of the ladies
is respectfully solicited,
teed.
Satisfaction
guaran-88-tf
.A.. K. WEIE,
WOULD RESPECTFULLY NOTIFY HIS
'riends and the public generally that he
has purchased the Blacksmith and Carriage Shop
forn erly conducted by A. Morgan at Nor 70 n.,ri
fl King street, where he is now prepared to do
all kinds .of Cairi ige Painting and Trimming,
Carriage and Heavy Wagon Work and General
uiDCKsmitiiing with promptness
Satisiuctiuu guaranteed.
and dispatch,
l.il-tf
NOTICE.
riMIE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE WAIKAPU
1 Sugar Co. will be held at th nfficp nf u v
Mac far lane & Co
MONDAY, Nov. 5th, at 12 m.
WM. M. Git AH AM,
Secretary.
V'CU
Annual Jkleetino;
Waiiiee Sugar Co. '
rpHE ANNUAL MEVMi OF THE WAIIIEE
J Sugar Co. will b on MONDAY. Nnvm-
ber 12, 188S, at th
Queen street, llonoi.
e C. Brewer & Co.,
i'clock a. in.
llUMd
'Kit, Secretary.
t & a-plU8 OV
-CSTJJ
I7URNISIJEL COTTAGE OF Til
IJ rooms centrally located. Ap,
fice.
"OUR
i of
w 3STOTICI
D'
URING
THE
TEMPORARY
our Mr. Wm. G. T
OF
lorn,
under
in from L.
act for our
Mr. W. M. Gitfard W
power of uitorn. y.
firm
NOTICE.
URING THE
TEMPORARY A mrvpr
J J Oil
w IT a 1 t J 1 r .
i .in. irwin trom
Kingdom,
V i . 1 f I
jir. rraun jr. Hastings will act for
all matters of business
our 13ank In
CLAUS SPRECKELS & CO
Honolulu, Oct. 23, 1838. 18-3 w
NOTICE.
T
HIS IS TO CERTIFY THAT THE LARGE
and commodious Dining Rooms of the
COSMOPOLITAN RESTAURANT
Will be shortly extensively altered. wLereby
greater convenience and comfort will be af
forded to patrons, while tbe tabla i l be sur,
plied with every luxury obtainable at the market"
with the very best of Teas and Coffee.
Kg- Terms, 85 per week.
138'2W JUN II EE. Proprietor
Boat For Sale.
THE BOAT SAVED FROM
the wreck of the "Dunnotar
Castle." and sold at auction
fttd . "aa uKeu re-
.J lUB Jl 11 f hug Vd
,7' ucufceu over by Mr. Holland
and is for sale cheap for cash bv uana'
. B. KYAN, Boat Builder.
Absolutely Pure,
For quick raising, the Royal Baking Powder Is
superior to all other leavening agents. It is ab
solutely pure ami wholesome and of the highest
leavening power. It is always uniform in
strength and quality and never fails to make
light, sweet, most palatable and nutritive food.
IJread, biscuits, muffins, cake, etc., raised with
Iloyal Baking Powder may be eaten hot without
distressing results to the most delicate digestive
organs. It will keep in any climate without
deterioration.
Prof. H. A. Mott, U. S. Government Chemist,
after examining officially the principal baking
powders of the eointry. reported:
"The Koval Baking Powder is absolutely pure,
for I have so found it in many tests made both
for that company and the United States Govern
ment. "Because of the facilities that company have
for obtaining perfectly pure cream of tartar, and
for other reasons dependent upon the proper
proportions ot the same, and the method of its
preparation, tue ltoyal uaking I'owaer is un
doubtedly the purest and most reliable baking
powder offered to the public.
"Dn. HENBJT A. MOTT, Ph. D.,"
5 1'221-ly U. S. Government Chemist.
For Kent or For Sale.
A TLEASANT COTTAGE
Iu Ierfect Order.
A few minutes walk from the Post Office.
Apply to
15tf
HUGO RTANfiENWALD. M.D
House To Let!
THE HOUSE AND PREMISES LATELY
occupied by W. S. Luce, Esq., situate on
Union Btreet and Adams Lane. The
house contains parlor, three bedrooms,
wo dressingrooras, hallway, diningroom, pantry
and kitchen, mere is also a Cottage in the
grounds with three rooms; stable, carriage
house and servants room. The place is in per-
tect order. Possession given at once.
Apply to J. M. MONSARRAT,
13Mf No. 27 Merchant street.
Notice to Creditors.
pHE UNDERSIGNED HAVING BEEN DULY
1 appointed and qualified as Administrators
with the Will annexed of the estate of Samuel
Gardner Wilder, late of Honolulu, deceased.
hereby notify all persons haviag claims against
said deceased to present the same, duly authen
ticated, with the proper vouchers if any exist,
even it secured by mortgage, to m. F. Allen,
Esq., at the bank of Bishop & Co.. Honolulu,
within six months from this date or they will be
torever barred. A. J?. JUDD,
W. F. ALLEN,
Administrators with the will annexed of the
Estatetpf S. G. Wilder, deceased.
Honolulu, Oct. 11, 1888. 1240-5t 120-lro
TO PLANTERS!
TXAVING RECENTLY IMPROVED
- and strengthened our construction of
2-Roller Mills, as also the slat feeding mechan
ism for same with very satistactory results, we
are now prepared to contract for that class of
machinery at short notice. We have patterns on
hand for 40xCCin., 3CxC6in., 32x6'lin.. 30xC0in.,
30x54in., 2Gx54in. sizes of rollers, steel shafting
and eteel gearing throughout with any desired
type of engine, or they can be driven from
engine in use on 3-Roll Mill, by compounding
the Bame, thereby economizing steam. Results
under EQUAL CONDITIONS Clinrantpfrl ttvqtttj.
passed by any otheu construction or system of
FEEDIKO.
J. N. S. WILLIAMS.
Aent Risdon Iron and Locomotive WQrkg,
136 1243-tf San Francisco.
The Ship "J. C. Pllngcr"
Has Jus fc Arrived
WITH ANOTHER CARGO OF
NEW GOODS!
FOR
H. HACKFELD & CO.
Monolulu, Nov. 2. 1888.
138-lw
Ex "J. C. PFLUGEK,"
400 rToiis
West Hartley Coal
FOR SALE BY
EE. Hg,ckfeld
138-lw
& Co.
DAY1S & WILDER,
52 FORT STREET.
IMPO
7--r
Grocers -' i'rvisii! ncr.Jprv
rFBEST;
i.il-
FVEIiV STEAMER.
131 L.J
5 'If ff'l
Ms
. J
GEN
MUIiR- Us,,
the
FOR
Handkerchief
Toil.
AND
THE
bath.
TN TROPICAL COUXTPlr,t (
X a greater popularity , rlIT fiA$ 404
:.r.r, ...
nave once experienced tbe rl
anecssityofeuta,ni:
t
.VUt tUU j
For
ALL
Sale
BY
And Dealers in FantJ Gm1;
119 1240-1 j
Ex Bark H. u
fKOlI LIVERPOOL,
IRON FIL
I,
Selwig & Land's Patent
18 to 30 (Jiamlters,
Hanaiuaolu, Kekaha. Wdm. k.,i. i.Ti
Laupahoehoe, etc., and winch areVy
with the latest improvements; also,
SPARE PARTS OF ABOVE PRIli
and
FILTER CLOTH FOR TUE SAME ;
Sugar
Cooleii
(round corners)
Iron Tanks, 3 sizes;
Baxter Engines,
Diane's Steam Yd
SteeJ Bails ffixtuii
Portable Track, Sleepers & Switclr
Corrugated Iron, all lengths;
Fire ttrirks, Slates,
Fire Clay, Asbestos,
White Bros Portland Cein
Germania P. Cement,
Keg Shook3, Rivets,
Sugar and Coal I!a,
Coal Baskets, Twine,
Stockholm and Coal Tar, Etc.
For Sale at Lowest Kate bj
H. HACKFELD & (
13t!-lm
Just Arrived.
Ex Bark "C.E. Bis
Two of those well-known
&t For Sale by
ttm CITCfff T.AEGER 4 LU"
JU. iiWl . . , J
King and JJetMJ
Ex Coranna
From Liverpo
ol,
A Fresh S apply of
GUINNESS'
Foster kJZjtft
Bottled by M. B
by W. E. Johnson & Co i
i,lVCf t
of Benj. and Eng Perrier
Of Joseph Perrier Fils & to.,
Of Veuve Ainiot, Chalons.
3Tor Sale by
r 4 C
Ed. Hoffsclilaeger
BETHEL STBIETS'
RING AND
150 1 203-tf
BAZA
GRAND
Under tbe
Patronage
of
MAJESTY THE QU
HER
vnaVLV ASU
THE "iUAUUi their tfi-- I
bui" society;. ill ' g
v- the heneni qi iu .t
On Saturday. 'al ' ,
Honolulu r.ifl
rm.
retaniaiPUD
AtManamana (cor.
"1!
heir Cft-
FLORIDA to
STOt
vt. IT,
1 1 V

xml | txt