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The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, May 23, 1889, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1889-05-23/ed-1/seq-2/

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DAILY PACIFIC COMMERCIAL ADVERTISED, 3IAY 23. 1889.
EVENTS OF TO-DAY.
Am ion Sai.i-.s Rcji'dar .!. ! at 10 i.
in., au.i sale wl itriii;in furniture
jti"t imported ;it 11 a. m. hv L. .J.
Levey. Sale of .?. l.uniii's fur
niture at 10 a. m. I.y .1. Y. M oi';tn.
Dkmvtim! S.x iktv OiIhi L ro.:n,
Fort strtft. 7 k hi.
V. V. V. A. II Ai l. ( la in En-IM.
Literature, 7 ::') p. in.
K Mi:i'mkh lifAKi) -Lplfiolu.ku'iuanls.
lrill, 7 :.') p. ni.
THE DAILY
Pacific Commercial Advertiser.
Hi Jast :til fr not:
Lt all the eiid thou aiin'nt at bi
Thy Country', thy (ioV. n 1 Truth'.
Thursday,
.MAY 2.5, iss'j
HOMESTEAD LOTS.
The hIuw increase of population,
and the tardy development of all
kinds of agricultural enterpri.-es in
this country, oiUmMo of sugar and
ricn growing, aro matters upon
which wo have already commented
prouy ireeiy. nen we compare
cur record in these respects, with
what is goin on in the Pacific
States of America, we have reason to
feel that we art very small potatoes
indeed. Of course, the fundamental
difficulty is the lack of available
land, obtainable in small quantities,
and suitable us regards location,
accessibility and so on, for the use
of people of moderate means. Our
climate is at one) healthful and
delightful. Our arable land, much
of which still lies wast'.1, is of exceed
ing richness, and there is a consid
erable home market for many pro
ducts which flourish, in this country,
but with which we aro still supplied
m linly from abroad.
Some supercilious critic may ios
sibly ask us, what are you going to
1 ) about it? Well, so far as wo are
personally concerned wo aro uot
going to do anything about it, ex
cept to agitato the question and en
deavor to keep it before tho public.
It is not tho business of newspapers
to provide lands for the landless' any
moro than it is to feed tho hungry,
clotho tho naked, or furnish free
rides for tho lame and tired. It is
their business, however, and their
duty, to call attention emphatically
to existing ovils, and, so far as prac
ticable to indicate tho direction in
which a remedy may be sought for.
In matters of this kind, men aro
apt to look first to the government
as the source from which relief
ought to come. If this tendency is
not natural and inevitable, it is a
all events very common, the result
perhaps of education and habit.
Many people regard a government
as a kind of npecial providence,
whose function it is to provide all
kinds of gootl and desirable things
for people who nro unable to pro
vide the samo for themselves. This
paternal theory of government has a
certain amount of reason in it, and
only does much harm when carried
too far. In the present instance,
th help the Government can reader
under existing laws, is very limited,
aud an inquiry into the facts of the
v lie satisfies us that what they have
done, aud aro no;v doing, is all that
could be reasonably asked.
A few years ago a so-called Home
stead Wet was passed, providing for
the disposing of unoccupied Govern
ment lauds in small lots to actual
net-tiers. Tho law may be a some
what lame and inadequate one, but
such as it is, it is being carried out
iu good faith, and with results in the
main satisfactory. VTe have taken
the trouble to obtain a list of the
different lots which have been offered
under tho provisions of this act at
different times within the last year
and a half. The following is the
list:
In 18S7, twelve lots iu Nuuanu
Valley, Honolulu, and thirty-seven
lots at Ahualoa, Hamakua, Hawaii.
These, compri-ung forty-nine lots in
all. were well and promptly taken.
In 188S there were forty lots offered
at Kaapahn, Hamakua, Hawaii, tif
teon lots at Kaunamano, Hamakua,
Hawaii, thirty lota at. Paauilo, Ham
akua, Hawaii, and so far during the
present year, forty-seven lots at
North Koua, Hawaii, forty two lots
at Ukumehameiki, Kula, Maui, and
thirty-eight Ijts at Kaiwiki, Hilo,
Hawaii. The advertisement of the
last nam ! appeared in our yester
day mon. igs issue. In addition to
the above there are thirty-two lots at
Waiakon. Maui, which have been
surveyed and mapped, and the ad
vertising of which is being held back
pending the settlement of some mat
ters involving certain legal formal
ities. The above lots, nearly three hun
dred in number, have all been care
fully surveyed and mapped, and no
questions concerning titlos or boun-
daries aro over liable to arise. This,
in a country where boundaries ;
are as uncertain and titles as'
badly mixed as thov often are
here, is no small advantage. Kvery ;
lot lias a frontage upon some exist
ing public road, or upon laud ro
served for road purposes when the !
lots are occupied. j
The readiness with which the lots j
are taken up depends, of course,
upon their location and desirability. '
This, necessarily, varies consider- I
ably. Iiiose situated in Nuuauu .
Valley and Ahualoa, Hawaii, went ;
oft, as we have already remarked, j
very rnpidly. Those at Kaapahu,
Kaunamano and Paauilo art less in
demand. The location is rather out
of the way and some of the land
rough. For tho lots at North Kona,
Hawaii, and Ukumehameiki, Maui,
there are already plenty of seekers,
anil there are also abundant ir:
quiries for those at Waiakoa, which
aro not yet advertised.
The total acreage included in the
above, we have been unable to as
certain accurately. Tho size of
homestead lots is limited by law to
twenty acres. The effort has boon
to make them, while not exceeding
that limit, as near to it as the size
and shape of the lands from which
they wort cut, and tho need of pro
viding them all with road frontage,
rendered possible. Wo suppose it is
safe to say that the total area is in
'.he neighborhood of live thousand
acres. This may not seem like a
v i-y great showing, but the accurate
: ..rveyirg and mapping of some
hundred pieces of land is
something which cniinot be done in
hurry, particularly when the force
t the tlisposal of the Department
is limited.
It will bo understood, of course,
that the work of laying out hoine
ttad lots is not completed. It is
siill under way, and we are assured
will be steadily prosecuted, as long
land suitable for the purpose
i mains, and as fast as the small
available working force can do the
necessary work.
The great and radical difficulty in
the way of carrying out a public
homestead policy upou any large
scale, is that the Government has
not tho land to do it with. Although
the amount of public land seems
largo when stated in acres, it is
mostly of a kind which is absolutely
useless for cutting up into twenty
acre lots. The Government had
already parted with most of its good
land, long beforo tho present Home
stead Act became a law. What now
remains is, with the exception of
small bits here and there, such as
can only bo utilized to advantage
in large tracts for cattle ranges, goat
farms, timber growing aud the like.
Evidence of an intention to execute
the law in its letter and spirit, and
due dilligence in demonstrating that
intention by means of practical work,
is all that can be reasonably ex
pected. These wo have.
CANADIAN PARLIAMENT.
A lrotrict'l Ilate on the Seizure
in Kehrir.g Set.
Ottawa, April 20th. In the Com
mons this evening Prior of Victoria,
1. C, brought up the question of
the seizure of Canadian vessels iu
Bearing Sea, and said he wished to
impress upou the Government the
imperative necessity of bringing
matters to a speedy settlement. He
hoped Sir John Macdouald would
urge the Imperial Government to
settle the questiou once anil for all,
and urged that be should cable the
Imperial authorities to order a gun
boat to protect British citizens in
Behring Sea. If this were done he
ventured to predict thero would be
no more complaints about the ill
treatment of Canadian fishermen by
the United States.
Davies of Prince Fdward Island
thought the conduct of the Amer
ican Government in the matter re
prehensible, and urged their posi
tion be strongly opposed by the
Canadian Government. He said the
Dominion should have an lhubassa
dor at Washington to ileal with such
matters as this.
Sir John Macdouald said the
House should remember the question
was one which did not a fleet Canada
only. Americau vessels had been
seized as well as Canadians. Others
ha 1 iK- n rendered bankrupt and
ruined by the seizures; many Amer
ican vessels had been abused by the
Alaska Commercial Company. The
rn stion was one which affected the
w" ole vorld, which opposed the
1 1 :i .s of the Americ in Government
to monopoly of these waters. It was
an imperial question, and when they
foil', i lnglaud remonstrated strong
ly they might leave it to her. The
delay in negotiations is duo to the
An.frican Government and not to
England. Ho believed Sir Juliau
Pauncefote, tho new Kmbassador at
YYadiingtoii, was peculiarly qualified
to deal with such a question, and
that Canada's interests were safe in
hi. hands.
vue British Government had as
su.red him of their belief that the
claims of Canada were just and those
of t'io United States unfounded. If
the American Government continued
tc insist that the whole of this sea
, 1 . " ii... . i i it i i
vus iwwu to uiw v.onuii, wouiu leati
i- " 1" 11 - i
10 serious compneanons, ana no a:a
not want by a single word to add to
the calamitous consequences. Lord
Lunsdowne, the ox-Governor-Gen
eral, when he retired from office, had I i t.l rKKoxs akk in:nr:r.Y c.r
takeu the views of the Canadian; tiencd atraint vi-: vn -ii: t !.r-n-Government
wilh him and laid them in " twnne vi:h..:it ;V'IyI'vri.,.:i'r,,'V-,'Ir..
before the British Government. i WailH M:u:i. 'vn
Hie great wrong Canada has suf-
fered at the hands of the United ' T , j ;
States, he was s ire, would impel the ' .hOOlHS X ) MM
Imperial Government to settle tl -
p:uti(n, if
in .t jH-acefully, then ;
otherwise.
SUGAR IN THE UNITED STATE;
There is no reason for uny surprise ,
at the advance in sugar. Wo aro j
merely experiencing tho inevitable j
reaction from the unwarranted de- j
press?on of 18SG, when dry granu- j
la ted sold at 5. cents. The thing ;
has worked in a circle, as usual. By I
offering bounties and bonuses the
Germans caused an excessive pro
duction of beet sugar, which led to
a decline in the price; the decline
made it unprofitable to work some
of the plantations in Cuba, where
the crop of cane sugar has fallen off
150,0X) tons, and the reduced stock
has now again stimulated speculation
and prices have risen. Taking dry
granulated as a type of the market,
it is now 1 cents higher than it was
ut New Years and 1 cents higher
than it was at New Years in 1888.
The advance is based on a reduction
in the visible stock of raw sugars
equal to 170,000 tons, as compared
with this date last year, though, of
course, the upward tendency has
been assisted by the manipulations
of the trust. An increased pro
duction is sure to follow, and at
some point, probably not far distant,
a downward turn iu prices will come.
The important feature in the case
is the probable effect of the recent
advance in the development of the
sugar industry in this State, and its
dependency, the Hawaiian Islands.
Tho Hawaiian crop this year will
probably amount to 125,000 tons;
but the demand for raw sugar from
our two refineries is so krgo that a
small fleet of vessels are u mv on the
way from Manila loaded with sugar.
Tho product of beet sugar on this
coast is thus far onlv nominal. But
Mr. Clans Spreekels states that the
last of the capital in his new o,
000.000 beet sugar company has just
been taken up, and that in a short
while ten factories, each costing
$500,000, will be in operation in this
State, making raw sugar from beets.
If the price of tho commodity can
bo maintained anywhere near ire
sent figures, the profits of these
concerns will be large and other
refineries will be established. We
may thus yet come to see the day
when, as Mr. Spreekels predicts, the
United States will not import a
pound of dutiable sugar, California,
Louisiana and the Sandwich Islands
being able to supply the whole
demand.
So startling a change in the tide
of commerce could not fail to be fol
lowed by political consequeuces of
moment. In the times in which we
live politics aro more frequently
ruled by commercial considerations
than by patriotic sentiment. If, to
morrow, the reciprocity treaty with
Hawaii were repealed, the islands
would have to sue for admission to
the Union to save the sugar planta
tions, and the United States would
have to admit theni to save them
from tho clutches of some European
power. Again, if ever, as Mr.
Spreekels says, this country comes
to grow its own sugar, Cuba will be
ruined; and all the armies of Spain
will not suffice to prevent its inhab
itants from begging for annexation.
It is thirty odd years since James
Buchanan and Pierro Soule issued
the Ostend manifesto, in which they
advised tho United States to give
Spain a hundred millions for Cuba,
in order to add more slave States to
the Union ; and now here comes a
qui"t business-like German gentle
man, who sets up beet sugar fact
ories and so works things that Spain
may presently be offering tho island
to us for a small consideration.
The effect of a cessation of snar
imports into the United States
would be felt over the whole com
mercial world. We pay now to for
eigners without counting the Ha
waiian sugar some 75,000,000
every year for sugar and molasses.
This payment, which passed through
the world's clearing-house London
goes a long way to defray the cost
of the food which we supply to
Europe. If it stopped Europeans
would have to pay for that food in
money; and the new departure
would in the course of a few years
make New York and San Francisco
the financial centers of the world,
instead of Loudon. S. F. Paper.
I ..li
SI
A T 'I'-BKAK V. IN' coon j
reiair. Knoiiireof Dr. D.;v. .vi i
Bcretania -ireet. 22 -lni
Waiako;) M ill Co.
t a mi:f.tin; of this company.
held Mayl'l. 1:, at the otrice .f
TIko. H. Davies it Co., the following
otticers were elected fur the ciiMiinir year :
President Mr. Tho. II. Davies
Vice-President... .Mr. Alex Yeiini:
Treasurer Mr. F. M. Swanzy
S; relary Mr. 10. W. lIi.!dvorth
Auditor! Mr. T. P. Key worth
E. W". HOLDSW oPiTH,
Sccrctarv.
Honolulu. Mav 21, is. ri
IS IIFdlKDY (1IVF.N THAT MY WIFK.
- Tiieresa Madiado Meranda. has Kit my
bed and boaivl vsithi'tit imii-c nr ;-rovira-
tion an(1 i win not ,,e resnon-iUe for anv
. . . . A
ini contram-i hv tier. rj"-:u
O'J'ICE.
v,:;; u,t.u;uin.
nuttion Sale
BY L. .r. LKVKV.
Important Sale of
Household Furniture
AT AUCTION.
Dv order of Mers II UACKFKLD & CO, I
will sell at Public Auction,
This Day,
THURSDAY, MAY 2:3d
AT 11 O'CLOCK A. M.,
A
coM.i-nmnil of Fine Household -urn
j n -t airiwd by the bvrk O N V ncox.
Id Furniture.
i.'onipris-ii-.iC
Book Cases, Bureaus,
Sideboards. Wardrobes,
.Mart.lcto;, W KM.iudr-. m Walnut aud
Kxiirsfon Vini,, Table & Writine Table,
Card and Sm.-kiiij; "la hie,
Vienna Furniture !
Consis-tin.ir of
Hinititr Koon: Chairs. s,,f;(s. Chairs,
l-Vidin-and Arm Chair-, I'mno moo;,
ETC.. ETC., ETC.
A ho, a chok e selection of
Lame & Small Bugs
LEWIS J. LEVEY,
Auctioneer.
Su'lrn'tt.crmnt-
What is Worth A l v'i t isiiiff
Is Worth Al-Hisiii- Weil.
Therefor-. Advertise in the
DAILY AIVKIlTISi:i:.
Up-lowii Bookstore!
gy-The. novki. way of sur-plying; tlic
market with NOViOL.S only re:tfs a
liemand for greater novklty in noyi.i.
readin.tr.
gy-lv late steamers the following
SKA.sl DKS am otiii:r LimiAltli:
have been received. Works by
.Airs. Alexander,
jliin .M . K. liraililcn.
Charlotte !U. lirat-ine,
Willi tin niark.
Wilkie Collins,
I V ii i i m r- Cooper,
M'he Duehess,
C'has. Hickeiis, (complete)
C,o. Kli t
Killer !Iasr;;arl,
.James A. i roinle.
Sir K. Ilulu cr l.ytton,
('has I.cvfr
Ouhla,
I. ujiene S
Sir W alter Scott, ami other
Standard W'k of Fiction
Brown's KnIih (traininar with analy
sis, cloth, 2i cents.
Revised New Testaments, cloth bound
LT) and 50 cents.,
.Morocco l'.ibles. 7.r cents.
Webster's Dictionary. :'" cents.
Tocket Atlas, 3o cents.
Tablets suitable for schools and private
letter writing at lowest possible rates.
A (p-.antity of l.ADIKS' 15A;:S, to be
sold out at cost !
Kid ':in rinses. 1 5o.
St j aj hie ami Fountain IVtia, 7"c.
and up; a variety of -styles.
Toilet "'apers, ami ;.rie. pks.
Croo.net :sets from il.50 up.
Lawn Tenuis Sets.
lirr.UF.U V.ALLS, P A H F. BALLS;,
BATS, .MASKS and (JLOVLS.
LAWN TKNN1S BALLS and
KAl'KHTS. 121-lw
lip-Town kA Store, Foil St
Planters' Monthly
For Mav
loo;?.
TAP. Ll". OF (ONTKNTS:
Notes
Willi O.ir Headers.
l'o:i!;l. t. "ru-hii :it P.ih.ila,
I'a'ie SoodlinL's once more
Causes of the Kie in the Price of Sugar
Srlrr:ir V' annuel m o in Hawaii
Mangoos and their Improvement
Tobacco Culture
The Olive, Varieties of
Sohtr Natural las
He pi it of Pro:
ss; t L. M. Norton on i
j
So!ar Natural Jas
Spot fli of Paroii i!e Woims on the
F.urotHvin Bou'ity System
Purine of Si;.ii- Iiahi.-try in the Ar
gentine Kepublic
The teensiaiul Sugar Industry
Uussia Beet Sugar D lutry.
I
ti:rm:
Yearly su! si-ription .
. $ 2 oO ,
r orei'ii
Iouiui Volumes
Haek oIumes F":;nd to ord
4 0 )
3 Addros :
GZF.TTE PUBLISHING CO.,
4', Merchaiit St., Honolulu.
tiScw'Jw
KEMOVAL!
CRYSTAL SODA WORKS
Have moved tin ir Ym 'ory to
CoIburiTs Pire - proof Building,
I v I X O STEEET,
Near MaViiinkea
lo:',-l in
;tr-et.
UVERTlSi: YH R WANTS IN
jus 1 :h. i1il C .:nui-rcial Advertiv r
BOATS FOK SALE.
VK HAVE ON HAND
JJkiiXM J one -ioot Whaleboat,
h ; with iron center-board,
niast, sail, oars, etc.,
complete; Miitable tor tihing.
Also, one 7o-lb. clinker pleaMire SkiT,
copper fastened, with oars and rowlocks;
will be sold cheap for cash. Both new.
I-Apply at POWER it M)N"S,
115-1 m Shop near the Fish Market.
EAGLE HOUSE
NUUANU STREET.
Thia First-class Family Hotel,
having just changed Lauds. Las leeo i
thorougLlv renovattd, together ith
the K A PEN A PUKMISK3 uow attached,
and is prepared to receive gmrsis
By the Day, Week or Month
At Reasonable Kates.
TABLE UNSURPASSED. Transient quests
will find every accommodation, & place where
all the coinlorttt of a home cau he obtained.
TIIOS. K ROUSE, Proi
Uonohilu, II. I. 15f
Selling Off! Selling Off!
CHEAP FOK CASH !
On account of CLOSING OUT my
Business '.
MRS. GOOD,
Fashionable Milliner
Fort Street, : Honolulu,
Has Received per Steamer Umatilla,
50 Dozen Latest Style
Straw Hats and Bonnets
LADIES' SAILOR HATS Black
and White Straw.
tips, j?:ltj:ii:s
Also, a large variety of
FLO AVERS AND FEATHERS:
A LOT OF CHEAP RIBBONS.
Latest Novelties in Gauzes
and TRIMMINGS,
l. Personally selected by me for
Honolulu and the other islands. S'l lni
LOVE'S 15AKEK Y.
Xo- 73 N'utiatii Street.
MKS. Hour. LOVE, - . - Proprietress.
Every Description of Plain and Fancyi
Bread and Crackers,
F P. E 8 11
Soda Crackers
A N I)
Saloon Bread
Alvnis on llnul.
MILK IKElD
-A SPECIALTY.
ImIhikI Orders I'romptly At liiill lo
172-:hn
WING W0 CHAN & CO.
NUUANU STREET,
Have Just Received by Late Arrivals
A lary:e and well assorted Stock of
IV0KY WAKE,
Conijuisin'j; Card Boxes, Paper ("utters
and .Jewelry Boxes. Also a
Complete Stock of
Dross Silks and Oivpes
All eo'or.-J and patterns. A New
Lot of Elegant
PORCELAIN and I RONZE VASES.
Al.-o, all varieties and qualities
of .ilk Hand kerchiefs.
Silk X Cotton I ntliiiiLT Kobe
pS?"Tii:s Slock is well uojlli an hi
sp-'eti.n. the Goods having just Ixen re-
ce'.vod ;.ij Slmr. I inaiilla. loa-lv
r 1 TI2T Xj 13 TO I i XT
! Iron and Locomotive Works,
Corner of Beal and Howard Streets,
San Friu'Uco California
W U. TAYT.OU.
PriBiiient j
.Superintendent i
K. S. MOOKE.. .
Ml'k-i . M c;i in Mafiiiiiri'V
In all its Iitt lichee. j
i
Steal
litis '..o-:, S u aiuship. Land Kulnes tt iioiltrs j
1 r ssure or Coiui.ound- ' ,
' STKA.M VKSSKLS of all kinds b:ilt conjjdete, j
I wiih hulls ot wood, iron or composite. ' '
! OKMNKY ENGINES cojiipounded when ad
visable. . ! STK-M LACNCHES, Barges and Steam Tugs con-
siri.ciea wiin reiereuce totl:e tradx in which
they are to Ire e:u:,k.y d. Sj.eed, tonnage and
drait of water guaranteed.
STGAK MILLS and Snjjar Making Marhicery
un.de ro'te- tee most approved plaus. Also, all
T'.iil I -. i V'.. 1 ............... ...
j WATE1'. riTE, of Boiler oi fihet Iron of at,
size, m.wde i ?i suitaM le nths for con neetiuc
together, or Sheets rolled, punched and packed
for Bhipnient, ready to be riveted on the
grouDd.
nyr.i'.AULlC HlVKTI.Na, Boiler Work and Water i
l'ilz inv:le by this establishment, rivettnl hv '
5'"" machinery, that ctialltyof !
w ji i. : iiit. i.,r sui. t rior to Lund work
SHIP W'HIK. Ship and st- am Oa,Htans, SteaiD
icl.. Air ud Circulitin- hiap, made
after the luost api roved ilans.
SOl.K .lgpnls.m.1 ru.mnfaeturere for the I'ai, '
Cast ot the Heine Safety Holler. I
1 V'nri,irrCt Ac,iu I'umpsfor Irritation or
i -. , "'rrfe, OUlit with the c.-1-h rated
.ac .uoiioa, superior to any other
.in.iv mv. p
u-.nu
. .. Honolulu
HE
1IANDFACT0RERS'
S6 and SS
50, ooo !
WOBTII OF
BOOTS
-:- At Wliolt-al
Canvas, Sporting
SPORTING HOOTS AND SHOES OF KYKIiY DESCRIPTION, SUCH AS FOR
YACHTING, BICYCLE, MOUNTAIN CLIMBING, SEASIDE,
FOOTBALL, BASEBALL, RIDING
In fact, a complete
complete assortment of Footwear for all outdoor and athletic purposes
be found at this store and at the LOWEST POPULAR PRICES!
can
All kinds of reliable foot covering
than same grade of Goods can he bought
Orders- by mail from the other Islands
D. IB. SMITH, .A sent,
113 1270-ly
"G. N. WILCOX."
Having JUST RECEIVED ex above vessel a Consign
ment of
a. u. ixjrr co.'s
"E CHAMPAGNE !
We otter the same for sa0 at
30.00 iu-r Case, ca. 1 doz. qts.;
32.00 er Case, ca. 2 doz. pfs.
W. C, PEACOCK & Co.,
MERCHANT STREET.
!M t ?.'!(
STEAM USEES, ATTENTION !
Q
CD
Q
rf
W
CD
?.
?c
c t
r.
0
7u
as n
10
(I)
I I
-
CD
Tfl
1. S
2L
r- J-- I I
5 C5
There
are no Seams
KTTUKRE ARE NO LOOSE
expansion and contractions of the plate, the bottom
E EN surface which can be easily cl.- i
The following sixva
GO inches .linrrWo- i.,. 1t! , ...
4S inches diameter by r, feet Ien-th,
-o-
MSDUN io
ZXT- Eor particulars, apply to
CO.
Hotel Street.
50,000!
WORTH OF
SHOE
AM)-
and TotaiL
and Vacation Shoes
for man, woman or child for less money
lor elsewhere.
will receive prompt and careful attention.
o
- Cm
in tlie fire to leak
T'IV1:TS causp.1 by the continual
presenting a SMOOTH,
- ied.
It roiiNtantly in stock:
o4 inches diameter by 10 feet iength
4-' inrl.es diameter by 14 feet length.
LOCOMOTIVE W0KKS,
SAN 1'HANCISCO, C A L.
SHOE
' '-;WSvi:V '1 ' yf0K
l $ A- --i.vMt.'. 1 I'-"
- :;. pv''':-::.a4f': V
, !:: t J:v o"i
' y
.A
4 'Ij -l
'S.
Uoom No. 3, uvsiair?, preckeU'ljJock.
1271 HI 2ui
Honolulu, nawu. lml 'j

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