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The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, June 29, 1891, Image 2

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DAILY PACIFIC COMMERCIAL ADVERTISER, JUNE 29, 1891.
Baldwin
The up'
-Bo'
words. More than two-thirds of or does be question the fact that
the pupils who have passed through the bitterness of the one threatens,
the College have settled in the but that the strength of the other
kingdom, and are known as "loyal will truly make a paradise of the
and Dublic snirited citizens." country? or are his statistics in
General Armstrong, a Punahou fault?
Tenders for Purchase of Ha
waiian Government Bonds.
Notice is hereby given that, tinder au
thority of Chapter 33, Session Iaws of
1888, " An Act to give greater security to
Depositors in the Hawaiian Postal Savings
Bank," the Postmaster-General offers for
sale $50,000 of Coupon Bonds of the Ha
waiian Government, such . bonds to be
issued in the denomination of One Thou s
and Dollars each, or a multiple thereof,
redeemable in not less than five years nor
more than twenty years, with interest at
six per cent, per annum payable semi
annually, principal and interest payable
That General Armstrong should
be taken to task, be critized, be
taught to "know his place" by one
who had never heard of these isl
ands or dreamed of the evil
chances that were to bring him
boy, spoke many words of wisdom
and encouragement in his address
on the 25th at the Kawaiahao
church. Addressing the present
able President of the College, Gen
eral Armstrong said, " In time
your excellent work will onng j nere, seems scarcely creaioie. ic is
pupils from over the sea; for the the mere blundering rashness of
other advantages of this Paradise ignorance and incapacity.
of the Pacific added to your first That ' General Armstrong, who
rate training will make it an ideal was a scholar at Punahou College
placo for many American youths." before his critic was born, should
Why not? A good school is a now be told that he is "a stranger,
I ... . ,
great inducement to families who a "new comer," a "tourist, a "poii-
in U. 8. gold coin, and to express on their may be induced by considerations tical crank," and this from whom ?
face that they are issued as security for cf elimate and health to make this One thing is certain, the name of
tne postal Savings l,anK Uepofiits. I tnm I Armatrnnor wn knnnrn and hrmor
Tnlr fnr tlio nnrphju rf tho vchre nr 1 u"4 J "cu '"lueo n M 1
any part of said Bonds will be received at montns or years: educational iacu- ea in xiawau ioug ueiuio iuo u.
the office of te Regist rar of Public Ac- ities are always the first question, of Hawaii was known to his would
and their existence often go far in be detractors, and will be . known
rer.nmmondiner a sanitarium for the and honored here and elsewhere
wealthy or the invalid.
Professor Alexander's historical
address was deeply interesting,
giving the progress of the College
from its start in 1841 to its present
prosperous condition fifty years
later.
But orations were not alone the
order of the day. On Thursday
counts, Fimnce Department, up to 12
o'clock noon o Monday, July sixth, A. D.
1891.
No tenders will be received for less than
par value.
The Postmaster-General does not bind
hiroself to accept any tender, or the whole
of any tender.
Dated Jane 27, 1891.
WALTER HILL,
Postmaster-General.
Approved:
Samckl Paekib. Minister of Finance ad
interim.
long after they and theirs
sunk into deserved oblivion.
have
AT CENTRAL UNION.
The Central Union Church was
filled by a large congregation bun
day evaning. General S. C. Arm
strong gave a general talk, mostly
concerning the teaching of the two
Samcix Pahkeb, Minister of Foreign Af- the out of door Bp0rts showed that racea in America, the Negro and In-
limbs and lungs are cultivated at dian. In the opening of his remarks
the College as well as brains. In he referred somewhat to the eimi-
addition to the ordinary pro- larity of the two governments
1 1 ill A ' I A J TTa X Z M M -k MinMi
gramme 01 scnooi atnieucs, was American uu uawauau m giauu
cavalrv drill, very creditably ex- ing suffrage to tne negro ana tne
ecuted.anda pretty exhibition of it aoiWe
fairs.
C. N. 8pekcxb, Minister of Interior.
W. Austin Whitihg, Attorney-General.
2802-tf
Honolulu Tax Assessor's Office.
From and after July 1, 1891, the under
Oahu, will be in his office in the Kapuaiwa riding at me ring, anu a very iuu- in the i8iands nave kept faith better
Buildine on each dav ot the week (Sundays n v one of a race between old than those in America
excepted), from 9 o'clock until 4 o'clock hnVR enme of them ffrandfathers. In ? general way the speaker re-
J ' . , . . . ferred to tne establishment or.
The event was considered 10 oe schooi8 in the South, their mainten-
character that
(excepting Saturdays, when the office will
be closed at 12 o'clock noon) for the pur
pose of receiving the returns of all persons
liable to taxation in this district.
All returns must be made to the under
signed not later than July 31, 1891, or no
appeals can by law be granted.
Special attention is herewith drawn by
the undersigned to the fact that no return
is valid in law unless sworn to before the
Assessor, Deputy Assessor, Notary Public,
or some other person authorized to ad
minister oaths.
Blank forms on which to make returns
can be had daily during the months of
June and July on application at the office
of the undersigned.
T. A. LLOYD.
Deputy Assessor and Collector of Taxes
for District of Kona, Island of Oahu.
Approved :
II. A. WlDXJIAHK, .
Minister of Finance. 2791-2w
THE ADVERTISER CALENDAR. '
of such a national
the public schools were closed, or
closed themselves at midday on
Thursday, and by the Board of
Education's authority were not
opened on Friday. On the latter
dav many stores were closed all
ance and the manner in which they
are conducted. He spoke chiefly of
the Hampton Schools. These schools
are not supported altogether by
charity ,but rocflive from the Govern
ment $15,000 a year to be maintain
ed as an agricultural institution, and
$20,000 a year for the support of a
number of Indians. Une of the ob-
Jnne, 1891.
day, and the banks and nearly the jects of the schools is to give those
whole of the business houses shut wh wish an industrial education as
otaiI n a on inrollanrnal nna His noa.
their doors at noon. The grand cription of the way of conducting
luau or least in Hawaiian style was this was clear, showing the practical
shared hv fnllv a t.honnand nennlft results from it.
j j r tr j mi j i ,1 j.1 i.
U6 j.j t th brjeadier" Governors of Vir
and suite. erinia and other States were both
We have heard of no accident or hearty and substantial. He paid a
upward , event to mar the genera! XtoJSSdS
success oi lue ueieurauou, auu. wo thosfl Honthern men. He contrasted
heartily tongratulatetbe Principal
his assistants and all who shared
the organization preparations
iXtiu tfDcrtiscnunts.
Hawaiian Harare Co., I'd.
8a. Mo. Tu. W. Ft. St. T Jar.e 8.
LNew Moon.
12 3 4 6 0
-jk ik une 14.
. i g 10 11 13 13 t yu'rt'r.
14 IS 16 17 18 19 20 Cs Jnn 21.
wFall Moon.
31 33 23 34 2S 36 27
pr Jane 38,
38 39 30 i LMtQn'rt'r.
in
or who in any way contributed to
the pleasure of the event, and trust
that those who witness the cen
tenary ol the College in 1941 may
be able to say that the institution
has grown and nourished in its
second fifty yei
has in its first.
THE DAILY
PACIFIC COMMERCIAL ADVERTISER
AN UNCALLED FOR ATTACK.
Bo Just and fear not;
X.t 11 th ends thou aim'st at be
Thy Country's, thy God's, and Truth's.
MONDAY,
JUNE 29, 1891.
THE PUNAHOU JUBILEE.
The public were astonished and
disgusted to see in the Bulletin of
Friday evening a most unwarrant
able attack on General Armstrong.
A gentleman born ana reared in
Hawaii, for many honorable-years He spoke of the different national
a resident here, he has. worthily ities that can obtain admittance at
The celebration of the Jubilee
or half century of the establishment
of Punahou College, as carried out
on Thursday and Friday last was,
as was shown by Professor Alex
ander, an event of national import
ance. From small beginnings this Col
lege has,within the lifetime of some
of its earliest helpers, and of many
of its earliest pupils, spread its
beneficent branches and sown its
good seed so widely that the old
world and the new, east and west,
from old Spain and from the newly
opened Japan, from Virginia,where
one of her sons has created and is
conducting an educational institu
tion, which is a marvel of success
in this age of marvels, from every
island in this group assembled to
gether men, women and children,
some attracted by actual existing
interest, some by fond recollections,
others again by sympathy, all
came to witness and to testify to
their cordial acknowledgment of
the value of this particular institu
tion. Professor Alexander tells us that
the fifty year catalogue will con
tain 904 names of pupils who have
been connected with the college
since 1841, of whom no less than
796 are believed to be living. Of
these many are known to be occu
pying distinguished positions in
various walks of life, scientific, lit
erary, mercantile or mechanical.
The families of the first Board of
Trustees are still represented here,
and their names are household
the difference between the two races
in America. The negro's moral con
dition has been elevated by civ
ilization with his physical state
unchanged ; while the Indian
is , undoubtedly benefited in
the former, yet his physical
force is weakened; the former are
more anxious than the . latter
to improve, having a greater
inborn trait in that direction. The
negro under the lash of the slave
holder was more capable of improve
ment than the Indian, the ward of
the nation. Owing to the former
condition of servitude of the one,
there is a barrier in the way of ming
ling and emerging into a common
people that does not exist in the lat
ter. When the Indian race has been
emerged into a common race with
the Americans, the result will be one
of honor to the country. The same
is being done here, and the same can
be said for Hawaii as for America.
served the country of his ancestors
on the field of battle, and during
the peace which he help to achieve
has created and controlled a benefi
cent educational institution which
has acquired a world-wide fame.
Like his friend and fellow-worker
in the field of philanthropy, the
Hampton; none are excluded, from
the Bushmen of Australia, the Jap
anese, to the Armenians and Per
sians. The speaker also paid a high
tribute to C. P. Huntington, the
railroad magnate, of aiding the insti
tution by large donations in the way
of both lumbering and money.
The General's remarks proved in
large number of
terestiog to' the
rtannla oeoomhlorl fn hpnr him. nnri
late noble General Marshall, Arm- gave them an i(jea of the working of
strong returns to this county, those southern institutions of learn
his birth-place, to take part in
worthily celebrating the fiftieth
anniversary of the establishment
of the school in which his child
hood was instructed. He naturally
was requested to speak to an au
dience which crowded the largest
auditorium in the city, and amongst
that crowd no one could have bus
pected the presence of an enemy
who should rise up and vilify him.
Among all the nine hundred and
four pupils who, as Prof. Alexander
tells us, have passed through the
halls and schoolrooms of Punahou
College, and were there fitted
for the noble and useful life that
many have lived, we believe that,
were it possible that a vote should
be taken, as to which of all the
array should be awarded the palm
of the most noble, the most useful
life, we verily believe that it would
bo awarded to Samuel C. Arm
strong. Here in the country of his
birth, and in the United States, the
country of his ancestors, and the
scene of his labors, has General
Armstrong been a true, consistent
and earnest friend to Hawaii.
To which of the General's state
ments does this critic object? Is it
to the maxim that " Race spirit is
harmful, national spirit is noble,"
ing and industry.
Handicraft.
The June Handicraft, the last
number till the Kamehameha schools
re-open in September next, is out.
It contains an original poem by
V. B. O.," and an interesting ar
ticle about " Our First Graduates,"
besides its other usual matter. The
names of the class of '91 are given,
also the programme of the school's
annual exercise.
Local matter will be
outside pages.
found on the
"ci lDDr.rtistnmita
JUST TO HAND.
AUTOTYPES AND PHOTO-
GKAVURESi
Colored.
Finely
Photograrures on
Satin and
Japan
Paper.
Pastel Landscapes and Fruit 1 leces.
A Now Lot of Refrigerators
Monday, June 29.
Business flows like water in
the direction of least resist
ance ! High prices are the
greatest obstacle in the way
of trade, but they have no
place in our store. Business
is brisk with us while others
have been complaining.
Our friends know this:
strangers will soon learn it.
We have never said much,
except in a general way, about
fine cut Glassware, though it
is pretty generally known that
we have quite the best stock
ever displayed in this part of
the world.
We won't mention all of the
pieces, it would take too much
space, we merely call your at
tention to some gems in Berry
and Butter Dishes, one of them
a fan shaoed affair, will win
you : so will the price.
From Cut-glass to Agate
Ware for the kitchen is quite
a jump, but then the Agate
Ware is useful.
Some people may not like
the gray color of the Ware,
but its lot's better than tin. It
will last longer and you save
time and trouble in polishing.
Agate Ware dont need it, Tin
Ware does, and your cook will
like it for these and many oth
er reasons. It is made up in
nearly every article in use in
the kitchen and we have
quantities of it,
About the best thing we've
seen in Refrigerators is made
by Monroe Bros, in Cleveland,
Ohio, a long way to bring
them but we get the best, no
matter what the distance is.
This is for- your good as wel
as ours. The last lot received
have four compartments, one
for butter, cream and milk, one
for vegetables and berries, one
for meat and game, and a large
space for ice. Parties who are
using this make of Refrigera
tors tell us that they consume
less ice and keep everything
sweeter and better than any
other they have ever tried. We
have them in natural wood and
stained cherry.
We have other makes than
the one mentioned and in other
styles : not so elaborate and
lower in price.
Warm weather has its uses
even if it causes inconvenience
and adds to the wash bill. Be
sides helping us sell Refriger
ators and Ice Chests it in
creases the demand for Ice
Cream Freezers.
There are a thousand differ
ent styles made and every one
made is said to freeze cream
quicker than any other. We
differ from 999 of them and
insist that the White Mountain
is the very best and quickest
Anyone who has used it wil
tell you this.
We have them to freeze one
quart or ten gallons. We ca
ter to the demands of the
masses and everyone don'
want the same size.
After you have frozen the
cream you may want Dishes
in Haviland China and be
up with the times in properly
"ITT 1 1
serving 11. vv e can neip you
in this ! We have the Goods
and will tell you something
about them at another time
and Ice Chests.
Lime Apueezers
Wood and Porcelain.
KEROSENE OIL.
Picture Mouldings.
PACIFIC HARDWARE CO.,
FORT STREET.
1377 2776-q"
Lt'd..
HAWAIIAN HARDWARE CO. L'D.,
(Opp. Spreckels' Block),
FORT STREET.
Slurtion Salts.
BT JAS. F. MORGAN
This Day.
Auction Sale of Lease!
BY ORDER OF R. JAY GREENE
and J. N. Wright, mortgagees, 1 will
noli at Pnhlir: Auction, at ruv Salesroom.
Queen street, Honolulu. : -
This Day, - June, 29th, 1891,
.A.T 12 NOON,
That certain Lease of Premises on Union
street, Honolulu, lately occupied by
FraDk J. Higgins.
There are commodious Buildings on the
premises ; the location is central and alto
gether is desirable property.
The Lease will expire November 1,
1894. Rental $15 per month.
Et3 For further particulars enquire of
N Wright. W. O. Smith, or the under
signed.
2802 3t JAS. F. MORGAN, AUCtr.
Desirable
i
For Sale at Auction
ON MONDAY, JUNE 29
A.T 12 NOON,
At my Salesroom, Queen Street, I will sell
at Public Auction,
SO
Valuable
Residence Lob
Being a division of the property formerly
occupiea as me uucKie Homestead.
LIL1HA STREET.
a
189 11 103
12 "
y C 10Q
13 H 5
235 " 105
Ti - , 4
228
" T H - 5
211 J" Ml .
179 129
17 Z - I
188 01 187
8 - ' S 8 ...
207 148
KUAI)
: T - 146
10
The property has been eubdivided into
convenient Re-idence Lots.with an avenue
25 feet wide leading from Liliha street and
running through the place.
An examination of this property will
convince intending purchasers of the de
sirableness of these lots. A map of the
property can be seen at my salesroom.
Ctf-FoT further particulars apply to A.
J. Cartwnght, or to
Jas. IT. !M!orgaii,
2786-tf AUCTIONEER.
4rtliof July
A LL AMERICANS WISHING TO
ix subscribe for the Celebration of the
coming 4th July, can find Subscription
Lists at Messrs.
Castle & Cooke King street
Egan & Gunn . . : King street
M. N. Saunders King street
Pacific Hardware Co Fort street
W. F. Allen Kaahumanu street
2801-6t
W. F. A LLEN,
Chairman Finance Committee.
- Bishop Museum !
THE MUSEUM ALTHOUGH NOT
finally arranged, will be open to the
public on Saturday, June 27th, from 9 a.m.
to 1 p. M. On the following week at the
same hours on Tuesday, Thursday, and
Saturday, and from 2 to 5 p. m. on Wed
nesday and Friday. After this the Mu
seum will be closed until the arrangement
of the collections is completed.
WM. T. BRIGHAM.
280l-lw Curator.
Notice of Assignment
AH LEE OF LAUPAHOEHOE, HA
waii, baving this day made an assign
ment of bis property to the undersigned for
the benefit of his creditors, notice is hereby
given to all parties bavin;; claims against
said estate to present the same before the
first day of October, 1891, and all parties
indebted to said estate to make immediate
payment at. the office of
ED. KOFFbCHLAEGER & CO.,
Assignee estate of Ah Lee.
Honolulu, June 13, 1891. 2800-t
Notice ot Assignment.
pHANG LOO OF MAKAPALA, HA
v waii. having this day made an assign
ment of his property to the undersigned
for the benefit of his creditors, notice is
hereby given to all parties having claims
against taid estate to present the same be
fore the first day of October, 1891, and al!
parties indebted to said estaie to make im
mediate payment at the office of
ED. HOFFteCH LAEGER & CO..
Assignee estate of Chang Loo, Makapala.
Honolulu, June 20, 1891. 2800-3t
FOR LEA.SE!
M THOSE VERY DESIRABLE
premises situate on Punchbowl Hill,
just back of residence of J . F. Hack
feld, Esq. The house is just finished, con
tains parlor, dining room, four bed rooms,
kitchen. Pantry, store room, bath room
and closets; also, fitted with stationary
washstands. There are also stables and
carriage house The premises commands
one of the finest views of the harbor and
Diamond Head to be had on the hill.
Apply to J. A. MAGOON,
2790-tf Adjoining Post Office.
THE ADVERTISER IS THE
leading daily paper of the Kingdom
2Ctm 5li)flcrtiscmcnt3.
PACIFIC HAEDWAEE CO., LU,
Fort Street, - - Honolulu.
O '
MECHANICS FINE TOOLS
JUST RECEIVED
Ice Chests and Refrigerator?,
The favorite paterns ; a large assortment.
-Ao?t Eooms - Mclnerny Hall
25,000 feet New Picture Mouldings, latest styles. -v
A iew Invoice of
ARTX)TVPES,ETCHINQS.PHOTOGRAVURE8,
Etc., Etc. ' : '
Windsor & Newton Colors, Brushes, & Artist Material
Lubricating Oils,
ST VACUUM OILS A SPECIALTY
Feuce Wire of Superior Quality; Galvanised
and Plain Fence Staples.
PLOWS, HARROWS, SSSSu
. A new invoice of Planet, Jr. Cultivators, and Horse Hoes.
MANILA and SISAL ROPE, HIGH TEST KEROSENE OIL, CYCLONE
WINDMILLS, HOUSE FURNISHING GOODS, LAMPS,
CHANDELIERS, LANTERNS.
Lawn Mowers, Stoves, Tin Ware. Agents for the Best Brands of RTTBR'R'R
79-q HOSE.
MOSQUITO BITES!
Positive Preventative
CALLED
FLEAS MUST GO !
CTFor Sale by
BENSON, SMITH & Co.
SOLE AGENTS,
113 and 115 Fort Streets
1381 2651-q
JOHN NOTT,
IMPORTER AND DEALER 11-
1
111 HiMII t 1"' -'lIMTt
Tk r( -t; jiff i y-"
rrr
Steel and Iron Banges, Stoves and Fixtures,
r f
HOUSEKEEPING GOODS AND KITCHEN UTENSILS,
AGATE WARE IN GREAT VARIETY,
White, Gray and Silver-plated.
LAMPS A3STID FIXTIJBESf
RUBBER HOSE,
LIFT AND FORCE PDMPS. WATER fiT.nsTs wrti
Plumbers' Stock, Water and Soil Pipes.
Plumbing, Tin, Copper and Sheet Iron Work,
DIMOND BLOCK, 95 and 97 KINOJjSTREET.
1356-2651-q
A liOOD INVESTMENT 1
To be nold by private contract, a
Weil-Furnished and Fully Equipped
LODGING HOUSE!
The hnng ia in no.ru
centrally located.
CASH DOWN ONLY
For particulars, apply to
S. E. PIERCE,
Corner Fort and Merchant 8ts.
2797-lw
READ THE DAILY ADVERTISER
ii yon want the latest newt.
KEROSENE OIL !
EX S. S. AUSTRALIA.
AND TO ARRIVE PER
Oeylon, and Forest Queen, from Sam
Francisco, and bark John D.
Brewer, from Boston,
At Following Prices
1000 Case Lots at .$2 10 per Case
500 Case Lots at $2 20 per Case
2o0 Case L ,ts at. ..... . .$2 30 per Case
100 Case Lots at $2 40 per Case
Less than 100 Case Lots at $2 50 per Case.
1000 and 500 Case Lots 30 days time, all
others CASH 1
We will deliver lots of not less than 10
or more than 100 Cases.
(Signed) CASTLE & COOKE.
C. BREWER & CO.
2799-1 w .
mil cUhh; 50. per month.

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