OCR Interpretation


The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, November 12, 1894, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1894-11-12/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

I .
-
ri rm i u fi i"i ii in it ij 11 jr cj h w
V 17 1 1 til N ( il K !
Established July '4. Is:,g.
VOIj. XX., .NO. 3810.
nOOIjUIiTJ. HAWAIIAN IStAXDS, 3IOXDAY, ZSOVEMISER 12, 1S94.
PRICE: 5 CENTS.
torfrtif
4S I
r
'-Wji-iVVrir L-'' "TS ":SilirSri
1
J3usincs3 Cards.
The Hawaiian Safe Deposit
-ASD-
INVESTMENT COMPANY
Orlern lor Bale it
Dargain
50 SHARES KAflOKU STOCK
50 Shares Hawaiian Sugar Com
pany Stock.
as Shares People's Ice Stock,
CCCash raid for Government
Bonds, all issues.
3S24-lw
C. BREWER & CO., LIMITED
Queen Street, Honolulu, H. I.
AGENTS FOR
Hawaiian Agricultural Co., Onomea
Sugar Co., Honomu Sugar Co., Wailuku
Sugar Co., Waihee Sugar Co., Makee
Sugar Co., Ualeakala Ranch Co., Kapa
pala Ranch.
Planters' Line San Francisco Packets .
Chas. Brewer & Co.'s Line of Boston
Packets.
Agents Boston Board of Underwriters.
Agents Philadelphia Board of Under
writers. I.IST OF OFFICERS:
P. C. Jokes President
Gxo. II. Robertson Manager
E. F. Bishop Tres. and Secy.
Col. W. F. Allen Auditor
C. M. Cooke 1
H. Waterhoc8E... ......Directors
C. L. Cabteb )
Castle & Cooke,
LIFE AND FIRE
1
AGENT8 FOR
NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL
Life Insurance Company
OF BOSTON.
tna Fire Insurance Company
OF IIARTFORD.
National Iron Works
QXJKKN 8TKEET,
Between Alakea and Richard Streets.
THE UNDERSIGNED ARE PRE
pared to make all kinds of Iron,
Brass, Bronze. Zinc and Lead Castings;
also a general Repair Shop for Steam
Engines, Rice Mills, Corn Mills, Water
Wheels, Wind Mills, etc. ; Machines for
the cleaning of Coffee, Castor Oil Beans.
Ramie, Sisal, Pineapple Leaves and
other fibrous plants ; also, Machines for
Paper Stock, Machines for extracting
Starch from Maniock, Arrow Root, etc.
yAll orders promptly attended to.
White, Eitman & Co.
342S-tf
M. E. Grossman, D.D.S.
DENTIST,
S3 HOTIL STRUT.
CST-Qiticx Ho Pa- 9 a. x. to 4 r. x.
mm
Business Cards:.
The Hawaiian Investment Co,
M EGOTIATES LOANS ON
Keal Estate and
Personal Property
STOCKS AND BONDS
BOL'OIIT AND SOLD.
I you have Real Estate for Sale
we can find you a purchaser.
"If you have Houses for Rent we
can find tenants.
GENERAL REAL ESTATE AGENTS
13 and 15 Kaahnmuu Street,
Mutual Telephone 629. Near Postoffice.
C. A. LONG,
NOTARY PUBLIC
15 Kaahumanu st. Telephone G39.
3311 -Cm
C. B. RIPLEY,
ARTHUR REYNOLDS,
ARCHITECTS.
Office New afe Deposit Building,
Honolulu, H. I.
Plans, Specifications, and Superintend
ence given for every description of Build
ing. Old Buildings successfully remodelled
and enlarged.
Designs for Interior Decorations.
Maps or Mechanical Drawing, Tracing,
and Blueprinting.
XS5Drawings for Book or Newspaper
Illustration.
New Goods
A FINE ASSORTMENT.
TILES FOR FLOORS !
And for Decorating Purposes ;
Mattcvq or all Kxmds,
Majtila Ciqabs.
WING WO CHAN & CO.
No. 3 2Tvirmnvi itYoat.
S651-q
He New Jewelry Store
003 Fort Street,
ABB PREPARED TO MANUFACTURE ANY
THING IN THEIR LIN 2.
Souvenir Spoons'!
a specialty. Also, on hand a fine stock
of imported
JEWELRY.
BVSBYTHIKO IN THE LATEST DE8IGNS.
tsJMsland orders promptly attended to.
P. O. BOX 237.
MUTUAL TELEPHONE 463.
E. A. JACOBSON
"PIONEER
Steam Candy Factory and Bakery
F. HORN,
Practical Confectioner and Baker,
2STO. 71 HOTEL STREET.
3753-tf
HUSTACE & CO.
Dealers in
WOOD AND COAL
Also White and Black Sand which we
will sell at the very lowest market rates,
0"Bbll Txlxphonb No. 414.
Mutual Tblbphonb No. 414.
3493-1 y
THE
Merchants' Exchange
Will receive by the Australia this
morning
A F1CESII INVOICE OF
ENTERPRISE BEER !
ALSO-
OYSTERS FOR COCKTAILS I
3S0S-tf
The Daily Advertiser, 75 cents a
month Delivered by Carrier
business ante.
Viavi Remedies.
ILLUSTRATED TALKS EVERY
Saturday at 3 p. m., ::t Viavi office,
King street, by Mrs. C. Galloway.
3S14 1593-tf
WILLIAM FOSTER,
Attorney at Law,
REMOVED TO NO. 42 MERCHANT STREET.
XPg"Mutual Telphone 3S0. 3SQS-lm
A. PERRY,
ATTORNEY AT LAW
And Notary Public.
Oflace: Over Bishop's Bank.
3692-ly
WILLIAM C. PARKE.
ATTORNEY" - AT - LAW
A I'D
gam to tko Acknomrladgmanta.
Oncx No. 13 Kaahumanu Street, Hono-
lulu, H. I.
H. R. HITCHCOCK,
Notary Public, Second Judiciary Circuit
II. I., KALUAAHA, MOLOKAI.
3S04-3m
HAWAIIAN HARDWARE CO.,
IIAKDWARE,
Cutlery and Glassware
307 Fort Street.
35 75-1 y
BEAVER SALOON,
FORT STREET, OPPOSITE WILDER A CO.'S
II. J. NOLTE, Proprietor.
First-class Lunches served with Tea, Cof
fee, Soda Water, Ginger Ale or Milk.
X7"0PEN FROM 3 A. M. TILL 10 P. M.
Smokers' Requisites a specialty.
CITY -:- CARRIAGE -:- COMPANY
Corner King: and Bethel Streets.
Carriages at all Hours !
"Both Telephones 113.
3713-tf J. S. ANDRAPE, Manager.
HONOLULU IRON WORKS CO.,
Steam Engines,
Boilers, Nugar mils, Cooler, ErM
and Lead Casting,
And machinery of every description made
to order. Particular attention paid to
ships' blacksmithinjr. Job work excuted
on the shortest notic.
lewis & CO.,
Wholesale and Retail Grocers
111 FORT STREET,
Telephone 240. P. O. Box 297.
LEWERS & COOKE,
Successors to Lewers & Dickson.
Importers and Dealers in Lnmber
And all Kinds of Building Materials.
NO. 83 FORT STREET, HONOLULU
JOHN T. WATERH0USE.
Importer a& Etalei !u
GENERAL MEP.OH A1TDZSS.
fo.JS-Jl Qaeoa titreet, Honclain .
M. W.
our
WHOLESALE GROCERS
AND DEALERS IX
Leather and Shoe Findings
HONOLULU.
Af!T?NTQ Honolulu Soap Works Co.,
ilU.mil O Honoluln Tannery.
CONSOLIDATED
Soda Water Works Company, Limited
Esplanade, Comer Allen and Fort Sts.
HOLLISTER & CO.,
3710 looS-lv Agents.
H. HACKFELB & CO.,
General Commission Agents
Cor. Fort and Queen pts., Honolulu.
Massage.
MRS. PRAY WOULD
that she -will attend a limited num
ber of patients. Address at H. M.
Whitney's, King at. ; Bell Telephone 75.
3228-tf
RELICS OF CAPT. JAMES COOK,
Quite a Collection at Sydney that
is Highly Valued.
THAT PLACE HAS A MONUMENT ALSO.
All Honor the Great Discoverer, AVliote
Name 1 Familiar In Hawaii They
Say that He Had a Deeply Religious
Spirit Ills Memory Still lives.
The following careiuj''-epared
article on Captain Cook shows the
esteem in which the fearless navi
gator's memory is held down in
British Colonies. The matter is
from the Sydney Herald :
On the 13th of May, 1S35, there died at
Clapham, England, a certain Mrs.
Cook, aged 94, whose name is inter
woven with the history of Australa
sia. Her husband was Captain James
Cook, who was killed by the natives
of Owyhee (Hawaii), in the Pacific
ocean, on St. Valentine's Day, in the
year 1779. We, in Sydney, are fairly
familiar with the name of Captain
Cook, but to most of us he looms
through the mists of dead centuries
along with the Drakes, Raleighs, Dam
piers, and other mighty men of long
ago. It is startling to find that his
widow died less than sixty years ago.
On the monument to Captain Cook,
which stands in Hyde Park, Sydney,
we are told the date of the birth and
of the death of the famous sailor, but
few of us realize how great was the
man. We forget that his father was
a day laborer on a Yorkshire farm,
and that when James was seventeen
years old lie was apprenticed to a
grocer and haberdasher near Whitby.
The young grocer had a mighty soul,
and by sheer good conduct and pure
grit he won his way from the humble
haberdashery to one of the proudest
places in the records of British heroes.
He was one of those
Who stamped the signent of their soula bo
deep
In art and action, and whose memories
keep
Their height like stars above our misty
ways.
The monument opposite to the Syd
ney Museum serves to remind us of
the bravest and most unselfish sailor
men that ever sailed the sea, but the
Sydney Museum has just obtained
some pathetic memorials of his career,
of which most of our people are as yet
unaware. In the Colonial and Indian
Exhibition held in London in 1866
there were exhibited a number of
"Cook Relics," which attracted a
great amount of attention. They were
the relics of the hardy navigator who
had discovered the Society Islands,
who had declared the insularity of
New Zealand, and sailed through the
Straits now called by his name. He
had explored the then unknown
coasts of Australia for over 2000 miles,
and be had watched the transit of
Venus for the scientific men of his
own land. One of the relics was an
arrow from the Pacific Ocean; part of
which was made from the leg-bone of
the dead sailor by the savages who
murdered him. Such a relic has a
ghastly pathos about it that appeals
decidedly to the sympathies of a wan
dering race like ours, and it was no
wonder that the relies attracted a
large amountof attention in England.
The children of the Euglish mother
are scattered all the wide world
over, and their adventures ap
peal ever to the sympathies? of the
maternal race, and our hearts respond
to the words of lludyard Kipling:
There dwells a wife by the Northern march,
And u wealthy wife is she;
She breeds a breed o' rovin' men,
And ousts them over sea.
Axid some they drown in deep water,
And some in sight of shore.
Aiid word coes back to the carline wife,
And ever she sends more.
Cook discovered New Caledonia
and the Sandwich Islands and many
another plce that is now well known.
He made unto himself a name that
will cever die, and the relics that
have come to our Museum seem to be
long to us of right, and seem, too,
appropriately housed in the Museum
which stands opposite to the statue of
the great navigator. The boy who
served his time on a north country
collier has today :i right to the place
of honor in Sydney. These relics
were purchase! by Sir Saul Samuel
during the Parker Administration,
and transferred to the Syduey Mu
seum by Sir George Dibbs, and are
now open to the public during the
reign of (Jeore K. Rei.f, ?o that they
stand clear of" all party Imes, and j'et
belong, as it were, to all parties, as
they indeed do.
Almost thn fir-t thing ' hat strikt-3
the eye is the bible that Ju sues Cook
used on board hissliip, from which he
read the les-0113 to his cr- This
book hhows the man an upright, fear
less, intensely ju-t man, with s deeply
religious spirit. He may nut have
been understood in hi day. but to the
reader of human nature these relics
have much to tell. How little his
contemporaries understood him may
be realized from two engravings which
form part of the precious relics. One
represents the fearless British sailor
lighting against the savages with his
clubbed musket. The other picture
represents him as standing at the wat
er's edge, beckoning to his boat's crew
not to lire, while a savage is plunging
his knife into the christian sailor s
back. The latter agrees most nearly
with the authentic narratives of the
tragedy, and was drawn by Webber,
the celebrated designer, who was em
ployed by Wedgewood. The same
man designed in 17S9, ten years after
Cook's death, a very perfect medallion,
which is now in this collection. It
represents "Hope addressing Peace,
Art, and Labour," and is made from
clay sent to England from Sydney
Cove by Sir Joseph Banks. This
medallion carries us back to the very
earliest days of our young colony, and
suggests the deep insight Sir Joseph
had of the possibilities of the young
and unknown country that his friend
Captain Cook had done so much for.
The silver plate, the spoons, knive9
and forks from, the good ship Res
olute, and the silver buckles from
the sturdy captain's shoes have all
a kind of significance for us,
a9 if declaring the common human
ity of the wonderful man, but
he comes nearest to us in a little
w-c V box, which was the first pres
ent he ever made to the lady who af
terwards became his wife, the lady
who died at Clapham less than sixty
years ago. As we stan J now in Col
lege street Museum and gaze on these
poor remainders of Captain Cook, we
seem to feel more keenly than ever
that he was a man like unto ourselves
in all things, and that it is not a
mighty gulf of time that separates us
from him. There are wonderful me
morials of many kinds in this collec
tion, such as it is fitting should be
preserved by us in our city treasury
of wonders, but they possess a new in
terest when we remember that the
man himself was a genius, a hero of
whom we have reason to be proud.
He was one of the first of the great
sea captains who could take his ship
away for years and come back with
out the scurvy! He dealt fairly and
honestly by all men, even by his own
crew, even by the "common sailors"
who were his fellow-voyagers, and
this is greater praise for Captain Cook
than the most glowing account of all
his mighty di&coveries. He was a
man! These poor relics, his dres3
sword, his compasses, his yokelines,
and the various little things that went
to make up his everyday life, are very
pathetic, and the autograph account
of the transit of Venus is suggestive of
his learning, but they are only valua
ble and interesting as we know the
man himself. Those who are familiar
with his life's history, with the story
of his boyhood and his young man
hood, and his faithfulness to duty,
will feel inclined to uncover their
heads before these poor relics of a dead
and gone day.
Those who can recall his life at the
grocer's counter, or on board of a
"Geordie collier," will be able to ap
preciate the glowing patent of a Royal
title which is shown now at College
street. They will see the value of the
Royal Societies medal and the Admir
alty medal conferred upon the son of
a poor day laborer in England, and
rightly read, these relics are priceless
to us. It seems a pity to leave the
suggestions of the relics without a
word about Mrs. Cook, who died so
recently. Her husband was killed in
1779, and she heard the news in 1780.
The same year her son Nathaniel, 16
years of age, was drowned on the man-of-war
Thunderer, which went down
in a gale of wind. Three years later
another son died of fever at the age of
17, and in the following year the eldest
son, commander of the warship Spit
fire, was driven out to sea in a small
boat and drowned. Her other children
had died young, and so in about four
years the old lady was left widowed,
childless and desolate. It was a ter
rible shock to her, but the world sym
pathized with her, and King George
III gave her a pension of 200 a year.
She lived for 50 years after her hus
band's death, and seems to bind our
own day to the day that appears so far,
far away.
The relics that have come to us now
are full of teaching power and full of
significance, for they recall the name
of the great and good sea-captain, and
show what is possible to dauntless
courage and the faithful discharge of
the humblest duty, and they tell to all
of a man who, "though dead, yet
speaketh." R. M.
BLIGHT AND RATS.
Active Enemies to Coffee Culture in
South Kona.
A citizen who returned by the
Hall brought the surprising report
that in South Kona, there was a new
blight that fed cn the lady bug.
This account was laid before Mr.
Marsden at once. Said he: "That
is simply rediculous. There may be
a blight that resists a certain kind of
lady bug, but blight feeds on leaves
and branches and fruit only. The
lady bug of certain varities has its
enemies but they have not yet been
discovered a blight which did not
disappear before some kind of
lady bug. Some absurd people have
suggested that the blight destroyers
will become a pest. Their food is
blight and when that is gone they
are pan."
One of the coffee planters has sent
to Honolulu a requisition for rat
dogs. He writes of a new species of
rat, that is very destructive to coffee
plants. It kills the new shoots.
Many trees of good growth have
been girdled.
The Daily Advertiser 75 cents a
month.
MARSHAL HITCHCOCK'S AXE,
It Decends on the Neck of the ,
Mounted Patrol Captain.
KLEMME HAS BEEN DETHRONED.
Summarily Discharged Ilia Superiors
Bad Iost Confidence in II I m Was
Distrusted Has liren Talking Too
Much He Had a Good Thing.
Emperor Klemme has beep
throned. Czar Carl is now an
ary citizen of the country,
been emperor-czar only in J
The axe fell Saturday, and 1
Cordes is acting captain of t
ed police. rtTMifr
There is much to be saidil H'iVlt
said about the setting of th
sun. The first fact, in plali
is that Klemme was sumn
charged. The reason is, th.
perlors lost confidence in him ;
distrusted. For a long time he f
been on the list with other suspects.
The charges against suspects vary
from plotting treason to insubordina
tion, inefficiency and neglect of duty.
There are several theories about
Klemme. Some say that his mouth
ran away with him. Others suggest
that a disease which usually attacks
the feet and causes them to swell,
made a raid on Klemme's head. The
man has manifested, in many ways,
the most extravagant exaggeration of
his own importance. His idea was
that the best gifts of the gods should
be showered into his lap. He had the
belief that Klemme was a sort of
king-bolt. This is an article without
which a band-wagon will come to
grief.
As captain of the mounted patrol,
Klemme had a very fair billet. The
salary was $135 a month. There were
probably some perquisites with the
place. He had first ten, then seven,
men in his squad. The duties were
not arduous. Klemme, after being on
watch all night, was usually down
town by 10 In the morning.
The ex-captain has been quite actiye
in politics, but the department took no
cognizance of this. He was at the
head of the original Schuetzen club.
This organization split and the captain
started another. The mother body re
mained in charge of Harry Klemme.
This one has been disbanded. Last
week the talk was that there would be
one strong club with Capt. Klemme as
its president. For a time it was re
ported that feeling between the two
clubs was bitter, but as HarryKlemme,
remarked: "Blood is thicker than
water." Capt. Klemme and Lieut.
Cordes were lately fined in circuit
court for assaulting one Muller. This
man has been writing about Klemme
in one of the evening papers. It was
while Capt. Klemme was at the head
of the Schuetzen club that the notor
ious suppressed resolutions were sent
to the Councils. They were returned,
and the authors sharply reprimanded.
Klemme has not asked why he was
discharged. The authorities do not
give out details and Klemme only
growls. At times he has been very
saucy. He is reported to have made
the most astounding remarks on the
head of his ability to control or direct
Governmental affairs. It was Klemme
who was mixed up by gossip in the
dynamite scare of la-t year. They
say, too, that the cock and bull stories
he has carried to the station house
had material for 'steeu dime novels.
Lately Klemme has been watched,
and it is said that his associates, to
gether with his alleged utterances,
led to the parting.
In relegating Klemme to private
life his superiors took full account of
his services. He was one of the men
who turned out January 17, 1S93. He
has been in service ever since.
Captain Klemme came to Hawaii
direct from Germany. He led a strike
on one of the plantations and they
had quite a nasty time with him and
his followers.
There is very little sy m patby around
town for Klemme. He has been too
self-important.
-
Knights of Pythias.
Negotiations have been under
way for eome time with the pur
pose of consolidating two of the
Pythian lodges of the islands.
These are Mystic No. 2 of this city
and Kealia No. 5 of Kauai. The
latter has a membership that is
widely separated and it has been
difficult. Otherwise it is in good
circumstances, having earnest
members and ample funds. It is
planned to have the Kealia knights
become members of Mystic. The
two lodges will meet at Mystic's
hall this evening at 5 o'clock. For
the business at hand a quorum of
KeaHa has come to this citv.
Advertises 75 cents a month.

xml | txt