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The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, November 22, 1894, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1894-11-22/ed-1/seq-1/

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Established July 2, 2S00.
VOIj- XX- JSO. 3849.
HONOIUXTJ. HAWAIIAN ISLANDS, THUIiSDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1S94.
PRICE: 5 CENTS.
Business (Tarfts.
The Hawaiian Safe Deposit
-AND
INVESTMENT COMPANY
Offers for Sale at a
area in
50 SHARES KAHDKU STOCK
SO Shares Hawaiian Sugar Com
pany Stock.
as Shares People's Ice Stock.
gXJ Cash paid for Government
Bond3, all issues.
3824-lw
YOU CAN GET
Haviland China, plain and
decorated ; English China,
White, Granite; Cut Glass
ware, Moulded and Engraved
Glassware, Agateware, Tin
ware, Lamps and Fittings,
Flower Pots, Fruit Jars and
Jelly Glasses and a thousand
other useful and ornamental
articles at
J. T. I
Queen Street Stores.
3807-tf
C. BREWER & CO., LIMITED
Queen Street, Honolulu, XT. I,
AGENTS FOR
Hawaiian Agricultural Co., Onomea
Sugar Co., Honomu Sugar Co., Wailuku
Sugar Co., Waiheo Sugar Co., Makee
Sugar Co., Haleakala Ranch Co., Kapa
p&fa Ranch.
Planters Line San Francisco Packets.
Chas. Brewer & Co.'s Line of Boston
Packets.
Agents Boston Board of Underwriters.
Agents Philadelphia Board of Under
writers. LIST OP OFFICERS:
P. C. Josks President
Geo. II. Robertson Manager
E. F. Bishop Tres. and Secy.
Col. W. F. Allen Auditor
C. M. Cooke )
H.Waterhocse...- Directors
C. L. Carter )
Castle & Cooke,
LIFE AND FIRE
11
Jl
AGENTS FOR
NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL
Life Insurance Company
OF BOSTON.
fitna Fire Insurance Company
OF IIARTFORD.
HTERHOWS
SSDR1NCE
Hum ikj
HUSTACE & C6..
Dealers n
WOOD AND COAL
Also White and Black Sand which we
will sell at the very lowest market rates.
fiXJ1 Bell Tslepeoxb Ho. 414,
C7"Mctul Tzlepho5b No. 414.
3493-ly
business CariJs.
The Hawaiian Investment Co,
NEGOTIATES LOANS ON
Eeal Estate and
Personal Property
STOCKS AND BONDS
BOUGHT A2?D SOLD.
BJLJ If you have Real Estate for Sale
we can find you a purchaser.
EJj If you have Houses for Rent we
can find tenants.
GENERAL REAL ESTATE AGENTS
13 and 15 Kaahumanu Street,
Mutual Telephone 639. XearPostoffice.
C. A. LONG,
NOTARY PUBLIC
15 Kaahumanu st. Telephone 639.
SSll-6m
51. E. Grossman, D.D.&
O ENTIST,
S HGT21 113X11.
CSF"0ric Hoce & a. m.to 4 t. u.
C. B. RIPLEY,
ARTHUR REYNOLDS,
AECHITECTS.
Office New Safe Deposit Building,
Honolulu, H. I.
Plans, Specifications, and Superintend
ence giTen for every description of Build
lng.
Old Buildings successfully remodelled
and enlarged.
Designs for Interior Decorations.
Maps or Mechanical Drawing, Tracing,
and Blueprinting.
)y Drawings for Book or Newspaper
Ulnstratlon.
New Goods
A FINE ASSORTMENT.
TILES FOR FLOORS !
And for Decorating Purposes;
MaTTOIQ 07 ALL KlNDS,
Manila Cigars.
WING WO CHAN & CO.
No. H Nuuau Htyt.
263 I -a
The New Jewelry Store
003 ii'ort Street,
ARB PREPARED TO MANUFACTURE ANY
THING IN THEIR LINE.
Souvenir Spoons1!
a specialty. Also, on hand a fine stock
of imported
JEWELRY.
EVERYTHING IN THE LATEST DESIGNS.
"Island orders promptly attended to.
P. O. BOX 237.
MUTUAL TELEPHONE 463.
E. A. JACOBSON
PIONEER
Steam Candy Factory and Bakery
F. HORN,
Practical Confectioner and Baker,
ISTO. 71 HOTEL STREET.
3753-tf
WM. L. PETERSON,
Notary :- Public, -: Typewriter
AND COLLECTOR.
Ornci: Over Bishop & Co.'sBank.
SSlS-y
Massage.
ATRS. PRAY WOULD ANNOUNCE
JLtJL that she will attend a limited nam
ber of patients. Address at H. M.
Whitney's, King st. ; Bell Telephone 75.
222S-H
Business Carts.
JENNIE L. HILDEBRAND, M. D.
HOTEL. STREET,
Opposite Union street.
Office hours : 9 to 12 a. m. and 2
to 4 p. m. Mutual Telephone 2so. 610.
, 353S-3m
Viavi Remedies.
ILLUSTRATED TALKS EVERY
Saturday at 3 p. si., at Viavi office,
King street, by Mrs. C. Galloway.
3814 1593-tf
A. PERRY,
ATTORNEY AT LAW
And Notary Public.
Office: Over Bishop's Bank.
3692-ly
WILLIAM C. PARKE,
ATTORNEY -AT -LAW
JLVD
A. grnt to tak AekaowldgmnU.
OrriCB No. 13 Kaahumanu Street. Hono-
lnlu.H.I.
H. R. HITCHCOCK,
Notary Public, Second Judiciary Circuit
H. I., KALUAAUA, MOLOKAI.
3S04-3m
HAWAIIAN HARDWARE CO.,
HARDWARE,
Cutlery and Glassware
307 Fort Street.
3575-ly
BEAVER SALOON,
FORT 8TBEET, OPP08ITS WILDER A CO.'fl
II. J. NOLTE, Proprietor.
First-class Lunches served with Tea, Cof
fee, Soda Water, Ginger Ale or Milk.
'OPEN FBOM 3 A. M. TILL 10 P. M.
Smokers' Requisites a specialty.
CITY -:- CARRIAGE -:- COMPANY
Corner King and Bethel Streets.
Carriages at all Hours !
ECHBoth Telephones 113.
3713-tf J. S. ANDRADE, Manager.
HONOLULU IRON WORKS CO.,
Steam Engines,
Ltollera, 8n;rnr 22111a, Coolers, rau
and X,eact Cnstlnff
And machinery of every description made
to order. Particular attention paid to
ships blacksmithing. Job work excuted
on the shortest notic.
LEWIS & CO.,
Wholesale and Retail Grocers
111 FORT STREET,
Telephone 240. F. O. Box 297.
LEWERS & COOKE,
Successors to Lewers & Dickson.
Importers and Dealers in Lumber
And all Kinds of Building Materials.
NO. 83 FORT STREET. HONOLULU
JOHN T. WATERH0USS,
Importsr and Desist lu
GE2JSRAL MERCHANDISE.
No. 25-81 Qneen Street, Honoluln.
JL W. McCHESNEY k SONS
WHOLESALE GROCERS
AJ?D DEALERS IN
Leather and Shoe Findings
HONOLULU.
Af!FNT3 Honolulu floap "Works Co.,
AULilllO Honolulu Tannery.
CONSOLIDATED
Soda Water Works Company, Limited
Esplanade, Corasr Allen and Fort St3.
HOLLISTER & CO.,
3710 155S-ly Aeenf.
H. HACKFELD & CO.,
General Commission Agents
Cor. Fort and Qneen sts Honolulu.
Notice.
I HEREBY DECLARE MY INTE5C
tion to contest and ask to have de
clared void the election held on the 29th
day of October, 1894.
3S3S-2w HENRY KLEMME.
STRIKERS WALK INTO TOWN,
150 Japanese Field Hands Tramp
s0ver the Pali From Kahukn.
MAKE A SORRY LOOKING LOT.
Wet, Cold and Hungry Six Hours From
Kaneohe Mad Through and Through
Wanted a Luna Discharged Their
Ultimatum Was Unheeded Details.
From 10 o'clock last night to 3 this
morning an uneven procession of Jap
anese laborers occupied Nuuanu ave
nue from its head to Merchant street.
These men out in the mud and wet
and chill of the night were striking
Kahuku plantation field hands. They
walked thirty-eight miles over disor
dered roads through a storm.
Tiiere were 150 men in the party led
by seven agitators. They wanted to
see Mr. Okkots, the chief inspector
and then requested a hearing before
Goro Narita, the Japanese Charge
d' Aflaires. These gentlemen declined
to talk business until this morning.
Early today Mr. Okkots will listen to
the statement of grievances. Mr.
Narita is averse to becoming involved
in the affair and will avoid it if possi
ble. He will do his full duty but will
not act officially until it is quite nec
essary. ' The column of strikers broke first at
School street. The weary travelers
sought friends and various Japanese
hotels. They are quartered all over
the town. These men were mad last
night as men usually get. They were
completely tired out, wet, cold and
hungry. A fighting mood was on
them and a very sight provocation
would have caused them to riot. They
complained most bitterly of treatment
by the Kahuku management. They
declared they had been abused out
rageously, miserably housed, put on
short fuel allowance and deprived of
water. They said they were com
pelled to work day and night at times
tnd forced to walk from the fields
when trains were running. It is
known here that the Kahuku camps
are new and cottages comfortable, and
the water supply second to none on
the islands.
Some of the strikers brought all
their property along. A few of them
asserted they were going back to
Japan to be soldiers. One fellow sav
agely remarked that he hoped to be in
an army to come to the islands and
ravage them from end to end.
Kahuku plantation is by the Pali
road, thirty-eight miles from Hono
lulu. The strikers left there yesterday
morning. Boads through Koolau are
bad in the rainy season. It has been
raining all over the district for five
days. The column reached Kaneohe
at 4 o'clock in the afternoon. They
did not tell of their troubles along the
rnnfo Vvn f tvi o i CkA of ro nrVif: o H an
Lunch was taken at Waiahole. They
were short of food there and were
well-nigh starved on reaching Hono
lulu. Some of them had overcoats.
A great many of them were wrapped
in blankets. A number carried um
brellas. Part of them were armed
with cane knives and clubs to resist
arrest. They assert they will never
return to Kahuku. Borne women
started out with the strikers, but went
back. They could not stand the trip.
It is a task that is trying to a strong
team of horses.
Coming up the Pali many of the
Japs became greatly discouraged, but
were urged on by their leaders. Their
clogs slipped on the stones and they
fell and barked their knees. Most of
them were barefooted coming into
Honolulu. One stout fellow, who
seemed able to travel indefinitely, had
his trunk on his back. He wa3 well
at the head of the line, too. The best
of them were fully six hours coming
over from Kaneohe. There are proba
bly some left along the line of march.
To make the distance from Kahuku to
Honolulu in a day is a feat for an
athlete. It was very dark last night,
and one of the commanders thought
some of the battalion might have
wandered off into the mountains.
Grinbaum fc Co. are agents for Ka
huku. Mr. C. Bolte, the head of the
house, declined to give any informa
tion about the sti ike. Nothing could
be learned from tue manager. The
telephone did not seem to be in work
ing order. However, Mr. Bolte told
the piautat ion's story to one of the
Japant-r'e orlicials ami his version was
repeated to an Advertiser reporter.
On Tuesday afterooon the trouble
began. A Japnuee ami a Portuguese
both contract men had a fight. A
luna separated them. It was claimed
that the J:p was rougLly handled.
He appealed to the sa lawyers of his
camp. They decided in i-nort order
that he had been sLamelully mal
treated. A committee called upon
Manager Aruemaun and dvinaiided
the instant dismissal of the lun . Mr.
Arnemaun investigated and concluded
that the ultimatum would never do.
Thereupon the seven wi3 men who
had determined the merits of the case
between the luna and the Sullivan
esque Jap, went to work in earnest.
They tried to incite riot, but the lab
orers knew the plantation's head men
were armed and did not care to go
against six-shooters and rifles. The
seven disturbers then presented the
scheme of a trip to Honolulu. The
weather was good at this time and
about 200 men said they would fall in
line in the morning. About fifty
weakened.
Warrants are out for the seven ring
leaders. It is believed that if they
are taken from the body of the strikers
and disciplined, the trouble will end.
At best, the men will lose several
days' work, and many of them will be
ill from the trip.
There has been trouble with Japan
ese at Kahuku a couple of times be
fore. On one occasion they stoned the
office. There is an instance of a laborer
cutting himself with a hoe and claim
ing to have been assaulted by a time
keeper. A meeting of the Kahuku Company
was held at the Chamber of Commerce
yesterday morning. It was remarked
during the day that perhaps the field
hands were coming over to demand a
share of dividends. Kahuku has de
veloped into a fine property. It is the
only real windward plantation on the
island, both Waimanalo and Heeia
being well protected. Kahuku is, in
many ways, a model plantation. It
has a fine mill, a splendid railway
system, and one of the best pumping
plants anywhere. Alex. Young was
one of the projectors of the enterprise
and selected the machinery. They
have a good landing near Laiea. It
is a comparatively new plantation. It
is planned to cultivate much more
land on the Kahuku ranch estate.
At the recent meeting of the Plant
ers' Labor and Supply Company here,
a very frank report was submitted by
the committee on labor. Here is a
quotation from the remarks on Jap
anese field labor :
"The disposition to strike is one
which it is less difficult to account for
than it is to control: the men are well
treated and fairly dealt by, but not
withstanding this they never fail to
seize on the smallest grievance, of a
real or imaginary nature, to revolt
and leave work, and it is a matter for
regret that the facilities in the shape
of free legal defense do much to pro
mote appeals to the law courts on
frivolous pretexts. The demagogic
element among the laborers kindles
and keeps alive an antagonistic senti
ment against employers, which would
be non-existent but for the efforts of
the agitators, and when the specially
retained counsel of the Japanese Gov
ernment in open court justifies the
most flagrant outrages by laborers as
was done in the course of the trial of
some strikers from Ewa plantation in
September last, the possibility of con
trolling the badly disposed among the
laborers becomes a work of extreme
difficulty. It is needless to state that
such lawlessness and tendency to
strike as that which is sometimes be
trayed by the Japanese would not be
tolerated in their own country, and
would appear to have been bred of the
comparative comfort in which they
find themselves in this country. For
this tendency to strike the only rem
edy possible is the introduction of
some other class of labor to supple
ment the Japanese, and it is to be
most earnestly hoped that this other
class can be procured."
CROSS FIRE FROM GATLINGS.
These Pieces Have Been Placed on
Pivots at Executive Building.
Command All Sides Rapid-Firing and
Deadly Relics of the Kalniiloa
Steel Shields to be Used. j
A marked change and a decided
improvement has been made in the
defenses at the Executive Building.
Colonel Fisher has, for some time,
been engaged in planning a differ
ent arrangement of artillery. The
new distribution of the pieces was
made yesterday. The gatlings,
which are the most useful guns in
the battery, are now set to the best
possible advantage.
At one time these gatling guns
were on the deck of the Kaimiloa.
The3T were brought back from the
southern edge of the Polynesian
empire in good condition, and to
day are serviceable as ever. These
gatiing guns are the favorite city
and riot field piece the world over.
They are easily handled, rapid and
deadly. They give either a direct
or sweeping fire, and strike terror
to a mob any time. The ammunition
for a gatling gun is a 45-70 cart
ridge, the same as for a Springfield
rifle. The recoil from a small arm
is 170 pounds ; from a gatling gun
it is less.
Two gatling guns at the Execu
tive Building are now mounted on
pivots and tripods at the southeast
and northwest corners. They are
in the basement corridor, with the
brass muzzles a few inches above
the masonry parapet. Each gun is
to have a heavy steel shield. Each
piece commands two sides of the
building, and a cross-fire may be
produced. These guns were for
merly mounted on the Executive
Building porch, with some heavier
pieces. The latter have been taken
to the ground.
Details from E and F Companies
man the gatling guns. They have
been carefully trained, and are
quite expert.
AT
Dr. Alvarez Believes the Disease wa3
Brought There from Honolulu.
ONE MORE JAPANESE DOCTOR.
Fluke Ulrer Bullocks A Chinaman
Wants to Vaccinate Medicine for the
Goto Treatment Delp for the Bis
ters on Molokal A Question of Taxes.
The Board of Health met yesterday
afternoon, with President Smith In
the chair. The meat inspector report
ed that 145 bullocks were slaughtered
last week, thirty-five of which had
fluke liver. The diseased animals
were raised on this island.
A letter from Dr. Alvarez was read,
in which he reported that several
cases of German measles had devel
oped at Vaimea, this island. One of
the afllicted ones had died. The doc-r
tor was of the opinion that the disease
had been brought from Honolulu.
Dr. M. Wakayama, a recent arrival
applied for a license to practice medi
cine. On motion it was decided to
have the applicant appear before the
medical members of the board and be
examined as to his qualifications.
President Smith announced that an
other shipment of Japanese medicine
for use at the leper settlement had ar
rived. The bill amounted to a little
over $500. It was ordered paid.
A brief letter was read from a Chi
nese named Muck Won Toe. He in
formed the board that he had treated
small pox, and wanted permission to
vaccinate people. He was denied the
privilege.
Commissions were made out for
Sheriff Andrews and his deputies to
act as health agents on Maui. The
commissions will be forwarded by the
next mail.
While the members of the Board
were at the settlement the leper band
requested that they be furnished with
an outfit of new instruments. The
matter was mentioned yesterday but
no action was taken. -
The work of the Sisters at the settle
ment has been greatly increased dur
ing the past two years, and if the
Mother Superior desires additional
help the Board will permit it. A let
ter to that effect will be forwarded by
the next mail. The Board olTers to
fay the traveling expenses of at least
our Sisters, from tneir convent in
Syracuse, New York, to this country.
A number of people at the settle
ment complain that the tax assessor
had exacted the extra ten per cent,
when they paid their dues to the Gov
ernment. They claim that the official
did not call until after the 1st of the
present month, so they did not have
an opportunity to pay before taxes
were declared delinquent. President
Smith stated that the money would
be returned to them.
Dr. Wood, for the leprosy commis
sion, appointed at the last meeting of
the Board, made a partial report. The
members had met and formulated
plans. Thirteen cases, all youths,
were selected during the recent visit.
They will be brought to Honolulu and
housed at Kalihi station. Comforta
ble apartments will ba provided for
the patients. A doctor will be select
ed to care for them.
-4.
YOUNG HAWAIIANS.
Their Institute Accepts Mrs. T. R
Fosters Utter or Her Hall.
Henry Smith was in the chair as
usual at last evening's meeting of
the Young Hawaiian's Institute.
They gathered at Y. M. C. A. hall,
and there was a good attendance.
Three applications for membership
were received and sent to the com
mittee. A most gratifying report was re
ceived from the house committee.
Mrs. T. R. Foster had placed the
hall building on Nuuanu and Ma
rine streets at the disposal of the
society. This very generous offer
was accepted, and an appropriate
note of thanks will be sent to Mrs.
Foster.
Last evening's meeting was the
last that will be held in Y. M. C. A.
hall. The Institute members feel
under obligations to the Associa
tion people and passed resolutions
to that effect. They volunteer at
anytime to assist in Y. M. C. A.
entertainments. As there is con
siderable vocal and literary talent
in the institute they will doubtless
be called upon for the temperance
concerts. The Young Hawaiians
will always remember the Y. M. C.
A. as their first home, as the origi
nal roof over their institute.
In their new hall the institute
will have debates and listen to lec
tures. Occasionally a public enter
tainment will be given.
GERMAN
MEASLES
wAIMEA

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