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The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, December 20, 1894, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1894-12-20/ed-1/seq-1/

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0 'A A
HOOIjTJIjTjT 1S9
VOIi. XX- O. 3872.
4
PKIOE: 5 CENTS.
IMP M P
KutablUhfd July . yG
Uusincss (Tar
C. BREWER k CO., LIMITED
Queen Street, Honolulu, U. I.
AGENTS FOR
Hawaii&n Agricultural Co., Onomea
Snjfar Co., Honoma Hngar Co., Wailokn
ScgarCo., Waihee Sugar Co., Makee
Bnpir Co., Ilaleak&Ia Bancb Co., Kapa
paTa Bancb.
Planters' Lice San Franciaco Packets.
Cnaa. Brewer A, Co.fa Line of Boston
Packets.
Agents Boston Board of Underwriters.
Agents Philadelphia Board of Under
writers. I.X9T or OrriCEKS:
P. C. Jojtes President
Gio. H. Robxbtson Manager
E. F. Bishop Tres. and Becy.
Col. W. F. Aixkx Auditor
C. M. Cooue )
H. Watkbhousx... Directors
O.L. Cabtih )
YOU CAN GET
Haviland China, plain and
decorated ; English China,
White, Granite; Cut Glass
ware, Moulded and Engraved
Glassware, Agateware, Tin
ware, Lamps and Fittings,
Flower Pots, Fruit Jars and
Jelly Glasses and a thousand
other useful and ornamental
articles at
J. T. WATERBODSBS
Queen Street Stores.
3S07-tf
Tfie Hawaiian Indmenf Co,
HEAL ESTATE
AND-
POII SAIiE.
Desirable Property in all parts of the
City.
Four Houses on Punchbowl street at
a bargain.
A 4-acre Lot at Makiki.
Lots 4 and 5, Block 25, Pearl
City.
A2g-acre Lot at Kalihi.
Residence at Kalihi with barn, pig
pens and chicken coop, 120x10 ; suitable
for a Chicken Ranch.
13 and 13 Kaihnmann Street
Telephone 639. Near Postoffice.
Castle & Cooke,
LIFE AND FIRE
Jl
if
AGENTS FOR
NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL
Life Insurance Company
OF B08TON.
Utna Fire Insurance Coapy
OF HARTFORD.
HONOLULU
r i
W.W.WRICHT, - Proprietor.
Carriage -: Builder
A2sB KEPAIKER.
'All orders from the other islands
in the Carriage Building, Trimming and
Painting Line, will meet with prompt
attention.
O. BOX J21.
N03. 128 AND 130 FORT STREET
2363-y
INSURANCE
km
Dusinrss Cari)s.
DR. R. I. MOORE
DENTIST,
02:s: lrlintcn Csttigs, Hotel Eire
CJCJ Office hours : 9 a. m. to 12 h.
and 1 p. m. to 4 p. m. 3860-1m
M. E. Grossman, D.D.8.
DENTIST,
53 HOTJL STSKT.
C. B. RIPLEY,
ARTHUR REYNOLDS,
ARCHITECTS.
Orncx New afj Deposit Building,
tlOMOHTLC, U. I.
Flans. Bpecification&, and Saperlntend
nee giren for exery description of Build
ing. Old Bail-lings successfully remodelled
and enlarged.
Designs for Interior Decorations.
Maps or Mechanical Drawing, Tracing,
and Blueprinting.
X9Drawings for Book or Newspaper
ninstration.
New Goods
A FINE ASSORTMENT.
TILES FOR FLOORS !
x And for Decorating Purposes;
MjLTTCfO OP ALL KlX28,
Maxhjl Cigjles.
WING WO CHAN & CO.
Mo. sa Nauanu Btrt.
1631-q
Great Republican Victory
WE HAVE OX UANO A FINE AS
SORTMENT 07
EXGLISH -:- SERGES!
Tweed. Clay Wortted, Dlasonals
and Frech Caitimarei
Suitable for the Holidays.
Our prices are lower than ever. Give
us a call before ordering.
MEDEIROS Sr CO.,
Tailors.
Arlington Block,
Hotel Street.
3547-2m
F. W. MAKINNEY,
TY I? EWIi I TEK ,
Ccnveyancer and Searcher cf Records
F1HE, MF AM
Accident -: Insurance.
All kinds of Typewriting done, promptly,
cheaply and accurately.
.also
GENERAL COLLECTOR.
'orncK: 31S fort street 3S4S-tf
PIONEER
Steam Candy Factory and Bakery
F. HORN,
Practical Confectioner and Baker,
2sO. 71 HOTEL STREET.
3753-tf
WM. L. PETERSON,
Notary :- Pablic, -: Typewriter
AU collector.
OrriCE: Over Bishop A Co.'sBank.
331fty
WILLIAM SAVIDGE,
Collector and Real Estate Agent
Bents Collected. Houses Rented.
Office: Cummins Block, Merchant
ptrefet. jrJm
Massage.
,yf R8. PRAY WOULD ANNOUNCE
ifl. that she will attend a limited nam
ber of patients. Aidrees at 11, bL
Whitne'i, King st. ; Bell Tiephona 75.
32S8-U
Business CarDs.
JENNIE L. HILDEBRANDf M. D.
Homeopathic Physician.
HOTEL. STREET,
Opposite Ifnion street.
BJSJ' Office hoars : 9 tfj 12 a. h. and 2
to 4 p. m. Mutual Telephone "o. 610.
CS3&m
VFAYI
CURES ALL DISEASES PECU
liar toVfomen, rheumatism, skin
diseases ana acts as a blood purifier.
Lectured Viavi Hall at 3 p.m. this
afternooii.
3S51-tf
A. PERRY,
ATTORNEY AT LAW
And Notary Public.
Office: Over Bishop's Eank.
3692-ly
WILLIAM C. PARKE,
ATTORNEY -AT -LAW
Agant to taka AeknowUdgmcnu.
Onci No. 13 Kaahumanu 8trest,Hono-
lnln, H. I.
H. R. HITCHCOCK,
Notary Public, Second Judiciary Circuit
H. I., KALUAAHA, MOLOKAI.
3S04-3m
H. MAY 8c CO.,
Wholesale and Retail Grocers
OS FORT STREET.
Telephones 22. P. O. Box 470.
3450-y
HAWAIIAN HARDWARE CO.,
HARDWARE,
Cutlery and Glassware
307 Fort Street.
3575-ly
BEAVER SALOON,
FORT STREET, OPPOSITE WILDER A CO.'S
II. J. NOLTE, Proprietor.
First-claes Lunches served with Tea, Cof
fee, Soda Water, Ginger Ale or Milk.
gJZS OFZS FROM 3 A. M. TILL 10 F. M.
Smokers Reouisites a specialty.
WM. F. THRUM,
S-TJ H -V E TT O R.
Room No. 11, Spreckels Block.
3S59-6m
HONOLULU IRON WORKS CO.,
Steam Engines,
Boiler, Hugnr AUlIa, Coolers, Kraaa
ana Ia4l Caatlngr,
And machinery of every description made
to order. Particular attention paid to
ships' blacksmithinsr. Job work exented
on the shortest notic.
LEWIS & CO.,
Wholesale and Retail Grocers
111 FORT STREET,
Telephone 24Q. P. O. Itox 397.
LEWERS & COOKE,
Successors to Lewers A Dickson.
Importers and Dealers in Lumber
And all Kinds of Building Materials.
NO. 83 FORT BTltKKT. HONOLULU
CONSOLIDATED
Soda Water Works Company, Limited
Isplmie, Comer lllsn mi Fcrt Sis.
HOLLISTEK & CO.,
3710 15oft-lv Agents.
JOHN T. WATERHOUSE,
Uaporttr iai Dtaltr la
GENERAL MERCHANDISE.
50.J5-81 Qnn Btrt, Honololn.
M. W. HtCDESNEY 4 SONS
WHOLESALE GROCERS
AJD DEALEBfl IN
Leather and Shoe Findings
HONOLULU.
inrfJTQ Honolula Hnmp Worki Co.,
AUItHIO Honolulu Trry.
H. HACKFELD a CO..
Geueral Commission Agents
Cor. Fort end Queen ats., Uoaolola.
OHE MORE SACRED MEMORIAL,
Celebration of Founder's Day at
Kamehameha.
TKIltUTKS PAID TO MKS. HISHOP,
New School for Girls and Mmeioi An
nci Addd to Ins tit ntion's Complt
inDt Addreaa by Mrs. Haalelea
Tke Sports and Friz Winners.
Yeaterday was a gala day at Ka
mehameha School.
Founder's Day is always celebrated
appropriately but this day of the year
1S94 was one of notable importance
in the history of the institution, since
it marks another step in the comple
tion of the plans proposed by the
founder, Mrs. Bernice Pauahi Bishop,
the opening of the school for girls.
In conjunction with this the open
ing of the museum annex was a most
important feature.
The exercises of the day began in
the early morning, when after the
usual custom a party of some 100 boys
from the school rode to the corner of
King and Nuuanu streets and from
there marched to the mausoleum
which was decorated with wreaths
carried by the boys. The party was
accompanied by the school band, led
by Mr. Berger.
The formal exercises of the after
noon were held in Bishop Hall. At
the appointed hour this place was
filled to overflowing, many of the late
comers being unable to obtain seats.
The decorations were simple but
tasty. Potted ferns encircled the
stage, and about the pictures of Mr.
and Mrs. Bishop on either side of the
platform were appropriate decorations
of ferns and flowers.
Those seated on the stage were: Rev.
Dr. Hyde, Mrs. Haalelea, Col. V. F.
Allen, Miss Dodge, and Rev. J . "Waia
mau. Prayer was ottered by Rev. Mr.
"Waiamau. After a song by the school
Dr. Hyde delivered a short address of
welcome. He said in part: "These
buildings were designed not merely to
perpetuate tne name of the founder
but perpetuate for the benefit of others
those influences which she regarded
as of paramount importance in shap
ing and directing her own life and
character." Mr. Hyde then called
attention to the museum of Polyne
sian ethnoloy and natural history,
and Queen Kmma's interest in the
work. December 2, 1SS7, Hon. C. R.
Bisbop stated to the trustees, appoint
ed under the will of Mrs. Bishop, that
It was his desire to erect a suitable
building for a museum on the Kame
hameha School premises.
The Trustees cordially approved the
project, and selected the site. The
same architect who drew the plan for
this hall drew the plan also for the
museum. Mr. Bishop had previously
built and paid for the preparatory
school, and had also paid the bills for
the cost of the hall, as of record April
11, 1SS9. A deed of gift from him
passed over to the charge of the Trus
tees the contents of the museum,
under date of March 23, 1S91. Finding
that, through some mistake in phrase
ology, lands conveyed at the same
time had not been specially conveyed
for the maintenance and extension of
the museum, May 20, 1S92, he an
nounced his intention of giving, for
this purpose, his lands in Waipio. A
few months afterward (October 3, 1892)
he announced his intention to build
an annex, plans for which he pre
sented, as prepared by the Curator
and Superintendent. That building
is now completed, and is now opened
to the public. March f, 1S93, Mr.
Bishop parsed over to the Trustees
securities', whose annual interest will
be amply sufficient to maintain the
MiiM'um and extend Its collections.
Recently, Mr. Bishop has purchased,
for the 'Museum, Mr. CSarratt's large
collection of shells, and, still more
recently, Mr. W. T. Bingham's her
barium f Hawaiian plant.
It was Mr. Bishop's desire, in locat
ing the Museum on these premises, to
perpetuate what of public interest, of
national interest, of personal interest,
there is in thi extensive and unique
collection of Hawaiian antiquities and
relics. Heredity and environment are
two potent factors in the development
of ruees Mini It. dividual. It is Mr.
Bishop's desire lhat these memorials
of the past .shall furnifh suitable in
struction and intensify patriotic en-11iu.-la.oui
In the Hawaiian youth of
both isexe brought into these building-,
und-r these influences, for edu
cation and training, nd, as such, they
properly form a part f the equipment
of tti se M-hooN.
It N U imntin of the Trustees to ;
make the Miieu:ii a!- more and
more a nucleus for collect mg and con
centrating t he appliance f r scielltilie
research in the various cp!irtments
.f l'olyncrian KthnoNiv d Natural
History. Arrangements ilt he made
al.-o for opfimiL' ihe Muse-mi more
frequent to the general i 1 l as well
as lor special sstttice t it id vidual .
engaged in seientitle inveMigat ion.-. j
No one present regret mm- than i
Mr. Uishop's aH-iii iates In the Hoard :
of Trustees, his iiuthiliiy to he present !
at these memorial services of Found-,
er's Day. Or. many previous occasions j
we have heard from him word oi giuu
encouragement and sound advice. We
are happy in having present with us
one who has been Intimately asso
ciated with him in home life a well
M public duties. We fthall be glad to
hear a few words from Colonel Allen,
as Mr. Bishop's representative.
Col. Allen said: 1 know that you
all regret the absence of Mr. Bishop
on this occasion, and when asked to
represent and speak for him I should
much rather have declined, but felt it
a duty to accept.
That Mr. Bishop is with you today
in spirit you all know, and though
absent in person, his interest in these
schools never wanes, by correspon
dence with the trustees, principal,
and others he has kept well posteu in
all the progress here made.
On this the natal day of Bern ice
Pauahi Bishop, the founder's day of
this institution, such a grand monu
ment to her love and care for her peo
ple, it is beyond my powers to do jus
tice to the occasion or theme.
Both Mrs. Bishop and her husband
fully realized, that the proper care
and teaching of the young was the
only way to insure the stability of
the people, and so they have devoted
their best thoughts, and much of their
property to carry out these ideas.
To you trustees, principal and teach
ers, the responsibility of carrying out
the wishes of the founder's of this in
stitution belongs, and from the expe
rience of the few years since the open
ing, no fears are entertained of the
ultimate success.
To you boys and girls of Kameha
meha Schools I would say, that, to
show your appreciation of the great
gift of your benefactors, you should
ever strive to take advantage of all
lhat is here offered you, so that in the
future you can show by your indus
trious and virtuous lives, what the
' y - y '
5 - Mt. ;'
EEKNICE TAUAHI EISHOP.
Kamehameha Schools have doue for
you.
On behalf of Mr. Bishop I thank
you all for showing such an apprecia
tion of the grand work, and memory
of the founder of this institution
Bernice Pauahi Bishop.
Dr. Hyde then made a very pleas
ant reference to Mrs. Bishop's life and
read the minutes of a meeting of the
trustees of the institution under the
will of the late Mrs. Bernice P. Bisbop
held on June 15, 1SSS. These in fit
ting language recounted the beautiful
character of Mrs. Bishop and her ex
penditure of time, energy and money
for the benefit of Her race.
"All these excellencies and others
that cannot bespeclficallv enumerated
combined to lead up to the crowning
act of a noble, honored and well-spent
life. Knowing the fatal nature of the
malady that had seized on her, in the
disposition of her estate in kindly re
membrances of friends and depend
ents, in bequests outside of her church
connections, and especially in found
ing the Kamehameha Schools, she
showed how fully in sympathy she
was with the spirit of the Divine Re
deemer, who willingly departed with
the infinite glory cf Divine majesty
to minister to the necessities ami
weaknesses of a .sin-ruled world.
Founded in such a spirit, with such
high aims, may the Kamehameha
Schools fulfill the noble purpose, as
well as perjetuate the memory of Ber
nice Pauahi Biihop."
Mrs. Haalalea was the next speaker
introduced and spoke as follows:
Fkiends and Visitors: Parents
and children of Hawaiian kinship, I
greet you all with loving salutations.
By vote of the Trustees of the Kstate
of Mrs. Bernice Pauahi Bishop 1 have
been invited to give you a few perso
nal reminiscences of the honored
lady, whose birthday we have met
here to celebrate. I cannot refrain
from expressing first my warm affec
tion and admiration for the lady of
ro3'al lineage, to whose love for her
people this work of iermanent beauty
and usefulness must be traced in its
origin and design. What she desired
most of all was such an education for
the young people of Hawaii as would
make them good and helpful men and
women. Often did she speak of what
would l for the advantage and honor
if the Hawaiian people. Kspecially
did she wish tiiat the boys nnd girls
might receive such instruction in the
industries of modern days as would fit
them for thecompetition of uctlve life.
And most earnestly did she desire that
the purity of the home might be re
spected and cherished by young and
old of both sexes. She was thankful
for what measure of Instruction hud
been Imparted, but knowledge, said
.she, hold the key to uutoh! treasures.
What she desired for others jdie ex
emplified in her own life and charac
ter. Kxjuiite In h r ersonal tastes,
artistic in all the work she undertook,
diligent In looking after the ways of
her household, no word ever fell from
her lip of doubtful propriety or gram
matical inaccuracy. All department
of Chrintiuu UMefulnepH received her
hearty support, and many catea of
individual dhitrei were relieved by
n -
her wise generosity. "She was a model
of princely nobility and yet-an object
of warm affection to every Hawaiian
of all ranks in life.
For you, Hawaiian girls, she ha
planned advantages and privilege ,
that your grandparent never dreamed
of seeing. Great is your indebtedness
to your most estimable benefactress
for the opportunities so freely and
fully offered to you in connection with
this Kamehameha School. Be it
your faithfully to improve your time,
and make the wisest possible use of
these rich pro risions for your prepara
tion for the work of life better than
house or lands, for no one can rob you
of the stores of experience and princi
ples of conduct you may secure here.
Be attentive and obedient to your
teachers, diligent in study, faithful in
work, and neat and careful in your
person and surroundings. Remem
ber the example Mrs. Bishop has set
before you, and make yours the high
ideals which she cherished. A virtu
ous woman is deservedly to be praised,
and God's blessing is assured to all
such as from Christian homes here
are ready for the call to come up
higher to the heavenly home of the
Eternal Father.
My last word is for you, oh Ha
waiian parents. With you is the duty
of beginning in early life the walk on
ward and upward, or such a turn
downward as to end only in the mis
ery of your children. Your hands
hold the thread of their lives. You
yourselves are the examples your
children are most ready to imitate.
If your example Is against the influ
ences for good which the school fur
nishes, you will be responsible for the
shame and the injury that will come
upon your children. But let these
three separate strands work together
parents, children, teachers in unity
of aim and desire. They will form
the rope that will safely hold our Ha
waiian Ship of State amid . perils of
every kind, and the blessing of the
Heavenly Father will bring this Ha
waiian people peace and prosperity
never enjoyed before.
After a selection by the Kameha
meha School band, Dr. Hyde read th
portion of Mrs. Bishop's will be
queathing her property for the main
tenance of the Kamehameha School.
Then the keys of the girls school
were delivered to Miss Pope's keeping.
Mi3s Pope s acceptance was nicely
worded, and made a marked impres
sion. She referred to the girls school
as another memorial stone sacred to
the memory of Mr. and Mrs. Bisbop:
Beautiful for situation are her dome
and balconies, framing pictures of ex
quisite beauty, giving glimpses of na
ture in all her lovely moods, and then,
too. her foundation is builded upon
rocks, and there are sermons iu the
brown stone rocks of Kalihi; they
tell us of the rocks ahead danger
signals that will come in our work in
the education of Hawaiian girls.
In accepting this trust, on this me
morial day, we would enlist your
sympathy and ask your co operation
in making K. G. S. an honor and
power in this land, trusting that the
training received in this school will
fit Hawaiian girls for a self-respecting
independence, and that they may go
forth among their own people being
able to stand firm for truth and purity,
though snares and pit-falls abound.
The exercises closed with a song by
the scholars, accompanied by the
band stationed in the hallwa3'. The
audieuce then broke up to Inspect the
new annex to tbe museum and the
Girls' School building. The annex
is au elaborate counterpart of the
main building in the excellence cf ar
rangement and material put at its
disposal.
The programme of sports was car
ried on in froDt of tha dormitories.
This attracted a good hare of the
young people and not ti Tew of the eld
ers stopped to witness t he contests.
In tne 100 yard di 'i there wen
thirteen entries. S. A.ualu won the
first prize, a blacking set, and K.
S. ' V
. - - ..v.- : rSl-f V
. :
. TV.. - Jl i 1
ciias. r. manor.
Oaua the second, an inkstand. H
Hookano came iu llrst ou the harre
Kiure as nrsf prize, j. l usting wa
second, his he-t work being l! fet,
Indies. His prize wasa picture frame.
The oo-yard dasli was run iu three
heats. K. Oana and V. Montgomery
lf- J. ft Aft
winning nrsi ami second.
wn ijr KiwHi margin.
nil mis m exercises or Founder
Day closed. JCvery event of tbe day
panned off very smoothly, and great
credit Is due Principal Richanti and
his at$lttants for the uccei of the
day.
'.' V,
nrusii and hooi; were the trophies, s.
Aiualu was again a winner In the "tilt
contest; J. Naeoli, second. The prize
were a game of haluia and
"., calendar. The tug-of-war excited
not a little interest. t AmaluVi team
had the best of it from the first, and
woti by a good margin.
f.i
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