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The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, December 22, 1894, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1894-12-22/ed-1/seq-1/

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Established July iT, iS56.
VCXL. XX- JNO. 3874.
HOJSOIUXTJ. HAWAIIAX ISIiAlNDS, SATUliDAY, DECEMBER 2L 1S94.
PRICE:
5
CEXTS.
Business (Tariis.
C. BREWER k CO., LIMITED
Queen Street, Honolulu, 27. I.
AGENTS FOR
Hawaiian Agricultural Co., Onomea
Sugar Co., Honomn IS agar Co., Wailuku
Sugar Co., Waihee Sugar Co., Makes
Sugar Co., Haleakala Ranch Co., Kapa
paia Kancb.
Planters Line San Francisco Packets.
Chaa. Brewer & Co.'b Line of Boston
Packets.
Agents Boston Board of Underwriters.
Agents Philadelphia Board of Under
writers. LIST or OFFICERS:
P. C. Joxxs President
Oxo. II. Kobxetsox Manager
E. F. Bishop Tres. and Secy.
Col. VV. F. Allxm Auditor
H A
"I
C. M. Cooes
H. WATXBH0U8S...V ... Directors
C L. Cabtkr . . .
YOU CAN GET
Ilaviland China, plain and
decorated ; English China,
White, Granite; Cut Glass
ware, Moulded and Engraved
Glassware, Agateware, Tin
ware, Lamps and Fittings,
Flower Pots, Fruit Jars and
Jelly Glasses and a thousand
other useful and ornamental
articles at
J. T.
Queen Street Stores.
3807-tf
The Hawaiian Investment Co.
SEAL ESTATE
- A5 1-
LOANS.
FOK SALE.
Desirable Property in all parts of the
City.
Four Houses on Punchbowl street at
a bargain.
A 4-acre Lot at 3Iakiki.
Lots 4 and 3, Block 23, Pearl
City.
AL-acre Lot at Kalihi.
Residence at Kalihi with barn, pig
pens and chicken coop, 120x10; suitable
for a Chicken Ranch.
13 and 13 Kaihumami Street
Telephone G39. Near Postoffice.
Castle & Cooke,
LIFE AND FIRE
I
AGENTS FOR
NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL
Life Insurance Company
OF BOSTON.
fitna Fire Insurance Company
OF IIARTFOBD.
HONOLULU
CARRIAGE MANUFACTORY !
W.W. WRIGHT, - Proprietor.
Carriage -: Builder
AKD BEPAIKEK.
gXJ All orders from the other islands
in the Carriage Building. Trimming and
Painting Line, will meet with prompt
attention.
1CCTP. O. BOX 321.
NOS. 123 AND 130 FORT STREET
3S63-y
WATERBOKS
INSURANCE
AGENTS
Business lfan)s.
DR. R. I. MOORE
DENTIST,
02ee: Irlintoa Cottige, Hotel lit
Office hours : 9 a. m. to 12 m.
and 1 f. m. to 4 p. m. 3S60-lm
M. E. Grossman, D.D.S.
DKNTIST,
98 EOTIL STHSXT.
Omr Horn 'ik.u.ToAr. m.
C. B. RIPLEY,
ARTHUR REYNOLDS,
ARCHITECTS.
Orncs New afe Deposit Building,
Hgnoxxlc, H. I.
Plans, Specifications, and Superintend
ence given lor erery description of Build
ing.
Old Buildings successfully remodelled
and enlarged.
Designs for Interior Decorations.
Maps or Mechanical Drawing, Tracing,
and Blueprinting.
S7Drawing9 for Book or Newspaper
Illustration.
New Goods
A FINE ASSORTMENT.
TILES FOR FLOORS !
And for Decorating Purposes ;
Matting op all Kehds,
Maxxla Cigass.
WING WO CHAN & CO.
Ho. 23 Nauunu e4trt.
S431-Q
Great Republican Victory
WE 11AVK OS HAND A FIXE AS
SORTMENT OP
ENGLISH -:- SERGKES !
Tweed, Clay Wontedi, Diagonals
aad French Casslmeres
Suitable for the Holidays.
Our prices are lower than ever. Give
us a call before ordering.
MEDEIROS Jb CO.,
Tailor.
Arlington Block, Hotel Street.
C347-2m
F. W. MAKINNEY,
TYPEWRITER,
Conveyancer and Searcher of Records
F1KE, LIFE AND
Accident : Insurance.
All kinds of Typewriting done, promptly,
cheaply and accurately.
ALSO
GENERAL COLLECTOR.
'office: 31S roar street 334S-tf
PIONEER
Steam Candy Factory and Bakery
F. HORN,
Practical Confectioner and Baker,
NO. 71 HOTEL STREET.
3753-tf
i i .
WM. L. PETERSON,
Notary :- Public, -: Typewriter
AND COLLECTOR.
Office : Over Bishop & Co.'s Bank.
381 S-y
WILLIAM SAVIDGE,
Collector and Real Estate Agent
Bents Collected. Houses Kented.
Office: Cummins Block, Merchant
street. 3S56-lm
Massage.
MB8. PBAY WOULD ANNOUNCE
that she will attend a limited num
ber of patients. Address at H. M.
Whitney's. Kin st. ; Bell Telephone 75.
322S-U
Business (fariis.
JENNIE L. HILDEBRAND, M. D.
Homeopathic Physician,
HOTEL STREET,
Opposite Union street.
AjLT" Office hours: 9 to 12 a. m. and 2
to 4 p.m. Mutual Telephone 25o. 610.
3S3S 3 m
VIAVI
CURES ALL DISEASES PECU
liar to women, rheumatism, skin
diseases and acts as a blood purifier.
Lecture at Viavi Hall at 3 p. m. this
afternoon.
3861-tf
A. PERRY,
ATTORNEY AT LAW
And Notary Public.
Office: Over Bishop's Bank.
3692-lv
WILLIAM C. PARKE.
ATTORNEY - AT - LAW
grant to tstka -AcknovYledgmant.
Ornca No. 13 Kaahuxnanu Street, Hono-
mm, i.i.
H. R. HITCHCOCK,
Notary Public, Second Judiciary Circuit
H. I., KALUAAHA, MOLOKAI.
3S04-3m
H. MAY & CO.,
Wholesale and Retail Grocers
OS FORT STREET.
Telephones 22. P. O. Box 470.
3450-v
HAWAIIAN HARDWARE CO.,
HARDWARE,
Cutlery and Glassware
307 Fort Street.
3575-ly
BEAVER SALOON,
FOBT STREET, OPPOSITE WILDER A CO.'S
II. J. JfOLTE, Proprietor.
First-class Lunches served with Tea, Cof
fee, Soda Water, Ginger Ale or Milk.
'OPEN FROM 3 A. M. TILL 10 P. M.
Smokers Requisites a specialty.
WM. F. THRUM,
SU EVETOE.
Room No. 11, Spreckels' Block.
3S59-fm
HONOLULU IRON WORKS CO.,
Steam Engines,
Boilers, Nagar Hills, Cooler. Erau
and Iead Catln&-a,
And machinery of every description raade
to order. Particular attention paid to
ships' blacksmithinjr. Job work excated
on the shortest notic.
lewis & CO.,
Wholesale and Retail Grocers
111 FORT STREET,
Telephone 240. P. O. Box 397.
LEWERS & COOKE,
Successors to Lewers & Dickson.
Importers and Dealers in Lumber
And all Kinds of Building Materials.
NO. 83 FORT STREET. HONOLULU
CONSOLIDATED
Soda Water Works Company, Limited
Esplamds, Comer lllen and Fort Si.
HOLLISTER & CO.,
3710 155S-lv Agents.
JOHN T. WATERHOUSE.
Importer i&IDmIu t&
GENERAL MERCHANDISE.
No. 35-31 QoeeoStzeet, Honolulu
II. W. McGHESNEY & SONS
WHOLESALE GROCERS
DKALXBS I
Leather and Shoe Findings
HONOLULU.
AflTTfJTQ Honolulu Soap Work Co.,
AUIUllO Honolulu Tannery.
H. HACKFELD k CO.,
General Commission Agents
Cor. Fort and Queen sts., Honolulu.
FAR
COLUMBIA'S
ARMS
Dusky Hawaii Would Rest' With
Confidence.
MEETING OF AMERICAN LEAGUE.
Stirring Speeches On Annexation Cecil
Brown Tell Where He Stands, and
Dr. BIcGrew Gladly "Takes Back"
Get In With Both Parties to Work,
You don't know what you missed
will be a general greeting this morn
ing to every American League man
who did not attend the open meet
ing at trie nail last evening.
The attendance was not a large one
1 A. A. 1 j 1 m .
put ii was a litue ouncn 01 eninusi
asm nevertheless. Annexation and
its phases was of course the leading
ana only topic that the speakers dwelt
upon, 'ihe pleasing feature to those
interested m the cause was the an
nouncement made by President Mur
ray that it was the purpose of the
league to hold a series of similar meet
ings during the coming session of the
legislature.
General Hartwell was the first
speaker. He said :
"There are patriotic and intelli
gent Americans who, without regard
to party motives, consider that the
annexation of Hawaii to the United
States is open to serious and radical
objections, from an American point
of view. There are also public spirited
and intelligent Hawaiians of all na
tionalities who entertain the same
opinion from a Hawaiian point of
view. To discuss these objections
fully would occupy more time than is
desirable to take this evening. I will
merely outline their nature and the
principal arguments against them.
"For m3'4jelf, as an American citi
zen, I have to say that the interests
of the United States are far too pre
cious in my view to allow any per
sonal gain which I might gain as a
property owner in Hawaii to influence
me to advocate annexation, 11 1 did
not reeard it as a national advantage
to the United State?. Every military
and naval officer of the United btates
with whom I have conversed on the
subject and I have heard views of
officers of the highest rank deem
that the annexation of Hawaii would
add greatly to the security of the Pa
cine Coast. The main objection made
to any insular acquisition is that it
would entail great expense to fortify
and defend, and that if a policy of in
sular acquisition is initiated by an
nexing Hawaii, there will be an end
of the famous Monroe Doctrine, re
quiring the United States to keep
clear of all foreign entanglements, as
well as to prevent all foreign inter
ference. 'lt is also claimed by the objectors
that the mixed population of Hawaii
is not of a kind to assimilate with
American citizenship and American
institutions. As far as the expense of
holding Hawaii, the United 8tates
would have no more concern or diffi
culty, than in holding California or
Alaska. The sea power of the world,
as shown by our distinguished Amer
ican writer, Captain Mehan, can
never be safely neglected by any na
tion that proposes to maintain itself
as a first class power among the na
tions of the world. In these days of
armored cruisers, coaling stations at a
distance from the home country, are
absolutely essential.
"As for the Monroe Doctrine, and
what is called the 'American Sys
tern," nature has made Hawaii a part
of that system. The long admitted
necessity of keeping Hawaii clear
from the influence or interference of
any other power than the United
States fully concedes this. And as
for the population, does any one who
know.- the facts, consider its intelli
gence and capacity for free institu
tions as less than that which existed
in California, Texas, Alaska, or any
other territory heretofore acquired by
the United States ?
"Afide from what may be called the
political ami military advantages to
the United States of annexing Ha
waii, the commercial gain would be
of vast impoftauce. It is idle for the
wine producers of California to ask
that Hawaii shall keep out Japanese
goods. Even a free trade treaty with
the United State would not do that.
To maintain aguinst Japan a high
protective tariff, !uch as the Luited
States iiself must have to accomplish
the deeirtd object, nothing short of
the power and tbelnwsr.f the United
State would mi flic-. 2s ow for the
Hawaiin objections, uside from those
of a sentimental or exclusively per
sonal nature, uey may te summed up
as the oljeelious f th-e to whom
American t r at-y fiee iutitutions are
distasteful, and v ho also c -usider that
the svstem tf pnial enfi-emett of
contract labor is -?st ntiul to the Ha
waiian sugar industry. Th last ob
jection appear-- to msiny to b almost
insurmountable, .onie say tii;it tuey
prefer to sacriric-H in that reirnrd for
the greater gaiu of a strong ano ?able
government. But I do l ot consider
that it would be a su entice. .Labor
can easily be made abundant here, if
it is not already, ot a kind suited for
the production of sugar. The experi
ence of Queensland, if not of other
countries, shows that sugar cane may
be cultivated and sold by weight to
mill owners with mutual profit.
"The heaviest and most experienced
planters in Hawaii, like Baldwin,
Young, Wilcox, Spalding and others,
are more than ready to take the
chances of annexation for the sugar
business. The refining of sugar here
would create a large demand for
skilled mechanics. Permanent free
trade, resulting from annexation,
would give an impetus to all Island
business and productions, and set go
ing many kinds of manufactures,
which would open the door now closed
to both the native and white popula
tion. "The political gain which Hawaii
ans would receive as citizens of the
United States has hardly yet dawned
upon many of them. But they would
soon see it. As for the methods of
seeking annexation, and the imme
diate prospect of securing it, I can
only give my personal opinion and
conjecture. The treaty power rests
with the President and Senate, the
legislative power with Congress,
which has repeatedly been exercised
in cases of annexation, and which is
equally effectual and constitutional.
As far as I have seen, the President
has refrained from expressing his
view about annexation. I doubt
whether any but his most intimate
friends, if even they, know what it is.
He might naturally prefer that Con
gress, having practically assumed
charge of the Hawaiian question, shall
enact such legislation as will annex
Hawaii. If that should be his wish,
there are prominent members of each
House, in the Democratic party, liks
Senator Morgan and Ueneral Sickles,
for instance, to introduce annexation
measures.
! consider it unwise to anticipate
opposition from the majority of Dem
ocratic Senators and Representatives.
They may well prefer to abide by the
traditions of the Democratic party in
favor of a strong foreign policy, and of
former acquisition of territory, than
to leave the matter to the Kepublican
party to make use of in the next presi
dential election. I believe, therefore,
in the advantages and in the reasona
ble prospect of annexation.
" While I deprecate any course tend
ing to make what is sometimes called
'Americanism offensive to people of
other nationalities, 1 think that the
obvious gain which all island residents
would receive from annexation, polit
ically, socially and financially, is so
clear and indisputable upon examina
tion, that I am fully prepared to see a
general movement in its favor on the
part of those heretofore objecting or
hesitating.
'The student of Hawaiian history
can at once see that the course which
the United States Government has
for many years followed, concerning
Hawaii, has not been owing solely to
its desire to protect the interests of
American citizens but rather to main
tain American national Interests. It
is a consistent foreign policy which
the United States has never deviated
from. It is a policy which Great
Britain sanctioned as long ago as 1850,
when Liord Palmerston "said in sub
stance that in certain contingencies he
recommended 'receiving a protecto
rate under the United States by be
coming an integral part of that na
tion,' which he said he regarded as
'the destiny of the Hawaiian Islands.'
"The statement made by Mr. Foster,
as Secretary of State, in his letter to
the President of February 15th, 1893,
that he had 'received assurances from
the representatives of the leading
powers of the world and from our own
ministers abroad that the incorpora
tion of the Hawaiian Islands will be
regarded by these powers with satis
faction or ready acquiescence,' was
published to the world and has never
been criticized. As far as the great
preponderance of official utterances on
the part of leading public men in the
United States, of both parties, extend
ing over a period of fifty years, can
afford any indication of the present
prospect of annexation, they are re
markably unanimous in its favor.
"It is not likely that the object les
son of the war now going on in the
Orient will be lost on American states
men. Whether that war shall result
in European civilization asserting it
self more prominently in the affairs
in China and Japan, or in those pow
ers seeking to establish themselves in
opposition to Europe, the necessity of
the United States taking care ot its
picket stations off the Pacific Coast
will not be less clear."
Cecil Brown, the next speaker, said
that had anyone told him two years
ago that he should address a body that
had for its one great object the annex
ation of the Hawaiian Islands to the
United States he would have laughed
them to scorn.
Gentlemen, the time has come, and
every day that passes makes it more
apparent that annexation is our only
salvation, and the only solution for
peace and prosperity of these islands.
lou all know that the history of the
past two or three years has been one
of continual strife for those who are
desirous of good government. Today
we are on the road tc get it. The only
way we can get it i3 to become part
and parcel of the United States. This
is the c-.untry of my birth, and, being
of English extraction, these senti
ments may seem somewhat incon
gruous, lhere are others in the same
position, but we must all work for the
benefit of the great whole. The object
for which we are all so enthusiastic is
a3 sure to come as is the sun to pursue
its course: nut we must not be idle.
We have friends in both parties, and
we must work them for one single
end that we may become part and
parcel of the great American Re
public. There was a time, five or six years
ago, when we native Hawaiians
would have said no annexation ; but
that i3 not true now. When the people
of the country would trample under
foot the class which constituted the
back bone of the country, men could
not stand it. Those who haT-ht
the country to what it is should have
the right to say what should be done.
To obtain annexation, we should
camp with both parties, and, in time,
they will see that these are a part and
should be a parcel of the United
States. Many of us have pointed out
the path for this country to pursue for
the good of all, and those in control
failed to see it. On January 17th, the
climax came. The question arose as
to what we should do for self-preservation.
We naturally turned to the
country that had given much of its
life-blood its best citizens to bring
our land up to what it is. Had it not
been for political changes, we would
have been a part ot that country to
day; but Providence, or something
else, deferred our hopes for the time
being were blasted. We then decided
if we could not get what we wanted,
we would have what we could get our
own Republic. We must not stop there;
we must press on until our great ob
ject is attained. With all due respect
for President Dole, we shall be glad to
swap him for the President of 'the
United States. This once attained
there will be no more war or rumors
of war or conspiracy.
Mr. Charles JL. Carter was intro
duced as one who would speak on
matrimony. He believed it augured
well for the cause when the speakers
all devoted their remarks to annexa
ation, after the announcement had
been made that the leading questions
of the day would be discussed. It told
that the day was not far distant when
the great object would be attained.
Delays and disappointments should
give manhood greater strength, so
that when the time comes we shall be
well equipped to become a part of the
United States. We all believe that
the union of the fair Columbia and
dusky Hawaii will be a good one. We
should begin now to Americanize Ha
waii and Hawaiianlze America. So
cial and business standards should be
elevated to the high planes of the
United States. Put the American
spring in the heel of business life. One
man in Washington is not enough to
Hawaiianize America. There are
millions who should know more of
our country. Had there been a repre
sentative at the recent meetings of
California viticulturjsts, the resolu
tions regarding Hawaii would have
read, "If trade cannot be helped in
any other way, annex the islands."
JLove for the welfare of the country
should spur on to renewed effort.
At the close of Mr. Carter's remarks
there were loud calls for Dr. MeGrew,
that were not quieted till the doctor
stepped to the platform. He came to
listen, but wanted to take back the
expression he once made to the effect
that Mr. Brown was not solid for the
cause. Tonight he was glad to grasp
Mr. Brown by the hand and welcome
him to the ranks We have a good
Republic now, but I.shouJd be willing
to trade it for a better one.
J. A. McCandless was called to the
Elatform. Referring to Mr. Brown,
e said that though the English and
Americans might not be very near
one another, there never was an Eng
lishman who was not in favor of good
government. The American League
stands as a pilot, and should continue
its work till "we all sing Glory, Hal
lelulia ! the deed is done."
J. N. Wright and Mr. Bemner were
the last speakers. These gentlemen
believed that Democrats, ai well as
Republicans, could be looked to for
annexation. The latter believed the
league could do much toward educat
ing Americans as to the condition of
a flairs in Hawaii, and offered the fol
lowing resolutions for the considera
tion of the league:
Whereas, Many of the laboring
classes on the Pacific Coast of the
United States, owing to the general
business depression, are out of work,
and in the laudable dvsire to better
their condition many of these people,
with scant means, are coming to Ha-'
wail in search of employment ;
Whereas, The labor market here is
now overstocked, and a continued im
migration of this character will bo
productive of disappointment and dis
tress ; be it
Resolved, That a committee of three
be appointed by the American League
to secure fund and have printed and
distributed 5,000 circulars explaining
the industrial conditions of these Isl
ands at present, and advising the labor
of the Coast that remunerative work
cannot be obtained here. The circu
lars to contain in addition a descrip
tion of the resources of this country,
and the various avenues open to the
employment of capital.
WILL MAKE OTHERS MERRY
What the Ivamehameha Boys Are
Planning for Christmas Ere.
The boys of the Kamehameha
school will celebrate Christmas eve in
a most commendable manner this
year. Arrangements have been made
for an entertainment to be given at
the old church at Palama on Christ
mas eve. The event is prepared espec
ially for the poor children, many of
whom know little of Christmas day,
by virtue of the pleasant association.
which the more fortuuate enjoy.
The Katnehameha boys will have
the sole charge of the gathering. They
originated the idea, and will conduct
the amusements according to their
own happy will. The boys are de
serving of a great deal of credit for
their thoughtfulness for others, where
by they are fulfilling the desires of the
one by whose liberality they are cow
profiting.
Tuesday evening the usual Christ
mas exercises will be held at the
school.
The Hawaiian Gaezttz Courier
manufacture rubber stamps of all
descriptions.
7

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