OCR Interpretation


The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, January 07, 1895, Image 6

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1895-01-07/ed-1/seq-6/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 6

THE PACIFIC COMMERCIAL ADVERTISER : HONOLULU, JANUARY 7, 1895,
6
- - -
LATEST HEVS FROM
Holiday Events and Festivities
Take Up the People's Time.
NOVEL GIFT ItV MANA(!KK
The Toune Kartle or Mkawo Now a
liutternr Clab" A Tarty Views
the Wonders of Haleakala Improire-
meats at Pala A Kona Wind Wlows.
Maui, Jan. 5. Holiday events and
festivities seem to be the only news
Items at the present moment.
Hana people's methods of celebra
tion rather eclipse these of the rest of
Maui. AH the residents of that sec
tion, whether native or foreign, royal-
1st or republican, united in having a
lively and happy time during Christ
mas.
Bombs and crackers were exploded
continuously daring the night of the
24th of December, and five bands of
musicians (four stringed and one brass)
from Kahului, Keanae, Mokae and
Hana promenaded and serenaded the
village.
During the 25th there were luaus
everywhere.
During New Year's, Hana planta
tion gave a grand feast and dance in a
spacious lanai erected specially for
the occasion.
Judge Kaleoalso entertained a large
number of friends.
A shooting match took place on the
sea-shore at the Kauikl range during
Christmas, in whieh Messrs. H. T.
Hayselden, N. Omsted, Ovenden,
Manning, HockIng Tuck, Zoller and
A. Hayselden participated. Mr. II.
Hayselden made 41 at 150 yards, and
Mr. Omsted 40 at 200 yards. There
was co prize.
During the 29th of December there
was a cobweb party at Haleakala
Hall, which surely was a grand place
for such an event, wiin me ainereni
webs winding In and out through the
long, dusty stairways ana over tne
rafters and beams ot the chambers of
the old school building.
The young ladies of Makawao have
at last selected a name for their club.
It Is hereafter to be known as the
"Butterfly Club," and during the last
night of '94 they danced the old year
out and welcomed the new one in at
Haleakala Hall. The interior decora
tions were most pleasing and most
artistic. Star-bedecked bunting, red,
white and blue, most gracefully draped
the old room, terminating at the cen
ter In a huge ball ef maile. Behind
the musicians a green and silver and
cold butterfly glittered, and reflected
the mellow light from the paste-
colored lanterns. Under this gorgeous
figure was the word " Club traced in
evergreen and silver bails.
Exactly at midnight the usual
merry greetings and wishes were in
terchanged, and, as most of the guests
were members of Mrs. Alexander's
house-party, it was woefully late ere
the festivity came to an end.
Manager C. B. Wells, of Wailuku,
distributed forty-nine bags of Al sugar
as Christmas gifts to prominent resi
dents of the town.
Between two and three hundred
people attended the native Suuday
school convention neid at w aineeou
the 25th of December.
During December 25th there was
At.. A. A. A. T .
some snooting ior turneys at me ivu
hulul range.
The January evening of the Maka
wao Literary Society will take place
at the Hamakuapoko residence or Mr.
and Mrs. Gilhus on Friday evening,
the 11th instant.
During the week Misses Leonard,
Dyceand Sears, with Fred Baldwin as
guide, spent a night at "Cralgielea,"
and viewed the wonders of the extinct
volcano.
Misses Agnes Alexander, Beckwith
and Fleming return to Honolulu to
day. Pala mill has been making great
improvements in respect to machinery.
A new vacuum pan of buge propor
tions baa been added, and also a pair
of Krajewskl crushers rollers with
jagged, ugly looking lines of teeth,
which are said to grind out 50 per cent,
of the juice before the cane reaches
the other two pairs of rollers.
During Monday, December 31st, the
schooner Mary Dodge, C. Bergman u,
master, departed sugar laden ftr San
Francisco.
Weather: A kona wind for a day or
two past.
THE NEW YEAR AT HANA.
Hana ( Maui), Jan. 2. New Year's
Day at Hana was well celebrated.
Manager K. S. Gjerdrum, ot Hana
plantation, gave a grand feast, to
which all were invited. Many ac
cepted the Invitation, some coming
from distant ivaupo and iveauae.
About 300 persons sat down to eat of
the good things provided. The table
was spread beneath a canopy about
100 feet long, and was very artistically
arranged and decorated.
One pleasant feature of the occasion
was the appearance of the lucky gen
tlemen, who all found themselves dec
orated by the fair ones with leis of
roses and myrtle entwined.
Alter tne feast the popular manager
entertained many ot the guests at his
house. Dancing was begun towards
evening and continued until the hour
of nine. A large pavilion had been
erected for the occasion, profusely and
tastefully decorated with ferns and
eversrraens, and with colored lanterns
throwing a subdued light around, pre
senting a very pretty picture, .Be
yond the pavilion torches lit ud the
faces of hundreds of interested specta
tors, who lingered to watch the flying
fgures and listen to the strains of ex
cellent music iurmsnea Dy two local
string bands.
Mr. Gjerdrum has the good wishes
of everyone and is to be congratulated
in giving to so many a New Year's
day that win long do rememDereu.
HON. A, F, Jl
The Chief Justice, Reaches His
FiftjSeventh Year Today.
BRIEF SKKTCH OF HIS CAKEEIt.
A Graduate of Both Vale aud Harvard
His First Office was Secretary to the
Constitutional Convention In 18C4
Appointed Chief .Justice in 1881.
Chief Justice Judd will celebrate
his fifty-eeventh birthday today.
He is to be congratulated and no
doubt will be by his many friends.
Professor Berger has not forgotten
the event as he stated last night
that the Hawaiian band would ser
enade Mr. Judd at an early hour
this morning. The following is a
brief sketch of Mr. Judd's life.
Hon. A. F. Judd was born in Hono
lulu, on the seventh day of January,
1838. His early education was re
ceived at the Royal School and at
Punahou College, and he was still a
boy when he decided to make the law
his profession. It has been said that
it was ever the ambition of the late
4??
'"'77
r-t
!
'
CHIEF JUSTICE JUDD.
Dr. Judd to see his son Frank at the
head of the Supreme Bence of Hawaii,
the position which he now holds. His
studies were prosecuted with a view
to fitting him for a legal career, and
at the age of twenty-two, he was ad
mitted to the Junior Class at Yale
College, from which he graduated in
1862. He next entered tne Harvard
Law School, and graduated, two years
later, with the degree of LL.B. Dur
ing bis college studies the civil war
broke out, and, fired with the patriot
ism of his forefathers, he could with
difficulty restrain himself from join
ing the army. But his father was op
posed to any such proceeding on the
part of his son, who, considering the
store the old gentleman placed in see
ing bis son a graduated attorney-at-law,
had to content himself with vis
iting, during vacations, the scene of
various battles north of Mason and
Dixon's line. After crraduatintr Mr.
Judd returned to his island home and
was duly admitted to practice before
all Hawaiian courts. He was soon
after this elected secretary to the con
stitutional convention, in 1864, which
was so arbitrarily broken up by Iva
mehameha V. After this Mr. Judd
entered upon the practice of law, and
continued, from 1864 to 1S74, building
up a large and lucrative connection.
Mr. Judd's knowledge of tbe Hawaii
an language was and still is a material
aid in his practice. He bad mean
while taken great interest in the af
fairs of tbe country, and was inti
mately identified with all political
movements. In 1S63 he announced
himself a candidate for the Legisla
ture from South Kona, Hawaii. He
sent his name to that district as such,
and was returned at the election
without having gone there in per-
sou. in lbTi:, he was again elected
to tbe Legislature from Honolulu.
During this term Kamehameha V.
died ; and, as the election to fill the
vacancy fell upon the Legislature,
Mr. Judd was one of those who voted
for Lunalito: and, upon the latter's
ascension to the throne, he made A.
r. Judd Attorney-General In his
Cabinet, although then a young man
only thirty-four years of age. Being
a Noble cx ojficio, gave him a seat in
the Legislature ; aul upon the death
of Lunalilo, which occurred after a
brief reign, the Legislature was again
called upon to elect a king, and Mr.
Judd cast his vote for Kalakaua, which
confers upon him the distinction of
having been tne only man in tbe
country now alive, with the exception
of Hon. C. K. Bishop, that has voted
"or two kings. Upon the ascension ot
Kalakaua, and tbe formation of the
new Cabinet, the King took two ol
the members of the Bench, viz.,
Judges Elartwell and Widemann, into
his Cabinet, and tbe subject of tnis
sketch was appointed to one of the
vacancies that of Second Associate
Justice. This was in February, 1S74.
In 1S77 the resignation of Chief
Justice Allen, and tbe promotion to
that place of First Associate Justice
Harris, Mr. Judd became First Asso
ciate, and upon the death of Harris he
became, on November otb, 'Si, Chief
Justice, which office he has held ever
since.
Do Yon Want?
Do you want some real estate,
Or a box of paper collars .
Do you lack a chicken coop
Or a pocketful of dollars :
Make an ad make an ad.
Do you want a billy goat ?
Would vou sell a house and lot ?
Want to rent a lumber yard
ura tea or coiiee pot v
Make an ad make an ad.
Have you got a horse to trade,
Or a stovepipe, or a bell,
Or a gold mine, or a store,
Or a block oi stock to sen :
Make an ad make an ad.
Printer's Ink.
m
Mr. J. S. Klnzie
Washington, VL
Blood Poisoning
13 Running Sores Cave Way to
Hood's Sarsaparilla.
C. I. Hood & Co., Lowell, Mass.:
'Gentlemen Thirteen years ago I was la
Cour Do Alene, now called Fort Sherman, Idaho.
While there I went In swimming on day and
caught cold, chilling the bone In my leg, causing
afeTersoro on my limb. The soro continued
about three months, continually rotting my leg
until it got up to my knee, when I had the limb
amputated. My leg was so rotten that after the
limb was amputated the foot dropped off.
From this state 1 got blood poisoning and had
Thirteen Running Sores
on my body. These sores continued from
thro to four years, my blood being In a terrihlo
condition. After this I commenced taking
Hood's Sarsaparilla. I used three bottles ana
found It did ma good, so I kept on until I had
used ten bottles or more. My blood was com-
Hood'sCures
plstely cleansed. The sores stopped running
Bd hare not troubled me any now for six years.
appetite and digestion are good and I am
perfectly well. I owe my cure to Hood's Sarsa
par ilia.'' p. S. Knrziz. Washington. Vt.
Hood's PUIS are purely vegetable and per
fectly harmless. Sold by all dru exists. 25c
HOBRON DRUG COMPANY,
3366 Wholesale A9ents.
"Why let her waste
her strength and
time running all
over town for
goods when
THAT -:- WOMAN
can come to my store and find just what
she wants in my
Clearance
which will last for 30 days; a specialty
each wselr. I must have room for
my new Spring Stock which will be,
large and choice. This week I am of
fering my entire stock of Millinery,
Flowers, Feathers, Aigarettes, Un
t rimmed and
Trimmed Hats
FOR
50 Cents.
ON THE DOLLAR.
J. J. EGAN.
514 Fort Street.
3819-tf
The Planters' Monthly.
II. M. Whitney, - Editor.
CONTENTS
FOR
1894.
DECEMBER,
Notes.
Notes on Coffee Culture.
Concerning Sugar Cane.
Portuguese Population on Hawaii.
The Political Upheaval in Amer
ica. A New Disease of Sugar Cane.
A Contribution to the Art of Prun
ing Coffee Trees.
Jamaica Sugar Planters.
Keeping Farm and Plantation
Accounts.
New Varieties of Sugar CaDe.
The Value of Credit.
The Destiny of Sugar Cane.
Prices of Food Twenty-five Years
Ago and Now.
Profit Sharing or How to Make
Labor More Productive.
The Sugar Industry.
Hints to Mechanics and Clerks.
Dr. Stubbs' Views on Cane Cul
ture. American Trusts The Big Com
binations that Cause so Much Talk.
The Student of Forestry.
Plants and Trees for Distril ntion.
Subscription $2.50 a year.
Foreign Subscription 3 a year.
Bound Volumes 3 50
Back Volumes bound to order.
C"Published by the
HAWAIIAN GAZETTE CO.
46 Merchant 8t. Honololc .
WEINKLED BEAUTIES SHOULD
Use I ola Montez Cseke. Skin Food and Tissue Builder. Does
not cover, but heals and
t:st ues firm and builds up the worn-oat muscle fibers, and makes
thetn plump. Lowest in price And beet in value. 75 cxkts labgc pot.
Mrs Harrison's Face Bleach. Cures most aggravated cases
of Freckles, Blackheads, Flesh Worms, Sunburn, S&Downefis, and
Moth Patches. I2mck in action ana permanent in enects. rwci i.
Mjes. Harbison's Fack Powder. Pnre adhesive and positively invisible.
Three shades hhe, flefch, biunette. Will not clog the pores, stays on all day.
Prick C0 cents.
Mrs. Harrison's IIair Vigor. Stops Falling Hair in one or two applications.
Prevents Gray Hair and causes rich and luxuriant growth of Hair to grow on bald
heads. Cases of ars standing specially invited to a trial. Price $1.
Mrs. Harkiscn'8 Hair Restorer. Only four to ten days required to restore
hair to its natural color Is not a dye or bleach. No sediment or stickiness. Color
is permanent when once 5 our hair is restored to its natsral shade. 11 air becomes
glossy and clean. Frick $1.
Mrs. Hauriscn's Frizz. For keeping the hair in curls a week at a time ; not
sticky; don't leave a white deposit on the hair. Price 50 cents.
MRS. NETTIE HARKSON, America's Beauty Doctor.
SO Geary Street, San Francisco. Cel.
ECTIot eale by HOLLISTER DKUG COMPANY, 523 Foit Street. Honolulu.
C3"Any lady call at Hollister Drug Company will be given a Lady's Journal
containing a Beauty Lecture wiitUn by Mrs. Nettie Harrison.
1S94.
NOW FOR
Don't try to do business
seasons. Buy good, clean, fresn goods. Wtl HA& 7mi.
o
51G FORT
1S93.
Hurrah for
JANUARY 17tli.
JDST RECEIVED EX AUSTRALIA A FRESH STOCK OF
And American and Hawaiian Bunting and
Pacific Guano
COMPANY,
G. N. WILCOX President.
J. F. HACKFELD Vice-President.
P. O. BOX 484.
OUR NEW WOEKS AT KALIHI
to iurmsn
ARTIFICIAL
ALSO CONSTANTLY ON HAND
Pacific Guano, Potash, Sulphate of Ammonia,
Xitrate of Soda, Calcined Fertiliser Salts7
ETC., EIC, ETC., ETC., ETC
O
Special attention given to analysis of soils by our Agricultural Chemist.
All goods are guaranteed in every respect.
XX?"For further particulars apply to
PACIFIC GUANO AND
IL1ZERS !
THE HAWAIIAN FERTILIZING COMPANY keeps always and constantly
on hand all the well known CHEMICAL FERTILIZERS and offers them for sale at
the lowest market rates.
They manufacture complete High Grade Fertilizers to any special formula and
guarantee the analysis, and all that other firms do.
Planters would ao well to write the undersigned before ordering anywhere else.
a. aouar sdvea is a aoiiar made.
F. COOKIE,
Proprietor and Manager Hawaiian Fertilizing Company.
cures blemishes of the skin. Makes the
1895.
BUSINESS.
with the left-overs" of past
STREET.
1S95,
the Republic !
JANUAKY 17th.
(S3
AT THE
CORNER NVUANU
AND KING STEEETS.
Fertilizer
T. MAY Auditor.
E. 8UIIR Secretary and Treasurer.
MUTUAL TEL. 467.
bein completed, we are now ready
ail kinds ot
FERTILIZERS !
FERTILIZEE COMPANY
DR. W. AVERDAM. Manager.
f YOU MUST
MAKTI GOOD
CHOPS.
A FRESH, NEW
FINE LINE
CF-
Gents ForoLfc Goods
V
AT
413 Fort Street.
IBCflANT TAILORING
A Specialty.
Notice is called to our window ol
UNDERWEAR
Great Bargains f
C7"Call and inspect out stock.
VANCAS1P .10BKST0N & STOREY
413 Fort Street.
3845- tf
s
The Hawaiian Electric Company
Are now prepared to wire
houses either by contract or
day labor and to furnish elec
tric lamps, chandeliers and
fittings of all descriptions and
of elegant modern styles at
reasonable rates.
IS" The Company is now
extending its linetoKapiolani;
Park, and parties dwelling on
the route who are desirous of
being connected on tho
system, will please communi
cate with
THEO. HOFFMANN, ;
Manager. 9
Hawaiian Electric Go. ,
f - -r

xml | txt