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The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, February 06, 1895, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1895-02-06/ed-1/seq-3/

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THE PACIFIC COMMERCIAL ADVERTISJEIi: 1IOJSOLUIU, FEBRUARY 0. 1895.
TEACHERS LISTEN TO LECTURES.
Practical Men Tell of Their Experi
ence in Educational Matters.
A CALIFOIOIA PBOFEOK TALKS.
Addreaa hy Lpetor-Cenrl Atkln
on nd Dr Lyon-Profeior Brown
Explains the Method In Votut In
Other Countries-Workln Hectlons.
- Yl y h H E Teachers' As-
aociation held a
monthly meeting
last evening at x.
M. C. A. HalL The
time was devoted
almost solely to in-
s t ruction lectures,
which were listened to with great In
terest by the large audience present.
The programme wascommenced by
a piano solo by Miss Carrie Castle. It
was received with applause.
A. T. Atkinson, the Inspector-General
of Schools, was the first speaker.
His address was on educational aims.
He said that the greatest aim was to
reach the ideal of mental and moral
training. He spoke of the necessity
of a common base upon which to build,
and pointed out that language afforded
that base. He said it was impossible
to obtain the best results from primi
tive languages; the experiment had
been tried here In the old Hawaiian
schools, but was a failure. The speaker
Bald that English must be taught
thoroughly, so that the child will not
only speak in English, but think in
English also. He regretted that the
kindergarten schools were being car
ried on with racial differences. He
pointed out that one of the causes of
failure among teachers was the fact
that they tried -to do too much with
the heads of their pupils. The speaker
feaid that mere knowledge is not by
any means education. This fact had
been learned of late in these Islands.
As an instance, the speaker mentioned
that a youth had been sent abroad for
the purpose of getting the best educa
tion obtainable. He returned with a
little knowledge, but not enough edu
cation to keep him out of difficulties.
He spoke of the importance of training
the hand, and said that the cultivation
of the eye would naturally follow ; this
would lead to the greatest aim of the
teacher, viz., the cultivation of the
power of observation. But these aims,
great as they may be, are insignifi
cant compared with the great moral
aims which should actuate the
teacher.
After Mr. Atkinson finished his ad
dress, Miss Klchards sang "Springs,
Awakening" to a piano accompani
ment by Professor Richards, her
brother. , m
Professor Hosmer introduced Profes
sor E. E. Brown, of the California
University. Mr. Hosmer spoke of the
work Mr. Brown bad done in Califor
niaa work which was having a
splendid effect on the schools of the
State. a ,
Mr. Brown said that during his
short stay in Honolulu, he had become
profoundly Impressed with the import
ance of education. In no country
where he had had experience was the
immense responsibility of the teacher
more apparent than in these islands.
He agreed with Mr. Atkinson in his
remarks about the importance of lan-
fuage training, and when he returned
ome he would be able to impress
upon the teachers of California that
importance from his experience in Ho
nolulu. He said that two things were
absolutely necessary to success in
pedagogy : first, continuity of effort,
and second, cooperation in that effort.
He regretted that the educational
world had engaged heretofore In a
game of touch and go. It had tried
experiments and had abandoned them
without giving them a fair trial. It
had seriously laid itself open to the
charge of being a world of fads. The
speaxer said this should be overcome
by continuity of effort. He spoke of
the folly and uselessness of occasional
teachers meetings for the purpose of
listening to speeches, and pointed out
that if good Is to accrue from teachers'
associations, they must carefully fol
low and carry out a continuous line of
thought. Secondly, the questions in
volved in education were so great that
the individual could not deal with
them single-handed, and therefore the
wise teacher would seek the coopera
tion of his fellows in their common aim
This plan Is now being practiced, to a
large extent, inGermany, where papers
on educational topics are published
one year before the meetinsr, at which
the papers are to be read. This affords
the students of pedagogy an oppor
tunity of making a thorough study of
the subject. This plan is also carried
out to a large extent in California,
where the State Association issues to
each county thesis to be discussed by
the teachers.
The speaker said the ancient system
of formulating a course of study and
requiring the teachers to conform to
it was giving way to the better meth
od of inducing the teachers to formu
late their own course of study. The
speaker regretted that the United
States had not yet been able to annex
Hawaii, but expressed the hope that
the teachers of Hawaii would annex
the sympathy and co operation of
their fellows In the States. He prom
ised that for himself and the Teachers'
Association of California, anything
that would tend to benefit of teachers
in Hawaii would Jbe gladly under
taken. Dr. Lyons addressed the meeting
also. He said he was glad that the
association had determined upon a
plan of work which would agree with
the advice given by the previous
speakers. He expressed the hope that
the "working sections" would be in
full worklDg order within a week,
A recess was then taken, during
which time short meetings of the dif
ferent "working sections" were held.
Representatives were elected bv the
Board of Management, and the follow
ing meetings were decided upon: bec
tion B: Subject, "Psychology and its
Bearings on Education." Representa
tive, Miss Harriet Need ham. First
meeting on next Friday afternoon at
3 o'clock in the kindergarten rooms on
Nuuauu street.
Section C: Subject, "Practical
Methods In Instruction," Represen
tative, Rev. Alex. Mackintosh. Meet
ing this evening at 7:30 o'clock at tne
clergyman's residence.
Section D: Subject, "Nature and
Science." Representative, Dr. Lyons.
Meets on next Tuesday evening at
7:30 o'clock in the Y. M. C. A. par
lors.
Section E: Subject, "Child Study."
Representative, Miss Brewer. Ifo
date set for meeting.
1 i
Ilealani Boat Club Meeting,
There was a full attendance at
the regular monthly meeting of the
Healani Boat and Yachting Club,
held last night in the rooms of the
Chamber of Commerce. Several
applications for membership were
received, and three new members
elected. Plans and specifications
for the new boat house were accept
ed, and bids for constructing the
same referred to a committee com
posed of President Lansing, Sec
retary Gear and Tieasurer F. W.
McChesney. The contract will be
let as soon as the necessary arrange
ments can be perfected. It is ex
pected that work will be commen
ced on the new boat house some
time during the present month.
LT3ASE OF
VALUABLE CITY PROPERTY
AT AUCTIOX.
On Saturday, February 16
AT ItS O'CLOCK OOX,
I will sell at Public Auction, at my Sales
room, Queen stie6t, all the right, title
and interest oi Lau Akau in the lease of
Malie Kabai w , (deceased) to himself of
Premises Situated North-west
Side of Maunakea Street, Honolulu.
The lot has a frontaae of 1X0 feet on
Maunakea street.
Thorn rp a nnmhp.rof Buildincrson the
lot "which are sub-leased or rented to var
ious tenants, bringiujr in a rental of $S0
to $100 per month. The lease expires
juiy iBt, r.uo.
fTTTprma Cash. U. P. Gold Coin.
Deeds at purchaser's expense.
Jas. F. Morgan,
3903 1623-td AUCTIONEER.
Bemice PauaM Bishop Unseam.
rPHIS MUSEUM WILL BE OPEN
1 vrttaT and SATURDAY, from
10 a. m. to 4 p. m. until otherwise order
ed by the Trustees.
3904-lw Curator.
4 Practical Gunmaker
Will do any kind of repairing to J?ire
arma ftlpn Brownine and Blueing and
restocking equal to Factory work. Satis-
U. sterling, rainier. awa-y
-. onAO
JLOSt.
GOLD ENAMEL, HAT PIN, SET
J. with diamonds, between town and
Waikiki. A reward of $15 will be paid
for itP rnrn to this office. 3393-tf
2fr. J. JL Murpby
Beyond Expectation
Grand Results from Taking
Hood's Sarsaparllla
Broken Down System Thoroughly
Built Up.
- n T. Hood St Co IiOwtlL Mass, t
MiTitifTnni--.T txk treat Dleuure In 1t1.
lnx you of my cure by Hood' 8ariparlll and
gladly recommend It to aU snfferinc a I bxr
fen. My fyitem became thoroughly deranged
and nie seemed little else but a burden. X was
rerr btHoui and my kidneys an VLrtr were out
eCorder. I had no appetite and seldom ate any
treaklast. I had taken tonics and had ben
traatedDT different physicians but with little or
nVsuccess, and had become quite disheartened,
tearing my caso was
Beyond Human Aid.
Throuca friend's adrice, as a last resort I la
rested la two bottles of Hood's Sarsaparllla and
was so well pleased at my improvement I soon
Hood'sCures
afterwards secured four additional Jetties an
am now feeling as well as I ever did. J. 21.
Muspht, Ucgewlsch, Illlaoii.
Hood's PUIS cure Constipation by restor
ing tSo peristaltic action o the alimentary canafc
HOBRON DRUG COMPNAY,
366 Wholesale Agents.
The Hawaiian Gazette Company
manufactnre rubber stamps.
- f n
TEA GOWN, BALL DRESS AXD HOME COSTUME.
At tlf r?sht u a lilac crerwn tea gown with a pointed yoke of white velvet eni
broidru in ;nM. At the left is a home dress of old rose cashmere. Down the front
there ia n !. I f the niuterial with chocolAte colored buttons. In the center is a
maavp aiik ji- ;:!! evening gown with a line of mink fur and prune bows.
AHEAD IN SHOES
Is our position, and, for that reason, the public of Honolulu have their feet in ours. The
Grand Turk can't be dislodged from the table, and it is just as certain that nothing can
make ns relinquish our foothold. Our incomparable footwear makes it solid and perma
nent. Those who have- use for feet are as pleased with a shoe bargain as they are with
a turkey on a Thanksgiving Day. A glance at our stock will show what a shoe bargain
is in the highest sense of the word. Our footwear presents the best, the most and the
strongest points and, therefore, offers the largest values. Their quality andprice give
onr shoes double wear and make them twice cheaD. We have
A gent's window being filled with'Heywood Shoes in all styles,
shapes and colors for S4.50. Look at it and see what you paid
$5 and $6.50 for.
TBE MANUFACTURERS' SHOE COMPANY,
516 FORT STREET.
Eoyal Insurance Co.,
OF LIVERPOOL.
"THE LARGEST IN THE WORIJV
Assete January 1st 1892, $ 42,432,1 74.00
t"Fire nsjs.9 on aU aimas of insurable property taneu t Current rawf
b7
T
S.
8140-lm
DELICATE! DELICIOUS ! ! DAINTY
ask: your grocer for
BED LABEL OTSTEES
These are new pack Large, Fat, Extra Related. One trial will prove their merits.
u. The Cans of This Brand Contain a Greater Quantity
Than . Those of any Other
Frank B. Peterson
THE MUTUAL
LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEW YORK
RICHARD A. McCVRDY
Assets December 31st, 1893 : $i86,707,(5S0.14
o
A Good Record, the Best Guarantee for the Future.
-O
S7-FORIPARTICULARS, APPLYJTO
S. B. ROSE,
General Agent for Hawaiian Islands.
WALKER,
Agent for Hawaiian Islands
1 1 1
& Co., Coast Agents
Presidt-nt.
Arrived' bythe Alameda
And ad4ed to our large and
selected stock of
ardware I
Steel Garden Trowels,5 J,6 and
7 inches, Hawaiian Flags 4
to 12 feet, Wostenholm Poc
ket Knives, 150 dozen assorted;
Stubs' Jewellers' Files, 109
dozen assorted; Door Mats,
"Aloha" and plain, large as
sortment; Brass Blacksmiths'
Rules,Steel Blacksmiths'Kules,
A FINE LINE OF
RAZORS
The best Swing Strops, Mixed
"White Shellac, Hair and
Horse Clippers, Hunning's
Transmitters, L. D. Hand
Telephones, Bull's Eye Dash
Lanterns, Powder Loading
Measures, Hammock Hooks,
Paint Brushes, Patent Castors,
Turn Buckles, etc., etc., etc.
E. 0. HALL &
Corner Fort and
King Streets.
THE WAR "SWiL
is still on, although active
work in the field has been sus
pended until spring.
Through my agents, I made
arrangements before war was
declared for an immense stock
of goods to be shipped as I re-
?Uired, consequently I can af
ord to sell at the same low
figure.
Ex Bentala received a con
signment of goods comprising
all the latest and freshest de
signs in Dress Goods, Scarfs,
Morning Gowns for ladies and
sents. Silk Kimonos. Smokinc
Jackets, Silk Pajamas, Japa-
i ah . -ny n
nese ana tjnina vv are, screens,
Portieres. Lamp bhades, etc.
The latest thing in Lacquer
Ware, is the Cherog Lacquer
made up in handsome designs
wmcn cannot neip to piease
the most fastidious.
13-Remember. I have the
leading store for first-class
Japanese Goods.
DAI NIPPON,
HOTEL STREET, ARINGT0N BLOCK,
MRS. J. P. P. COLLACO,
Proprietress,
Is what we want, but' in order to ob
tain it, we must give
VALUE FOR VALUE
and invite the attention of the PEO
PLE (tourists especially; to make a
thorough examination of our stock
and prices, in Sterling Silverware
Souvenir Spoons, Plated Ware,
Watches and Diamonds, Native
Jewelry, manufactured in unique de
eigna and to order.
Jacobson & Pfeifter.
, FORT STREET,
Wenner & Co.'s Old Stand.
3858-tf
Wanted.
A FURNISHED COTTAGE
oi 3 or rooms, musi uo ouuio
little distance from the business
quarter. Address Box 32 Postoffice.
3S9S-tf
H
SON
NO SIGN OF PEACE
OTHER PEOPLE S
MONEY
Jfl
r,
On our success for the past
year that we have been in
business we are more than
pleased with our sales, and wo
feel confident that all our
transactions with our custom
ers have been of such a nature
that they are as fully pleased
as we are.
Looking Forward
To the prospect for the com
ing year we hope that wo have
so pleaaed our patrons that we
will see them acrain, and that
their friends will see how nice
ly they have been fitted , out
and profit thereby.
We shall greatly increase
our stock this coming year,
receiving new and fresn goods
by every steamer direct from
the most reliable manufact
urers of Europe.
Timely Suggestions
for the coming few months
and bints on our specialities.
Ladies' Underwear in Mus
lin, Flannels and Silks at
greatly reduced prices.
Ladies' hosiery in White,
Black, and Tan at prices that
will surprise you.
A fine assortment of Silks
in all shades and grades from
50 cents up.
Complete stock of Ladies'
Gloves, and Silk Mitts. Nit
ting Silks, (in all shades) in
prices that can't be duplicated.
ISP" Don't fail to inspect
our stock of Ladies', Gents'
and Childrens' fine Shoes and
Slippers.
i. -- .i ij. .11
m oi nun
1
519 Fort .Street,
BI. O. 8IXVA,
Proprietor
HUSTACE & CO..
Dealkbs w-r
WOOD AND COAL
Also White and Black Band which we
will eell at the very lowest market rate.
CTBiil Txlxfhoxb No. 414.
CCTOunuL Txlxphokx No. 414.
349S-ly
Why let her waste
her strength and
time running all
over town for
goods when
THAT -:- WOMAN
can come to my store and find just what
she wants in my
Clearance
SALE
1
which will last for 30 days; a specialty
each week. I must have room for
my new 8pring Stock which will be
large and choice. This week I am of
fering my entire stock of Millinery,
Flowers, Feathers, Aigarettes, Un
t rimmed and
Trimmed Hats
for
50 Cents.
OH THB DOLLAB.
J. J. ' E6AN.
514 Fort Street.
3319-tf
BACKWARD
Luimmu
Stop Her

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