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The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, February 13, 1895, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1895-02-13/ed-1/seq-1/

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Established July 2, ig3a.
VOIi. XXI.. .NO. 3917.
HONOIiUIiU. HAWAIIAN ISIAJOTS, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUAEY 13, 1895.
PBICE: 5 CENTS.
iff itftttf
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-T-" ' -: liV'-'V'-'- '--
C. BREWER & CO, LIMITED
Queen Street, Honolulu, H. J.
AGENTS FOR
Hawaiian Agricultural Co., Onomea
Bufcar Co., Honoznu Bazar Co., Wail oka
Sugar Co., Waihee Sugar Co., JIakee
Sugar Co., Baleakala Ranch Co., Ka pa
pal Bancb.
Planters' Line San Francisco Packets.
Chaa. Brewer & Co.'s Line of Boston
Packets.
Asrents Boston Board of Underwriters.
JLgents Philadelphia Board of Under
writers. LIST OF OFFICERS:
P. C. Joxs8 President
Gso. H. Robxbtsok Manager
E. F. Brsnor Trea. and Secy.
Cot. W. F. Allen Auditor
1XS A
- e J
.....Du
O. M. Cooxx.
H. Watxbhous . . .... -.Directors
C. L. Caktzb
THE HAWAIIAN SAFE DEPOSIT
AND-
INVESTMENT COMPANY,
HONOLULU, H. I.
Have Safe Deposit Boxes of various sizes
to rent by the month or year.
Stocks and Bonds Bought and Sold
AGENTS FOR
Sun Insurance Office of London.
AGENTS FOB
Great Northern Railway. Tickets
Sold to All Points.
AGENTS FOB "
The ' Hawaiian X.and and Improve
ment Company (Limited).
'Some of the finest Coffee and Fruit
Land on the Inlands for sale upon very
favorable terms. 3878-tf
The Hawaiian Investment Co.
REAL ESTATE
-AND-
FOR SAIiE.
Desirable Property in all parts of the
City.
Four Houses on Punchbowl street at
a bargain.
A 4-acre Lot at Makiki.
Lots 4 and 5, Block 25, Pearl
City.
A2-acre Lot at Kali hi.
Residence at Kalihi with barn, pig
pens and chicken coop, 120x10; suitable
for a Chicken Ranch.
13 and 15 Kaahnmana. Street"
Telephone 639.
Near Postoffice.
Castle & Cooke L'd.
' LIFE AND FIRE
INSURANCE AGENTS.
AGENTS FOR
NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL
Life Insurance Company
OF BOSTON.
Stna Fire Insurance Company
OF HARTFORD.
HONOLULU
CARRIAGE MANUFACTORY!
WVW. WRIGHT,
Iroprietor.
Carriage : Builder
AND REPAIHER.
Us All orders from the other islands
in the Carriage Building, Trimming and
Painting Line, will meet with prompt
attention.
CO"P. O. BOX 321.
HOS. 128 AND 130 FORT STREET
3863-y
Massage.
MRS. PRAY WOULD ANNOUNCE
that sne will attend a limited nam.
Suf -S?18- dress t II. M.
Whitney's, King st. ; Bell Telephone 75.
8228-tf
Business Cards.
DR. R. I. MOORE
ZDEJSTTIST.
02ce: irlinton Cottig, Hotel ('.re
Jm Office hours : 9 a. u. to 12 x .
and 1 r. u. to 4 p. m . 38601 m
I M. E. Grossman, D.D.S.
DENTIST,
to HOTXL 8TXH7.
rr-Orricw Hop&g 8i.ic.toif. u.
S. NISHIMURA,
COMMISSION MERCHANT,
DEALER IN
Japanese Provisions, Dry Goods,
Fancy Goods, Etc.
PRICES VERT MODERATE.
Foster Block, Nuuanu Street
New Goods
A FISE ASSORTMENT.
TILES FOR FLOORS !
And for Decorating Purposes ;
Mattzno or all Kinds,
Manila Cxgahs.
WING WO CHAN & CO.
Ifo. N uuanu Strt.
F. W. MAKINNEY,
TYPEWRITKE,
Conieyancer and Searcher of Records
FIRE. LIFE AKD
Accident : Insurance.
All kinds of typewriting done, promptly,
cheaply and accurately.
ALSO
GKNKRAXi COLLECTOR.
fcXr-Qpncg; 318 post btbbst 3848tf
WM. L. PETEJRSON,
Notary :- Public, -: Typewriter
AND COLLKCTOTt.
Office: Over Bishop & Co.'aBank.
318-y
DR. J. UCHTOA,
Physician and Surgeon.
No. 5, KUKUI LANE.
Office Hours: 8 to 12 a. in. and
2 to 8 p. m.
MntnalTel. 532.
HONOLULU IROH WORKS CO.,
Steam Engines,
Boilers, Sngmr Kill, Cooler, Brut
and Id Callings,
And machinery of every description made
to order. Particular attention paid to
ships' blacksmithing. Job work excuted
on the shortest notic.
LEWERS & COOKE,
Successors to Lowers & Dickson.
Importers and Dealers in Lumber
And all Kinds of Building Materials.
yO. 82 FORT 8TREET, HONOLPLP
P.O. Box 3S6. Mutual Tel. 544.
KAN-YD C011PASY, LIMITED,
Commission Merchants
I1IPOBTKK3 AND DEALEB8 TS
Japanese -:- Provisions
AND OOERAL HEECH1NDISS,
411 KING STREET,
Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands.
XCCNew Goods by every steamer.
3878-ly
Uustnrss Cards.
JENNIE L. HILDEBRAND, M. D.
Homeopathic Physician.
HOTEL. STREET.
Oppoeite Y. M. C. A.
lt"0ffice hours : 9 to 12 a. m. and 2
to 4 p. m. Mutual Telephone No. 610.
3338-3 rn
C. J. WHITNEY,
Teacher of Elocution and Dra
matic Art,
Arlington Hotel.
3S84-lm
8. T. ALEXANDER. H. P. BALDWIN.
ALEXANDER & BALDWIN',
Commission Merchants
No. 3 California St., San Francisco.
EJ-island orders promptly filled.
3397-6m
A. PERRY,
ATTORNEY AT LAW
And Notary Public.
Office: Over Bishop's Bank.
3692-ly
; WILLIAM C. PABKE.
ATTORNEY -AT -LAW
jLgmat to tak AeknowUdgmtau.
Oft:cNo. 13 Kaahumann 8treet, Hono
lulu, H.I.
GONSALVES & CO,
Wholesale Grocers and Wine
Merchants.
225 Queen Street, Hoaoluln, H. I.
:H. MAY & CO.,
Wholesale and Retail Grocers
98 FORT STREET.
Telephones 22. P.O. Box 470,
" : 3450-y
HAWAIIAN HARDWARE CO.,
HARDWARE,
Cutlery and Glassware
307 Fort Street.
3575-ly
BEAVER SALOON,
TOBT 8TB BET, OPPOSITE WTLDEB & Ca'S
H. J. NOLTE, Proprietor.
First-class Lunches served with Tea, Cof
fee, Soda Water, Ginger Ale or Milk.
'OPEN FBOK 3 A. M. TILL 10 P. X.
Smokers' Requisites a specialty.
WM. F. THRUM,
SUEYE YOE.
4
Room No. 11, Spreckels' Block.
3859-6m
LEWIS & CO.,
Wholesale and Retail Grocers
111 FORT STREET,
Telephone 240. P. O. Box 897
Soda Water Works Company, Limited
Zspluude, Corner Allen and Fort Sts.
HOLLISTER & CO.,
3710 1553-1 y Agents.
II. W. UcCHESNEY 4 SONS
WHOLESALE GROCERS
AND DBALXBS IN
Leather and Shoe Findings
HONOLULU.
AflFJNTS Honolulu 8oap Work! Co.,'
fl.Vl.EH AO Honolnln Tannery.
H. HACKFELD A CO.,
General Commission Agents
Cor. Fort andQueen Pta.. Honolulu.
T. E. LINDSAY,
Manufacturer ef Native Jewelry
DEALER IN
Imported Jewelry,
Gold and Silverware,
Diamonds, Etc.
Just the things suitable for the holidays.
2 OS MERCHANT ST..
Between Fort and Kaahnmana streets.
361-3m
BUTTLE FOUR WALLS STl,
Destruction of the Opera House by
Fire Yesterday Morning.
ORIGls OF THE FIRE UNKNOWN.
Honolulu's Only Place of Amusement In
Ruins A Tmct Tht Is Universally
Regretted The Owners Carried In
surance for 813.000 An Early Blaze.
Jt Is
a fact very much to be regret-
'ted that the Music Hall, Honolulu's
only theater, which has stood since
the year 1SS0, is now a complete ruin.
Although the walls are left standincf .
a glance at the interior will show!
nothing but heaps of twisted iron and
burnt wood lying about in rank disor
der. A little over an hour was suffi
cient to render the Music' Hall what
it is at present a complete ruin. '
Yesterday morning at about 7:15,
Charles Wichart, a member of the
mounted police force, while going
HAWAIIAN OPERA HOUSE DURING CONFLAGRATION. INSTANTAN
EOUS PHOTOGRAPH MADE EXPRESSLY FOR THE "ADVERTISER'!
BY A. W. BOLSTER, FORT STREET.
from his home to the police station
for the purpose of reporting for duty,
noticed a cloud of smoke issuing from
the tower of the Music Hall as he was
nearing that building. He put spurs
to his horse and made for the engine
house of Company No. 1. Finding
that this company had gone out for
practice with the engine, he tele
phoned to No. 2, which responded im
mediately to the call, arriving on the
scene about 7 :25 o'clock. The other
companies arrived coon after.
Before the building was entered by
the firemen, smoke was issuing from
every door and window, showing that
the fire had started a long time before
the discovery by Wichart. As soon
as the windows and doors were brok
en open, great tongues of fire leaped
forth, and for a moment drove the
men back. Rallying, the ' gallant
firemen -rushed into the auditorium
and played a stream of water upon
the rows of seats and the stage.
Everything seemed to take fire at
once. The front, back and sides of the
building were in flames at one time,
necessitating streams of water from
all Mde3.
The brightest blaze was seen when
the drop curtain and the scenery took
fire. Five minutes seemed all that
was necessary to consume the whole
stage with its effects.
In a short time it was evident to
every one that nothing could be done
to save the building. Had the force
of the streams directed on the fire
at the start been good, there might
have been some chance; but even
then it is doubtful, for the fire had
gained such good headway, and the
draught was a stubborn enemy to cope
with in such au open building.
The attention of the firemen was
directed to the prevention of any
spreading of the tire to buildings iii
the vicinity. The dnly house that
seemed iu immediat danger of catch
ing fiiv was the old Gibson residence.
Several sparks fell ou the roof and be
gan to burn the phinules, but a broom
brigade, headed by Will Chamberlain,
of the Advertiser office, climbed up
and removed ihe danger.
While the men in tti front hall
were playing a trtam of water into
the auditorium a lare patch of plaster
fell from the loof, nearly striding one
or two of them.
Rumors were abroad of a jrasoline
tank in the froi.t part of the I tiilding.
Guards were placed at the corners to
warn the crowd away. It wu soon
learned that there was no danger from
the tank, and the crowd proceeded to
get nearer.
At about S o'clock the roof fell m
completely, and a little while after
that there was nothing to be seen of
the woodwork.
The Chinese Fire Company No. 5
were almo9t the last to arrive on the
scene, but they made up for their tardi
ness in the work they did. It is ad
mitted by those who were present at
the fire that they had the best streams
of water, and did very efficient work.
In a little over an hour the fire was
under control, and one engine was left
to look after the smouldering remains.
The streets in the vicinity of the
burning building were lined with
spectators anxious to catch a glimpse
of the fire. ...
Special mention should be made of
the gallant effort of the firemen under
the most discouraging circumstances.
Although the force of the water was
very weak, they did not falter for one
moment. They got as near to the fire
as it Was possible for any human being
to do.
The Music Hall, completed in 1SS1,
with E. B. Thomas in charge of both
the stone and wood work, was owned
by a stock company called the Music
Hall Association, of which the late S.
O. Wilder, of this city, was president.
It soon became a well-known fact
that the owners o the building were
getting deeper and deeper into debt
every day, and soon it was learned
that the Music Hall was mortgaged to
C. It. Bishop & Co. Later, .the mort
gage was assigned to H. A. Wide
mann, who, on July 28, 18S3, had it
foreclosed, and the oulldlng sold at
Sublic auction to Wm. G. Irwin and
ohn D. Spreckels for the sum of
$21,500.
The building was insured for $12,000,
divided as follows: London & Lan
cashire Fire Insurance Co., in the
office of the late C. O. Berger, $3,000:
Boyal Fire Insurance Co., $6,000, and
Lion Insurance Co., $3,000, both in the
office or J. ts. waiter.
. When the Music Hall was an
nounced as completed, the pleasure-
loving public of .this city was very
much pleased at the thought that the
old tumble-down theatre which used
to stand on the ground now occupied
by the Masonic Temple, was to be
succeeded by such a substantial build
insr.
The first performance given in the
new theatre was a play called "Marble
Heart," a melodrama or theAdeJpm
type, presented by the California
Theatre Company under the manage
ment of C. B. Wells.
. This company scored a great success
and played to good houses until the
small-pox struck the city. From that
time the audiences dwindled, and in a
short period the Government gave the
order to have the theatre closed.
It will be remembered by those that
were here at the time, that the wells'
Company gave the first performance
for the benefit of the building fund of
the new theatre and gave the gross
receipts ol to those in charge,
paying their own expenses.
The first performance after the
small-pox - epidemic was the opera
'Pinafore," given by the Amateur
Musical Society of this city; A. r. At
kinson being the principal worker in
the getting up of the play.
When the Music Hall was conduct
ed as a stock company Judge B. F.
Bickerton, Godfrey Brown, J. F.
Brown and Dr. Mc Wayne had charge
of its affairs and took great interest in
providing amusements. The father
of the Wall boys was architect of the
building.
Honolulu people regret very much
that the only theatre in the city is no
more. Much more do they regret it
on account of the fact that ill-luck be
fell the first owners of the Music Hall,
and further on account of the fact that
W. G. Irwin says, "I have had enough
i opera houses."
frhe origin of the nre is unknown.
(
More Prisoners Released.
Fred Wundenberg, George Kit
man and Jim Brown, political
prisoners who have been confined
for several weeks, were released
yesterday morning on their own
recognizance. Besides these, two
old retainers of the ex-queen and
two young native boys were dis
charged. It is well to remind business
men that they do not have to send
abroad any more for rubber stamps.
The Gazette Company make them
to order.
010 STORIES TOffiii!,
Kaili and Hutchinson en Trial for
Misprision of Treason.
ACCUSED DECLINED TO PLEAD.
8Mion of the MUltarj Court Yes
terday Rather Xonotonoa Attor
ney Kane First Appoaranea
Hutchinson's Case Not Tot Finished.
The Rev. S. K. Kaili was before the
Military Commission yesterday morn
ing on the charge of misprision 6f
treason. S. K. Kane appeared as his
counsel. The preliminary proceedings
of the trial were quickly cleared up,
the usual objection to the jurisdiction
of the court meeting with the usual
overruling in very short time. The
objection was the exact counterpart of
that offered by Mr. Neumann.
The prisoner, on advice of counsel,
declined to plead, and ft plea of not
guilty was entered to each charge and
specification. 1 . " ; ,
Sam Nowlein was the first witness
called : Lived at Washington Place
prior to arrest; was conspiring against
the Government with Tilckard, Seward
and Gulick; heard arms were coming'
1st of December in a schooner from
some foreign port. The landing of the
arms and the incidents with the event
was told. ,'
Johnny Paaoao : Li ve at Kahala;
saw many Natives there Thursday ;
Kaili was among them; was at Kahala
that night ; slept there ; was wakened
by a man - named Kasiike knocking
on the door about 12 o'clock ; accused
was sleeping in the home at the time;
we went out and Kaai Ike disappeared;
I noticed a boat, and wtdked along on
the beach following it: I met It when
it landed and saw the freight of guns ;
we formed a line, and j:as3ed along to
Ihegliora V guxiSiwera put tmder the ,
algaroba trsts; eaw;BoLeri;VVilcox b
the , fence around - my house when I
returned; as I approached the bouse
Kalll came out; saw Kaili the next
morning ; he went out of the house
toward waiaiae to see white man
about some; wood ; he went along the
road ; gone . about hall an hour, and
came back from behind the house. I
did not talk to Kaili that day about
landing the arms. ' -
Cross-examined : On Friday morn
ing saw accused going from the house
toward Waiaiae, in the opposite direc
tion from where the guns were landed.
To Colonel WhitlngrKaili and his
wife lived at Kahala off and on. I
have lived there about six months.
Kaili arrived only the night before. -
Joseph Pabia : Live at Kahala ;
know, the accused, he lives at Kahala'
part of the time ; I saw accused morn
ing of Friday outside the house; Kaili
came around the Waiaiae end of the
house ; had not seen him before that
morning. When he came along the
sun was up, and I had been up some
time. I was with Kaili on the beach
afterward to : go a fishing ; noticed
many foot-prints on the sand. The fish
ing net was put down near the tracks,
and Kahanui called out something
about cartridge belt ; I was asked if I
had heard any news. Paring the night
I heard some talking and whispering
in the house; I don't know whether
Kaili went out ; I staid in the house.
Cross-examined: I dld't see whether
cartridge belt was filled or not; don't
know what was done with it; recog
nized several voices In the whisper
ing; did not recognize Kaili as one of
the whisperers. Kaili left on Satur
day morning and came back to town.
Rede rick: There was more drag
ging about of the fishing tackle on
the sand than was necessary to repair
it ; I suppose there was some cause for
the extra dragging, but don't know
what it was.
Kahimalani sworn: Live in Hono
lulu, sometimes at Antone Rosa's
place near Diamond Head ; know the
accused: I was in one of the boats
that brought arms ashore Wednesday,
January 2d; went again Thursday
night at the request of Kauai ; I was in
one of Bertelman's boats that landed
at Kahala; guns were placed in the
bushes; saw accused at time arms
were landed: Robert Wilcox. Warren,
Townsend and others were standing
about; Wilcox and Warren spoke to
Kalll; Wilcox told him to care for the
things landed at Kahala and explained
where they were hidden; told him to
cover up tbe tracks on tbe beach in
the mornlnp; Kalll agreed to do as he
w3 told; we then came to Honolulu.
Jn the cross examination reiterated
the statements of his direct testimony.
Charles Warren's preliminary state
ments were the same as previously
given. First. saw; Wilcox on night
guns were landed on board the Wai
manalo; saw Kaili same night out
side the house on tbe beach; Wilcox,
myself, George Townsend and a native
were there at the time; I told Kaili
where I had hidden the rifles, and told
him to go in the morning to see if
they were well concealed; Kalll con
sented to do the work; I told him to
see that the tracks were well oblit
erated; saw nothing more of Kalll
after that.
CrOi?s examination: I told Kalll to

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