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The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, February 18, 1895, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1895-02-18/ed-1/seq-1/

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Established July tj. ix.-.G.
VOIi. XXI.. JNO. 3921.
HOOIilJIiU. HAWAIIAN ISLANDS. 3I02sDAY FEBltUARY 18, 1895.
PEICE: 5 CENTS.
- it-Ik 4
A
Kit! i y
II K
v
Bus'imss (Cari)3.
0. BREWER & CO., LIMITED
Queen Street, Uonolnla, B. I.
AGENTS FOR
Hawaiian Agricultural Co., Onomea
8nar Co.. Honomu Bazar Co., Wailnru
Sugar Co., Waibee Sugar Co., Makee
Bazar Co., iiaieakaia it&ncn jo xuipa-
pal Ranch.
Planters Lino San Francisco Packets.
Chas. Brewer & Co.'s Line of Boston
Packets.
Acents Boston Board of Underwriters
Agents Philadelphia Board of Under
writers.
LIST OF OFFICERS:
P. C. Johxs President
Gxo. H. Robertson Manager
E. F. Bishop Tres. and Becy.
Col. W. F. Allxs Auditor
KXI A
...)
O. M. Cooes .
H. Watirhoub. . . ... Directors
O. L. Cabtsb
THE HAWAIIAN SAFE DEPOSIT
AND-
INVESTMENT COMPANY,
nosroLCxr, n. i.
Uave Safe Deposit Boxes of various sizes
to rent by the month or year.
Stocks and Bonis Bought and Sold
AGENTS FOB
San Insurance Office of London.
AGENTS FOB
Great Northern Railway. Tickets
Sold to All Points.
AQaWTS FOB
The Hawaiian Land and Improve
ment Company (Limited).
Some of the finest Coffee and Fruit
Land on the Inlands for sale upon very
favorable terms. 3878-tf
The Hawaiian Investment Co,
EEAL ESTATE
-AND-
Desirable Property in all parts of the
City.
Four Houses on Punchbowl street at
a bargain.
A 4-acre Lot at Makiki.
Lots 4 and 5, Block 25, Pearl
City.
A2)-acre Lot at Kalihi.
Besidence at Kalihi with barn, pig
pens and chicken coop, 120x10; suitable
lor a Chicken Kanch.
13 and 15 Kaahnmanu Street.
Telephone 639.
Near Postoffice.
Castle & Cooke L'd.
life and fire
IIB AGENTS.
AGENTS FORI
NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL
Life Insurance Company
OF BOSTON".
ZStua Fire Insurance Company
OF HARTFORD.
HONOLULU
CARRIAGE MANUFACTORY !
W.W. WRIGHT, - Proprietor.
Carriage : Builder
AND HEPAIHEK.
All orders from the other islands
fai the Carriage Building, Trimming and
Painting Line, will meet with prompt
attention.
CXT-V. 0. BOX 321.
NOS. 128 AND 130 FORT STREET
3S63-y
Massage.
MtP.?Ji3ULB ANNOUNCE
ber of iSSil?11 at.tend a Umited nnm'
&J.tf Telephone 76.
Ousinrss Cartis.
DR. R. I. MOORE
DENTIST.
02ca: ixiingion Cottige, Hotel Eire
CO-Office hoars: 9 a. m. to 12 m
and 1 p. x. to 4 p. sr. 3860-1 m
M. E. Grossman, D.D.S.
DWNTIST,
9? HOTIL STBUT
rt)Ffrc Hocas 9 a. x. to 4 r. u.
S. NISHIMURA,
COMMISSION MERCHANT,
DEALER IN
Japanese Provisions, Dry Goods,
Fancy Goods, Etc.
PRICES FEKY MODERATE.
Foster Block, Nuuanu Street.
New Goods
A FINE ASSORTMENT.
TILES FOR FLOORS !
And for Decorating Purposes;
MATTEta OP AIX KXSDS,
Majtela Cioabs.
WING WO CHAN & CO.
Ho. ft Nauaau Htrt.
2651-q
F. W. MAKINNEY,
TYPEWRITER,
Csnyeyancer and Searcher of Records
FIRE, LIFE AND
Accident : Insurance.
All kinds of Typewriting done, promptly,
cheaply and accurately.
ALSO
GENERAL COLLECTOR.
'oppick: 318 post btbket 3848-tf
WM. L. PETERSON,
Notary :- Public, -: Typewriter
AND COLLECTOR.
Office: Over Bishop & Co.'aBank.
3818-y
DR. J. UCHIDA,
Physician and Surgeon.
No. 5, KUKUI LANE.
Office Hours: 8 to 12 a. m. and
2 to 8 p. m.
Mutual Tel. 532.
HONOLULU IRON WORKS CO.,
Steam Engines,
Boiler, Hnrar XXllla, Coolers, Braaa
ana libd Cm ting.
And machinery of every description made
to order. Particular attention paid to
chips blacksmithinsc. Job work excuted
on the shortest notic.
LEWERS & COOKE,
Successors to Lowers A Dickson.
Importers and Dealers in Lumber
And all Kinds of Building Materials.
NO. 88 FORT STREET, HONOLULU
P.O. Box 3S6.
Mutual Tel. 544.
NAN-YD COMPANY, LIMITED,
Oommission Merchants
IMPORTERS AND DKALIBS IN
Japanese -:- Provisions
AND GKHER1L MERCHANDISE,
411 KING STREET,
Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands.
jG?"New Goods by every steamer.
3878-ly
Business (Tar lis.
JENNIE L. HILDEBRAND, M. D.
Homeopathic Physician.
HOTEL. STREET,
Opposite Y. M. C. A.
m-J-Office hours: 9 to 12 a. m. and 2
to 4 p. r. Mutual Telephone No. 610.
GS3S 3 m
C. J. WHITNEY,
Teacher of Elocution and Dra
matic Art,
Arlington Hotel.
3884-1 m
S. T. ALEXANDER. H. 1. BALDWIN.
ALEXANDER A' BALDWIN.
Oommission Merchants
No. 3 Californiast., San Francieco.
XT"Island orders promptly filled.
3S97-6m
A. PERRY,
ATTORNEY AT LAW
And Notary Public.
Office: Over Bishop's Bank.
3692-ly
WILLIAM C. PABKE.
ATTORNEY - AT -LAW
AFD
Agont to taktt Aeknowlodgmonto.
Ornca No. IS Kaahumanu Btreet. Hono
. lulu, H.I.
GONSALVES & CO,
Wholesale Grocers and Wino
Merchants.
oo
Queen Street, Honolulu, H. I.
H. MAY & CO.,
Wholesale and Retail Grocers
8 FORT 8TREET,
Telephones 22. P. O. Box 470.
3450-y
HAWAIIAN HARDWARE CO.,
HARDWARE,
Cutlery and Glassware
307 Fort Street.
3575-ly
BEAVER SALOON,
FOBT 8TBEET, OPP08ITB WTXDEB A CO.'S
H. J. NOLTE, Ir6prietor.
First-class Lunches served with Tea, Cof
fee, coda Water, Gmger Ale or Milk.
OPEN FB03C 3 A. M. TUX 10 P. M.
Smokers' Beouisites a specialty.
WIVI. F. THRUM,
SURYE YOE.
Boom No. 11, Spreckels' Block.
3859-Cm
LEWIS & CO.,
Wholesale and Retail Grocers
111 FORT STREET,
Telephone 240. P. O. Box 297
CONSOLIDATED
Soda Water Works Company, Limited
Esplanade, Corner Allen and Fort Sts.
HOLLISTER & OO.,
3710 1558-ly Agents.
M. W. McCHESNEY & SONS
WHOLESALE GROCERS
AND DEALBBS TS
Leather and Shoe Findings
HONOLULU.
I n.T'MTQ Honolulu Soap Work Co.,
AUliillO Honolulu Tannery.
H. HACKFELD a CO.,
General Commission AgenfH
Cor. Fort andJQneen Pts.. Honolulu.
T. E. LINDSAY,
Manufacturer ef Native Jewelry
DEALER IN
Imported Jewelry,
Gold and Silverware,
Diamonds, Etc.
Just the things suitable for the holidays.
208 MERCHANT ST.,
Between Fort and Kaahumanu streets
3SGl-3m
SENATORS FAVOR THE PROJECT
Congress Will be Asked to Grant a
Cable Charter.
bankm: Kinoi is imekkstki)
I'acltic Coast l'eople Want to C'outrol
the Hawaiian Cable-Congrega May
I as the Appropriation A Com
plete Line to Australia Probable
The long-discussed Hawaiian cable
proposition will assume practical
shape today, when the names o
twenty gentlemen who will compose
the board ot directors of the Pacific
Ocean Cable Company will be tele
graphed to Washington, to be there
inserted in the bill authorizing the
incorporation of the company under
the laws of the United States, says
the Chronicle of the 6th Inst. Ten of
the incorporators are well-known
merchants and business men of Ban
Francisco, Portland, Humboldt and
other towns on the Coast.
'Briefly stated, the object of the pro
posed corporation is to lay a submar
ine cable connecting San Francisco
with Honolulu, Tahiti and the South
Pacific islands, Asia and Australia. It
la proposed to connect with the
French cable at New Caledonia,
which stretches to Australia, and
thus make a complete line from this
(city by way of Honolulu to the auti-
poaes.
Washington, Feb. 7.It is nrob-
able that tomorrow there will be in
troduced simultaneously in both
houses of Congress a bill to grant a
cnarter to the international racino
Cable Company for the construction
of a telegraphic cable between the
United States and Japan by way of
Honolulu. Senator jferkins of Cali
fornia will introduce the bill in the
Senate and Representative Charles
Wilson of Pennsylvania in the House.
Admiral Irwin is the moving spirit in
the matter. Others who will probably
do named as incorporators are U. it.
Bishop of Honolulu, General Dimond
is also largely interested, as well as
Hugh Craig of San Francisco, William
Alvord, president of the Bank of
California, Louis Parrott, George W.
MeNear, as well as H. F. Allen,
another San Francisco banker, and
Herman Oelrichs, the late Senator
Fair's son-in-law.
Washington, Feb. 8. The bills to
charter the International Pacific Cable
Company were not introduced in
either branch of Congress today, for
the reason that it is expected that the
Senate will tomorrow vote on the pro
position for a route for an American
cable to Hawaii.
Senator Perkins said this evening
that the bill would probably be with
held from either branch of Congress
until it is ascertained what may be
done with the proposition now pend
ing before the Senate. He said, how
ever, that everything was in readiness
and waiting the favorable opportunity
to come.
Washington, Feb. 6. The Hawai
ian question in general and the Ha
waiian cable in particular were the
main themes before the Senate today.
The Diplomatic Consular Appropria
tion bill was taken up and would have
been quickly disposed of except for
the item of $500,000 for immediately
beginning cable construction between
the United States and Hawaii. Mills
of Texas made a point of order against
the cable proposition which is likely
to rule it out, but the decision was
withheld until the Senators could
further debate Hawaii. Hale ad
dressed the Senate in favor of cable
connection with Hawaii.
"The annexation of Hawaii is sure
to come, cable or no cable," said Hale.
The Seuator spoke of the efforts of
Great Britain to build the Hawaiian
cable, and said we should not permit a
foreign power to get this advantage.
Vest aud Palmer asked the cost of the
entire cable. Hale said he had care
ful estimates made by cable experts.
The distance along the surveyed
route was about 2,100 miles. The es
timates showed the cost to be about
$10,000 to $12,000 per mile. This
would make a total cost of $2,500,000 or
$2,600,000 for the entire cable. Hale
said the recent unfortunate events on
the inlands and the debates in Con
gress empbasixed the need of a cable,
and be coDi-idered the time opportune
to commit the Government to the
simple plan.
Allen biiegested an amendment that
the Hawaiian cable nhoiiM always re
main under Government ownership
and control. Allen asked whatdifler
ence there was betwen this proposi
tion to construct uiid own a caldeand
Government ownership of railroad.
Piatt read from President Cleve
land's message in 1SS8 urging the im
portance of ' clo.-e relations with Ha
waii, and saying the Importance of a
cahle should not be overlooked- In
18SS Mr. Cleveland ajjaiu urged on
Congress the desirability of establish
ing a submarine cable to Hawaii.
President Harrison bad recommended
similar action.
Butler asked if Hawaii was willing
the United States should build the
cable.
Perkins said he happened to be able
to answer that question. He was just
back from San Francisco. Uefore
leaving he was called on by the Min
ister of Foreign Anairs of the Hawai
ian Government, who urged the great
desire of that Government that the
United States should undertake the
building of the cable, as Hawaii did
not want Great Britain to control it.
Perkins said this was the latest declar
ation as to the wishes of the Hawaiian
Government.
The Hawaiian item was then laid
aside until tomorrow.
Washington, Jteo. 7. mere is
just an even chance that this Congress
will pass an appropriation for begin
ning the construction of a telegraph
cable to Honolulu. From the tenor of
the debate in the Senate it is probable
that body is favorable to this project
and will be willing to appropriate
$500,000 in the diplomatic appropria
tion bill toward commencing it. The
Vice-President may rule out this
amendment on Senator Mill's point of
order that a new project of this order
Is not germane to a regular appropria
tion bill, but as the majority of Sen
ators seem to favor the cable project
they could, with some shadow of ex
cuse, successfully appeal from his de
cision, contending that it is not a new
project, but had its inception in 1891,
when Congress, by ordering the Navy
Department to take deep-sea sound
ings between Monterey Bay and Ho
nolulu, practically began the cable.
Washington, Feb. 7. The cable
project was further discussed by
Mitchell and Perkins. In the course
of his remarks Perkins declared that
the United- States needed a new and
strong administrative policy, one
which would restore "old glory" to
the seas. We were now paying $100,
000,000 annually for carrying on our
trade In foreign ships. The urgent
message of Secretary Gresham to
Minister Willis as to the death sen
tences of Hawaii had to be taken by a
British ship flying the flag of St.
George.
Morgan supported the cable amend
ment. Referring to Mr. Willis' latest
dispatch Morgan said it strikingly
illustrated" the need of speedy com
munication between the Hawaiian
and the authorities here.
The 8enator declared that Great
Britain was secretly endeavoring to
wrest from the United States the great
coaling station, Pearl Harbor, in Ha
waii. This was granted to the United
States in consideration of the reciproc
ity treaty with Hawaii, and yet Eng
land was now moving to secure that
harbor in connection with her cable
concessions, and the President of the
united States had advised the grant
ing of the concession. It was part of
Great Britain's develonment of her
sea power; part of her determination
to control the facmc: part of her plan
to plant herself on Hawaii as the Gib
raltar of the Pacific.
"It is vital that we act, and act at
once," said Morgan impressively. "I
would rather see every rule of this
Senate broken than to have this
amendment fail. Strong as the case
of Hawaii was to us she would not
much longer be kicked about the
American Congress. She would at
last reluctantly turn to Great Britain."
HOW WILCOX ESCAPED.
It Will be News to Him and Others
Here.
A late San Francisco Call states
that Robert Wilcox, now at the reef,
escaped and was landed on the Cali
fornia coast from a schooner.
Francis Harden is credited with
saying that he saw Wilcox, and was
in his company for a day. Continning
said : "Bob is here, but I wouldn't
tell you where he is even if I were
Permitted to do so. He is wanted in
Lonolulu, and there may be gronnds
for his extradition. I am not posted
on the fine points of international
law. All I will say is this: Mr.
Wilcox is safe and his head will not
be cut off by Dole and company."
1 e i
China Knocked Out.
London, Feb. 7. A cablegram from
Wei Hai Wei, dated today, says the
Chinese fleet has practically ceased
to exist. The ironclad Chen Yuen
and her sister ship, the Ting Yuen,
have been sunk, and the other ves
sels of the Chinese fleet are within
the grasp of the Japanese.
mm
Postal Conference.
Hobabttown, Tasmania, Feb. 4.
At a meeting of the Inter-Colonial
postal conference held yesterday a
resolution was adopted reaffirming
the desirability of a four weekly
service from Vancouver, alternating
with San Francisco, lhe Pacific
cable question was also discussed.
-
Death of an old Missionary.
Utica, N. Y., Feb. 7. Rev. T. D.
Wrieht, who was a Presbyterian
missionary at Honolulu in 1843 and
who held pastorates in this state and
Michigan, died at his home in
Whiteboro today. He was born in
Rochester in 1910.
Thurston Denies a Rumor.
Washington, Jan. 26. Minister
Thnrston denied positively today
hat the Hawaiian Government was
selling bonds in this country at 25
cents on the dollar for the purpose
of influencing io favor of annexation.
ARMS FOR REVOlUlillSTS,
Minister Hatch Writes To Minister
Willis Concerning Them.
another excdamoe or notes.
Uinliter Ihuriton Wrote That the State
of Affairs Was Critical and Snffested
That a "War Vessel Be Sent To Protect
American Interests G re sham's Reply
Washington, Feb. 4L In the Ha
waiian correspondence submitted to
the House today Secretary Gresham
states tuat the department had no In
formation In regard to arms having
been furnished by British subjects to
persons in rebellion against the Gov
ernment of the Hawaiian Islands, but
in a telegram from the United States
Minister at Honolulu, dated January
11th, forwarded by way of San Fran
cisco, Mr. Willis says : "Arms are re
ported to have been brought from
Vancouver by the Norma."
The department has no information
In regard to any intervention by the
representatives of Great Brltlan to
prevent the application of martial law
by the Hawaiian Government to those
concerned in the .recent rebellion who
claim to be British subjects, or of any
foreign representative whatever in the
case, other than a statement contained
in a note from the Hawaiian Minister
January 20th, that the British Min
ister at Honolulu, Mr. Hawes, has
called upon the Government ot Ha
waii to give him assurance that no
capital punishment will be inflicted
upon the Insurrectionists, there being
fifteeu Englishmen under arrest,
which requested assurance the Gov
ernment had refused to give.
Under date of Honolulu, November
10th, Minister Willis transmitted to
Secretary Gresham the followintr note
of the same date from Minister Hatch,
the Hawaiian Minister of Foreign Af
fairs, adding that when he received it '
he had telegraphed the Secretary the
facts briefly :
"Department of Foreign Affairs,
Honolulu, November 10th. Sir: In
formation lias Just been received at
this office tending to show that a
filibustering expedition against this
Government is being fitted out in San
Francisco and that one of the follow
ing steam vessels, the Rosalia or the
Alexandria, will be used for the pur
pose. The information points more
strongly to the latter. I desire to ask
the good offices of your Government to
prevent the shipment of arms on these
vessels for such purpose. : ,l- ;
; F. M. Hatch."
"On the 19th Inst, the Hawaiian
Charge d' Affaires called on the de
partment at my invitation, and in re
ply to an inquiry said he had no in
formation that arms had been or were
to be shipped from San Francisco for
use against the Government of Ha
waii." - :
Following this correspondence. with
Willis there was an exchange of notes
between Secretary Gresham and Mr.
Thurston, the Minister here, which is
interesting mainly because of the in
sinuation by the .atter that the pres
ence of an American warship at Hono
lulu would be acceptable. Thurston
wrote January 20th :
"Sir: I have the honor to inform
you that I have received from my
Government telegraphic communica
tions stating that the insurrection in
Honolulu is broken; that several of
the leaders and the remaining follow
ers are fugitives in the mountains,
and that the British Commissioner at
Honolulu, Mr. Hawes, has called upon
the Government of Hawaii to give
him assurances that no capital pun
ishment will be inflicted upon insur
rectionists, there being fifteen Eng
lishmen under arrest, which requested
assurance the Government has refused
to give him. A man of-war at Hono
lulu has been recently the subject of
discussion in the press and elsewhere.
It does not lie within my province to
suggest any course of action on the
part of the United States concerning
such subjects. I feel, however, that it
is due your Government and to the
large American population and prop
erty interests in Hawaii to state that
although the Government of Hawaii
is, and will continue in the future as
it has in the past, fully able to main
tain itself from the attacks from do
mestic enemies, in view of the serious
nature of the charges now pending
against a large number of both for
eigners and natives, and of other com
plicating conditions, the state of
affairs at the Islands is critical, as in
the event of further insurrection or
complication, although the. Govern
ment win use every endeavor to pro
tect foreign citizens and their prop
erty, it is not impossible that sudden
contingencies may artee or isolated
acts of violence take place, against
whieh the Government, with its po
lice and military force, may temporar
ily be unable to afford protection."
In his reply, on January 20th, Sec
retary Ores ham said : "On receipt of
a dispatch from Mr. Willis yesterday
morning on the subject of the upris
ing, which was immediately given to
the press, a warshlo was at once or
dered to proceed from San Francisco
to Honolulu to afford needed protec
tion to any Americans entitled to It.
That fact was also announced by the
press Saturday afternoon and this
morning, and I naturally supposed
that the announcement had attracted
your attention."

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