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The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, March 16, 1895, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1895-03-16/ed-1/seq-1/

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Tlstabllshed July 3. IR50.
VOL. XXI.. JSO. 3944.
nONOLUIiU. HAWAIIAN ISLANDS. SATURDAY, MARCH 1G, 1895.
PRICE: 5 CENTS.
f! i! E H I II 1 I Tl
t 1 r
i 7 fimr
w i. i it. i i a. a i a i - a i l m i i i
- Y Y V Y V W
A-
i i ii i i ii
t
Unships (Tar lis.
THE HAWAIIAN SAFE DEPOSIT
INVESTMENT COMPANY,
IX02COLULC, II. I.
Have Safe Deposit Boxes of variona sizes
to rent by the month or yetr.
Stocks and Bontfs Bought and Sold
AQ&XTS FOB
San Insurance Offlc. of London.
AGINTS FOB
Oret Northern Railway. Tickets
Bold to All Point.
AGENTS FOB
The Hawaiian Land and Improve
ment Company (Limited).
Some of the finest Coffee and Fruit
Land on the Islands for eale upon very
favorable terms. 3878-tf
G. BREWER & CO., LIMITED
Queen Street, Honolulu, II. I.
AGENTS FOR
Hawaiian Agricultural Co., Onomea
Sugar Co., Honoma Sugar Co., Wailnku
Sugar Co., Waiheja Sugar Co., Makee
Sugar Co., llaleakala Kanch Co., Kapa
pala Uanch.
Planters' Line San Francisco Packets .
Chas. Brewer & Co.'s Line of Boston
Packots.
Agents Boston Board of Underwriters.
Agents Philadelphia Board of Under
writers. LIST OF OFFICERS:
P. C. Jokes .President
Geo. II. Robertson Manager
E. F. Bishop Tres. and Secy.
Col. W. F. AixEXt Auditor
O. M. Cooze )
II. Watebhousk. .. Directors
A. W. Oabter. . . . )
The Hawaiian Inrestment Co.
REAL ESTATE
-AXD-
ILOAJSTSe
TOR SALE.
Desirable Property in all parts of the
City.
Four llousea on Punchbowl street at
a bargain.
A 4-acre Lot at -Makiki.
Lota 4 and 5, Block 25, Pearl
City.
A2)-acre Lot at Kali hi.
Residence at Kalihi with barn, pig
pens and chicken coop, 120x10; suitable
for a Chicken Ranch.
13 and 15 Kaakmann Street
Telephone C39.
Near Postoffice.
Castle & Cooke Id.
LIFE AND FIRE
11
AGENTS FOR,"
NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL
Life Insurance Company
OF B08TON.
Etna Fire Insurance Company
OF HARTFORD.
HONOLULU
CARRIAGE MANUFACTORY
W.W.WRIGHT, - Proprietor.
Carriage -: Builder
AJND REPAIREK.
X7"A11 orders from th other islands
in the Carriage Building. Trimming and
Fainting Line, will meet with prompt
attention.
CTP. O. BOX 321.
KOS. 128 AND 130 FORT STREET
3S6J-y
Massage.
MRS. PRAY WOULD ANNOUNCE
that she will attend a limited num
ber of patients. Address at H. M.
Whitney's, King st. ; Bell Talephons 76.
3223-tf
INSDRANCE
AGENTS
DR. R. I. MOORE
DE2STTIST,
02ce: Arlington Cottage, Hotel Hre
Office hours ; 9 a. u. to 12 m.
and 1 p. m. to 4 p. v. 3860-lm
M. E. Grossman, D.D.S.
DKNTIST,
5 fiOTIL STS5IT.
HOI'P." M A. M. TO 4 r. .
Tk New Watchmaker
Will clean your Watch for 75c.
Put in the bEt Mainspring 75c.
Balance or Pallet Staffs 1.25
Jewel holes, Pivots, etc. 50c.
Clocks cleaned 50c.
EffTWyes his work well and GUA
RANTEES it for ONE YEAR. TRY
HIM.
W. J. STODDART,
Fort Mreet, above Hotel street, next
to McDonald's Blacfcsmith Shop.
3933-v
New Goods
A FINE ASSORTMENT.
TILES FOR FLOORS !
And for Decorating Purposes;
Mattirq or ALT. KC?D3,
Majtila CiGABa,
WING WO CHAN & Co.
No. as Nuuhau t tre 5.
S631-q
F. W. MAKINNEY,
TYPEWRITER,
Cenveyancer and Searcher of Records
F1KK, LIFK AND
Accident
Insurance.
All kinds of Typewriting done, promptly,
cheaply and accurately.
AX80
GENERAL COLLECTOR.
CmQYTicn: 318 PORT BTBEET 3848-t
WM. L. PETERSON,
Notary :- Poblic, -: "typewriter
AND COI.LF.CTOIC.
Offick : Over Golden Rule Bazaar.
3818-y
DR. J. UCHIDA,
Physician and Surgeon.
No. 5, KUKUI LANE.
Office Hours: S to 12 a. m. and
8 p. m.
Mntual Tel. 532.
HONOLULU IRON WORKS CO.,
Stoam Engines,
Boilers, Hagmr mils. Cooler. Krmmm
una la OMtlnr
And machinery of every description made
to order. Particular attention paid to
ships' blacksmith in bj. Job work excuted
on the shortest notic.
LEWERS & COOKE,
Successors to Lewers & Dickson.
Importers and Dealers in Lumber
And all Kinds of Building Materials.
WO. a FORT BTRKF.T, HONOLULU
P.O. Box 3S6. Mutual Tel. 544.
NAN-YD COMPACT, LIMITED,
Oommission Merchants
IMPOST EKS AD DEA1KK8 IN
Japanese -:- Provisioiis
AND GXHERAL MERCHAMilSB,
411 KING STREET,
Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands.
JfNew Goods by every steamer.
3S78-ly
JENNIE L. HILDEBRAND, M. D.
Homeopathic Physician.
HOTEL STREET,
Ophite Y. M. C. A.
iCT""Office hours: 9 to 12 a. m. and 2
to 4 p. m. Mutual Telephone No. G10.
39 33-3 m
C. J. WHITNEY,
Teacher ot Elocution antl Dra
matic Art,
Arlington Hotel.
3SS4-V
6. T. ALEXANDER. n. T. BALDWIN.
ALEXAXDEK & BALDWIN,
Commission IVIercliants
No. 3 California St., Ban Francisco.
CCrIslarKl orders promptly filled.
3897-Cm
A. PERRY, x
ATTORNEY AT LAW
And Notary Public.
Office: Over Eishop's Bank.
3G92-ly
WILLIAM C. PARKE,
ATTORNEY -AT -LAW
AFD
Agnt to tak AcknorllgMnte.
Oric No. 13 Kaahumanu Street, Hono
IU1U, i. i.
GONSALVES & CO,
Wholesale Grocers and Wine
Merchants.
225 Queen Street, Honolulu, H. I.
H. may & CO.,
Wholesale and Retail Grocers
OS Fortx SXXIICKX.
Telephones 22. P.O. Box 470.
3450-y
HAWAIIAN HARDWARE CO.,
HARDWARE,
Cutlery and Glassware
307 Fort Btreet.
3575-ly
BEAVER SALOON,
FORT 81BBET, OPP08ITE WILDEB A CO.'s
H. J. NOLTE, Proprietor.
First-class Lunches served with Tea, Cof
fee, Soda Water, Ginger Ale or Milk.
BJmf'OTRH FROM 3 A. M. TILL 10 P. M.
Smokers Recuisites a specialty. '
WM. F. THRUM,
SUEYEYOR.
Room No. 11, Spreckels' Block.
3859-6m
LEWIS & CO.,
Wholesale and Retail Grocers
111 FORT STREET,
Telephone g4Q. P. O. Boi 9
CONSOLIDATED
Soda Water Works Company, Linilted
Eepl&inde, Ccrner Allen xnd Fort Sis.
HOLLISTEK
3710 155S-lv
& CO.,
Apentf.
1!.- W. MHESNEY & SONS
WHOLESALE GROCERS
AID DEALSE8 IN
Leather and Shoe Findings
no NO LULU.
AflFNTS "onolnla Roap Works Co.,
AUIiillO Hnialn TnnVrr.
H. HACKFELD & CO.,
General Commission Agents
Cor. Fort andjQneen Ets.. Honolulu.
Imperial
Flour
Is the only b!ended flour ever
offered on theee Islands. It is a new
"Patent i'roceph" o Mending to:ethf r
the Best Known varieties of whaat for
strength and color, thereby producing
a flour that will give tht beet possible
baking results for the housekeeper.
XCCApk your grocer for a trial sack
it will cost you no more.
A. L. MORKIS A CO.,
3937-6m Wholesale Agents.
CABLE AMENDMENT KILLED.
But Senators Made a Hard Fight
For It.
CIIAKTKK FOi: IMUVATK CUMI'ANV
Fate of the Bill Aot Settled Till Lant
Daj' .Session of Coogresa Iloase
Conferees Win Their Point Next Con
gret xpe-ted to be More Friendly.
Washington, March 3. The pro
ceedings were comparatively tame.
In the Senate the naval appronriatiou
bill consumed the time until after 10
o'clock tonight. The amendment of
the Committee on Appropriations
striking out one of the proposed bat
tleships being, among other things,
agreed to. Then Senator Blackburn
reported the continued disagreement
of the couferes on the Hawaiian cable
amendment to the consular and dip
lomatic bill. He urged the Seuate to
recede from its stand in favor of the
cable, expressing his disapproval of
the project, and saying he believed
the President would not approve the
measure with such a provision. Black
burn confessed that the Democrats
had not shown themselves able to
cope with the financial question and
he thought the cable scheme should
also be committed to the next Con
gress. Senator Hale followed with :i speech
in favor of the cable, Haying that if
this Congress refused the appropria-,
tion the next Congress would surely
authorize it, and if the President
would not sign the bill it would not
be very long before a Republican P:e
sident would have a chance at it.
Senator White of California said
that he had favored the cable project
and voted for It before. He believed
it now ueceseary for the Senate to re
cede from the stand it took. The ayes
and noes were not ordered, but a num
ber of Senators on the Republican
side voted against the motion on the
viva voce vote. This disposed of the
consular and diplomatic bill.
"Blackburn presented another con
ference report on the diplomatic and
consular appropriation bill stating that
no agreement had been reached on the
Hawaiian cable, and there was no
prospect that the House would ever
yield. The bill would fail, he said, if
the Senate persisted on the vote about
to be taken, in keeping the cable ap
propriation in the bill. He believed
also that the bill was doomed to fail
ure even If the two houses acquiesced
in the item.
Hawley quickly asked if it was
meant to intimate that the President
would veto the bill.
I am not able to say;" replied
Blackburn, "that the President would
veto it, but I know that if I were the
President I would veto it."
Blackburn warned the Senate that
another Insistence on the cable then
might mean an extra session. He
thought perhaps that this might be
desirable, as he believed it would tshow
the next Congress as helpless in deal
ing with the financial question as this
Congress had been. He moved that
the Senate recede from the Hawaiian
cable amendment.
White (D.) of California announced
that he had heretofore supported the
cable item, but he now felt compelled
to change Ids vote.
Blackburn's motion to recede on the
cable item was then put to a vote and
carried without a division. The con
ference report on the diplomatic and
consular bill was then agreed to.
Washington,' Feb. 21. The House
devoted most of the day to the con
sideration of the Senate amendmeut
to the Consular and Diplomatic Ap
propriation bills, appropriating $500,
(00 for the construction of a cable to
the Hawaiian Islands. Ryan, Bart
lett and Sickles spoke in favor of the
amendment, which wa9 defeated by a
vote of 1 14 to 152, sixteen Democrats
voting for the cable. The bill was
then s-ent to further conference.
Hooker, a member of the Foreign
Allairs Committee, opened the debate
in opposition to the proposed amend
ment. By the terms of his amend
ment, he said, the Government was to
own, coutrol and operate this Hawaii
an cable. Such a proposition had
never been madt before. A private
enterprise should -onitruct this cable,
if it so desired.
Storer deprtcated making this mat
ter a party question, but said he real
ized ii was only In thi- way the Chair
man of the Committee on Foreign
Affairs hoped to defeat thia project.
Party li:es had been broken in the
Senate when thi amendment was
voted into the bill. H- called atten
tion to the necessity for ;he cable as
expressed in two of Present Cleve
land's messages a ud t-'-e recommenda
tions of Mr. Bsyard when h- was Sec
retary of ttate.
MK. CLEVELAND'S PROPER COURSE.
That, said Storer, was when there
was a Democrat at the hoad of that
department. Things were) different
now that there wa- a Secretary in the
State Depnrtment who roe above or
below party accordingly as he was
viewed. Still, if the Administration
was now opposed to this cable, the
manly thing for Cleveland to do would
be to send a message to Congress say
ing he had changed his mind. In con
elusion, Storer said that a submarine
cable was not as much a necessity to
the navy as the electric signal which.
rtnncufa tho riilrtf rimiao txifVi tKia an-V.
gice-room or a uatuesnip.
Draper said he favored this cable as
a preliminary step toward the annexa
tion of the Hawaiian Islands.
Hermann declared that to the Pacific
Coast the question of a cable connec
tion with Honolulu overshadowed and
transcended all others save only that
of the construction of the Nicaragua
canal. The people of the Hawaiian
Islands gave us 90 per cent of their
trade. More of our ships entered the
port of Honolulu than any other port
in the world last year, Liverpool not
excepted. Aside from the commercial
reasons for the construction of this
cable, there were patriotic and public
reasons.
Harter thought this cable should be
laid by private capital, .and, he con
cluded, private parties had appeared
before the committee and asked for a
charter for this purpose. Ryan thought
this Democratic House could well af
ford, in the closing hours of the ses
tion to show its sympathy with mer
clirsnts desiring to extend our trade by
voting an appropriation for the con
struction of this cable.
SICKLES' ELOQUENT SUPPORT.
Sickles earnestly supported the ca
ble proposition. He was compelled
to appeal from the judgment of the
House Committee on Foreign Affairs
to that of the Senate Committee. As
an American he had a platform of his
own. He favored annexation. As a
Democrat he found his warrant in the
policy of Jefferson, who annexed Lou
isiana, and of Jackson, who annexed
Texas. If party lines trammeled him
on a questiou like this he would break
them asunder as he had done before.
There could be no nartisanshin in
Americanism.
'Mr. Speaker," Sickles concluded,
"my spau of life has not much longer
to run, yet I hope to live to see the
star of the Republic of the Pacific add
its tropical splendor to the star of the
Western Hemisphere."
RlcCreary closed the debate, and in
the course of his remarks denied that
Mr. Cleveland had ever indorsed h
proposition for the construction of a
Hawaiian cable by the Government.
He had merely favored the incorpora
tion of a company to lay such a cable.
mo vote was then taken on Hitt's
tnolion that the House agree to the
Senate amendments. Hitt demanded
the ayes and noes, and the roll was
called. His motion was lost, 114 to
152. The vote was practically a party
one, the Republicans and Populists
voting for the building of the cable
and the Democrats against it.
Without division the House, on mo
tion of McCreary, non concurred in
the amendment and further confer
ence was ordered.
Washington, Feb. 28. The House
today insisted upon its disagreement
to the Senate amendment for the pro
posed Hawaiian cable. The California
delegation voted solidly as before for
the appropriation, but the majority
against the cable was practically the
same as when the matter was before
broached in the House.
Representative Stone of Pennsyl
vania, who offered the bill in the
House for an independent cable to
Japan by the way of Honolulu, said to
a Chronicle correspondent that if the
amendment to the consular and dip
lomatic bill was defeated he would
immediately try to get through his
own measure, asking unanimous con
sent therefor, if necessary, tegetit up.
The Senate is still firm, but opin
ions differ as to whether it will ul
timately yield or not. Senator Perkins
was inclined to think that the Senate
would stand firm, but Senator White,
on the contrary, spoke in rather dub
ious terms of the ultimate result of the
proposition.
Senator Perkins and Representative
Stone had a conference upon the sub
ject, and they determined upon a line
of action in the event of the defeat of
the proposition embodied in the con
sular and diplomatic bill. They will
both then endeavor to get through a
bill for a private charter.
FOR THK CAItLH.
Thurston Responds To a Toaat at a Ban
quet. Trenton (N. J.), Feb. 23. At the
annual banquet of the Trenton Board
of Trade Iat night the Hon. Dorrln A.
Thurston, Hawaiian Minister to the
United States, responded to the toast,
"The Commercial Control of the Pac
ific." After expressing his pride in
representing the youngest republic in
the world, Mr. Thurston quoted figures
showing the magnitude and thegrowth
of commerce iu the Pacific Ocean.
Not a vessel, he said, could go across
the Pacific Ocean without stopping at
Hawaii for coal. The great nations
are taking strides in subsidizing the
traffic in the Pacific, paying greater
attention to the Pacific Islands than
to Africa.
Canada has recognized the value of
the commerce of the Pacific, and has
started four steamship companies from
Vancouver, and every effort is being
made to push trade.
Mr. Thurston said one of the means
of establishing closer relations with
Hawaii was by building the proposed
cable. This he earnestly advocated.
Bishop Auction SaIs.
Auctioneer Morgan conducted a
successful gale of articles belonging
to Hon. C. Iw. Bishop yesterday.
Among tbe purchasers were Mr?.
Admiral Beardelee, Commissioner
Hawes and others. The eale will
be continued some day during next
week.
ROW III THE SPRECKELS FAMILY
Suit Between Rudolph Spreckels
and His Father.
IT CONCfiRSQ PA At II Al' STOCK.
Plaintiff Claim 1 hat if the Nevada Baak
Transfers Certain stock. He Will Loie
a Quarter of a Million Dollar by
Reason Hawaiian Govt. Taxes.
San Francisco, March 7. Rudolph
Sprcck-; Is has brought suit in the Su
perior Court to enjoin the Nevada bank
from transferring from his name cer
tain shares of stock pledged by him to
secure certain payments from C. A.
Spreckels. Judge Hebbard has grant
ed a temporary Injunction and will
hear the case. The injunction is in
the sum of $10,000 and the sureties
are C. P. Splivalo and Joseph Kahn.
The complaint sets forth that iu
January, 1S94, Claus Spreckels and
C. A. Spreckels entered into an agree
ment by the terms of which Claus
Spreckels was to transfer to his son
certain valuable property In consider
ation of certain yearly payments to be
made by him, the last one to" become
due next January. To secure his
yearly payments C. A. Spreckels
pledged some securities said to be far
more valuable than the total of the
payments so secured.
At that time, so runs the complaint,
Rudolph Spreckels owned 5000 ehares
of Paauhau Plantation Company
stock, which stood in Spreckels'
name. This stock Rudolph agreed to
pledge as additional security for the
payments from C. A. Spreckels
would provide that Claus Spreckels
transfer it to his (Rudolph's) name on
the books of tbe corporation. This
was done, and Rudolph indorsed the
certificates, it being agreed, so the
complaint alleges, . that the stock
should - remain in Rudolph's name
uutil after the maturity of the debt.
It was also agreed, sets forth the plain
tiff, that upon the payment of the
first yearly installment of the debt
2500 shares of tbe stock should be re
turned to Rudolph aud that upon the
liquidation of tbe indebtedness the re
maining 2500 shares should also be re
turned. Claus Spreckels transferred his
claim against his son to tbe Nevada
Bank, turning overall the securities
hypothecated including Rudolph's
5000 shares of Paauhau stock.
C. A. Spreckels paid his first yearly
installment amounting to $351,750,
and half the stock was turned over to
Rudolph. The other payment will
not become due till next January,
but the Nevada Bank, so the plaintiff
claims, disregarding the agreement,
now threatens to send the stock to
Honolulu and have it transferred from
Rudolph's name notwithstanding the
alleged fact that it holds other secur
ities far in excess in value of the pay
ment still to be made. It is charged
in the complaint that the bank's action
is taken for the purpose of voting the
shares against Rudolph at the next
election and preventing him from
pocketing his interests' in the corpora
tion; It is also charpt-d that the pro
posed action is meditated solely for
the purpose of injuring the plaintiff in
his property and fiuat cial credit.
Incidentally the plaintiff claims
that the transfer an-1 reissue of the
stock will impose a large expenditure
upon him, because the Hawaiian Gov
ernment levies a tax upon such re-
The plaintlff claim that if the bank
be permitted to pursue its intended
course he will be injured through the
depreciation of the stock from its
present value of $250,000, far beyond
any amount of damages be might be
able to recover. Therefore, he prays
that the bank be enjoined from re
moving the stock from the jurisdiction
of tbe State of California and from
having it transferred from the plain
tiffs name pending the maturity of C.
A. Spreckels' indebtedness.
Gay Gaiety Girls.
The Gaiety Girls troupe enjoyed
their short stay here yesterday.
They expressed themselves a 3 very
much delighted with their treat
ment. At the departure of the
Mariposa they were the center of
attraction. Whan the band played
' Tommy Aitkine" they could not
contain themselves and danced for
joy, waving their hands at the
crowd and to their gentlemen
friends of fehort acquaintance. As
the feteamtr hauled slowly out in
the stream the whole troupe sang:.
"God bless you, Honolulu, Here's
your country's health to you."
s
The Hawaiian band pfayed at
the Kamehsmeha Girls School on
Thursday afternoon by special request.

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