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The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, April 02, 1895, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1895-04-02/ed-1/seq-2/

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THE PACIFIC COMMERCIAL ADVERTISER: HONOLULU, APRIL 2, ISfM.
wholly
rienced
of steam
cities of America are already suffer
ing intolerably from excessive sum
mer heats, which increases as the
country becomes more completely de
forested. It can hardly be doubted
that artificial cooling will soon be felt
as great a necessity in city summer
life as artificial beating now is in
winter.
A second direction which electrical
invention has been pursuing with
much success is that of wtorage batter
ies, by means of which the torce gen
erated may be stored up to be used
when and where required. At present
such batteries are still somewhat
costly, and of great weight. The
ftroblem is to make them more cheap
y, and especially to have them light
aud portable. When this is accom
plished cars can profitably be driven
by them on ordinary railways. Ocean
greyhounds may exchange their
bunkers for great ranges of many hun
dred tons of such batteries to be
charged while in port. It can hardly
be doubted that very great progress
will rapidly be made in the art of
storing electric force in portable forms.
It seems quite plain that we are
already well entered upon an age of
the use of electric force, resulting in a
progress in applied art and in
dustrial development which will
eclipse the already expe
marvels of the age
power. It is impossible to
plainly forecast the developments of
the future. Certain possibilities indi
cated above seem very clear. Ttie
world is making strange progress along
many lines. The manufacture of
aluminum opens many possibilities.
Chemical discoveries are constantly
multiplying. Therapeutics are being
largely changed by discoveries in bac
teriology and inoculation. The twen
tieth century not uulikely has iu store
for mankind other discoveries and in
ventions as marvellous as any already
arrived at.
It is evident that in a not distant
future the capacity of mankind for the
production of wealth is to be enor
mously increased. Moat of the arti
cles of necessity ana comiort now re
quired will be produced with half the
expenditure of time and labor that
they now are. It follows that with a
natural and just distribution of the
products of labor and machinery, all
classes of men may both have their
hours of labor much reduced, and may
enjoy much larger compensation iu
their choice of the commodities
produced. It is conceivable
that this might be prevented
by the creed and selfishness of the
abler classes, who should seek to mo
nopolize for themselves the immense
advantages gained by improved me
chanical appliances. Such directors
of industry might ho manipulate af
fairs as to keep down wages to the
lowest point at which their employees
could live, and so keep for themselves
the chief share of the wealth produced.
Practically, this would in any case
become impossible. The operatives,
being straitened for means, would
have small ability to purchase pro
ducts. If there are few consumers,
production must decline. Then again,
production becoming limited by the
small demand, there would be labor
for only a moiety of the operatives,
and immense masse of the popula
tion would be left unemployed and
destitute. It is obvious that the dis
tress thus produced would create a de
maud for remedial measures w hich
would be irresistible. This condition ol
affairs, of destitution increasing in
the midst of an enormously devel
oped power of producing wealth,
would be so clearly unnatural
and an abuse, that it would soon work
out its own cure.
At the present time the call for so
cial reform is grdwing louder every
day. It is becoming obvious that
some means mu-t be found for prop
erly readjusting the relations of labor
and capital, so that both may have
reasonable recompense, aud produc
tion may not become congested by the
inability of the multitude of consum
ers to purchase what they have helped
capital and machinery to produce.
The considerations above presented to
show that productive power is to be
immensely increased by the coming
inventions of the m-xt half century,
would seem to make it clear that the
needed reform caunot long be delay td
It is absolutely inconceivable that
the laboring masses will submit very
long to a minimum of wages. They
are growing in education aud intelli
gence. They will clearly discern any
art i tici.il aud oppressive conditions
sought to be enforced upon them, aud
will iuevitab'y rise against such con
ditions in resistless opposition.
It is also to be expec ed that the
growing sentiment of Altruism so
characteristic of the age will rule iu
this matter. There will be a majority
amoug the abler aud directing classes
of men who will be governed by ben
evolent sentiments, and will work
unitedly to make the improved pro
ductive facilities inure to the good of
all the members of the community,
instead of to the few. It is to be
hop-d and expected that it will soon
become the honor aud the pride of the
leaders of thought aud action to sun.
press mere selfish greed an?".. , a!iowr'
ness men. and to strmtiohig oum
lin' tie,,l --0'j"1 4U:"ai ter a wide and
nSWi'..j5ffTbut!6n of the benefits of
J science and invention to the masses of
men. As Christian civilization ad
vances it cau hardly be doubted that
an increasing contempt will be felt
toward those selfish amassers of
wealth and their heirs, who waste
that wealth iu ostentatious display or
vicious indulgence.
This essay does not undertake
to iudicate the liues which
the needed reform and re
adjustment must take. It is
strongly believed that the rights of
property must continue to be respect
ed Any geueral communism will
not help mankind. There must con
tinue to be adequate teward for super
ior ability aud superior effort. Equal
ity of condit ion and of gain--cannot be
aimed at. How far enactments of law
can provide for the necessary reforms
is not dear. Law must have its neces
sary share in the work. No doubt
there will be great friction and severe
struggles.
It is believed that the most decisive
element in the advancing reform must
be the growth. and prevalence of prin
ciples ol benevolence and justice. Just
so far as these principles are em edded
in the hearts aud rule in the lives of
the people at large, so far will a peace
able aud happy refoim be accom
plished. Chief then above all other
good work for the coming age must be
that of dessemiuatiug aud rooting
such principles in the hearts of the
coming generation.
PICTURES R TELEGRAPH,
Transmitted Quite as Successfully
As Messages.
I'HONOGK l'H I'lUXCII'Li: I EI).
Relief Photograph Kulled on One Cyl
inder and Reproduced Automatically
At Other End of Wire Can be Used
In .f ournaltsna Amstutz Invention.
One of the most interesting recent
developments of electrotechnics is the
process invented by N. S. Amstutz, of
Cleveland, Ohio, for automatically
making a half-tone reproduction of a
photograph at a distant place, says
the Literary Digest. This process was
invented about three years ago, but it
has been greatly improved, as may be
seen by the illustration. Fig. 1 is a
portrait of the i.iventor, reproduced
from the ordinary half-tone process.
Fig. 2 is the same after telegraphic
transmission to a distant point. Fig.
3 is the transmitted portrait as made
three years ago. The improvement is
evident and the process has almost
reached the stage where it will be
available in daily journalism. Nelson
W. Perry gives the following descrip
tion of the development of the new
invention :
"Alexander Graham Bell found that
by varying the strength of an electric
current in consonauce with sound
waves he could transmit articulate
speech nearly to the ends of the earth.
"Edl-on, Taintor, and Bell found
that by causing a stylus attached to
the center of a diaphragm to which
words were spoken to near lightly
upon a revolving wax cylinder they
could engrave upon that wax and pre
serve for all time the characteristics
of those words. The undulating
graved line in the soft matrix became
the mechauical facsimile of articulate
speech, which required merely a re
versal of the process to reproduce the
original sound waves. If the dia
phragm stylus were allowed to trip
Fm. 1.
over the undulatory graved line it
would give out spoken words. If it
were caused to vary the strength of
an electric current, those undulations
might be reproduced in sound at a
distant point in a telephone receiver,
or, by causing this current to actuate
an eletro-magnetic device, a dupli
cate engraved record could be made
to utter again the original words.
'The phonograph inscription Ja the
mechanical record of sounds. Can we
make a mecuanirai rnrrd of Unlit in
all its various gradations ? Certainly,
and quile as simply.
M Many substances undergo changes
of solubility which are proportional to
the intensity of the light to which
they are exposed. One such substance
is ordiuary Kelatin iu which is dis
solved a little bichromate of potas
siurr. This, when exposed to the ac
tion of light, hecomes insoluble in
warm water, whereas before such ex
posure it will be dissolved away. If,
therefore, we expose such a plate be
neath a photographic negative, those
portions which are exposed to the
strong light will become totally in
soluble; those that are entirely shield
ed will remain soluble; and those
affected by the subdued light the
halftones will have their solubility
affected in proportion to the amount
jgi
trot3Tpe may be taken, flattened out,
and placed upon the press, aud it is
from such that the illustrations here
with produced were made.
'The graving tool is made V shap
ed, so that as it cuts deeper it cuts
wider, and, in printing, produces
blacker lines.
"If we follow the process wc see
that the relief photo in gelatin punted
from a negative is a positive. This
may be reproduced at the distant
point either as a positive or as a nega
tive." It should be stated that the rather
coarse quality of the picture shown is
due to the smaller number of liues to
the inch. The machine can do much
finer work, producing result that
look like photographs on satin, but
these are, unsuitable for the rapid
printing necessary in newspaper
work. Mr. Perry concludes as fol
lows: "The great utility of this process
Fig. 3.
lies in the fact that it is almost en
tirely automatic. The relief photo
must, of course, be prepared aud
wound on the cylinder by hand, aud
the machines at both ends of the liue
started up, but the tracing of the
transmitting stylus and the engraving
on the receiving cylinder proceed
without further attention."
HONOLULU
Teachers' -:- Association
The regular Monthly Meeting of the
above Association will be held in
the Y. M. C. A. Hall
This Evening, April
Addresses will be given by
Rev. Kennith Duncan,
2d.
AND-
Rev. J. M. Chase.
During the evening, musical sections
will be given by Mk. W. LOVE and the
boys of KAULAWELA SCHOOL.
J.
3956-3fc
LIGHTFOOT,
St-cretary.
A Grand Concert
AT
DRILL, SHED,
Saturday Eveoiog, April 0,
Will be given by the girls of
Kawaiahao Seminary,
s-l TEI BY
PfiOFESSOB BERG EE,
AND
ORCHESTRA.
Proceeds of the Concert to be used
benefit of Seminary.
lor
Admission
50 Cents
395S-td
Butter,
Butter,
Butter,
Table butter from Pau O
You had better get off the earth it you don't wear McIner
tty's Setoe
s-all prize winners.
Mclnerny,
Fort Street.
The
Mutual
Life
Insurance
Umpaoy
OF NEW YORK,
RICHARD A. McCURDY.
President.
Company's Statement for the Year Ending December 31st, 1894
ASSETS
$204,638,783.96
Income.
Received for Premiums .. $36,123,163 82
Received from a!l other Sources L,??Z.'6 12 WJM20,8e9 94
Disbursemente.
To Policy-h'ders for Claims bvdeath... $11 ,959,794 94
" forEnd'm'ts.Divid'dstc 9 159,462 14 $21 089,257 08
For all other Account ' 9 789.63418 $30,878,891 26
Assets
United States Bond and other Securities $83 970,690 67
First lien Loans on Bmds and Mortgage 71.339 415 91
Loans on Stocks and Bonds ll,36i 100 00
Real E-tate.. - 21 69! 73 39
Cash in Banks and Trust Companies 9,6"5,19S 91
Accrued Interest, Deferred Premiums, etc 6 6 5 6 5 07
$-04 63-T783 tt
P.cserve for Policies and other L'b'litieSjCo.'s Standard, Am .4 per cent. 18 109.46 14
Surplus $2,59,37 b2
Insurance and Annuities assumed and renewed $750,290 677 97
Insurance and Annuities in force December 31, 1&94 855,207,778 42
I have
correct.
carefully examined the foregoing Statement and find the same to
CH RLKti A. PRELLK.R, Auditor.
From the Surplus a dividend will be apportioned as usual.
be
Report of the
Examining
Committee.
Office ok Tub Mutual. Life Ivsubakcs Company op New York. Feb. 7, 1893.
At a m- eti' g of the Hoard of Trustees t this Company, held on the 2th day of
Decerab r las , the untie signed were ppoint-d a C mraitief to examine the annual
statem. nt for th ye ending December 31, 1894, and tu ver fy the same by comparison
with the assets of the Comp.mv.
The Committee have carefully performed! the duty assigned to them, and hceby
cert fy that the statement is in all particulars correct, and that the assets specified
therein are in possession of the Company.
I i making thi- certificate the Committee bear testimony to the high chnracter of
the investments of the t'ompany and exp'ess their approval of the system, order, and
accuracy with w hich the accouuts and vouchers have been kept, and the business in
general transacted signe
H. C. Von Post, J. Hobart Herrick, Charles R. Henderson.
- Thpo. A. Havemeyer, Charles E. Miller, Robert BeWdlL
Board of Trustees.
Samuel D. Pabcock.
Charl s E Miller,
Henry H Rogers,
Charles R Henderson,
George F Ba er.
He mann C Von Post,
Adrian Jseli t, Jr.,
Oliver Harriman,
George S. Coe,
Walter R. Gillette,
J no. VV Auchincloss,
George Bliss,
DudLy Olott,
Alex. H. Ricp,
George S. Bowdoin,
Robert Sewell,
"Henry W. Smith,
it h A. McCurdy,
H. Walter Webb,
The . Morford,
R W. Pecbham,
Fred Cromwell,
Lewis day.
Robert A. Granniss,
s. V R. Cruger,
Robert Olyphant.
James C. Ho den,
Geoige J. Hven,
William Babcock,
J. Hobart Herrick,
Julien T. Davies,
Very choice
Malei Dairy.
GOOD TABLE BUTTER FROM KONA.
GOOD COOKTNG B OTTER FROM
.. .ft
Received every week.
FRESH BLOCK BUTTER FOR
TABLE
GOOD BLOCK B OTTER FOR COOK
ING Received every steamer.
For sale at low rates by
Stuvves.int Fish,
Wm. P. Dixon, Augustus D Juilliard, Theo. A. Havemever
ROBERT A. GRANNISS, Vice-President.
WALTER R. GILLETTE, General Manager.
ISAAC F. LLOYD. 2d Vice-Fre-ident. HKMKY K. DU
wit it, , r t . . i . x - . . 4 r nr. n n L I
BYAUTH0RITY.
Hale of Government Lot on the Mitukt
tlde of Green Street, Above the
8 tone Ouarrr, South Slope of
I'uiu tibow 1 Hill, If onoIutu.Oahu.
On THURSDAY. May 'Jd, 1895, at
12 o'clock noon, at the front entrance
of the Executive Building, will be
sold at Public Auction a Government
Lot on the maukasideof Green street,
above the Stone Quarry, south slope
of Punchbowl Hill, Honolulu, Oahu
containing an area of 25,300 square
feet, a little more or less.
Upset price, $250.00.
J. A. KING,
Minister of the Interior.
Interior Office, March 20, 1895.
(3956-31.)
Water Notice.
Holders of water privileges, or those
paying water rates, are hereby notified
that the hours for irrigation purposes are
from 7 to 8 o'clock a. m. and 5 to 6
o'clock P.M.
ANDREW BROWN,
Superintendent of Water Works.
I Approved J. A Kino,
Minister of the Interior.
Honolulu, March 12, 1895.
3942-tf
Partnership Notice.
H
ENRY H. WII 1.1 AMS AND ED
ward A. Williams have thil day
dissolved the partnership heretofore ex
isuutf between them under the firm
name oi I in er furniture Company, as
well as of Williams Brothers in die Fur
niture and Undertaking business in Ho
nolulu, in the Island of Oahu.
Henry H. Williams ret'res from paid
firm and business and Edward A. Wil
liams remains in said business, having
formed a partnership therein with his
father, C. 1 .Williams.
The new firm consist' of C. E. Wil
liamB and E. A. Wi uams, and hence
forth will carry on said humitnio and
Undertaking business in said Honolulu,
under the fiim name of C. E. Williams
& Non.
Th new firm will collect all accounts
oing to the old firm and pay all liabili
ties thereof.
Dated Uis March 30th. A. D 1A95.
H. II. WILLIAMS.
ED. A WH LI A MS,
3957-2 w C. E. WILLIAMS.
Assignee's Notice.
I
"MTV. HNnFi?jinM,'n
in Banknip cy of the
ASSIGNEE
Estate of A.
T 1 t . .
no'Da nereoy gives notice to ail p rsons
who have proved their da ms auainst
said Ba krupt, that he has tiled his ac
counts as Assignee in the Circuit
Court for the First Circuit and
will apply for a disThanre as such
Assignee on 1 UEDAY, April 2d, A. D.
1895, at JO a. m.
C. BOLTE,
Assignee of the Estate of A. Borba, a
Bankrupt 3935 4t
Guardian's Notice.
HAVING THIS DAY BEEN AP
pointe i guardian of James l ove, a
spendthrift, notice is hereby given that I
will not be responsible for any bills con
tracted by him or hv any person in his
behalf, unless authorized by nie in
writing. (Sig ) J. ALFRED MAGOoN.
Da'ed Honolulu. February 14, 1S95.
gggjMf
Assignee's Notice.
TMIR UNDERSIGNED, THE A8
1 sitjneo in bankruptcy of the Estate
of W. H Smith, uivea n'tu-e that hw has
tiled in the Circuit Court, First Ci cuit,
Hawaiian Island, hi accounts as such
Assignee, arm has asked for a settlement
of the name and a di charge, and that
heanng on the sam r-as been set for
'IUE6DAY, 4pri- 9, lv05, at 10 o'clock
Estats of W. H Smith,
M47-td
assignee of th
Ban k rn
:isf
MENTION
Fiq 2.
of light received. It remains now
only to sponge the plate with warm
water to have a photograph iu relief,
whvrein the high lights will have the
greatest elevations and the shadows
will be depressed.
'If, now, this relief photograph were
rolled upon a phonograph cylinder
and placed upon the m chine, its sty
lus, describing the spiral path, would
rise and fall as the picture passed be
neath it, just as it does when follow
ing the pnonogram. It is not sound,
however, that is wanted in this case,
but another record at a distance, so
Mr. Amstutz causes tin rising and
fulling of the stylus as it parses over
the relief photograph to vary in
similar maimer the strength of an
electric current. This uudulatory
current passing over an ordinary
telephone or telegraph wire actuates a
similar stylus at the farther end,
which, bearing upon a revolving wax
cylinder, engraves in the wax an ex
act reproduction in elevation of the
path over which the first stylus has
passed. From this cylinder au elec-
H. May & Co.
3956-I m
CHALK TALK !
Chalk marks properly made on cloth
to conform with your figure, are sure to
give you a fit.
I guarantee to fit you in pants or suits
or we don't want your trade.
Give me a trial and you will come
C A KIM A,
v 46 Nunann street.
aain.
3955
At Gazette Office.
wJii A. rOS DA, Aosistant .insurer.
WILLIAM P. SAND -, Cashier.
E v O BY McC LI N TOO K ,
JOHN TATLOCK, Jr., ssistant Actuary.
CHABLBo A. FKELLEB, Audi or.
Cor
Asst. JSec.
Treasurer.
J M Ed Tl M F60N, 2d K ssistant Treasurer.
EDWARD P. HOLDKN, Assistant Cashier.
LL D., K.I. A , Actuary.
WM. W. RICH A'RDS. Comptroller
H S. BROWN, Asst. Comptroller.
EDWARD LYMAN SHRT. General Solicitor.
MEDICAL DIRECTORS:
GUSTAVUS S. WINSTON, M.D. ELIAS J. MARSH, M.D.
GRANVILLE M. WHITE, M.D.
For particulars apply to
General A gent Hawaiian
ROSE,
Islands.
FERTIL ZERS !
YOU MUST
HAVE TO
MAKE GOOD
CROPS.
THE HAWAIIAN FERTILIZING COMPANY keeps always and constants
on hand all the well known CHKMIOAL FERTILIZERS and offers them for sale a'
the lowest market rates.
They manufacture complete High Grade Fertilizers to any special formula and
guarantee the analvsis, and all that other firms do.
Planters would do wll to write the undersigned r.efor ordering anywhere else.
A dollar saved is a dollar made.
A. F. COOKE,
Proprietor and Manager Hawaiian Fertilizing fJompany .
Join the Columbia Bicycle Club.
LD RESP P CT FULLY IN-
I form my friends and the public that
I am etill in the Tinsmith aud Plumbing
business That I am now offering for
cash regular size 2x6 feet, Zir.c Lined
bath Tubs with Plug, Chain and small
piece of pipe ready for connection for
only $10 each. Also Stone Pipe at bed
rock prices : 6 in. 45c. a length ; b in.,
40c a length ; 6 in . , 35c a lenifth.
jF"Ali kinds of Jobbing promptly
atienoVd to.
J0F Ring up Telephone 844 and your
orders will receive prompt attention at
lowest prices. J AS NTT. Jr.
Note That the War
Is over, and it is the duty of evry citizen
to support th- existing form of govern
ment. Although things may n it move
with the ordialtv that would insure an
everlasting pe-ce still they mav be al
lowed to subside into that indifference
without animosity, tuat would allow
either part; to work out their best
int rests
All things considered It may be for the
best, but time, the onlv arbitrator in iuch
cae-, must alone dncide that
STEWAHT isarplumber an j
your work in a shape and at figi
will wive saiisfacion. m
349-tf 15 K ETHEL H
tt
J. T. JLund, i
IU Bethel street, PRACTICAL NO
LOCKSMITH; Repairing ol
cri prions, Electrina1 Corrigate
ch ectura Iron Work ; O-nanv
Gates nnd HVncf s ; 'rownini',!
Restocking Guns and icycle I
a specialty , a i
The Hawaiian Gazette iLJ
manufacture rubber stamps WFj
G.
do
tat
on
nd
lag

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