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The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, April 08, 1898, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1898-04-08/ed-1/seq-4/

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TnE PACIFIC COMMERCIAL ADVERTISER : IIOXOLULU, APRIL S, 1S9S.
THE PACIFIC
Commercial Advertiser,
W. N. ARMSTRONG
EDITOR.
FRIDAY
APRIL S.
A FLOWKil AND PLANT
DL'STRY.
IX-
Tliere arc in Belgium two Govern
ment, and 24 private schools in which
m
the pupils are thoroughly trained in
the cultivation of flowers. The students
take a two years' course. They are not
taught, but are (trained in the art of
floriculture, just as men are trained to
become civil engineers. In 1803, Bel
gium appropriated $82,000 for the sup
port of these schools. The result of
this simple common sense way of do
ing things is that orchids, carnations,
palms, azaleas and araucarias of Ghent
command the best prices in Europe.
Sixity-threo firms in that city alone are
engaged in supplying the demand. The
capital invested runs up into the mil
lions. The value of the exports in
1893 was $382,249. The climate of Bel
guim is not as favorable to the busi
ness as the climate of Southern Eu
rope. Somebody had the sense, years ago,
to comprehend the proposition that
brains and thorough training put into
the cultivation of plants meant money
and prosperity.
venerate the memories of our fathers
who spent their lives in unselfish, devo
tion to the race, main-Lain an abiding
love for it. At the same time, we
know that no human power can re
lieve it from the necessity of making
its own fight for existence. It must
take its chances wi;:h the rest of the
fourteen hundred millions of human
beings that inhabit the eaTth.
PENAL CONTRACT LABOR.
Can wo not learn something out of
this singular history of floriculture, so
unique even in Europe?
Putting aside all idle "boom" talk,
in whidh we unfortunately over indul
ge, we do know, or ought to know, and
Professor Agassiz while (here strongly
affirmed fit, that a score of tropical
plants can be raised here with profit.
The Island of Jamaica alone exports
allspice to the value of $400,000 an
nually. Like all other industries, how
ever, there can be no profit in the bus!
ness, unless there is intelligent work
about it.
If a school for horticulture had been.
established here, years ago, and the na
tive children had been thoroughly
trained in the production of articles
which grow only in the tropics, but
sell in the great markets of the world,
it goes without saying that no native
woman or child would be without
means of support.
We wish that the deed of trust made
by that noble woman whose memory
-we cherish, had contained the follow
ing words:
"There can be no wholesome educa
tion of the brain, without the educa
tion of the hand, among the masses of
people. Let no native girl or boy
graduate from the schools without
training in some staple industry. If
there be no industries of the character
that will suitably support the increas
ing wants created by the education of
the head, let the trustees investigate
the industries of all tropical countries,
iinitil such be found that are adapted
to the climate and soil of these Isl
ands. And when found, as they can
be, let the training be so thorough that
the graduates shall be able not only
to maintain themselves, but to instruct
others."
We take again, for illustration, the
article of perfumery, which we alluded
to yesterday. A school of .horticulture
for native girls would give each one
all of . the common education of the
times. It would possess land enough to
give each student practical training
every day for two years, in the best
cultivation of the plant, in the distilla
tion of the perfume in its extraction by
a simple process. The training would
I "nounded" into them. The economy
of cultivation, the best preparation of
the final product would be thoroughly
taught by severe training. The tisual
and unfortunate practice in America
of jumping at some new thing, with
out previous training or experience,
followed generally by bitter disappoint
ment, would be avoided. If the native
girls with this training refused to sup
port themselves. Christian philan
thropy would at least feel that it had
done its whole duty.
The project of establishing some of
(these industries is perfectly practicable
but it involves vast work. Teaching
Sunday school and preaching to tho na
tives, is like sailing with a free wind
on a summer sea, in comparison with
the establishment of industries, how
ever small they may be. For that
would be sailing for many days in the
teeth of the wind, and clawing off lee
shores, before smooth water was found
We know that the later emigration
of white people take no interest in the
natives. But some of us, who are the
kamaainas have a strong sentiment on
the subject, aside from any religious
aspedt of the case. We love the native
race. We know that it would strike ua
down politically, if it could. We know
that it would, in its ignorance, make
"cats and dogs" of material properity
here, if it were in power. We know
that it has, in its ignorance, little grat
itude for what has been done for it by
Christian philanthropy. But we wlio
We entirely agree with Mr. John M.
Horner in his conclusions, which ap
pear in another column, on the matter
of penal contract labor. He is a suc
cessful man, handles labor, and is
credited with being very intelligent.
But the majority of the planters do not
agree with him in his willingness to
abolish the system.
The majority do not like it, but they
fear that its abolition may disturb the
labor supply. Nor will the community
ike the disturbance cf the sugar indus
try which is the cow that gives us
milk. Any move that may possibly af
fect this great industry is a serious
one.
However desirable it is to abolish it,
the general feeling among the planters
is thalt a better system of labor should
first be provided for to take its place.
But as the planters are business men,
and not statesmen, they have not felt
under any special obligation to wrestle j
with the question, and the rest of the
community not being brought largely
in contact with this labor system, have
not felt under any special obligations
to bother the planters. So it is a live
coal that no one cares to finger. Lord
Bacon who was called the wisest of
men, said that business men had their
eyes fixed on immediate profits and
did not make wise statesmen. Our
friend Mr. W. J. Lowrie would say
that Lord Bacon was playing "high
politics" when he said it. But it looks
as if the business men really prefer
red to go on with immediate profits,
rather than boldly face this ugly labor
question.
Mr. Horner knows that ium politics, it
is not wihat is best to be done is the
wisest policy, but what can be done.
The men who deal in railways know
thalt the very best thing to do for the
railway is just what the stockholders
prevent.
It is unfortunate for us that no way
is devised to abolish this system. In
the event of annexation, it will tumble
in. If ithere is no annexation, the su
gar beet men will use it as a club over
the head of our commercial prosperity.
Tne friends of annexation in Washing
ton regard the systam as one which
creates antagonism in America, and
claim that it is due to the friends of
annexation that St be abolished. But
our feeling is, perhaps, that so long aa
we can ride on the steps of the recipro
city buss, without paying fare, we may
as 'well do so.
St. Andrews t athcdral.
The services on Good Friday, Easter
eve and Easter day will be as follows:
uooci Tiaay. b:30 a. m., ante-communion
office; 11 a. m., morning pray
er, litany and sermon; 1:30 p. m., ad
dresses on the Seven Words; 4 p. m.,
evensong in Hawaiian; 7: SO p. m., ev
ens-ong and sermon.
Easter eve. G:20 a. m., ante-communion
office; 9 a. m., morning prayer;
7:30 p. m., choral evensong.
Ea.uer day. 0:30 a. m.t holy com
munion in Hawaiian; 7:30 a. m., holv
communion (choral) English; 11 a. m
miming prayer anu sermon; diliO p
m., evensong in Hawaiian; 7:30 p. m.
evensong and sermon.
Mood's iBhuge Waring &
Cure
Liver Ills
Spreading Their Gospel.
it was whispered about yesterday
.'that a portion of or all of the anti-an
nexation commission to Washington
had stared on the announced pilgrim
age throughout the group. It was. etat
ed by Mr. Kaulia, immediately upon
his return from the States, that he
would go to every Hawaiian villa?
from Hawaii to Niihau and giving the
grip and wink of the Aloha Aina So
ciety, advise every native to strictly
hold aloof from the present Govern
ment and to await the day when an
nexation would be declared officially a
corpse. It was given out by Mr. Kaulia
as his plan that a Monarchy for the
Islands would be restored, but that
Liliuokalani would not occup3" the
throne.
It will cost the boat boys about 60
to repair the injuries done to their
boats while being used in the interests
of the people of the flooded Kamanu
wai district on March 24th.
Cheap
AND
The Star interferes in our pleasant
little philosphical discussion with
Senator McCandless about the safety
of the lighthouse. It comes to the Sen
ator's aid by suggesting that the ma
thematical calculations in the construc
tion of the British warship Captain
were incorrect and therefore that ves
sel turned bottom up.
The simple, cogent and exhaustive
reasoning as taught in the Whang
Doodle College is this: Some mathema
tical naval crank made a miscalcula
tion about the confer of specific grav
ity in the Captain, and she turned
over. Therefore JUr. Koweii has made
a miscalculation about the lighthouse,
and it won't stand. It may add another
illustration. A Whang Doodle gradu
ate calculated that sun beams could be
extracted from cucumbers. He failed
to get them. Therefore Mr. Rowell has
blundered in his calculations about the
lighthouse. In the meantime a person
infested with "snakes" looked at it the
other evening, in the moonlight, and
insisted that it was a huge spider with
four legs, and that he saw it walking
about, and over the gulches. It is a
strange affair.
"Pill
IL JL Ji
A walk through most
any section of this city
at night when all is still
will cause anyone to won
der why more sickness
does not exist. The ob
noxious orders from defec
tive sewerage and many
other causes ought to be
overcome and that at once.
5 CENTS 1 GALLON.
Look after your cess
pools, water closets and
garbage barrels. They are
fever producers. Keep
them free from offensive
odors.
It saves doctor's bills.
ODORLESS II I
m
Much simpler and more
convenient than Chloride
of Lime, Carbolic Acid
and many other disinfec
tants. Used in all the
prominent Hospitals and
Public Buildings through
out the United States.
THE
Hood's Tills are as peculiar and as pleas
ant, in comparison with all others, as is
Hood's Sarsaparilla.
To compound a pill which shall be
pleasant to take, shall not be coated with
what by age becomes insoluble, and which
shall be just that mild stimulant to the
liver and bowels which shall help Nature
to restore her disordered functions that
is the problem for the pharmacist.
It is easy to purge, but that is not what
is wanted. A mild but sure and un-
CURB
disturbing cathartic will set Nature to
going, and relieve the head, the stomach,
the liver and all the organs of the body
from the evils of a clogged drainage.
The Liver is the gateway between the
stomach and the organs which the
stomach purveys for. Stop up the gate
and death quickly ensues. Burden it with
obstructions and a thousand ills result.
Hood's Pills CURE Liver ills, sick head
ache, biliousness, indigestion, nausea,
constipation, without purging, without
pain, without violence.
Everybody at sometime needs them.
Everybody should keep them on hand at
all times for emergencies.
Iiver Ills
Hood's Pills are sold by all druggists.
25 cents. Sent by mail on receipt of price,
by C. I. Hood & Co., Lowell, Mass., U. S. A.
HOBRON DRUG COMPANY,
Wholesale Agents.
TIMELY TOPICS
s
4
&pg,g Qgff 1
Real Estate and Financial Agents.
Teleccone 678 314 FORT STREET, HONOLULU.
We are ready to purchase Large Estates near Honolulu and Hilo, na3
Coffee Lands on Hawaii.
Loans placed and negotiated; Estates taken charge of and manar.
Choice Lots for sale at Kewalo, at Punahcn and the growing Cit7 of Ell
on the Installment plan. Houses built for investors. No trouble to afeow
property to intending purchasers.
OeO'00000000000C0000000
March 31, 1898.
VICTOR
AFES
Sold in an7
from 25 cents
Give it a trial.
quantity
upwards.
STORES TO LET.
The large store in Waverley Block,
formerly occupied by B. P. Ehlers &
Co., will be subdivided and applica
tion should be made at once to Henry
Waterhouse & Co., for stores of con
venient size and good location.
HENRY WATERHOUSE & CO.
I!
J. LI
III
Sole Agents.
WERE invented, patented and put
onto the market to supply an urgent
demand for a well built, and at the
same time, medium priced safe.
t &
The manufacturers of this safe have
made a careful study of the require
ments of the different safes and classes
and as a result the VICTOR SAFE has
supplied the vacancy.
Aside from the regular six sizes we
carry in stock, we can order any style
of safe required and have it divided to
suit the purchaser.
In our office we are using one of the
regular make, and for convenience it
cannot be touched by any safe we have
ever seen.
H l K
All VICTOR SAFES are made of the
best materials known to the trade and
only skilled workmen are employed.
tp fc
Every part is made by the VICTOR
SAFE & LOCK CO., from the raw ma-
erial and are thoroughly tested before
and after construction.
i K .
One of the best recommendations for
hese safes fs that other sate com
panies often use the VICTOR SAFE as
a criterion as being not only burglar,
but fire-proof.
t y
We invite inspection.
0
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ollister & Co.
Import Cigars direct from Havana.
o
o
Hollister & Co.lmFlctAorican Cigar? d,rect from the-
o
1-4 ? cn4-v JP fi Import Manila Cigars direct from the 5?
Factories.
Hollister & CoJmpct5oTieslins Tobaccos direct from the
o
49
Hollister & CofIS 5
JjQjJJgQj CO Import Snuff direct from the Factories.
Hollister & Co.ImTWTl;rLoBdporilrcctfron,theFac'
t
JjQjJgj-j0j OO HaV9 Havana and Manila Cigars in Bond.
Hollister & Oo.Are tobacconists.
Hollister & Oo.Are Located at
Corner of Fort & Merchant Sts.
o
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CO
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A V
0 00000Oto0CCi
j0 rfiTiTiffrs
WHOOPING COUGH, CROUP
ASTHMA, CATARRH, COLDS.
CRESOLENE being- administered by inhalation,
jfives th safest and most effe ctual means of treat
ing the throat and bronchial tubes. Its efficiency ix
Whooping Cough anu Croup is wonderful. Its anti
septic virtues render it invaluable in contusion
diseases, as Diphtheria, Scarlet Fever, etc. Des
criptive booklet with testimonials free. SoM y
druggists. v
HOLLISTER DRUG CO., Honolulu, H. I., Igaais.
For Sunburn,
Rough Skin,
USE-
in
d it
PRLPARLD DULY SV- A
HONOLULU, H. 1.
SOFT, WHITE SKIN Is within th&
reach of every woman. All that is needed
to make the complexion faultless is Maiue
Cream.
Removes every facial blemish, takes
away redness and oiline1?'?, preserves and
beautifies the skin.
i ill
Limited.
Prepared Only By
enson, Smith &
Co
LIMITED-
Firs
The balance of the goods having
arrived on the Zealandia they
will be offered at the fol
lowing Prices:
ddifioflft
Brown Cotton, 26 inches wide, 25 yds
for $1.00.
White Cotton, 30 inches wide, 20 yds.
for $1.00.
Prints, Xew Pattern, 30 yds. for $1.00.
Print Org-andies, New patterns, 10c. yd.
Printed Dimities, Xew Patterns, 13 yds.
for $1.00- '
White Dimities, 20 yds. for $1.00.
Victoria Lawns, 10 yds. in a piece, 50c.
TABLE LINEN. Unbleached Damask,
23c. a yd.
Bleached Damask, 50c. a yd.
Bleached Napkins, large, $1 doz.
SHEETINGS. Brown Sheeting 10-4,
ISc. per yd.; Bleached 10-4, 20c.
Brown Sheeting 9-4, lCe. per
Bleached 9-4, ISc.
Brown Sheeting 8-4, 14c.
Bleached S-4, lCc.
S3
ycL;
Shirts, Collars, Cuffs, Neckties and
Underclothes at Half Price.
We
Gents' Furnishing Goods
have All the Latest Novelties at One-Half
Ready Made Clothing
SUITS FROM S4.50.
TROUSERS FROM $1.50 UP.
what they cost elsewhere
uee
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