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The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, April 19, 1898, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1898-04-19/ed-1/seq-1/

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ftetabllaiied July 8, 1856.
KOL. XXVH, NO. 4S97.
HONOLULU, HAWAIIAN ISLANDS, TUESDAY, APRIL 19, 1S93.
PICE FIVE CENm
? HOP pi iinrrf liT
& My Wtlk
V
!
t
3
J. Q. WOOD,
Attorney at Law.
AND
NOTARY PUBLIC.
OFFICE:
Corner King
Streets.
and Bethel
nn. c. r. high,
Dentist.
Philadelphia Dental College 1892.
Masonic Temple. Telephone 318
A. C. WALL, J). I). S.
Dentist.
LOVE BUILDING, : FORT STREET.
M. B. G'KOSSMAX, D.D.S.
Dentist.
B8 HOTEL. STREET, HONOLULU.
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 4 p. m.
mi,
Dentist-
CORNER FORT AND HOTEL STS.
MOTT-SMITH BLOCK.
Telephones: Office, 615; Residence, 789.
HOURS: 9 to 4.
CKEO. II. IIUDDY, D.D.S.
Dentist.
FORT STREET, OPPOSITE CATHO
LIC MISSION.
Hours: From 9 a. m. to 4 p. m.
DR. M. WACHS.
Dentist.
University of California.
Beretania near Fort street.
Office Hours: 9 to 12 a. m. and 1 to 4
p. m.
C. L. GARVIN, M.D.
Office No. 537 King street, near
Punchbowl.
Hours 8:30 to 11 a. m.; 3 to 5 p. m.;
7 to 8 p. m.
Telephone No. 44S.
THE HONOLULU SANIYaRIUAI.
1082 KING ST.
A quiet home-like place, where train
ed nurses, massage, "Swedish move
ments," baths, electricity and physical
training may be obtained.
P. S. KELLOGG, M.D.,
Telephone 639. Supt.
CIIAS. F. PETERSON,
Attorney at Law.
-AND-
NOTARY PUBLIC.
15 Kaahumanu St.
lyle a. dickey,
Attorney at Law.
14 KAAHUMANU STREET.
Telephone, 682.
william c. pakke,
Attorney at Law.
AND
AGENT TO TAKE ACKNOWLEDG
MENTS. Odce: Kaahumanu St., Honolulu.
O. G. TKAPHAGKEX,
ARCHITECT.
223 Merchant Street between Fort
and Alakea.
Telephone 734.
Honolulu, H. I.
H. HACKFELD & CO.. Ltd.
Cor. Fort' and Queen Sts., : Honolulu.
LIMITEl
Esplanade, Cor. Allen and Fort Sta.
HOLLISTER & CO., - - AGENTS.
P. O. Box
480
Telephone
478
New and First-Claw
SECOND-HAND FURNITURE
OF ALL KINDS
SOLD CHEAP FOR CASH.
Hfgheet Cash Price paid for Second-Hand
Furniture at Corner King
and Nuuanu titreets.
Clip If i,
Consolidated Sol Water FoiKs Co.,
li
of the following Stocks havei
been placed in our hands for sale at
prices that should be of interest to in
tending investors:
Ewa Plantation Co.
Paia Plantation Co.
Kahuku Plantation Co.
Hawaiian Electric Co.
Inter-Island S. N. Co.
Wilder S. S. Co.
Hawaiian Safe Deposit and
Investment Company.
GEORGE R. CARTER, Mgr.
Office in fear of Bank of Hawaii, Ltd.
SPECIAL BUSINESS ITEMS.
IF YOU BUY A SINGER,
You will receive careful instruction
from a competent teacher at your
home.
You can obtain necessary accessories
direct from the company's offices.
You will get .prompt attention in any
part of the world, as our offices are ev
erywhere and we give careful attention
to all customers, no matter where the
machine may have been purchased.
You will be dealing with the leading
company in the sewing machine bus!
ness, having an unequalled experience
and an unrivalled reputation the
strongest guarantee of excellence.
Sold on easy payments. Repairing
done. B. BERGERSEN, Agent.
1QY2 Bethel Street, Honolulu.
The City Carriage Company possess
only first-class hacks and employ only
careful, steady drivers.
Carriages at all hours.
Telephone 113.
JOHN S. ANDRADE.
I
GUIDE
THROUGH
HAWAII.
PRICE, OOc.
BEAUTIFULLY ILLUSTRATED.
FOR SALE BY ALL NEWSDEALERS
WOMAN'S EXCHANGE.
215 Merchant St.
HAWAIIAN CURIOS Leis, Kapa,
Niihau Mats, Calabashes, Idols, Fans,
Shells, Seeds, etc., etc.
SAMOAN TAPAS. Carved Emu
Eggs, Hula Drums, Gourds, etc., etc.
Point Lace Handkerchiefs, Doylies,
Fayal work and Hawaiian Dolls.
Telephone 659.
DR. GEO. J. AUGUR.
Homcepathic Practitioner
Surgeon.
AND
Special attention Given to Chronic
Diseases.
Richards street,' near Hawaiian hotel.
Office and Residence the same.
Office hours: 10 to 12 a. m.; 3 to 4
p. m.; 7 to s p. m. Sundays a:30 to
10:30 a. m. 4 Telephone 733.
M. W. McCHESNEY & SONS.
Wholesale Grocers and Dealers in Leather and
Shoe Findings.
Agents Honolulu Soap Works Company
and Honolulu Tannery.
LESSONS ON CORNET.
The undersigned will give lessons on
the Cornet to a limited number of pu
pils. Individual Instruction. For terms
apply to
C. KREUTER,
Music Dept. Wall, Nichols Co.
AH Kinds of Boats
Built to Order.'
m
CHAS. D. WALKER.
692 KING ST.
PRESIDENT ASKS AUTHORITY
FOR ARMED INTERVENTION
His Message Declares
Able to Cope With
SPAIN DECLARES ARMISTICE
Consul-General Lee Sails From
Cuba Additions to the
American Fleet
"The long trial has proved that the
object for which Spain has waged the
war cannot be attained. The fire of in
surrection may flame or may smoulder
with .the varying seasons, but it has
net been and it 'is plain that it cannot
be extinguished by present methods.
The only hope of relief and repose from
a condition which cannot longer be en
dured is the enforced pacification of
Cuba. In .the name of .humanity, 'in
the name of civilization, in behalf of
endangered American interests, which
give us the right and the duty to speak
and to act, the war in Cuba must stop.
"In view i&f these facts and these con
siderations, I ask the Congress to au
thorize and empower the President to
take measures to secure a full termina
tion icf hostilities between the Govern
ment of Spain and the people of Cuba,
and to secure in the island the estab
lishment of a stable government cap
able of maintaining order and observ
ing its international obligations, en
suring peace and tranquility and the
security of its citizens as well as our
own, and to use the military and naval
forces 'Of the United States as may be
necessary for these purposes, and in
the interest of humanity and to aid in
preserving the lives of the starving
people of the island, I recommend that
the distribution of food and supplies
be continued and that an appropriation
be made out of the public treasury to
supplement the charit?' of our citi
zens.
"The issue is now with Congress. It
is a solemn responsibility. I. have ex
hausted every effort to relieve the in
tolerable condition of affairs which is
at our doors. Prepared to execute
every .obligation imposed upon me by
the Constitution and the law,' I await
your action.
'Yesterday and since the prepara
tion of the foregoing message official
information was received by me that
the lastest decree cf the Queen Regent
of Spain directs General Blanco in order
to prepare and facilitate peace, to pro
claim a suspension of hostilities, the
duration and details of which have not
been communicated to me. This fact,
with every other pertinent considera
tion, will, I am sure, have your just
and careful attention in the solemn
deliberations upon which you are about
to enter. If this measure attains a
successful result, then, our aspirations
as a Christian, peace-loving people
will be realized. If it fails, it will be
only another justification for our con
templated action.
"(Signed.) WILLIAM McKINLEY.
"Executive Mansion, April 11th."
These are the closing paragraphs of
President McKinley's long expected
message to Congress on the Cuban
situation. It was sent after Consul-
General Lee and the other Americans
who wished had left Cuba and had
reached their native countrv. In this
message the President reviews the
principal incidents of Cuba's long and
bitter struggle for independence. He
briefly summarizes the attempts on
the part of the United States to secure
peace, and quotes from his messages
to Congress and the diplomatic cor
respondence with Spain.
President McKinley declares that it
is inexpedient to recognize the inde
dence cf Cuba at this time. This is
the position which he has held during
his administration. He believes that
to recognize such independence might
subject the United States to embarras
sing conditions of international obliga
tions. He maintains, however that
such recognition is unnecessary to en
That Spain Is No Longer
the Situation In Cuba.
able the United States to intervene.
In referring to the iMaine disaster,
the responsibility for .which he says re
mains to be fixed, he uses the follow
ing language:
"In any event the destruction of the
Maine, by whatever exterior cause, is
a patent and impressive proof of a
state of things in Cuba that is intoler
able. That condition is thus shown to
be such that the Spanish Government
cannot assure safety and security to
a vessel of the American Navy in the
harbor of Havana on a mission cf
peace and rightfully there."
Tde President declares that the war
in Cuba is of such a nature that there
is no end short of subjugation or ex
termination. He says that the policy
of devastation and concentration in
Cuba is inhuman and unprecedented in
the modern history of civilized Christ
ian people. The four grounds for in
tervention are as follows:
First In the cause of humanity and
to put an end to the barbarities, blood
shed, starvation and -horrible miseries
now existing there, and which the par
tries to the conflict are either unable
or unwilling to stop or mitigate. It is
no answer to say this is all in another
country, belonging to another nation,
and as, therefore, none of our business.
It is expressly our duty, for it is right
at our door.
Second We owe it to our citizens in
Cuba to afford them'thatj)xPtection and
indemnity for life and property which
no Government there can or will afford
and to that end terminate the oondi
tions that deprive them of legal pro
tection.
Third The right to intervene may
be justified by the very serious injury
to our commerce, trade and business of
our people, and by the wanton destruc
tion of property and devastation of the
island.
Fourth And, whichis of the most
imnortanee. th nresent condition of
affairs in Cuba is a constant menace to
our peace, and entails upon this Gov
ernment an enormous expense.
THE COMMITTEE IN FAVOR.
Alter a Iouc: Session Members Decide
on a Resolution.
NEW YORK. April 11. A World
special from Washington says: The
Committee on Foreign Relations had a
long session this afternoon. For three
hours they considered the President's
message and a resolution. At the close
this was the situation: Senators r rye,
Cullom, Lodge and Clark, Republicans,
and Grav and Morgan. Democrats, will
accept the Presidential views. Chair
man Davis hesitates. It is believed
that he will ultimately join the major
ity. Senator Fo raker was in a state of
mind that may be described as furious.
He asserted he would never yield the
point of proclaiming .independence.
Senators Mills, Turpie a'nd Daniel are
with him.
When the session closed it was un
derstood that two reports would be
made. The majority, as stated above,
will stand by the President. It is
thought tonight that a report will not
be made tomorrow. General Lee will
go before the committee. He cannot
reach Washington until some time in
the afternoon of Tuesday. The com
mittee will probably not report until
Wednesday.
The resolution now in favor is as fol
lows: The President is hereby empowered
to take such action as will bring an
immediate termination to the hostili
ties in Cuba and establish a stable
government by and for the people of
that island, and he is authorized and
directed to employ the land and naval
forces of the United States, if neces
sary, to bring about this result.
WASHINGTON, April 11 The Re
publican members of the House For
eign Affairs Committee held a session
all afternoon to map out a definite Cu
ban policy, but were totally unable to
reach an agreement. It is understood
that many of the members whose views
heretofore have been pronounced in
favor of independence and intervention
in stating their position at this infor
mal meeting announced an almost
complete change of position. These, it
is understood, include Adams of Penn
sylvania, now acting chairman of the
committee, and Quigg of New York.
SITUATION FllOM MADRID.
Arrangement at Request of the
Pope and the Powers.
MADRID, April 10. At 11 o'clock
last evening Senor Capdepon, Minister
of the Interior, issued a circular to
the prefects giving an account of the
situation, which, he explained, had
been arranged at the request of the
Pope and under the counsel of the
great powers and which, while saving
the honor and military dignity of
Spain, preserves her rights in the
grand Antilles.
Un'ited States (Minister Woodford, in
a conference last evening with Senor
Gullon, Minister of Foreign Affairs, ex
pressed (his satisfaction with the ar
rangements. El Imparcial says that Lieutenant
General Correa, Minister cf War, in a
conversation yesterday with several
people, expressed himself as follows:
"It is an error to say that the Govern
ment has granted an armistice to the
rebels. I would never give that before
leaving the Ministry, because it would
be the same thing as recognition of the
belligerency of the rebels. The Gov
ernment has granted the wishes of the
powers that we should cease hostilities
during the day, which General Blanco
judges expedient for preparing for
peace. I acceded to a cessation of hos
tilities, because to refuse the wishes of
the powers would be to divorce Spain
from the world. If I left the Cabinet
I should be placing my successor in an
awkward position.
"General Blanco will probably pub
lish a proclamation of 'truce, and also
another offering indulgent terms dur
ing the cessation of hostilities. If
during this period ther are important
submissions, and the United States
withdraws its ships from the neighbor
hood of Cuba and the Philippines, a:ll
will be well and peace will soon be
reached. Otherwise the Cuban war
will continue and the powers will be
obliged to demand that the United
States maintain absolute neutrality
and foTce a dissolution of the filibus
terins: committee in New York. The
armistice is not to prevent the Spanish
Government continuing its military
preparations and placing the penin-
suia, tne canaries ana liaiearic isianas
and Porto Rico in a state cf defense."
L,i:E DEPARTS FROM HAVANA.
MI-s Rarton Also and Other Red Cross
Representatives.
HAVANA, April 9 At 1 ic'clock this
afternoon , the Consul-General, accom
panied by his staff, went on board the
dispatch boat Fern, and Consuls
Springer and Barker went on board .at
5 o'clock. The Machina wharf, where
they embarked, was crowded with cu
rious persons, but no discourtesy was
shown.
Consul-General Lee called on Gover-
nor-General Blanco to bid him good-by,
but the Governor-General did not re7
ceive mm. rne porter .toia uenerai
Lee that General Blanco was not well
and could not receive callers. Mr.
Gollin, the British Consul in charge
of the American Consulate, was re
ceived by General Blanco and had a
long talk with .him. "Mr. Blanco,"
said a high official, "is a good friend
of the Governor-General."
At 5:30 o'clock the American vessels
began leaving port. The Spanish tug
towed out the schooner James H. Dud
ley, which arrived here on Thursday
last from Pensacola with lumber, but
did not discharge her ergo.
The steamer Emelin followed with
about 50 passengers and after her
came the Olivette with 247 passengers,
among whom were Miss Barton and
the other representatives of the Red
Cross Society who have been engaged
in the rescue work in the island. The
Olivette was followed by the Bache,
with ten passengers, and last of all
the Fern, which left at 6 o'clock, hav
ing on board Consul-General Lfe, Con
suls Springer and Barker, Consulai
Clerk Fosca, Dolz and Drain, Corre
spondents Johnston, Pepper, Redding,
Akers, Frake, Dunning, Nicholls and
Scovel. She a:so carried G. Lawtr.n
Childs and William Lawton and Dr.
Brunner. The Fern is commanded by
Lieutenant-Commander Sawyer. En
sign Powelscn was also on board.
4
Spain R-Bds It Victory.
NEW YORK, April 11 A World ca
ble from Madrid says: From the Min
isters downward, with few exceptions,
the Spaniards are convinced that the
maintainance of Spanish sovereignty
in Cuba is assured now. They believe
a cessation of hostilities, having been
decreed, without their entering into
any positive engagement with the
United States, .must necessarily lead,
through the assistance of European
powers, to some settlement satisfactory
to their honor and dignity which
means the retention of Cuba and Porto
Rico.
Populace Kxcltetl.
.MADRID, April 12. At 10:30 last
night numerous gruops in the Puerta
del Sol and in front of the offices of the
Minister of the Interior raised the cry
"Viva Espana." The gendarmes and
the police scattered them and occupied
the square, but the groups quickly re
formed several times, until finally the
gendarmes charged the crowd. Many
were injured or arrested.
INTERESTED IN CURA.
Germany Makes Demands for L.os to a
Sugar Firm.
BERLIN, March 31. Germany has
demanded of the Spanish Government
indemnity for losses to the German
firm of Fisher & Schmidt of Cauna
maba, near Trinidad in Cuba. The
sugar factory of the firm was attacked
on the 18th of March by insurgents,
who plundered the houses, set them on
fire, killed four persons and wounded
ten. The German cruiser Geier which
was on the way to Bahoa, has been
instructed to go to Cuba in case satis
faction is not given.
The Queen Regent's Plan.
LONDON, April 12. The Berlin cor
respondent of the Standard says: "The
impression prevails that the Queen
Regent intends to grant complete au
tonomy in Cuba; that is, to establish a
relation similar to that existing be
tween Austria and Hungary, the main
bond between the island and the moth
er country being allegiance to the same
flag.
1
O'ermany Will Send a Ship.
NEW YORK, April 8. A dispatch to
the World from Berlin says: In view
of the probable outbreak of hostilities
the German admiralty, which at the
present has not a single ship In West
Indian waters, is considering the advis
ability of sending at least one cruiser
for the protection of the political and
commercial interests of Germany there.
:
Itlanc-o Signs Decree.
HAVANA, April 11. The Official Ga
zette publishes a decree, signed by Cap
tain General Blanco, announcing that
the Spanish Government, yielding to
the reiterated wishes of the Pope, had
declared a suspension of hostilities in
Cuba in order to facilitate the restora
tion of peace in the island. No time is
fixed for the expiration of the decree. ,
' nsuls Leave Manila.
MADRID, April 11 A dispatch re
ceived here from Manila, the capital of
the Philippine Islands, confirms the re
port that the United States Consul at
that place has left Manila. O. F. Wil
liams is the United States Consul at
Manila, and William A. Deland is the
vice-consul.
Spain's Prowess.
MADRID, April 12. El Heraldo de
Madrid publishes an interview with
Admiral Beranger, formerly Minister
of Marine, in the course of which he
expressed his confidence in the ability
of the Spanish navy to win in the event
of war with the United States .
MELBOURNE, (Victoria), April 7.
The wheat yield of this colony is esti
mated at 10,400,000 bushels.
Royal makes the food pure,
wboleaome and delicious.
Absolutely Puro
POVM. BAKIMO CO.. HfWVQBK.
mi
E 6

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