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The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, April 22, 1898, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1898-04-22/ed-1/seq-4/

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THE PACIFIC COMMERCIAL ADVERTISER : HONOLULU, APRIL 22, 1S93.
7 5
THE PACIFIC
Commercial Advertiser.
W. N. ARMSTRONG - EDITOR.
FRIDAY
: APRIL 22.
THE CHAS. L- CARTER MEMO
RIAL. The proper location of the Charles
Jj. Carter memorial fountain is not easy
ro determine. It is largely a question
of taste. The committee in charge of it
are subject to only the very mildest
criticism for selecting a location on
Union Square. The place, like all oth
er places where business is transacted
is not in harmony with the idea of ret
and tranquility which befits a mem
orial. The suggestion of the Bulletin is an
excellent one, that .the memorial be
placed in Kapiolani park. An excellent
spot is at the junction of the Waikiki
road and the mauka road just beyond
the bridge or viaduct. There is abun
dance of ground there. The spot may
be ornamented with trees, and partially
surrounded with flowers. It is within
a short distance of the sea. The play
of the fountain would be seen from the
approach over the bridge. Placed on
this spot, the artistic effect of the
memorial will be much greater than it
can be in a crowded place, close to
buildings. In making this suggestion
we have the cordial assent of several
of those who, from their close relation
ship to the late Charles L. Carter,
would naturally be consulted in the
matter.
The Japanese have given the Occi
dental races some excellent ideas in
the use of natural scenery and situa
tion in selecting memorial sites. The
idea of quiet and rest predominates.
CUBAN
INDEPENDENCE WHAT
NEXT?
President McKinley and his advisers
have gone into this Cuban affair much
more thoroughly than the newspapers,
because the responsibility is largely
upon them of making war, or keeping
ihe peace.
With Cuban independence what
comes next? The President must 'take
this question in. He cannot make it a
separate matter to be dealt with after
wards. He must have a plan about it
definite and sufficient.
The island of Cuba has about the
same area as the State of Kentucky,.a
larger area than Maine, or Indiana,
and a little less area than the State of
New York. This is a population of over
1,500,000. This is a population larger
than that of any one of 33 Ameri
can States and territories, and less
than that of only 12 States. The ser
iousness of the question becomes evi
dent at once.
The President is confronted with sev
eral propositions.
1. Cuba as an independent State is
incapable of self-government, owing to
the large numbers of negroes and
ignorant people of mixed blood. The
people are in the average, it is said,
less capable of self-government than
the people of the South American re
publics. Independence therefore, means
revolutions, anarchy and continued dis
turbance, directly under the eyes of the
American people. This will be an intol
erable condition of things and it is
foreseen.
2. If the United States force Cuban
independence, they cannot stop at that
point. They must in the interests of
commerce and humanity undertake to
control" Cuba in some way.
3. The American theory cf territory
is, that whenever -the number of the
population of a territory reaches 100,
000, it shall become a self-governing
State. This theory has been acted upon,
from the adoption of the Constitution.
4. The government of a territory
like Cuba, with a population larger
than that of anyone of 33 States, de
mands an entirely new departure from
the accepted theory of democratic gov
ernment. A departure of this kind, re
garding the little Isla-nd of Hawaii, is
one of the causes which prevent an
nexation. Forcible intervention by the United
States precipitates a most serious mat
ter before President McKinley. The
disposition of Congress is to intervene
first and fix things up afterwards. The
President's disposition is to move very
cautiously in view of the perplexing
questions involved and he keeps the
future before him.
Independent Cuba will be a dreadful
white elephant on the hands of Con
gress, just as the Southern States were
many elephants on its hands at the
close of the war. The Republican
party now sees its many blunders in
dealing with the negijo question. Wiser
now than it was then, it sees, or Presi
dent McKinley sees, a problem in Cuba
in every way more perplexing than the
negro question of the reconstructed
States.
The President, with the fear of an
immense white elephant being driven
into his door yard, and left there, is
naturally conservative.
A DISAGREEABLE OPINION.
The Washington Post, always a firm
friend of annexation, and always well
informed in political affairs has an
editorial which again affirms the need
of annexation. It says:
"But it is clear to us that the so
called reciprocity treaty between Ha
waii and the United States is an expen
sive and indefensible blunder. There
is no element of reciprocity in it. We
admit Hawaiian sugar to our ports free
cf duty, thereby presenting foreign su
gar producers with several millions of
dollars annually, and we receive in re
turn what? The friends of the treaty
point to the fact that our merchants
practically control the trade of Hawaii,
and that is, perhaps, approximately
true. But two very important queries
present themselves in this connection
"First To what extent does the
treaty influence our commercial rela
tions with the Islands, and
"Secondly Even supposing the case
to be one of cause and effect, is the
trade of sufficient importance to war
rant us in giving away five or six mil
lions annually to alien sugar planters
and to that extent discouraging and
burdening our domestic industries?
"For our part, we believe that such
trade as we have with Hawaii comes to
us legitimately and without the slight
est reference to the free admission of
her sugar. We believe, too, that the so-
called reciprocity treaty operates at
every point to our disadvantage. It is
a treaty which we should not tolerate
for one instant with a foreign nation,
since aliens receive all the benefits and
we bear all the burdens. Our own pro
ducers of sugar are subjected to the
competition of foreign producers, who
operate under incalculably superior
conditions. Our free and intelligent
labor is antagonized by the semi-barbarous
labor of Asia. American indus
tries are checked in their development
so that foreign industries may thrive.
Nothing more improvident, less pa
triotic, more unstatesmanlike, could be
imagined. If we decide to adopt Ha
waii, to take it into the American
Union, and to throw open to our own
citizens all the splendid opportunities
and possibilities it presents, that is one
thing. But to continue a treaty which
gives to a foreign nation and an alien
people such conspicuous advantages at
our expense, is quite a different one.
For that arrangement there is no con
ceivable excuse."
The above extract shows the drift of
feeling in the States. As we have rati
fied the treaty of annexation, there is
perhaps nothing more for us to do, but
onnosed to the
UlUkJV 1 w v . -
treaty may as well understand what
lies in the future.
The London Economist gives a dfc
tailed statement of the Cuban aeot,
guaranteed by Spain, a!nd sums it as
follows: "The three Cuban loans,
therefore, amounting in capital to 89,-
936,000, requiring 3,508,740 in gold for
the coupons and sinking funds of the
18SG and 1890 issues, and 5,260,000 in
pesetas for the coupons and sinking
fnnrl of the 5 ner cent, bonds of 1896-
7-8 guaranteed by the revenue of Span
ish customs. These three loans, how-
oror ir Tint rpnrpsent the whole
V, J v- f V- vw X
amount of the liabilities of the Cuban
Treasury, as it has been stated in the
Madrid Ministerial press that the Cu
ban Treasury was in debt on January
1, 189S, to the extent of 14,000,000, for
several months' arrears due to the
army, navy, civil servants, pensioners,
and army contractors of the colony."
OPERA HOUSE,
Saturday Evening, April 23.
MISS ELSIE ADAIR,
Assisted bv several of the leading
local amateurs will give ONE PER
FORMANCE, consisting of new COM
EDIES. SONGS AND DANCES.
The wonderful EDISON VITAS
COPE. The only picture, projecting
machine on exhibition before the pub
lic which is ABSOLUTELY without
vibration.
Box plan at Wall, Nichols Co. Prices
as usual. Particulars announced later.
NOTICE.
DURING MY ABSENCE FROM THE
Tci.inrts Dr. Kobavashi will have
charge of my practice.
IGA MORI, AI. D.
April 16, 1S9S.
The balance of the goods saved from the big fire in London must be cleared this week, and in order to do this
s we will offer them at the following prices
New, TJp-To-Date Shirt Waists, 35c; former price, 75c. 0, c
New, Up-To-Date Sailor Hats, $1.00; former price, $1.60.
French Organdies. New Patterns, lOc a yd; former price, 25c.
gF'An effort will be made to
by the end of the month.
to secure bargains.
HEAVY PROGRAM.
'cat u res in 3Iiss Adair's Bill for
Saturday Evening
The energetic little Miss Elsie Adair
has been wonderfully busy the past
week arranging for her specialty and
vitascope show to be given at the opera
house on Saturday evening. Tickets
are now on sale at Wall, Nichols Co.
he evening will open with a sketch by
Brander Matthews, called "The Decis
ion of the Court." The parts will be
taken by Miss Adair and J. H. Walker.
The story is that of an American girl
married to an Englishman of title. In
ternational difficulties ensue. The
chief interview is while a libel for di
vorce is pending and there is a neat
ending of the trouble. There will also
be a musical sketch by Miss Adair and
Jock McGuire. McGuire and Vierra will
present "Ten Minutes with the Irish
lelp in the Kitchen of a Klondike Mil-
ionarie." There will be music by
Captain Berger, by the Kawaihau
Quartette and the Mandolin and Guitar
Club. " Miss Adair wiCl give some se-
ections from "Gay Parisian." The non-
vibrating vitascope pictures will in
clude: Jumbo, the horseless fire engine,
May Irwin's kiss, White Flyer railroad
rain, fire in stables, wash day, a quiet
flirtation. There are 30 pictures in all.
Miss Adair was telling "at the the Ad
vertiser office last evening that she had
been doing the work of three men here
or a week and had eaten nothing but
food during the time. In consequence
her voice was a bit ruffled, but it will
be in trim all right tomorrow evening.
The Gazette (semi-weekly) will be
tesaed thia morring In time for the
outgoing Island and fcreign mails.
jfil
AND
A walk through most
any, section of this city
at night when all is still
will cause anyone to won
der why more sickness
does not exist. The ob
noxious orders from defec
tive sewerage and many
other causes ought to be
overcome and that at once.
5
A
J
Look after your cess
pools, water closets and
garbage barrels. They are
fever producers. Keep
them free from offensive
odors.
It saves doctor's bills.
ODORLESS ID IB.
Much simpler and more
convenient than Chloride
of Lime, Carbolic Acid
and many other disinfec
tants. Used fn all the
prominent Hospitals and
Public Buildings through
out the United States.
il
Sold In any
from 25 cents
Give It a trial.
quantity
upwards.
Sole Agents.
Powcrfti
CENTS
UALLUil
HI
THE
STUFF
on ii
All Other Dress Goods
clear these goods
Now is the time
fl:
A Tumor Formed
Finally It Broke Inwardly
and Discharged
Trouble Began With Dyspepsia
and Impure Blood
Thorough Course of Hood's Sarsa
parilla Completely Cures.
There is danger in impure blood.
Disease and suffering are surely com
inir to those who neglect this threaten
ing symptom. Head this:
"Gilliam, Missouri.
"C. I. Hood & Co., Lowell, Mass.:
"Gentlemen: My troubles began with
nervous headaches, which would last
me for two or three days. The doctors
pronounced my trouble dyspepsia, but
they could not do anything for me, and
advised a change of location. At the age
of 55 a tumor formed on my spine, which
Was Very Painful
but did net rise or discharge. The doctor
thought best to cut it out, but I objected.
It finally broke and discharged a great
deal. The doctors said they could do
nothing for it. Then the tumor began to
rise inwardly and discharge. I read much
about cures by Hood's Sarsaparilla and
thought I would try it. Before I had
finished taking one bottle I was much
relieved. I continued the use of Hood's
Sarsaparilla, and after taking 12 bottles I
was entirely cured. I am now well, have
a good appetite and feel that I owe my
life to Hood's Sarsaparilla." W. D. Fork.
ocTs
Sarsa
parilla Is the best in fact the One True Blood Purifier.
Sold by all druggists, $1 ; six for $5.
HnnrJ ' C Dfflc ct harmoniously with
UUUU 2 11IIJ Hood's Sarsaparilla. 25c.
HOBRON DRUG COMPANY,
Wholesale Agents.
TIMELY TOPICS
April i ,,1898.
Honesty in business deal
ings is the only ladder to
success, and a firm whose
prosperity and reputation is
built upon tne honor ana
truthfulness of their state
ments will eventually sur
mount all difficulties. We
always make it an "affair of
honor" when telling about
our 200 ds. .
The goods we wisn to
...
"talk shoo" about this week
are the many styles of plows
and breakers we Handle.
There is no need of any
lensthv talk on these goods;
thev have been on the mar
ket sufficiently long to speak
for themselves.
(12. 14 and 16 Inch)
AND THE
Peilecl DouDle ii.
The mould board and point
are made of the best cniuea
- 1
steel.
WO
10.
For light cane cultivation,
j inch to 13 inch cut.
THE AVERY D. H. BOARD
With or without extension
wings are said by many
plantation managers to be the
best plow. The strong point
to all of these plows is that
they draw easier than any
other and turn a furrow that
leaves nothing to be desired.
li iili i.
Limited.
in proportion.
r,
nt Pew hw.
PflfeC
u
net
Plows
Sizes
j -Sin ITS n
;Bf?UCE WARING ck
Keai Estate and
Telephone 678.
314
We are ready to purchase Large
Coffee Lands on Hawaii.
Loans placed and negotiated; Estates taken charge or ana manitea.
rhnifo T nta fnr hsIa at Kwain At Pimahou and the erowinjc City or KW
on the installment plan. Houses built
property to Intending purchasers.
oo oooooooooooooooooo
0
0
0 Hollister & Co.
I Hollister & Oo.In,MS!an CiRars dir"tfromth0 2
TTll-;4- JP r
XJLW J.J.J.O UCJL JO JJ.
Hollister & CofJ!neTobaccos'iKcUwmih'
S Hollister & Oo.lmpoFlcSeTnsTobaccosdirect,rom,ho
BCollistoF & Go
I Hollister & OoX1MS8dtettaB,hF,p
3EEollist)Gi & Co Hava Havana and Manlla Clgars 5n BonJ
0
Hollister & Oo.Are tobacconists.
Hollister & Oo.AreLocatcdat-
Corner of Fort & Merchant Sts.
0
0
0.0.0. 0.0. 0.0. 0.0.
Hooping Cough, Asthma, Croup, Catarrh, Golds.
CrOSOlonO wbeanporued isttewefc rooa wUl (ivc iaaeduu rUe.
It. nHe tjowerm arc wonderful, at tW time preventing the area
ot cootagiotts diseases by acting
j-ovngext child. Sold by Arvgais. Vaiaabic booklet ire.
HOLLISTER DRUO CO., Honolulu, m. l Awrts.
"
PREPARED CI
HONOLULU. H. I.
Prepared
Be
nson, Smith & Co
-LIMITED-
ONE WEEK
ONLY!
1
Financial Agents
FORT STREET. HONOLULU.
Estates near Honolulu and Hllo.
for Investors. No trouble to ifcw
o
o
o
Import Cigars direct from Havana.
Import Manila Cigars direct from the
0
Fac
ctories.
A
0
t
0
0
0
0
lmport Snuff direct from the Factories
0.0. 0.0. 0.0. 0.0. 0.0.0
Cures while I
a a powerful disinfectant. Itaraslesa tbm
For Sunburn,
Rough Skin,
USE-
(III!
SOFT, WHITE SKIN Is within the
reach of every woman. All that is needed
to make the complexion faultless is Mailk
Cream.
Itemoves every facial blemish, takes
away redness ana oiliness, preserves and
beautifies the skin.
Only By
.
ft

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